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The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One

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With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series written by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Chase Conley. The first Robert Jordan graphic novel, New Spring: the Graphic Novel, was a New York Times bestseller. The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One begins Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy tale by i/>The With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series written by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Chase Conley. The first Robert Jordan graphic novel, New Spring: the Graphic Novel, was a New York Times bestseller. The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One begins Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy tale by introducing Rand al’Thor and his friends Matrim and Perrin at the spring festival. Moiraine Damodred and Lan Mandragoran appear, and almost before Rand knows it, he and his friends are fleeing his home village with Moiraine, Lan, and Egwene al’Vere, the innkeeper’s daughter, who wishes to become an Aes Sedai. The conclusion of this volume leaves the travelers on the road to Baerlon, barely ahead of the pursuing Trollocs and Draghkar. As they run for their lives, Moiraine and Lan begin to teach the young people what they need to know to survive in this dangerous world.


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With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series written by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Chase Conley. The first Robert Jordan graphic novel, New Spring: the Graphic Novel, was a New York Times bestseller. The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One begins Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy tale by i/>The With the full cooperation of the Jordan estate, The Eye of the World has been turned into a stunning comic book series written by Chuck Dixon and illustrated by Chase Conley. The first Robert Jordan graphic novel, New Spring: the Graphic Novel, was a New York Times bestseller. The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One begins Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy tale by introducing Rand al’Thor and his friends Matrim and Perrin at the spring festival. Moiraine Damodred and Lan Mandragoran appear, and almost before Rand knows it, he and his friends are fleeing his home village with Moiraine, Lan, and Egwene al’Vere, the innkeeper’s daughter, who wishes to become an Aes Sedai. The conclusion of this volume leaves the travelers on the road to Baerlon, barely ahead of the pursuing Trollocs and Draghkar. As they run for their lives, Moiraine and Lan begin to teach the young people what they need to know to survive in this dangerous world.

30 review for The Eye of the World: The Graphic Novel, Volume One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tina Haigler

    I love the Wheel of Time series. It has always been my favorite fantasy series. To see it brought to life with art is a dream come true and the artists did not disappoint. Amazing!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Phaedra

    It was easier to read this for me than the actual book. I disliked the artwork, mainly for it's inconsistency with characters looking the same or even being recognizable. When there are three boys who all have brown hair and I can't tell them apart... that's a problem for me. I like that the story itself is distilled down to it's essence, it makes it easier to follow and the story doesn't overpower itself. I hope at some point they change artists, or the current artist refines his characters so It was easier to read this for me than the actual book. I disliked the artwork, mainly for it's inconsistency with characters looking the same or even being recognizable. When there are three boys who all have brown hair and I can't tell them apart... that's a problem for me. I like that the story itself is distilled down to it's essence, it makes it easier to follow and the story doesn't overpower itself. I hope at some point they change artists, or the current artist refines his characters so they have distinctions between them. I don't like having to rely solely on hair color or costuming to tell them apart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I read the first three books about a decade ago. I am not a big fan of re-reading books (too many new ones to read), but I want to try and read the whole of WoT and need reminding. This is where I start. Slightly spoilery. This comic book version of The Eye of the World is Volume 1 and contains seven chapters, that do not actually match up with the chapters in the book (10 chapters). Why not have the same chapters as the book? I like the artwork. Well drawn, some very nice details. So I read the first three books about a decade ago. I am not a big fan of re-reading books (too many new ones to read), but I want to try and read the whole of WoT and need reminding. This is where I start. Slightly spoilery. This comic book version of The Eye of the World is Volume 1 and contains seven chapters, that do not actually match up with the chapters in the book (10 chapters). Why not have the same chapters as the book? I like the artwork. Well drawn, some very nice details. Some pages have great colouring, very vivid, with contrasts that shine from the page... Not so sure about the Kindle formatting. Double tapping or two-fingered drawing will enlarge panels, but it is limited to pre-defined areas. It's not a big deal, I actually think this feature is pretty nifty. But it is also a bit limiting. I found it difficult at times to tell the boys apart. They all looked too similar and/or did not retain their individual characteristics enough to remain easily recognizable from one panel to the next. Tam also seemed to change his look from one panel to the next sometimes. Rand moving through the wood with his father--when the shade, sorry, fade appears--I get this urge to replace Rand and Tam with four hobbits. The first book of WoT feels so much like a LOTR rip-off, it's very weird. Another one: A tainted weapon, causing a wound that won't heal, that will fester and consume the wounded. Ring a bell? *cough*Frodo*cough* The bonus sketchbook is nice. The cover gallery is great, but that mountain is definitely Mount Doom! *sigh* So, despite all of the above, I really liked this and will give it four stars. Good artwork, a story well told, very close to the original (as far as I remember). *~*~* Parallel to the comic I skimmed the Tor chapter summaries: Chapters 1-9 of The Eye of the World The Eye of the World, Chapters 10-18 They are a bit spoilery, beware! But the commentary is fun to read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ranting Dragon

    http://www.rantingdragon.com/the-eye-... When the graphic novel adaption of New Spring, the prequel to the epic Wheel of Time series, was released on January 18th, it was well received here at the Ranting Dragon. Having loved that, we’re even more thrilled to be able to review the first volume of The Eye of the World Graphic Novel, the comic adaption of the first novel in The Wheel of Time series. An aesthetic beauty This absolutely stunning hardcover does The Eye of the World justice. The characters shown on the fron/>An http://www.rantingdragon.com/the-eye-... When the graphic novel adaption of New Spring, the prequel to the epic Wheel of Time series, was released on January 18th, it was well received here at the Ranting Dragon. Having loved that, we’re even more thrilled to be able to review the first volume of The Eye of the World Graphic Novel, the comic adaption of the first novel in The Wheel of Time series. An aesthetic beauty This absolutely stunning hardcover does The Eye of the World justice. The characters shown on the front—Rand, Mat and Perrin—are only part of a full scene that can be fully viewed when you unfold the dust-jacket and see Nynaeve, Egwene, Tam, Moiraine, Thom and Lan as well. It’s a truly amazing piece of art—one worthy of framing on any wall. Underneath the dust jacket, you’ll find a relief of the Wheel of Time symbol—the Wheel and the serpent biting its own tail—which is a very nice touch. Doing the novel justice We opened the book with very high hopes, and we weren’t disappointed. This first volume in The Eye of the World Graphic Novel opens with the Ravens prologue found in the young adult version of The Eye of the World and not released in the adult version, which was a very nice surprise. With the additional prologue, as well as an introduction to The Wheel of Time series from Robert Jordan himself—written before his death—new readers to the series won’t feel as lost as they might have starting The Eye of the World novel. Absolutely no scene, no matter how inconsequential, is left out, from Mat and Rand taking the caskets of wine into the basement of the Inn, to seeing a raven that appears to be spying on them and Moiraine subsequently showing up, to the attack on Rand and Tam’s farm—where Narg, the talking trolloc, makes an appearance. Even Moiraine’s telling of Manetheren’s history was given due attention. In the grand scheme of things, this scene plays such a minor role; yet it is a fan favorite, and one of our favorite scenes in the entire series. This part actually works out rather well in the comic, and Robert Jordan would likely have appreciated how true to the original story this graphic novel remains, not leaving any bit out, no matter how hard to translate the images may have been. A small warning! One thing for fans of The Wheel of Time to keep in mind before reading the graphic novel, however, is that this is the first time that the characters have ever been drawn to be mass-marketed in the twenty-one years since The Eye of the World was first released. Unfortunately, some of these drawings might not live up to the pictures in your head. However, they are drawn consistently, and an exquisite amount of detail is rendered in these pages, so we might as well cut the artist, Chase Conley, some slack, especially considering that he had the absolute approval of The Jordan Estate. Obviously, we had our preferences as well. For example, Thom looks like a fragile and grumpy hippie. We have always pictured him with longer hair, and while his attitude seems completely spot on, the drawings just don’t match up with how we pictured him for so many years. The style in which Moiraine is drawn provided a big problem for us as well. She doesn’t seem to embody the Aes Sedai presence that she so clearly possesses in the novels. Her height, while accurate, was depicted in such a way that made her seem small and submissive, contrary to the novels. Some of her facial expressions were so very unlike Moiraine and a tad demeaning to the character. Tam, on the other hand, was absolutely amazingly drawn. He seemed very well-represented—the perfect image of a grizzled war veteran who has now settled down to life as a shepherd. An improvement upon New Spring Unlike the art of New Spring, which was for the most part lively and colorful, The Eye of the World is dark, perfectly capturing the atmosphere of the story. Some minor details were missing for die-hard fans like myself, such as the heron marks on Rand’s sword when it’s first introduced, even though it’s discussed later on. That doesn’t diminish the masterful skill with which this story was drawn onto the pages, however. This is further enhanced by the fact that the same artists worked on the entire graphic novel. Where New Spring had characters that were drawn in a different style every other chapter, the art in The Eye of the World provides us with continuity and consistency. Epic bonus materials The bonus materials at the end of this volume are simply amazing. Chase Conley’s sketchbook features a lot of characters that we won’t see for another volume or two—if not longer—but the initial sketches being included here further increases the anticipation for future volumes. It is definitely hard to pick out a favorite from the twenty-six character sketches, but it was impressive to see how many were included. The second part of the bonus materials—the cover gallery—is also absolutely stunning. You get to view every cover that was released for the individual issues, and they’re all impressive. These images don’t come directly from the story, but are nonetheless stunning – just take a look at the example on the right. Why should you read this novel? Overall, The Eye of the World Graphic Novel absolutely did the first part of the book justice. The characters are literally brought to life right in front of you, and the script doesn’t detract from Jordan’s marvelous storytelling. This comic comes together perfectly, from the surprising prologue to the marvelous cut-off at the end, complete with cliffhanger. This comic adaption of The Wheel of Time is a great addition to the collection of any fan of the series, as well as a decent starting point for those that wish to start the series in a lighter way. We definitely cannot wait for the next volume, which is coming in June 2012.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Story is great. Jordan's series is one of my favorite fantasy series of all time (ok THE favorite). What was really holding this back was some pretty rough artwork. and being as that was all this could add its a failure for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sannie Hald

    My beloved 'hubby' found this for me and I was so excited that I read the first volume there and then. I love how graphic novels bring something new into a well-known story, and how for those unfortunate souls who does not find pure pleasure in reading the book and all its pages, can get much and more for reading the few sentences and looking at the beautiful illustrated pictures which are found within.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    Aww how nice. All of the strong, independent female characters just happen to be 5'2 with 36DD breasts, 20 inch waists and form-fitting, cleavage-showing dresses. But the men are all imperfectly perfect of course. Robert Jordan would be so proud.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marlowe

    I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by how much of the firsthat The I took all the Wheel of Time-related graphic novels out from the library and brought them along on vacation. Unfortunately, I didn't realize that The Eye of the World comes in six volumes, and only brought the three my library has. I got to the end of the third pretty certain that a good chunk was missing and, sure enough, I'm only halfway through. Still, I figured I'd better write a review, since I don't know when I'll be able to get my hands on the next three volumes. I was quite surprised by how much of the first novel's plot I could remember. The middle books, particularly around where it became obvious that Jordan had completely dropped the reigns of the plot, are a blur, but I had distinct memories of everything covered in the graphic novels. I've found the same thing with A Song of Ice and Fire - where the first book is also quite well plotted, with a much tighter storyline than later books. In both cases, I feel like the authors started off with a very clear idea of a beginning, and then much vaguer notes for the rest of the series. It's a shame. Regarding the graphic novels specifically, I found the text to be much better than what I saw in the New Spring graphic novel. It was much easier to follow what was going on, and I think I would have been able to read it even if I hadn't read the book first. I'm not sure how much of that is a real difference in quality and how much is just because the plot of Eye of the World is so much more action-oriented, relying less on narrative (and therefore more easily exportable to a visual medium), though. The artwork was a little disappointing, though. The images looked messy, for lack of a better word - like coloured sketches. This meant that it was often difficult to tell one character apart from another - particularly in the beginning. Some of that might have been intentional, to show how ordinary the three Ta'veren are at the start of the story, but I don't feel like that came through very well. There were also quite a few consistency issues, particularly with Moiraine's forehead pendant (which changed shape and style frequently from panel to panel). Generally, though, I thought it was fine. It was certainly readable. I'm just scratching me head over who the intended audience might be for these. There isn't really a lot of added value for someone who has already read the novels, and I'm not sure how well someone who hasn't read the novels would be able to follow along with the graphic novel version. It seems a bit superfluous. Or perhaps they are looking for people like me, who are at the end of the novels and want a refresher on the series without having to tackle the doorstopper tomes for a second time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Margot

    I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time Book 1) quite a bit more than I expected to after my disappointment with the New Spring graphic novel. The only frustrating thing is that they are being produced so slowly. I would love to "reread" the series (up to where I left off) in this new form, but despite publication of the first graphic novel volume back in 2011, there are still only four published volumes, and that's still only covering part of the first book in the series. Thought you(Wheel I enjoyed this graphic novel adaptation of The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time Book 1) quite a bit more than I expected to after my disappointment with the New Spring graphic novel. The only frustrating thing is that they are being produced so slowly. I would love to "reread" the series (up to where I left off) in this new form, but despite publication of the first graphic novel volume back in 2011, there are still only four published volumes, and that's still only covering part of the first book in the series. Thought you waited long for the original series? It seems it will be decades upon decades before the graphic novel series is complete (if ever). Too bad. But I'll still enjoy reading the four that are out so far.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Roberta Jayne

    Pretty decent. Love the artwork in this, it's dark and rich and perfect for this immense story. Kind of sad that the story barely gets started in this volume, but I appreciate that there was a lot of info/set up that needed to be given. Yeah, it was handled really well. And the characters, and magic system, were nicely set up and explained. Perrin looks a bit too gruff and brutish in my opinion but Nyaneve, Moraine, Rand and Matt are spot on.

  11. 5 out of 5

    These Violent Delights (Robin)

    I read this for Booktube-A-Thon 2014, for the book with pictures category. This graphic novel is filled with gorgeous illustrations. You know what they say, "Don't judge a book by its cover." and I know this cover is ugly but the images inside are beautiful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    BooksInPhotos

    Funny how the adaptation is almost as slow as the books lol.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Louisiana36

    I'm hooked on this series for the graphic novels

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This gets a pity point for being a faithful adaptation according to my limited reading and subsequent abandonment of The Eye of the World, but I pretty much hated everything about this graphic novel - the art, the story, the characters, the clichés... The art seems to be stylized after old-school American superhero comics, but even a 9-year old is given boobs. The colorist also can't keep characters straight and randomly makes people translucent, possibly forgetting what side of the window This gets a pity point for being a faithful adaptation according to my limited reading and subsequent abandonment of The Eye of the World, but I pretty much hated everything about this graphic novel - the art, the story, the characters, the clichés... The art seems to be stylized after old-school American superhero comics, but even a 9-year old is given boobs. The colorist also can't keep characters straight and randomly makes people translucent, possibly forgetting what side of the window they're on. At least I can confidently say that I am never going to bother with The Wheel of Time now. I have previously gleaned most of the plot by internet osmosis. It also showed that e-graphic novels are a valid medium for me. (Thanks, library!)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Doug Irving

    Reading for pleasure these days looks like popping an audio book in my car's CD player. I have been listening to my library's copy of the excellent "The Eye of the World" for the better part of a month, and still had only listened to 9 discs of 25 before I had to return it to fulfill a hold request. This graphic novel edition has served to tide me over until the audio book becomes available once again. Having cut my teeth on comic books as a kid, I am very familiar with the limitations of t Reading for pleasure these days looks like popping an audio book in my car's CD player. I have been listening to my library's copy of the excellent "The Eye of the World" for the better part of a month, and still had only listened to 9 discs of 25 before I had to return it to fulfill a hold request. This graphic novel edition has served to tide me over until the audio book becomes available once again. Having cut my teeth on comic books as a kid, I am very familiar with the limitations of translating beloved literary works to the panels of the comic book medium. My hat is off to Dixon and Conley for the work presented here. This first volume wonderfully captures Jordan's work with beautiful artwork and a faithful adaptation of the text. Flashbacks and dreams are both rendered with impressive detail. The only criticism I have is an inconsistency in character design. Otherwise, this is a wonderful companion piece to Jordan's epic novel, and which will serve as a terrific introduction to The Wheel of Time for the unfamiliar reader.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kyera

    I have wanted to read the Eye of the World for a while now, but I wasn't sure if I wanted to jump into a dense fantasy at the moment. As a result, I decided to read the graphic novel and see how I felt about it. It is a more succinct version of the story, which allows it to get the plot and characters across without weighing it down too much. I felt satisfied by the story that I read but intrigued enough by it that I would like to read the actual book to get more details about the world.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nathanael Eoff

    Though I wouldn't recommend skipping the paperback version of this book, it DEFINITELY makes TEOTW far easier to get through. Wish I would have had this when I was reading the first book of the series. Unfortunately, the art is hit and miss. Some of the images are incredibly well crafted, but as others have mentioned in their reviews and comments, the characters aren't drawn consistently and often don't have the same appearance from panel to panel. That being said, I'm having fun reading this bo Though I wouldn't recommend skipping the paperback version of this book, it DEFINITELY makes TEOTW far easier to get through. Wish I would have had this when I was reading the first book of the series. Unfortunately, the art is hit and miss. Some of the images are incredibly well crafted, but as others have mentioned in their reviews and comments, the characters aren't drawn consistently and often don't have the same appearance from panel to panel. That being said, I'm having fun reading this book again in a shorter, more visual medium.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I have read the entire Wheel of Time series. This is the one book (besides A Memory of Light, of course) that is not a reread for me. I just got it and read it for the first time. However, it's impossible for me to fully separate it from the actual novel version of The Eye of the World, so this review will illustrate some of my mixed feelings as a result of comparing the two. There were some things I liked more than the actual novel and some I didn’t. I don’t want to get into them too much because I don’t w I have read the entire Wheel of Time series. This is the one book (besides A Memory of Light, of course) that is not a reread for me. I just got it and read it for the first time. However, it's impossible for me to fully separate it from the actual novel version of The Eye of the World, so this review will illustrate some of my mixed feelings as a result of comparing the two. There were some things I liked more than the actual novel and some I didn’t. I don’t want to get into them too much because I don’t want to heavily affect others’ feelings about the book, but I’d like to list a few. One thing I really liked was the concept. It was great to have the book in a different style (it would be especially useful for those out there who are really into graphic novels and don’t quite know how they feel about long books yet). I could see myself using it as a way of drawing in a new reader who I know would like the series but might be put off by the sheer physical size of the novels. Because it doesn’t cover the whole novel, if they really liked this they’d have to pick up the wordy one to get the rest. However, with the concept comes the art. I’m not really an art snob on the whole; I can always deal with artists picturing things in different ways than I do. So I think it’s cool to have it visually depicted no matter what. And I don’t have any serious issues with the art. In fact, there were some amazing one page scenes (preceding each chapter) depicted by guest artists that I would love to have posters of. So where’s my problem? Well, I often had trouble deciphering emotions on the faces of the characters. They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and I would expect something like this to be a great opportunity to really express the characters’ feelings without having to describe them. However, I felt like the characters fell flat in a lot of ways where they didn’t in the novel, and I’m certain it’s because their faces felt too wooden to me. I just never quite felt like they looked emotionally on the same level as their actions or words indicated they were. Even when a character’s action or dialogue was extremely emotionally charged, I felt sometimes like his or her face made it seem… less so. I guess this speaks to Robert Jordan’s talent at showing us instead of telling us? He’s so good at getting their feelings across through the thought, dialogue, and actions that giving us a picture actually makes it worse because it’s not at the same level of quality. (This is personal opinion though; I could just be bad at reading faces.) Another thing I really DID like is the fact that it includes both the Egwene prologue and the Lews Therin one. I have read Ravens before, but that’s not something I got to read until quite late into the series. Honestly, I think it has great merit, and should be read by everyone who hasn’t read it as soon as possible. It’s a prologue for the first book, after all. I’ve handed The Eye of the World to a few people who were turned off by the (as they called it) “weirdness” of Dragonmount. In those cases, Ravens might have worked better to draw them in. I also really like it because it gives us more insight into the psyches of the young main characters. The first time I read EotW, I found Egwene to be kind annoying, and I think that I would have found her less so if I had gotten this look into her brain at the beginning. It really helps to explain the reasoning behind a lot of her actions. It does….how shall I put it, “bash” you over the head with foreshadowing at some points, but that’s understandable seeing as how it was originally meant for readers who aren’t as experienced at picking that out yet. And of course, for re-readers, Ravens is great for a laugh, because some of the aforesaid foreshadowing is pretty awesome/hilarious. So what would I suggest this as? Definitely not your only EotW experience, but I think it’s a great supplement to the full novel. Some of the visual stuff is really helpful (view spoiler)[ for instance, the spread of Emond’s Field after the Trolloc attack very nicely shows how some houses were spared and some were totaled. (FINALLY I can fully visualize that!) (hide spoiler)] If you haven’t read From the Two Rivers, it gives you Ravens, which again, I recommend for everyone. And if you want to lure a hesitant reader into the series, it could be a hook to grab them with. I had a hard time deciding whether to give this three or four stars. I did have some problems with it, but there are definitely some awesome parts. I think I might only want to give it a three because it's not complete and I didn't connect with the faces as well as I could have... It's hard when I'm comparing it to something I love so much. I'm giving it a four though, because I love this story no matter what form it comes in, the graphic novel does have merits the other books do not have, and I'll definitely reread it. But even though this particular rating is not 5 stars, the series as a whole is DEFINITELY 100 out of 5 stars!! If you liked this review, check out my (spoiler-filled) blog where my best friend and I reread the whole series in preparation for A Memory of Light! Where's Bela?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Wise Fool

    Read the books. Thought I'd try these. Interesting to see how other depict characters you had pictured in your head. Storyline holds true to the books! Thus the storyline only gets better!!! Enjoy!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Campo

    Hated the digital format It had a weird zoom effects that was inside the text. It's terrible to read on a phone, dare to say also on a tablet. Guided view would help the book a lot. Besides that, didn't like that much the story or the characters don't care about any of them.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nomad nimrod

    Art is simply awful. When you aren't sure which character is which then there's something wrong with the art. I have never read the book so just wanted to see the glimpse of the series. Story is going slow but it's decent.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Pacing is a bit off. On the whole not too bad. More than anything it gets me intrigued to read the book it’s based off of. Also hard not to draw similarities from Fellowship of the Rings in this one, too many parallels to not feel repetitive

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joel Minty

    Carefully done, great art. A nice, different way to approach the series, and I keep a copy in my classroom to encourage my tween students into engaging with fantasy.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This took me back to when I received the “teaser” book for the Eye of the World, it stopped in the same place even!!! It’s a great intro to the WOT

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Thomas

    Good story, have seen better drawing, but will continue to follow the series...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Riggs

    3.5 to 4 mostly because of the artwork.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Not for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Zanghi

    Nice little read. Definitely a more streamlined version of the first few chapters of The Eye of the World. I like the artwork, as well.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    A worthy adaptation...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jessica H

    Better then the book. The graphics are awesome!

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