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Unfair Advantage: The Power of Financial Education

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On the heels of his 2010 New York Times bestseller Conspiracy of the Rich, Robert Kiyosaki takes a new and hard-hitting look at the factors that impact people from all walks of life as they struggle to cope with change and challenges that impact their financial world. In Unfair Advantage &mdash The Power of Financial Education Robert underscores his messages and On the heels of his 2010 New York Times bestseller Conspiracy of the Rich, Robert Kiyosaki takes a new and hard-hitting look at the factors that impact people from all walks of life as they struggle to cope with change and challenges that impact their financial world. In Unfair Advantage &mdash The Power of Financial Education Robert underscores his messages and challenges readers to change their context and act in a new way. Readers are advised to stop blindly accepting that they are ‘disadvantaged’ people with limited options. They are encouraged to act beyond their concept of limited options and challenge the preconception that they will struggle financially all of their lives. Robert’s fresh approach to his time-tested messages includes clear, actionable steps that any individual or family can take, starting with education. Education becomes applied knowledge, a powerful tactic with measurable results. In true Rich Dad style, readers will be challenged to understand two points of view, and experience how financial knowledge is their unfair advantage. Why do the rich get richer even in a financial crisis? In his new book, An Unfair Advantage, Robert confirms his message and challenges readers to change their context and act in a new way. Readers are advised to stop blindly accepting that they are ‘disadvantaged’ people with limited options and challenge the notion that they will struggle, financially, all their lives. What does school teach you about money? In most cases, the answer is “Not much.” If there is any financial education, the courses are taught by financial planners and bankers… the agents of Wall Street and the big banks, the very people that caused and profited from the financial crisis. This book is about real financial education. This book is about how debt and taxes make the rich richer &hellip and why debt and taxes makes the poor and middle class struggle. This book explains why the rich get richer, paying less in taxes, while the middle class shrinks &mdash with many losing jobs, homes, and retirement &mdash and paying more in taxes. This book is about the five unfair advantages a real financial education offers. The Unfair Advantage of Knowledge The Unfair Advantage of Taxes The Unfair Advantage of Debt The Unfair Advantage of Risk The Unfair Advantage of Compensation These five unfair advantages are the outcomes of real financial education.


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On the heels of his 2010 New York Times bestseller Conspiracy of the Rich, Robert Kiyosaki takes a new and hard-hitting look at the factors that impact people from all walks of life as they struggle to cope with change and challenges that impact their financial world. In Unfair Advantage &mdash The Power of Financial Education Robert underscores his messages and On the heels of his 2010 New York Times bestseller Conspiracy of the Rich, Robert Kiyosaki takes a new and hard-hitting look at the factors that impact people from all walks of life as they struggle to cope with change and challenges that impact their financial world. In Unfair Advantage &mdash The Power of Financial Education Robert underscores his messages and challenges readers to change their context and act in a new way. Readers are advised to stop blindly accepting that they are ‘disadvantaged’ people with limited options. They are encouraged to act beyond their concept of limited options and challenge the preconception that they will struggle financially all of their lives. Robert’s fresh approach to his time-tested messages includes clear, actionable steps that any individual or family can take, starting with education. Education becomes applied knowledge, a powerful tactic with measurable results. In true Rich Dad style, readers will be challenged to understand two points of view, and experience how financial knowledge is their unfair advantage. Why do the rich get richer even in a financial crisis? In his new book, An Unfair Advantage, Robert confirms his message and challenges readers to change their context and act in a new way. Readers are advised to stop blindly accepting that they are ‘disadvantaged’ people with limited options and challenge the notion that they will struggle, financially, all their lives. What does school teach you about money? In most cases, the answer is “Not much.” If there is any financial education, the courses are taught by financial planners and bankers… the agents of Wall Street and the big banks, the very people that caused and profited from the financial crisis. This book is about real financial education. This book is about how debt and taxes make the rich richer &hellip and why debt and taxes makes the poor and middle class struggle. This book explains why the rich get richer, paying less in taxes, while the middle class shrinks &mdash with many losing jobs, homes, and retirement &mdash and paying more in taxes. This book is about the five unfair advantages a real financial education offers. The Unfair Advantage of Knowledge The Unfair Advantage of Taxes The Unfair Advantage of Debt The Unfair Advantage of Risk The Unfair Advantage of Compensation These five unfair advantages are the outcomes of real financial education.

30 review for Unfair Advantage: The Power of Financial Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I really enjoy reading Kiyosaki. He's a great motivator and a money making genius. The fact that he loves to share his wealth of knowledge is more powerful than his love of sharing his financial wealth. His books do get a little repetitious but I find that through repetition I remember things better. Especially when this knowledge is put to work, AND has proven that it DOES work...

  2. 5 out of 5

    David Donhoff

    This is, frankly, such a well written book for the "average Joe" of average knowledge, who no longer wants to be "average"... that it appears to escape the grasp of too many looking for something that its not (at least according to the other reviews I see here.) Kiyosaki neither "talk down to" nor "sells/pitches to" his readers here... the book appears to sincerely be an "opening of the kimono" attempt at candid disclosure of the methods & viewpoints he has used to accomplish his feats to This is, frankly, such a well written book for the "average Joe" of average knowledge, who no longer wants to be "average"... that it appears to escape the grasp of too many looking for something that its not (at least according to the other reviews I see here.) Kiyosaki neither "talk down to" nor "sells/pitches to" his readers here... the book appears to sincerely be an "opening of the kimono" attempt at candid disclosure of the methods & viewpoints he has used to accomplish his feats to date. This is an outstanding book that I intend to make available to my financial advisory clients. (And no, it doesn't 'nudge' the reader into any direction that would particularly benefit my advisory practice... its just quality financial perspective & active knowledge to proceed from.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Kiyosaki is highly repetitive in this book, and he admits he is not a good writer. Still, very lucid and necessary financial advice in this era of fiat currency.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt Austin

    Reading this book in 2019 was worth it in showing just how wrong RK can be in his advice. Every once and a while I go back to reading Kiyosaki books to see if there is anything I'm missing on the investment side and also to somewhat confirm a benchmark to how I invest. Reading this one from 2011, I realized just how far I had come and how easy it is to write personal finance books without regard for the success of your readers. While I believe it safe to assume that many readers of this book have Reading this book in 2019 was worth it in showing just how wrong RK can be in his advice. Every once and a while I go back to reading Kiyosaki books to see if there is anything I'm missing on the investment side and also to somewhat confirm a benchmark to how I invest. Reading this one from 2011, I realized just how far I had come and how easy it is to write personal finance books without regard for the success of your readers. While I believe it safe to assume that many readers of this book have read his other books such as RDPD or Cashflow Quadrant, It's important to note that many of the messages, notably portrayed in this book, can (and would have if you followed them in 2011) result in notable losses and missing out in many ways in the greatest bull run on the stock market in history. Some critical points that we can make in hindsight reading this book in 2019: 1) If you followed RK's message and loaded up on silver and gold in 2011 to "diversify" your risk as he explains, you would have bought gold between $1500 and $1890 an ounce. Not only would gold prices crash in September of 2011 due to margin calls on many firms when the market was on a down-slide, it showed that significant drops in the market would correlate to gold sales and the reverse was not necessarily true. If you held this gold, it would continue to fall to levels below $1100 an ounce at the end of 2015 while at the same time the S&P 500 would grow from around 1200 pts to over 2000. The S&P 500 would then continue to grow to almost 3000 pts at the time of writing this while gold would continue to move sideways to about $1400 an ounce at the time of writing. If you shared in RK's near conspiratorial claims of gold as currency and invested in this precious metal over a broad-based market ETF, you likely would have lost money and missed out on nearly tripling your capital. 2) The claim that the US Government is printing counterfeit dollars is downright absurd. 3) RK's understanding of a bank's reserve ratio (what has to be kept on the books relative to what can be lent out) is wrong. Banks are not legally authorize to create money as RK states. If a ratio is 1:5, the bank must have $1 cash able to cover withdrawls for every $5 lent out meaning that only $1 of money kept with the bank has to kept in the "vault" with the other $5 invested with the bank being turned around and loaned out. No money is printed. 4) RK bashes ponzi schemes - as we all should. It's worth noting that he firmly believes in multilevel marketing (pyramid schemes) and this appears in his Cashflow games. It has been argued that the majority of his book and game sales come from people in Amway selling them as "business tools" inside their MLM scheme. Just a bit of a pot calling the kettle on this one. 5) Bankrupcy - RK is no stranger. Do your homework on this one. 6) Technical Analysis in trading - He advises readers to become educated in this style of trading. Very risky and prone to leading people to day-trade with statistically horrible results. Learn some of the methods but be wary - if you want to know if it's for you, talk to previous day traders. 7) Get a coach - better than this, join free or low-cost investing groups in your area. Learn from each other and navigate dealflow together. Hiring a coach is a great way to spend a lot of cash and wonder what to do next. (This was a big part of RK's paid seminars which have some really mixed reviews - do your research) 8) RK blames Warran Buffett for the financial crisis. No really, it's in there. Overly simplistic and lacking the depth of knowledge of the major players in the financial crisis. Other than that, if this book inspired you to learn more, perfect. Next step should be to meet up with like-minded people and start talking. Don't use this book as a recipe for success but rather talk to those who are navigating deals in your area and start changing your group of friends for your future success. All the best in your journey!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nihar Suthar

    Overall, this is a pretty good book. Kiyosaki definitely challenges the norms of thinking, especially when it comes to finances and financial freedom. However, depending on what you are looking for, he doesn't necessarily provide actionable guidance on what to do next. This book is more motivational and inspires you to think differently when it comes to how you view money. It's worth the read if you don't have much financial knowledge and are looking to get motivated on creating passive streams Overall, this is a pretty good book. Kiyosaki definitely challenges the norms of thinking, especially when it comes to finances and financial freedom. However, depending on what you are looking for, he doesn't necessarily provide actionable guidance on what to do next. This book is more motivational and inspires you to think differently when it comes to how you view money. It's worth the read if you don't have much financial knowledge and are looking to get motivated on creating passive streams of income.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed H

    By far one of the best Audiobooks I have listened to in 2013. My obsession with audiobooks came from an article I read from a dear Friend Ahmad Moshrif, Who I believe is a really talented writer. He has inspired me to read listen to Audiobooks and write. Today I am thankful to him for opening a whole new world of knowledge to me. If you would like to follow him this is his blog: http://amoshrif.com/ The below Audiobook is an advantage you will gain by reading or listening. I suggest you get your By far one of the best Audiobooks I have listened to in 2013. My obsession with audiobooks came from an article I read from a dear Friend Ahmad Moshrif, Who I believe is a really talented writer. He has inspired me to read listen to Audiobooks and write. Today I am thankful to him for opening a whole new world of knowledge to me. If you would like to follow him this is his blog: http://amoshrif.com/ The below Audiobook is an advantage you will gain by reading or listening. I suggest you get your kids, wife, husband, brother, sister, mother or father to read it. I learned some very important lessons from this Audiobook. For a successful investor or entrepreneur you need to have financial knowledge to take you to your desired goals in life. Without knowledge we are just in the dark. I leaned that in 1971 the dollar was no longer pegged to gold! Hence the american dollar lost since then 95% of its value and gold prices increased from 34$ in 1971 to $1200 today. There are many important lessons to learn from this book. I hope it can add to your knowledge.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Bishop

    I do not think Kiyosaki talks down to anyone as some have accused him. I do think most people lack financial education, he realizes this and is trying to breakthrough the rhetoric and fog that has clouded most people's thoughts on finances which contributes to them being in their present financial state which is not good. In order to breakthrough the mental barriers put up by decades of bad financial teaching and advice, things need to be repeated and broken down into an understandable I do not think Kiyosaki talks down to anyone as some have accused him. I do think most people lack financial education, he realizes this and is trying to breakthrough the rhetoric and fog that has clouded most people's thoughts on finances which contributes to them being in their present financial state which is not good. In order to breakthrough the mental barriers put up by decades of bad financial teaching and advice, things need to be repeated and broken down into an understandable vocabulary. His audience are those person with little to no financial education so of course he is going to present the information as clear and as concise as possible. So far, it is a great read and all of his books and games should be taught in schools across America, even beginning in elementary grades. Enough of glamorizing and romanticizing being poor. Let's all increase our financial education and thereby our financial standing and become part of the solution, by not adding to the problem.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Machine Reading

    In the past, when I still young about personal financial subject, I can't catch up with Kiyosaki's book very well so that make me not impress with his book very much. But, as my financial literacy go up to higher level, I can understand him quite better with this book and can got some useful information from him a lot. If I have to summarized the main idea of this book that is it doesn't matter what financial literacy level that you are now, anyway, you still have to have a good, really good, In the past, when I still young about personal financial subject, I can't catch up with Kiyosaki's book very well so that make me not impress with his book very much. But, as my financial literacy go up to higher level, I can understand him quite better with this book and can got some useful information from him a lot. If I have to summarized the main idea of this book that is it doesn't matter what financial literacy level that you are now, anyway, you still have to have a good, really good, financial education. Highly financial educated guy has the unfair advantage over others, which is the main citizen of the world. If you want to survive from the economic chaos (Kiyosaki called it 'exceited') that will come, you have to get yourselves to become better in financial education.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Waseem

    Sometimes I find Roberts book a tad bit repetitive, and slightly re-hashed versions of his other work, but one thing that will remain true is this mans ability to call it very accurately and say how it is - and based on that just alone and his emphasis on the need of good financial education makes it worth while for anyone to be constantly reminded of his warnings aswell as solutions of the problems we all face today So I would recommend it nevertheless, and you do sometimes pick a new story from Sometimes I find Roberts book a tad bit repetitive, and slightly re-hashed versions of his other work, but one thing that will remain true is this mans ability to call it very accurately and say how it is - and based on that just alone and his emphasis on the need of good financial education makes it worth while for anyone to be constantly reminded of his warnings aswell as solutions of the problems we all face today So I would recommend it nevertheless, and you do sometimes pick a new story from his 'rich dad days / childhood' which you may have not heard before, and with a book of this nature, one golden nugget can be worth its weight in gold for your long term financial future and success keep it up Robert :) Waseem Mirza http://www.WaseemMirza.net

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maxim

    Excellent, professional handbook to understand the investment for beginners. It is the essence of Rich Dad, Poor Dad books and Summary: The CashFlow Quadrant - Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter. It provides real life examples and explains the consequences of financial crisis in 2008.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luccas

    Very good book! I have read some of Roberts previous books and this is just one the best works that he has done. Really showing not only Americans but the rest of the world that financial education is essential to live a happy and prosperous life. I am Brazilian and his ideas fully apply in my country as well as any other country. We all need to educate ourselves better. Because lets face it economic crises will always happen no matter where you are or what you do it will affect you. How it Very good book! I have read some of Roberts previous books and this is just one the best works that he has done. Really showing not only Americans but the rest of the world that financial education is essential to live a happy and prosperous life. I am Brazilian and his ideas fully apply in my country as well as any other country. We all need to educate ourselves better. Because lets face it economic crises will always happen no matter where you are or what you do it will affect you. How it affects you and what you do about it depends on how well educated you are financially.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    After Rich Dad Poor Dad I was excited to read everything else Robert Kiyosaki had to say. But this book disappointed me. Although The processes that he lays out are good and worked for him. In my mind they lacked the common sense factor. Don't get me wrong, it was an excellent read. But, I disagree with the methods he sugguested.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    A very to-the-point, extremely digestible book that intends to educate the average investor, though mostly about the US investment climate. Written in a little bit of an angsty way, but I guess that was supposed to jolt people into revelation and action.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan_hg

    Kinda repeat from what he is trying to say in all his previous book. Its a good read if you are a first timer for Robert's book, but if you are those who have finished a series of his book, its getting boring

  15. 4 out of 5

    Noel

    It a great book, Robert is actually emphasizing on how having financial education will open you to more opportunities and give you an unfair advantage. He goes into details talking about your knowledge on taxes, debt, risk and compensation

  16. 4 out of 5

    Carl

    This book really has opened my eyes. Robert does a really good job explaining what is wrong with our financial system and what can be done to survive and do well despite how things are run. I would recommend this book to anyone.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mano Chil

    Be a capitalist, not a socialist. Work on increasing your assets and decreasing your liabilities.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

    3.5 stars here tempted to put this in an 'important to take a look at' category though much of it is his personal perspective, there is plenty that is quite sound as well

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    This book was ok but didn't add a lot to Kiyosaki's previous works. The downside of this one is that it gets REALLY preachy. "Remember in 2002 when I said the economy was in danger?" "I'm so smart for investing in gold and silver (but don't necessarily do it now, you need to learn about the investments yourself)". I couldn't help but wonder that he has likely made hundreds of statements that in retrospect look ridiculous and he's only highlighting the ones that make him look prescient. That being This book was ok but didn't add a lot to Kiyosaki's previous works. The downside of this one is that it gets REALLY preachy. "Remember in 2002 when I said the economy was in danger?" "I'm so smart for investing in gold and silver (but don't necessarily do it now, you need to learn about the investments yourself)". I couldn't help but wonder that he has likely made hundreds of statements that in retrospect look ridiculous and he's only highlighting the ones that make him look prescient. That being said, his focus on the cashflow quadrant and the importance of understanding investing and how taxes and expenses work is good advice that is not adhered to by enough people. I appreciate that he focuses on operating with integrity and treating others fairly as he explains why the tax code is structured to favor investors and business owners but it makes me wonder his viewpoint on taking advantage of tax loopholes that very clearly shouldn't exist outside of sweetheart deals. What wins out in his mind in that case: operating with integrity, or letting the tax code direct your financial moves? Not a bad read but I think if you read Rich Dad, Poor Dad and Cashflow Quadrant (which I intend to read soon) you can probably skip this one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cory Saint-Esprit

    While I like to overall message, I felt like he just repeated himself over and over and over and over. The book could've been half as long as it was if he would stop telling the same story. There were a lot of grammatical errors in the book, which is weird because you think editors would've grabbed that. I've been a Dave Ramsey fan for a long time and wanting to do my part to learn as much as I can about personal finance, my business finances, etc. This is why I've begun reading widely in While I like to overall message, I felt like he just repeated himself over and over and over and over. The book could've been half as long as it was if he would stop telling the same story. There were a lot of grammatical errors in the book, which is weird because you think editors would've grabbed that. I've been a Dave Ramsey fan for a long time and wanting to do my part to learn as much as I can about personal finance, my business finances, etc. This is why I've begun reading widely in personal finance, so Kiyosaki was at the top of the list. This was my first book by him and probably the last. I feel like the stories will all be the same (much like Dave Ramsey go to for me). Even in the "special section at the end" that previewed his next book, it was the same stories. I feel like he tried to pack in as much as he could. A 1 page section at the very end on how much he hates traditional education? We know. Sharing more about how much you love Steve Jobs? We get it! Again, great message and a lot to think about. However, it bothers me he recently filed bankruptcy and that he spent this whole book saying the economy would never recover from 2007 (wrote this in 2010) - yet here in 2018 it's the best economy we've seen in over 100 years.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fotis Koutoulakis

    Let me start this review by saying that Rich Dad Poor Dad (Kiyosaki's most famous work) is brilliant. Its first principles are amazing to build a mindset that supports wealth building. This was... not so amazing. And by "not so amazing" I mean that for the most part it was bloody terrible, and a waste of time. Kiyosaki likes to self-aggrandise his knowledge and project it in a larger than life way, but it becomes annoying and boring very quickly. The book repeats a lot from his previous books - Let me start this review by saying that Rich Dad Poor Dad (Kiyosaki's most famous work) is brilliant. Its first principles are amazing to build a mindset that supports wealth building. This was... not so amazing. And by "not so amazing" I mean that for the most part it was bloody terrible, and a waste of time. Kiyosaki likes to self-aggrandise his knowledge and project it in a larger than life way, but it becomes annoying and boring very quickly. The book repeats a lot from his previous books - scratch that, it's just a near complete recycle of the ideas with a little bit more anecdotes sprinkled here and there for good measure. Also, another thing that was bad was that for all of Kiyosaki's claims of his amazing financial education and what not, frankly, a lot of times he had no idea what he was talking about. His claims about how reserve banking works are flat out wrong. His fixation on 2008 being a Warren Buffet job is laughable, if not downright lunatic. The book's only saving grace is that at times, some paragraphs are brilliant and very quotable. But that's all there is to it. If you've read Rich Dad Poor Dad, my opinion is skip this. You won't be losing much.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey

    I've read basically all of Kiyosaki's stuff. RDPD changed the way I thought about money back in 2003. Say what you want about all of his work, but while repetitive, it is genius and if you commit to making improvements to your financial education, your life will change for the better. This particular book was repetitive and unoriginal, but it never hurts to hear his lessons on repeat. If you want the basics of Kiyosaki without the repetition, read only RDPD and the Cashflow Quadrant. Then read I've read basically all of Kiyosaki's stuff. RDPD changed the way I thought about money back in 2003. Say what you want about all of his work, but while repetitive, it is genius and if you commit to making improvements to your financial education, your life will change for the better. This particular book was repetitive and unoriginal, but it never hurts to hear his lessons on repeat. If you want the basics of Kiyosaki without the repetition, read only RDPD and the Cashflow Quadrant. Then read them again, about 10 more times, and apply the principals to drastically improve your financial health - no matter what your current situation.

  23. 5 out of 5

    An Thai

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Highlight of the first half of this this book gives a quick glance into some basic economic mechanism. Explaining how the economic bubble works in relation to debt and currency. I found the way the story was constructed really catchy and easy to follow. The second half of this book did recall some of the previous books information in Q and A format which I saw some other reviews disliked. However I really enjoy and appreciate the content despite some information is repeated. The highlight at The Highlight of the first half of this this book gives a quick glance into some basic economic mechanism. Explaining how the economic bubble works in relation to debt and currency. I found the way the story was constructed really catchy and easy to follow. The second half of this book did recall some of the previous books information in Q and A format which I saw some other reviews disliked. However I really enjoy and appreciate the content despite some information is repeated. The highlight at this second half is about the type of investors and how one can set their path to gain the unfair advantages. Overall like many of his book, I learned a lot.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Dutton

    I really, really, really don’t like reading Robert Kiyosaki. When I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad many years ago I didn’t like it either. He redefines words and terms from accounting and he paints an unfair picture of paper asset investing. His writing is choppy and needs a liberal dose of editing. That said why did I choose to read this book? I think the author has some excellent points about financial education. If you can wade past the redefinitions, there are nuggets to be found. I would not I really, really, really don’t like reading Robert Kiyosaki. When I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad many years ago I didn’t like it either. He redefines words and terms from accounting and he paints an unfair picture of paper asset investing. His writing is choppy and needs a liberal dose of editing. That said why did I choose to read this book? I think the author has some excellent points about financial education. If you can wade past the redefinitions, there are nuggets to be found. I would not suggest this as a book early in your financial education because of the flaws. Once you have a handle on the basics, it may be worth reading. I won’t be re-reading it anytime soon.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I have noticed some discrepancies throughout the book, but I left it an open question for myself. Few days later I started to read "Rich Dad's cashflow quadrant" and that's when it came to my mind, that even thought he is very lucky, that his marriage didn't tore to pieces after he allegedly went bust and spent 3 weeks with his wife homeless in a car in 1985, I wondered, what on earth did he do just prior to that, that made him so broke. So I started to research and could not find any I have noticed some discrepancies throughout the book, but I left it an open question for myself. Few days later I started to read "Rich Dad's cashflow quadrant" and that's when it came to my mind, that even thought he is very lucky, that his marriage didn't tore to pieces after he allegedly went bust and spent 3 weeks with his wife homeless in a car in 1985, I wondered, what on earth did he do just prior to that, that made him so broke. So I started to research and could not find any information about that. He literally doesn't say anywhere, what brought his finances down so badly. However, I found one guy, who did 4 parts article about his investigation on Robert Kiyosaki. Before anyone reads any of his books, I suggest to read this - here's a part 1. https://johntreed.com/blogs/john-t-re...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    So there's was a lot I liked about this book. It teaches a totally different view of personal finance and wealth building than all the other personal finance books I've read. However, while reading this, keep in mind that the book is basically one long sales pitch for you to go to one of their seminars which are outrageously expensive and have gotten several reviews as a straight up scam. However, the over all message he delivers about debt, financing real estate, and taxes among other things So there's was a lot I liked about this book. It teaches a totally different view of personal finance and wealth building than all the other personal finance books I've read. However, while reading this, keep in mind that the book is basically one long sales pitch for you to go to one of their seminars which are outrageously expensive and have gotten several reviews as a straight up scam. However, the over all message he delivers about debt, financing real estate, and taxes among other things was very illuminating. This book really got me thinking.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    2 Stars... because there’s great information in this book. Awesome info... but Robert has been exposed for being a scam. I even witnessed it in NYC. Also rumors of him not even writing these books and making up Stories in these books that’s not even true. The books are very informative... but it leaves you hanging with no source of “what next!” Well that’s where his “book seminar tour” comes in handy. If he comes to your town.... save yourself and your money. Don’t go! It’s a set up! Trust me!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Very interesting and eye opening book. I need to learn more. Everybody should read this book many times. This is a great for anyone needing or wanting to get ahead. I am in the S quadrant an old Socialist wanting to learn to be a capitalist hopefully I'm not too old.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Asia

    Decent book that made some interesting points. Although, I found it to be way too repetitive and the FAQs were not very informative to say the least. This was not my favorite book by Kiyosaki, but worth a read if you haven't read his other books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Petrossian

    Unfair Advantage reaffirmed some original points learned in Rich Dad Poor Dad, but mostly with the emphasis on Financial education. The most valuable aspect from this book was probably about investing In Gold instead of leaving money in the bank to accumulate interest.

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