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Tales from Facebook

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Facebook is used by nearly 500 million people throughout the world. Once the preserve of youth, the largest increase in usage today is amongst the older sections of the population. This book examines how Facebook transforms the lives of particular individuals, but it also presents a general theory of Facebook as culture and considers the likely consequences of social netwo Facebook is used by nearly 500 million people throughout the world. Once the preserve of youth, the largest increase in usage today is amongst the older sections of the population. This book examines how Facebook transforms the lives of particular individuals, but it also presents a general theory of Facebook as culture and considers the likely consequences of social networking in the future.


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Facebook is used by nearly 500 million people throughout the world. Once the preserve of youth, the largest increase in usage today is amongst the older sections of the population. This book examines how Facebook transforms the lives of particular individuals, but it also presents a general theory of Facebook as culture and considers the likely consequences of social netwo Facebook is used by nearly 500 million people throughout the world. Once the preserve of youth, the largest increase in usage today is amongst the older sections of the population. This book examines how Facebook transforms the lives of particular individuals, but it also presents a general theory of Facebook as culture and considers the likely consequences of social networking in the future.

30 review for Tales from Facebook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    On the second page, the author says that Facebook was founded by "Mike Zuckerberg." I probably should have stopped reading then.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hanne

    Somewhat boring, lots of rambling and not-getting-to-the-point. This was a book I chose to read for a uni course and it was hardly academic. There's a small portion of sociology-related analysis at the end of the book, but 2/3 of the entire book are stories about Facebook use in Trinidad. Good read if the topic (Trinidad&Facebook) interests you, but for academic purposes, don't bother.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Barnett

    I had only come to hear about this book through an assignment for my course at university in which we had to choose between three books and write a review based on if it displays 'good sociology'. I'll admit I chose Miller's Tales from Facebook because it was the shortest even though Philippe Bourgois's In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio seemed to be a much more interesting choice! The book itself anthropological study into the use of Facebook in Trinidad, and what it has come to mean for i I had only come to hear about this book through an assignment for my course at university in which we had to choose between three books and write a review based on if it displays 'good sociology'. I'll admit I chose Miller's Tales from Facebook because it was the shortest even though Philippe Bourgois's In Search of Respect: Selling Crack in El Barrio seemed to be a much more interesting choice! The book itself anthropological study into the use of Facebook in Trinidad, and what it has come to mean for its users on the island. In part one there are twelve portraits, rather short tales, of how Facebook has come to effect twelve people's lives. This is great for those who have picked this book up to read outside of academia for some aspects are indeed written as if this is a novel rather than an ethnographic account written by an anthropologist, but some of the stories were rather dull and there was quite a lot of repetition. Part two is much more analytical and probably of more interest to those who are studying anthropology or sociology as a discipline. It uses some of the material discussed in part one to try and draw together conclusions for the findings. An issue with this book is that the analysis is quite pushed into the end due to the focus on the portraits where he has already incorporated a lot of his own opinions. It didn't develop quite the insight into Facebook that could have been done due to the heavy focus on Trinidad's usage. Overall the book could be an entertaining read for some but for those studying the disciplines involved it does not quite deliver on what it promises to. The focus on Trinidad and trying to depict it as different for other countries is quite poor for there are similar incidents to those mentioned in the portraits that have occurred all over the world.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dragos

    Daniel Miller's Tales From Facebook builds upon his previous Trinidad related new media work. It's a very hard book to review as it consists of two very distinct parts: a large 13 case study/vignette section addressing individual informants in their relation to Facebook and a shorter anthropological interpretation of facebook. The first part is flawed, easy and pleasant to read but flawed, suffering from classic 'anthropologist trying to be a writer' syndrome, with Miller going on lengthy diatri Daniel Miller's Tales From Facebook builds upon his previous Trinidad related new media work. It's a very hard book to review as it consists of two very distinct parts: a large 13 case study/vignette section addressing individual informants in their relation to Facebook and a shorter anthropological interpretation of facebook. The first part is flawed, easy and pleasant to read but flawed, suffering from classic 'anthropologist trying to be a writer' syndrome, with Miller going on lengthy diatribes and flowery introductions yet often being a bit sparse in his ethnography. The second part is a bit unconvincing and repetitive at times but overall solid thanks in no small measure to 'standing on the shoulders of giants', in this case using Facebook as illustration for a thirty year old theory on fame on the Kula circuit by Nancy Munn, itself drawing on Malinovski's work. This final illustrative bit is perhaps the best and most convincing part of the entire book. All in all Miller's Tales from Facebook is a decent anthropological foray into the social dynamics of social networking and a interesting virtual snapshot of Trini culture.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Miller

    Miller attempts to argue that in Trinidad Facebook culturally manifests differently from the United States. He does make this point, but it is weak at best. He talks about sexuality, relationships, business, and other elements of Facebook in Trinidad, but these do not seem to be unique to Trinidad. For example, a couple who divorce because they cannot trust one another on Facebook, or a star whose sexuality is exploited via Facebook, both happen in the United States as well. The most annoying el Miller attempts to argue that in Trinidad Facebook culturally manifests differently from the United States. He does make this point, but it is weak at best. He talks about sexuality, relationships, business, and other elements of Facebook in Trinidad, but these do not seem to be unique to Trinidad. For example, a couple who divorce because they cannot trust one another on Facebook, or a star whose sexuality is exploited via Facebook, both happen in the United States as well. The most annoying element of the book is it's anatomy. The first 160 pages are anecdotal stories about Trinidad and how "different" it is. All the analysis is crammed into the final 50 pages. If you're looking for what Facebook looks like in Trinidad, then this is a book for you. However, if you're looking for examples of local cultural manifestations resulting from global digital exchanges, look elsewhere.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    I found this book disappointing and it didnt deliver the insight or analysis of facebook users that I was hoping for. Infact I found the case studies in part one of the book dull with far too much of the authors opinion which should have been left in the analysis in part 2. I was expecting extracts of postings, seeing the events unfold for myself with cautionary words from the participants. Parts 2 of the book deals with the analysis of part 1 and a conclusion which included many refe I found this book disappointing and it didnt deliver the insight or analysis of facebook users that I was hoping for. Infact I found the case studies in part one of the book dull with far too much of the authors opinion which should have been left in the analysis in part 2. I was expecting extracts of postings, seeing the events unfold for myself with cautionary words from the participants. Parts 2 of the book deals with the analysis of part 1 and a conclusion which included many references to other research and further reading together with references to the authors previous books. The author was working on another project in Trinidad when this project began hence all the research was done there and not in the USA or UK as I assumed when selecting this book. He spends alot of time telling of the importance and significance of Trinidad as a study which was unconvincing.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Leighton

    Disappointing. I was reading this book hoping to use it in my high school IB Social Anthropology class thinking it would be a topic they could relate to and enjoy. Unfortunately the insights were not groundshaking and the case studies boring.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    For my University assignment on how Facebook is displayed by media to make society anti-social. I hope what I got out of this book applies.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  11. 4 out of 5

    Romy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Middlethought

  13. 5 out of 5

    Victória

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pavel

  16. 5 out of 5

    Suzie

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nefeli Theiakou

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dani

  19. 4 out of 5

    Denise

  20. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Strange

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rafaela

  22. 5 out of 5

    Seth Williams

  23. 4 out of 5

    Phineas

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thunderhead

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bryce Renninger

  26. 4 out of 5

    Andre O. bueno

    An interesting book showing some histories of Facebook users and how people see Facebook nowadays.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mariza

  28. 4 out of 5

    aho's homemade food

  29. 4 out of 5

    John Richardson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Erin

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