Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Little Green Men

Availability: Ready to download

John is convinced that he was abducted from his exclusive golf club by aliens. When he is kidnapped a second time, he realises he has been chosen to spearhead a vital crusade - to persuade the White House to take alien abduction seriously.


Compare
Ads Banner

John is convinced that he was abducted from his exclusive golf club by aliens. When he is kidnapped a second time, he realises he has been chosen to spearhead a vital crusade - to persuade the White House to take alien abduction seriously.

30 review for Little Green Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    Much as I enjoy a good satire, they are quite difficult to find. At least the nonpolitical ones. So naturally one must settle for the political ones, for which Buckley is pretty famous. And so this is a story of a pompous self important wealthy and well connected Princeton educated Washington pundit whose life gets turned upside down when he experiences an alien abduction, and then another one. Ripping into the stupidity/gullibility of the general population and the confused, obfuscating ways of Much as I enjoy a good satire, they are quite difficult to find. At least the nonpolitical ones. So naturally one must settle for the political ones, for which Buckley is pretty famous. And so this is a story of a pompous self important wealthy and well connected Princeton educated Washington pundit whose life gets turned upside down when he experiences an alien abduction, and then another one. Ripping into the stupidity/gullibility of the general population and the confused, obfuscating ways of the government Buckley gets a lot of mileage out of a fun idea that goes a long way to explain all manner of extraterrestrial existence. Published in 1998, it reads straight out of the 80s, and there aren't many particularly likeable characters, but it's entertaining enough to pass the time, though it doesn't even come near Buckley's latest, the very awesome Relic Master. Then again, I find medieval history infinitely more interesting than (semi)modern politics, so it's all a matter of personal preference. Fun light read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Topolovec

    Satires usually stretch the truth, but I'm confident that if a respected public figure told the world aliens were real, this is exactly how it would play out.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mal Warwick

    Ever Wondered Where UFOs Come From? Christopher Buckley Solves the Mystery Perhaps it requires a rarefied sense of humor to appreciate Christopher Buckley, but you wouldn’t know it from the sales figures on his books. Anyone who can write a book with endlessly eccentric characters named Sir Reginald Pigg-Vigorish, Col. Roscoe J. Murfletit, General Tunklebunker, and Deputy FBI Director Bargenberfer may be reaching the pre-adolescent in me, but he makes me laugh, dammit, and I’m not going to apolo Ever Wondered Where UFOs Come From? Christopher Buckley Solves the Mystery Perhaps it requires a rarefied sense of humor to appreciate Christopher Buckley, but you wouldn’t know it from the sales figures on his books. Anyone who can write a book with endlessly eccentric characters named Sir Reginald Pigg-Vigorish, Col. Roscoe J. Murfletit, General Tunklebunker, and Deputy FBI Director Bargenberfer may be reaching the pre-adolescent in me, but he makes me laugh, dammit, and I’m not going to apologize for it, so there! In Little Green Men, not only does Buckley make me chuckle and wheeze with immoderate glee, but he also solves the mystery of the UFOs! Could anyone possibly wish for more? Like so many of Buckley’s satirical novels, Little Green Men tells the story of a hapless (though in this case willing) victim of the absurd circumstances surrounding him — circumstances caused in large part by a witless supporting cast with names such as those listed in the opening paragraph of this review. Buckley’s antihero here is John Oliver Banion, a pompous Sunday-morning public affairs television talk show host with a pedigree that looks just a little bit like Christopher Buckley’s (including Yale, of course!). In fact, Buckley is never better than when skewering People Like Us, and he does it with such skill that I can almost imagine him cackling in the background as he types away. One fine day John O. Banion is slicing into the rough on his exclusive country club golf course when he is abducted and “probed” by aliens — not Little Green Men, actually, but silver ones whom UFO taxonomists call Tall Nordics. The action that radiates from this inexplicable event is far too complicated, and far too unlikely — not to mention funny — to sum up, so I’ll leave it to you when you read this beautifully crafted little book. Little Green Men is the fourth of the nine satirical novels Christopher Buckley has published since 1986. I’ve read most of them and reviewed two of them here: The White House Mess and They Eat Puppies, Don’t They? I also found Boomsday and Supreme Courtship hilarious, though I read them before joining Goodreads.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Christopher Buckley scares me a lot. Not only is he a Washington insider, he's the son of a respected writer. So this stuff could all be real. And if it is, we're hosed. Another excellent book from Buckley, this one concerning UFOs, aliens, and government conspiracy. I found this to be laugh out loud funny. FAR funnier than "Thank You For Smoking" or "Florence of Arabia", I think I'll be doing my star-gazing from inside hereafter. An excellent filleting of Sunday news shows, presidential elections, Christopher Buckley scares me a lot. Not only is he a Washington insider, he's the son of a respected writer. So this stuff could all be real. And if it is, we're hosed. Another excellent book from Buckley, this one concerning UFOs, aliens, and government conspiracy. I found this to be laugh out loud funny. FAR funnier than "Thank You For Smoking" or "Florence of Arabia", I think I'll be doing my star-gazing from inside hereafter. An excellent filleting of Sunday news shows, presidential elections, and space programs. You may consider this a three and a half star review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

    4.5 Christopher Buckley is another new writer to my library and I have to thank the film Thankyou for Smoking as the reasoning, without the library having at least one book by Buckley I wouldn't have chanced this book. Little Green Men is quite a fun and weird concept, but when you view the books of Buckley, you tend to see a satire pattern growing. I enjoyed the book and consumed it in my regular binge style on the train, unlike the slower paced books I come across. The characters are interestin 4.5 Christopher Buckley is another new writer to my library and I have to thank the film Thankyou for Smoking as the reasoning, without the library having at least one book by Buckley I wouldn't have chanced this book. Little Green Men is quite a fun and weird concept, but when you view the books of Buckley, you tend to see a satire pattern growing. I enjoyed the book and consumed it in my regular binge style on the train, unlike the slower paced books I come across. The characters are interesting and when you have a politically humorous focused novel, the characters need to be carefully constructed. Buckley has a lot of fun with his characters and the more outlandish the plot development, the more the characters played well together. The straight laced nature of the characters is the best part of the book. When Banion suffers the humiliating abduction and goes on a crusade, you can really see someone taking such a detour and jumping into the world of alien abductions. The plot device is quite different and tends to tilt to the bizarre. The concept is quite simplistic but the turn of events didn't fit any storytelling model I was expecting. I can see why writers have attempted to adapt this for film. When a film like Thankyou for Smoking exists, Little Green Men could exist as well. The clever story beats allow this film to bounce around and just when you think this is heading into cliché storytelling, it takes another path. I was pleasantly surprised by the plotting of this novel. Why the 4.5? Little Green Men wasn't the home run I wanted by the end. Yes, it was great and had a lot of fun along the way, but I felt the conclusion lingered for too long. There could have been a better ending and I was a little underwhelmed by the wrap up. I'm interested to check out more of Buckley's books and I have already asked the library to hunt down another. I don't expect to visit Buckley again during 2019, but I have enough faith the remaining books he has authored carry the same enthusiasm and rich satire within.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Tyler

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to satire modern politics as the reality is a depressing joke enough. If you think the UK has it bad, that is nothing compared to the two party lobby based system in American that is riper for corruption than a PC still running Windows 95. Christopher Buckley is an author who specialises in exploring political and corporate corruption in a slightly off centre fashion. ‘Little Green Men’ is a great example of this – the book explores the relationship between It is becoming increasingly difficult to satire modern politics as the reality is a depressing joke enough. If you think the UK has it bad, that is nothing compared to the two party lobby based system in American that is riper for corruption than a PC still running Windows 95. Christopher Buckley is an author who specialises in exploring political and corporate corruption in a slightly off centre fashion. ‘Little Green Men’ is a great example of this – the book explores the relationship between the government and the media, but also the government and its people. You may think that it is all about The Executive keeping their knowledge of aliens hidden, but Buckley is a far savvier author than that and suggests perhaps that there are conspiracies wrapped in conspiracies. When leading political TV personality John O. Banion is kidnapped by aliens he decides to turn his powerful investigative lens on little green men. The government are not too bothered by this, but Banion in a terrier and he is close to learning the truth. Buckley manages to produce a book that belittles almost every sphere of American life from the rich to the poor. In fact, the book at times is almost too cynical as no one is pleasant. It even takes almost the entire book for Banion to become a person you can actually like. ‘Little Green Men’ is the type of biting satire that feasts on the hand of the reader. Buckley’s cynical viewpoint means that some of the more interesting ideas in the book are left slightly unpalatable as they are told to us by characters we do not like. It was also difficult at times to understand the complexities of the US political system and only my degree level understanding helped me to wade through some more of the US-centric language and institutions. Despite the layers of complexity between the reader and the meat of the book, the ideas on offer are very interesting and fun to read. A little more cheer and slightly less sneer would have pushed this book even higher.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    My favorite thing about this book is how tight it is. There's no fluff, just three hundred pages of clever, well paced chaos. It's a silly book about small mistakes (delightfully) escalating into major problems. It's a fun read; you'll finish it in a week. Definitely recommended.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Evren

    Very enjoyable read. Thanks to my cousin for passing this along. 🤗

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Up to this summer, I had read exactly two novels by the master political satirist Christopher Buckley -- his first, Thank You for Smoking, and his latest, The Relic Master -- and they both ended up being so brilliant that I decided that I should probably take the time to read the six other novels he wrote (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted illegally.) Up to this summer, I had read exactly two novels by the master political satirist Christopher Buckley -- his first, Thank You for Smoking, and his latest, The Relic Master -- and they both ended up being so brilliant that I decided that I should probably take the time to read the six other novels he wrote between these two. I just finished the first of that series, which I'm taking on in chronological order, Little Green Men which in this case came out in 1999, three years after Thank You for Smoking; but it unfortunately turned out to be a disappointment compared to the other two. See, while his first novel had such an outrageous concept that it made it easy to picture it actually coming to life (a lobbyist for the tobacco industry has a nervous breakdown, decides his industry should actively embrace the most demonic aspects of their trade, and ends up becoming hugely successful because of it), always the sign of a truly great political satire, in Little Green Men the central concept is only outrageous enough to have inspired a lot of eye-rolling while I was reading it, which made it not nearly as enjoyable an experience. (The idea basically is that the CIA has been the cause of every single UFO sighting since Roswell, originally done as a dirty-trick psych-op to make Stalin paranoid, then continued as a way of assuring big budgets for the military and NASA; after a low-level agent in this shadow department gets passed for a promotion, he drunkenly one night targets a George-Will-type intellectual conservative talk-show host as the newest victim of an "abduction," and his credentials-backed story inspires millions of "millennial-anxious" fellow believers to follow him as the leader of a new cult.) It's a funny book, make no mistake, with great little moments of pitch-black hilarity and intelligence sprinkled throughout; but it takes a whole lot more suspension of disbelief to picture the ultra-zany plotline actually happening, features weaker characters than in the other two books of his I've read (the love interest invented for our hero is an especially wincing one, in this "white-male political-satirist nerds should never write romantic subplots" kind of way), plus is just a subject that feels like a lot of deliberate machinations went into Buckley choosing it to write about in the first place. (He keeps quoting a statistic throughout the book that showed, as of the late 1990s, supposedly a whopping 80 percent of Americans believed that alien life exists, and this entire novel many times feels like that Buckley randomly came across that poll one day and thought, "Now, how do I build a 300-page story around that fact?") And this of course is always a big danger with satirists as well; that after an accidentally great first novel, their attempts at catching lightning in a bottle again always result in more and more diminishing returns, as the labor they put into finding a good subject for satirizing becomes plainer and plainer to see. I've got a bit of a happy spoiler going for me in this case -- I know that his latest novel from 2016 is truly great, so I can rest assured that the books before that at least aren't going to bottom out into unreadability -- but certainly when I take on his next novel in this series, 2002's No Way to Treat a First Lady (in which a Hillary-Clinton-like character catches her President husband cheating on her, and accidentally kills him inside the White House while whipping an antique spittoon at his head in anger), I'll be going into it with my expectations not set as high this time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tung

    The story focuses on John O Banion, the host of the it Sunday morning political talk show, and what happens to his life when he is abducted by aliens (actually not real aliens, but rather MJ-12, the covert US government department charged with fabricating the entire UFO phenomenon in order to increase military funding). The story is really about a man’s reaction to discovering “truth”, and what he will risk (his comfortable life) in order to spread that truth. Overall, a quick read with one recu The story focuses on John O Banion, the host of the it Sunday morning political talk show, and what happens to his life when he is abducted by aliens (actually not real aliens, but rather MJ-12, the covert US government department charged with fabricating the entire UFO phenomenon in order to increase military funding). The story is really about a man’s reaction to discovering “truth”, and what he will risk (his comfortable life) in order to spread that truth. Overall, a quick read with one recurring annoyance: Buckley’s snarky one-liners meant to bring a chuckle to the lips of the intelligentsia. Some samples: “Many WASPs are reluctant to throw things [after a fight] for fear of having to explain afterward to the insurance company” or “His office was located here [in the basement of the Social Security Administration] on the theory that no congressional investigator ever dared look into Social Security” or “You *&%$ WASPs! You get a babe like this in a hotel room and say to yourself, Oo, how romantic not to *%%$ her.” I imagine such barbs to be written while the author is smoking a pipe and sipping on a dry martini. Bon mot! Bon mot! That mot is so bon! Those who like to feel smart and clever might enjoy feeling smart and clever reading this one; those who have experienced the Beltway life might also appreciate his quips. For me, I tired after the first several dozen zings. The other annoyance is that the book feels rushed at the end, and the finale wraps up rather quickly in just a few pages. Still an entertaining read. I’m astonished this hasn’t already been turned into a feature film as the characters, climactic situation, and conspiracy theory plot seem made for an adaptation.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I like satire (A Modest Proposal is one of my favorite stories), but this one wasn't sharp enough for me. This may be partly because it was written in the late 1990s and hasn't aged well (I'm not sufficiently versed in what insider Washington was like in the late 90s to know if it would have been substantially more on point then). Basically, the government invented UFOs and aliens to confuse the USSR and China, and a secret government agency has continued to keep aliens relevant with more and mo I like satire (A Modest Proposal is one of my favorite stories), but this one wasn't sharp enough for me. This may be partly because it was written in the late 1990s and hasn't aged well (I'm not sufficiently versed in what insider Washington was like in the late 90s to know if it would have been substantially more on point then). Basically, the government invented UFOs and aliens to confuse the USSR and China, and a secret government agency has continued to keep aliens relevant with more and more outrageous activities (now including alien abductions and probing). A minor player in this agency is denied a promotion, feels badly treated, and works the bureaucracy so that a major network news host is kidnapped by "aliens." This knocks the DC establishment out of kilter. More than anything, this book disappointed me because it took little jabs at seemingly every bit of DC inside baseball the author was acquainted with rather than focusing in on the most scorn-worthy portions of our body politic and relentlessly critiquing those with satire. This, along with several lines the author came back to over and over (e.g., polls say 80% of Americans believe in UFOs), made the writing seem sloppy, or maybe not well edited. I tolerated this book, but I think I may have enjoyed it if the author made the same points in around 20% less space by taking out everything that wasn't part of his most important critiques of US politics.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kyle O'Connell

    Wow I just CONSUMED this book. This book was a burger and fries and apparently I was starving. In the week that I read this I was enraptured by Buckley’s engaging, deep, hilarious, and varied characters and caricatures of the political elite. Even for someone like me who knows little to nothing of the goings-on in DC I found all of his jokes and general satire to be spot on. Loved loved loved this book, incredibly entertaining. Please read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    ashley kara

    A fun read.....Christopher Buckley doesn't disappoint.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lilly

    This is pitch-perfect satire. My dad had recommended this to me a long time ago and I put off reading it, but once I was in, I was immersed. Such a fun, different read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heath Vogel

    Grade: D+ Synopsis: This is the story of a resolute right-wing television news commentator who is ‘abducted by aliens’ twice. As one might expect, he responds to the first abduction with tight-lipped denial, but responds to the second abduction with unbridled acceptance. The protagonist then becomes willing to reduce his celebrity life to rubble to find the truth about alien abductions. This leads into Part 2, where the author explores the bureaucratic red flags that are raised when a renowned med Grade: D+ Synopsis: This is the story of a resolute right-wing television news commentator who is ‘abducted by aliens’ twice. As one might expect, he responds to the first abduction with tight-lipped denial, but responds to the second abduction with unbridled acceptance. The protagonist then becomes willing to reduce his celebrity life to rubble to find the truth about alien abductions. This leads into Part 2, where the author explores the bureaucratic red flags that are raised when a renowned media figure tries to spread ‘fantastic’ ideas to the public and how the protagonist deals with them in his quest for honest answers. Positive: I feel that this author did well covering the intricacies of the subject, in that, there are only a few inconsistencies in the plot. The main character had some likable personality traits hidden beneath his abrasive exterior, and the rest of the cast supplemented the story well. Parts of the book are undeniably well-written; enough to keep the reader engaged throughout. The author had plenty of fun with the subject matter, which is important for both the reader and the author alike. Negative: The punchlines of most of the jokes become predictable and stale by Part 2. Never did I feel that the author allowed himself to follow the train of thought that aliens could actually exist, and the protagonist reflected it; the main character’s stance seemed veiled by superficiality. Overall, I felt that the plot was unsatisfying. Most of the characters lacked spontaneity (and most other components of the Human Element) and seemed more like placeholders to keep the plot in motion than personalities to which the reader could identify. My honest opinion: Aside from some minor twists, this book is exactly what I thought it would be. I’m really not sure why I continued reading it. Mostly, I wanted to know what would happen if someone like Bill O’Reilly was ‘raped by aliens’, I guess. Now that I’ve said that out loud, I think I might be a twisted son of a bitch. My favorite new word: Mammon (n.) - the personification of wealth and avarice as an evil spirit (from Wordnik / Wiktionary) My favorite quotation: “Doesn’t anyone have imagination enough not to believe in something?” #ThoughtProvoking My least favorite quotation: “Around them, scattered like masticated hamster bedding material, newspapers were piled and strewn.” #PoorWriting Further reading: Mahatma Gandhi (http://www.mkgandhi.org/bk123.htm)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    "Little Green Men" is a text I was ready to love. Although it begins quite nicely, the book limps to its tepid conclusion leaving the reader feeling like so much more could have been done with this very intriguing premise. Mr. Buckley is a witty, and at times, funny writer, but this novel seems to be among his minor achievements. This frustrated me even more as its premise is one of his more promising. One of this text's major flaws is its plodding conclusion. The last two chapters of the book an "Little Green Men" is a text I was ready to love. Although it begins quite nicely, the book limps to its tepid conclusion leaving the reader feeling like so much more could have been done with this very intriguing premise. Mr. Buckley is a witty, and at times, funny writer, but this novel seems to be among his minor achievements. This frustrated me even more as its premise is one of his more promising. One of this text's major flaws is its plodding conclusion. The last two chapters of the book and its epilogue kill the fast paced, and clever, romp of nineteen chapters that preceded it. Another major flaw is that Mr. Buckley inserts some caricature and half drawn characters into key plot roles. These characters come and go in the plot with little or no explanation, and the character of Roz is so unbelievably written that she detracts from the novel whenever she appears. Having said that, it is not the worse thing you could read, and Buckley is more entertaining then many other writers. He is still one of the best Washington DC satirists out there, and if you are not overly familiar with his others works, then you will be plenty satisfied by this one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    Buckley's premise: Uncle Sam benefits by the proletariat believing in aliens - citizens will vote for funding for defence and space exploration - and it'll have the additional benefit of scaring the Russians into thinking we carry a secret knowledge. However, the tabloid-reading-public are not long wooed by a random UFO sighting, so the super-secret gov agency set up to handle alien affairs begins to specialize in crop circles, cattle multilation, and eventually human abduction...to escalating r Buckley's premise: Uncle Sam benefits by the proletariat believing in aliens - citizens will vote for funding for defence and space exploration - and it'll have the additional benefit of scaring the Russians into thinking we carry a secret knowledge. However, the tabloid-reading-public are not long wooed by a random UFO sighting, so the super-secret gov agency set up to handle alien affairs begins to specialize in crop circles, cattle multilation, and eventually human abduction...to escalating ramifications. Sounds funny, no? Well, there are parts that are terrific, but overall the plot is as flimsy as a house of cards. Randomly a disillusioned gov employee targets a highly visual talkshow host for alien abduction?? Twice?? This talkshow host happens to be nothing more than a rather boring smoothe talker who likes pretty women and who is surrounded by a series of painfully stereotypical characters pulled right out of Humor 101. Unlike the best of Hiaasen's or Barry's or Moore's books you don't even get a crotchety old bugger for which to cheer, and instead are left to plow through the book w/ a notably unbated breath.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bales

    Political satire is not my usual cup of tea but I did enjoy reading this book. I liked the main character, Jon O'Banion. Even when faced with the most remarkably ridiculous situations, he seems to muddle through and always insists on standing behind what he believes to be the truth no matter the personal cost. By the end of the story, he seems to have discovered that there are better things to life than being on the "A list".

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Great story idea, came across like a shorter, paranoid, conspiracy filled Bonfire of the Vanities. Even with the helpful translations into normal English, a lot of the references left me feeling cold, maybe as I had little understanding of North American pop culture in the late millenium. Thought the ending was a little anticlimatic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pat Harris

    I had just finished Phantom and knew that I needed to absorb the book so turned to a lighter, humerous read. Christopher Buckley fills that need for me. Not his best but I often smiled during the reading so it accomplished its purpose.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pito Salas

    A fun, light, funny novel. I was thinking that there aren't a lot of fiction writers who write books that are funny. This is one. I will read more books by this author.!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Latharia

    From the same author as "Thank You For Smoking," this amusing modern-day romp uses satire & wit to move the story along. I enjoyed it, and may seek out other titles from this author in future.

  23. 5 out of 5

    K.A. Ashcomb

    This was my first introduction to Christopher Buckley's political satires. I had heard good things about his writing, and I didn't have an excuse not to read the Little Green Men I had bought two months ago. So, I dived into the book about little green men (no surprise there; the proof is in the title) and American politics. Little green men always get me excited, so much my husband says I have an unhealthy obsession. And like with the monsters I root for the little buggers. I'm the first one to This was my first introduction to Christopher Buckley's political satires. I had heard good things about his writing, and I didn't have an excuse not to read the Little Green Men I had bought two months ago. So, I dived into the book about little green men (no surprise there; the proof is in the title) and American politics. Little green men always get me excited, so much my husband says I have an unhealthy obsession. And like with the monsters I root for the little buggers. I'm the first one to open the doors for them to destroy the world, advertise the free open space in my head for their slugs to nestle in with their patios and swimming pools, but where I draw my line is abductions and probing. That is just weird guys! Now you know where I stand and my dirty secrets are out, we can move on to the actual review. Buckley's Little Green Men was about abductions and invasive probing, but we can only blame ourselves about that, in so many twisted levels I would need a shrink to recuperate. Anyway, I had ambivalent thoughts about this book. There was only one relatable character, and he got more space in the middle of the book. The beginning was too slow, and the political picture and its relation to the main character could have been done quicker and without repetition. Middle being the strongest part of the book is an odd problem to have. Usually, it is the other way around. One major beef I had with the book was its footnotes. They drove me crazy. I hated that they explained open jokes and references. I think he should have left such things for the reader to look up if they wanted to. I couldn't just skip them as I'm a completionist. Any unread footnotes and half-finished books haunt me. The thought I don't know what was said causes me to spiral into the madness of consoling myself with chocolate from white to dark. Back to the point. I'm not sure how the book fits into Buckley's other books. This was a bit of a disappointment as I had high expectations. I know I give him another chance and Little Green Men wasn't bad. I know I have been bashing the book more than I have said good things about it, there were bits I enjoyed and a lot, and I don't regret picking up the book and owning it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Anne

    The blurb: "The reluctant hero of this hilarious novel is John Oliver Banion, a stuffy Washington talk-show host, whose privileged life is thrown into upheaval when aliens abduct him from his exclusive country-club golf course. But were his gray-skinned captors aliens...or something more sinister? After Banion is abducted again -- this time in Palm Springs -- he believes he has been chosen by the extraterrestrials to champion the most important cause of the millennium, and he embarks on a crusade The blurb: "The reluctant hero of this hilarious novel is John Oliver Banion, a stuffy Washington talk-show host, whose privileged life is thrown into upheaval when aliens abduct him from his exclusive country-club golf course. But were his gray-skinned captors aliens...or something more sinister? After Banion is abducted again -- this time in Palm Springs -- he believes he has been chosen by the extraterrestrials to champion the most important cause of the millennium, and he embarks on a crusade, appearing before a convention of UFO believers and demanding that Congress and the White House seriously investigate UFOs. His friends and family suspect that Banion is having some kind of manic-depressive midlife crisis and urge him to seek therapy before his credibility as a pillar of the punditocracy is ruined. So John Oliver Banion must choose: keep his establishment status or become the leader of millions of impassioned and somewhat scruffy new friends who want to expose the government's secret alien agenda. 'Little Green Men' proves once and for all that the truth is out there. Way out there. And it reaffirms Christopher Buckley's status as the funniest humanoid writer in the universe." ----- I don't think I've lost my sense of humor, but quite frankly, I did't find this book funny -- not terribly amusing at that, unless you chuckle about characters named "Dr. Falopian" (a lot of effort was put into creating such names for the characters). For me to find a book funny, it has to make me laugh, and I was pretty disappointed that I didn't, not even once. It's very rare that I put a book down without finishing it, yet I was tempted to do so several times; I kept reading in the hope that the plot would turn in a way that would make the whole story arc humorous. It didn't. [In comparison, I found Christopher Moore's "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal" hilarious. When my daughter recommended it, she cautioned me not to read it in public because people would think me bonkers for laughing out loud, and she was right -- I did laugh out loud, a lot, and got a lot of strange looks from fellow subway riders, and that's saying something.]

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Langert

    Christopher Buckley is a very clever satirist, who has proven in this book that he can tell an entertaining tale about just about anything. Published in 1999, this book is about whether and how aliens and UFOs are present and posing a threat to people in America. The protagonist in this book is one John Oliver Banion. Banion is an Ivy League-educated Sunday morning TV show host, with a show that attracts top political guests and achieves very high ratings. Until he gets all wrapped up in the subj Christopher Buckley is a very clever satirist, who has proven in this book that he can tell an entertaining tale about just about anything. Published in 1999, this book is about whether and how aliens and UFOs are present and posing a threat to people in America. The protagonist in this book is one John Oliver Banion. Banion is an Ivy League-educated Sunday morning TV show host, with a show that attracts top political guests and achieves very high ratings. Until he gets all wrapped up in the subject of aliens and UFOs. The book pokes fun at government waste and bureaucracy. The crazy tale of how Banion gives up everything to get the truth out on UFOs does drag on at times, but the book definitely has its moments. The fact that it was written in 1999 hurts it reading it today (2017) as many of the references are dated and don't stand he test of time. A good, not great, entertaining book written by a brilliant and witty guy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marc Gerstein

    As he usually does so well, Christopher Buckley skewers the political scene with his biting satire. This time, he focuses on the space program, which needs to drum up support for funding by convincing people, or at least the tin-foil hat crowd, that they are being abducted by aliens and bodily probed. But the noise they make is being drowned out by an enormously popular commentator with a highly-ranked political show, who thinks spending on space is wasteful and says so loudly. What to do, what As he usually does so well, Christopher Buckley skewers the political scene with his biting satire. This time, he focuses on the space program, which needs to drum up support for funding by convincing people, or at least the tin-foil hat crowd, that they are being abducted by aliens and bodily probed. But the noise they make is being drowned out by an enormously popular commentator with a highly-ranked political show, who thinks spending on space is wasteful and says so loudly. What to do, what to do . . . Let’s just say Buckley offers his own take on public relations persuasion. This didn’t strike me as Buckley’s very best work, but it’s still buckley and that’s pretty darn good.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sullyaugustine

    4 stars out of 5 - I read this over the past couple of evenings. If you've never read one of Christopher Buckley's books this is a good one to start with. It all begins when a drunk government agent, in his cups because he has been repeatedly denied a transfer to a more interesting job, arranges for a television talk show host to be abducted by "aliens" and subjected to various procedures the abductee community has come to associate with the experience. . . If it fails to make you laugh out loud 4 stars out of 5 - I read this over the past couple of evenings. If you've never read one of Christopher Buckley's books this is a good one to start with. It all begins when a drunk government agent, in his cups because he has been repeatedly denied a transfer to a more interesting job, arranges for a television talk show host to be abducted by "aliens" and subjected to various procedures the abductee community has come to associate with the experience. . . If it fails to make you laugh out loud at least every few pages you haven't watched enough talk TV, listened to enough talk radio, or read enough about conspiracy theories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mary C. Ward

    A thinking person's amusement Christopher Buckley has again written an imaginative and delightful entertainment, this time about UFOs and government conspiracies. His lighthearted style enhances the amusement and his well-crafted sentences support a carefully plotted story. He and his copy editors might shudder at some of the obviously typographical errors in grammar and punctuation so sadly common in e-books today. Buckley's books don't repeat themselves but they continue to vivify a unique sati A thinking person's amusement Christopher Buckley has again written an imaginative and delightful entertainment, this time about UFOs and government conspiracies. His lighthearted style enhances the amusement and his well-crafted sentences support a carefully plotted story. He and his copy editors might shudder at some of the obviously typographical errors in grammar and punctuation so sadly common in e-books today. Buckley's books don't repeat themselves but they continue to vivify a unique satiric niche.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The book has its heart in the right place by in the words of Maxwell Smart "Missed it by that much" It sputters repeatedly, the footnotes often insult the reader(NORAD? Really?) and the romance seems artificially tacked on. Not to mention none of the characters are someone you'd root for, why the author thought you'd root for the young version of his own father is beyond me. It has moments, some of the jokes land, you WANT to like it, but at the end you're left with, "I read a book, I should fin The book has its heart in the right place by in the words of Maxwell Smart "Missed it by that much" It sputters repeatedly, the footnotes often insult the reader(NORAD? Really?) and the romance seems artificially tacked on. Not to mention none of the characters are someone you'd root for, why the author thought you'd root for the young version of his own father is beyond me. It has moments, some of the jokes land, you WANT to like it, but at the end you're left with, "I read a book, I should find something else now"

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter Herrmann

    I've enjoyed all other books of Buckley that I've read (except 'The White House Mess'), but not this. But the problem here is definitely mine, not his. This one up to his prior high standards. But now, 2018, with the White House in the hands of a likely dictator (stay tuned ... I think the odds are higher than 50% that it will actually happen), I can find nothing funny in political satire of any kind any longer. This book is dated ... which I could overlook if the political climate were differen I've enjoyed all other books of Buckley that I've read (except 'The White House Mess'), but not this. But the problem here is definitely mine, not his. This one up to his prior high standards. But now, 2018, with the White House in the hands of a likely dictator (stay tuned ... I think the odds are higher than 50% that it will actually happen), I can find nothing funny in political satire of any kind any longer. This book is dated ... which I could overlook if the political climate were different than what it now is. I had to stop reading this about 1/4 through.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.