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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow [NOOK eBook classic]

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Since this story's first appearance in 1820, generations of readers, young and old, have thrilled to the headless horseman galloping through the haunted woods of Sleepy Hollow. The rollicking tale of Ichabod Crane and his ill-fated courtship of Katrina Van Tassel has proven irresistible to illustrators. Now Michael Garland brings his trademark realism to this immortal clas Since this story's first appearance in 1820, generations of readers, young and old, have thrilled to the headless horseman galloping through the haunted woods of Sleepy Hollow. The rollicking tale of Ichabod Crane and his ill-fated courtship of Katrina Van Tassel has proven irresistible to illustrators. Now Michael Garland brings his trademark realism to this immortal classic with paintings that are as crisp and clear as a Halloween night in Sleepy Hollow. NOOK eBook classics with optimized navigation and full text search.


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Since this story's first appearance in 1820, generations of readers, young and old, have thrilled to the headless horseman galloping through the haunted woods of Sleepy Hollow. The rollicking tale of Ichabod Crane and his ill-fated courtship of Katrina Van Tassel has proven irresistible to illustrators. Now Michael Garland brings his trademark realism to this immortal clas Since this story's first appearance in 1820, generations of readers, young and old, have thrilled to the headless horseman galloping through the haunted woods of Sleepy Hollow. The rollicking tale of Ichabod Crane and his ill-fated courtship of Katrina Van Tassel has proven irresistible to illustrators. Now Michael Garland brings his trademark realism to this immortal classic with paintings that are as crisp and clear as a Halloween night in Sleepy Hollow. NOOK eBook classics with optimized navigation and full text search.

30 review for The Legend of Sleepy Hollow [NOOK eBook classic]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Hailey (Hailey in Bookland)

    Such heavy description, but still a good Halloween classic!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    “I recollect that, when a stripling, my first exploit in squirrel-shooting was in a grove of tall walnut-trees that shades one side of the valley. I had wandered into it at noon time, when all nature is peculiarly quiet, and was startled by the roar of my own gun, as it broke the Sabbath stillness around, and was prolonged and reverberated by the angry echoes. If ever I should wish for a retreat, whither I might steal from the world and its distractions, and dream quietly away the remnant of a t “I recollect that, when a stripling, my first exploit in squirrel-shooting was in a grove of tall walnut-trees that shades one side of the valley. I had wandered into it at noon time, when all nature is peculiarly quiet, and was startled by the roar of my own gun, as it broke the Sabbath stillness around, and was prolonged and reverberated by the angry echoes. If ever I should wish for a retreat, whither I might steal from the world and its distractions, and dream quietly away the remnant of a troubled life, I know of none more promising than this little valley…From the listless repose of the place, and the peculiar character of its inhabitants, who are descendants from the original Dutch settlers, this sequestered glen has long been known by the name of SLEEPY HOLLOW…” - Washington Irving, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow Pull up a chair and have seat. Do you want a drink? Please, I insist. I’ve been drinking for hours. As you can see, I have a fire going in the fireplace, to ward off the chill of a winter you can already sense around the corner. It is dark outside the window. The nights come fast as the days shorten. The wind is howling. That is the wind – right? Its shriek sounds almost alive, almost human. Here, have another drink. Scoot closer to the fire. I want to tell you a terrifying story. The 2016 election cycle. Wake up. Are you okay? You lost consciousness and fell out of your chair. No, I didn't rifle through your pockets. No, you aren't missing a ten-dollar bill. Moving on. I probably should have given you more warning, since the political theater we have experienced these past months (years?) has filled me with more dread than anything Stephen King could ever conjure. Just recently, I attempted to watch the evening news, which is silly, I know, but I am old fashioned in some ways. Specifically, I like it when someone tells me the weather; it makes me feel someone is accountable. With the exception of a couple Viagra commercials, dispiriting in and of themselves, every commercial was a political ad. They were run in sequence, the first candidate calling the second candidate a tax-lover, followed by the second calling the first a terrorist-lover, and then circling back to the first calling the second a liar. Since I live near the border of two states, my misery is compounded. Strikingly, not a single advertisement referenced any positive position statement. It was all grossly negative hyperbolic attacks. If you were to get all your political information from watching the ads sandwiching the evening newscast, you would come to a shocking revelation. Everyone running for elected office this year is in cahoots with ISIS! My advice. Take a break. Take a drink. (There are so many things to mix Baileys with). Read a book. Better yet, read a seasonal book, one that puts you in the mood for the finer things of fall. Forget about politics. It’s time to focus on pumpkin pie, pumpkin bread, and pumpkin beer. It’s time to read – or in my case reread – Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Irving’s short story is familiar to most. Even if you’ve never read it, you’ve probably consumed some of it by cultural osmosis. It concerns a love triangle between itinerant school teacher Ichabod Crane; the lovely Katrina van Tassel, daughter of a wealthy planter; and local big-man-on-campus Brom van Brunt, who goes by the baller nickname of Bram Bones. The setting is rural New York State, in the years following the American Revolution. The exact year is unclear, though I’ve seen it placed in the 1790s. Ichabod, a striving pedagogue with a taste for the high life, has come to teach in “the drowsy shades of Sleepy Hollow.” As drawn by Irving, Crane is a memorably awkward figure. He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weathercock perched upon his spindle neck, to tell which way the wind blew. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield. This sketch gives you a good idea of Irving’s excellent powers of description. He masterfully renders his setting. The farms, the forests, the babbling brooks, are all made vivid in your imagination. The “great fields of Indian corn,” the “golden ears peeking from leafy coverts.” A sloop “loitering” on the river, “dropping slowly down with the tide, her sail hanging uselessly against the mast.” The hues of the forest in “their sober brown and yellow…some trees of the tenderer kind…nipped by the frost into brilliant dyes of orange, purple, and scarlet.” Irving paints this beauty with color and detail, with sound and scent. Imbedded in these descriptions is a sense of the vastness of the wilderness, and how its trackless depth gave rise to superstitions, to tales of spooks and goblins and galloping Hessians lacking heads. The dominant spirit…that haunts this enchanted region…is the apparition of a figure on horseback without a head. It is said by some to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper, whose head has been carried away by a cannon-ball, in some nameless battle during the revolutionary war; and who is ever and anon seen by the country folk, hurrying along in the gloom of night, as if on the wings of the wind. File Photo: The Headless Horseman, as captured in this undated photo that was definitely not taken in my front yard, but rather in Sleepy Hollow This is not a scary story. It only borders on the spooky. The achievement of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is in its near-perfect atmospherics. Irving delivers Sleepy Hollow in all its rustic glory: the sweep of her fields; the wend of her roads; the beliefs of her people. And the food! Oh, the descriptions of the food! Fain would I pause to dwell upon the world of charms that burst upon the enraptured gaze of my hero, as he entered the state parlour of Van Tassel’s mansion. Not these of the bevy of lasses…but the ample charms of a genuine Dutch country tea-table, in the sumptuous time of autumn. Such heaped-up platters of cakes of various and almost indescribable kinds, known only to experienced Dutch housewives! There was the doughy dough-nut, the tenderer oly koek, and the crisp and crumbling cruller; sweet cakes and short cakes, ginger cakes and honey cakes, and the whole family of cakes. And then there were apple pies, and peach pies, and pumpkin pies; besides slices of ham and smoked beef; and moreover delectable dishes of preserved plums, and peaches, and pears, and quinces; not to mention broiled shad and roasted chickens…Heaven bless the mark! I want breath and time to discuss this banquet as it deserves, and am too eager to get on with my story. Happily, Ichabod Crane was not in so great a hurry as his historian, but did ample justice to every dainty. You just gained five pounds reading that. I probably should have warned you. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow has become a timeless American classic since its publication in 1820. It has been adapted (often terribly) into plays, musicals, cartoons, movies, and television shows. The original remains deceptively simple, a good-naturedly mythologized vision of pastoral America. In a few short pages, it wonderfully evokes a time, a place, and a season. Year after year, it never fails to inject me with the spirit of the fall. It leaves me with comforting visions of turning leaves, sharpening weather, roaring fires, hot drinks, and warm pies. Right now, that is exactly the type of escape I need.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    What?! All this time I was feeling sorry for him and it turns out Ichabod Crane was a douchebag! Ok, this is my first time hearing the actual short story. So, I've been going off of movies and cartoons as my reference to what The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow was all about. And if you haven't read it, you may have some of the same preconceived notions that I did. Stop me if this doesn't sound familiar... Poor awkward Ichabod falls in love with the town beauty and she (because women are saints) likes hi What?! All this time I was feeling sorry for him and it turns out Ichabod Crane was a douchebag! Ok, this is my first time hearing the actual short story. So, I've been going off of movies and cartoons as my reference to what The Legend Of Sleepy Hollow was all about. And if you haven't read it, you may have some of the same preconceived notions that I did. Stop me if this doesn't sound familiar... Poor awkward Ichabod falls in love with the town beauty and she (because women are saints) likes him back. The evil bully, who also wants the girl, viciously drives Crane out of town by using The Headless Horseman story. Whether or not the Horseman got him or he just ran away is up for grabs. The End. Well. Boy, was I in for the shock of my life. Turns out, sweet old Ichabod was only really interested in the girl because her father was wealthy! And the evil bully was more of a rowdy prankster who didn't want Crane moving in on the girl he was already courting. <--getthefuckoutofhereIchabod! Oh, and the story makes it pretty obvious that Crane just shit his pants and ran off at the end, so there's no real wondering about whether or not the Headless Horseman got hold of him. Which was fine by me. I'm glad he's not dead, but I'm also glad the greedy little fucker didn't get his hands on any of that money. Brom deserved to chuckle his way down the aisle while thinking about the mysterious pumpkin found by the river. Anyway, here's what I took away from this experience: If a character is gangly and a bit of a nerd, most of the time people automatically feel like they are somehow the heroes of the story. If a character is outgoing and generally well-liked, they must be the villain. THAT'S SO WRONG! I mean, yeah. We all root for the underdog who is trying to break out of a bad situation that isn't their fault, right? But sometimes (and you know this is true) the supposed underdog is a really annoying dick who brings down shit on their own head and then whines about it. So, to me, this story was about a simpering little queef who got exactly what was coming to them. And Justice was served in the form of a meatheaded jokester (dare I say hero?) named Brom. At any rate, this was a highly entertaining short story, and just about the perfect sort of thing to read around Halloween. This was the audiobook version I listened to and it was pretty cool. Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Edition: Unabridged Anthony Heald - Narrator

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    I thought this story and I were Meant To Be. A few days before reading this, I read and reviewed Washington Irving's other famous story, Rip Van Winkle, and really enjoyed it. And then I read The Fold, which has this exchange between a high school student and his teacher in the first few pages:“Ichabod Crane isn’t really the hero of ‘The Legend of Sleepy Hollow’.” “Explain.” “He’s, like, the British. You told us that when you said we couldn’t just watch the TV show to learn the story. You said I thought this story and I were Meant To Be. A few days before reading this, I read and reviewed Washington Irving's other famous story, Rip Van Winkle, and really enjoyed it. And then I read The Fold, which has this exchange between a high school student and his teacher in the first few pages:“Ichabod Crane isn’t really the hero of ‘The Legend of Sleepy Hollow’.” “Explain.” “He’s, like, the British. You told us that when you said we couldn’t just watch the TV show to learn the story. You said that sometimes the bad guy is right there in front of us.”And I really love symbolism, so I was all set to love this story. It just didn't quite work out the way I'd envisioned. Ichabod Crane, a schoolteacher, is an outsider in the beautiful New York valley of Sleepy Hollow, but he's a native of Connecticut, not England. When you Google "Ichabod Crane" nowadays, you get mostly this: . . . which, nice as he is to look at, is not the real Ichabod. Washington Irving writes:He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snip nose, so that it looked like a weathercock perched upon his spindle neck to tell which way the wind blew.Disney got this one right. What Disney also got right was distilling Irving's story down to the the good stuff. Irving just spends too long describing the countryside, Ichabod and his avarice and questionable habits, the coquettish Katrina and her family farm (Ichabod wants to wed Katrina, but mostly because she's beautiful, she's rich, and she's got huge ... tracts of land), and Brom Bones and his jealousy. All of these descriptions were nicely done, but didn't hold my interest like I had hoped. And if there was any symbolism of post-Revolutionary War Great Britain in Ichabod, other than just his greed, I couldn't find it. He's not at all admirable--as well as being greedy, he's pompous, self-absorbed and superstitious--but I also found him kind of pitiful. When the Headless Horseman (aka "Galloping Hessian of the Hollow") finally appears, the excitement ramps up. And there's the enduring mystery: What really happened that night? And what became of Ichabod Crane? (Actually, I think the story itself makes it fairly clear what happened(view spoiler)[: Brom pretended to be the Headless Horseman, threw a pumpkin at Ichabod and knocked him off his horse, and Ichabod, between his superstitions and cowardice and his disappointment and humiliation that Katrina had just dumped him, slipped away during the night) (hide spoiler)] . It was interesting reading the original version of the tale and comparing it to the heavily Disney-influenced version in my head. And the character of Ichabod Crane is well-drawn. Overall the story was just a little too detailed and slow for me. Free on Gutenberg, here (at the end of this original collection of Washington Irving stories, with some really charming original illustrations) and here (just the story itself). Art credits: http://poolichoo.deviantart.com/art/S... and Disney Studios. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    This little treasure was simply delightful! Quite honestly, I didn’t expect to enjoy it quite so much. I’ve seen the various movie adaptations over the years and figured there wasn’t really anything more to be gained by reading this short story. I was wrong – the eloquence of the written word brought the legend up to a whole other level for me. Everyone is probably familiar with the tale of the Headless Horseman and the little valley of Sleepy Hollow, situated near the small town of Tarry Town, This little treasure was simply delightful! Quite honestly, I didn’t expect to enjoy it quite so much. I’ve seen the various movie adaptations over the years and figured there wasn’t really anything more to be gained by reading this short story. I was wrong – the eloquence of the written word brought the legend up to a whole other level for me. Everyone is probably familiar with the tale of the Headless Horseman and the little valley of Sleepy Hollow, situated near the small town of Tarry Town, New York. The descriptions of the countryside were remarkably vivid and evoked such a lovely image and feeling of autumn in New York, a personal favorite time of year. Ichabod Crane is well-known to those familiar with early American literature. You need not have seen the Disney movie to picture this oddball of a figure! Washington Irving draws an image of a somewhat ungainly fellow who is a bit of a freeloader and a fortune hunter. He is well-versed in Cotton Mather’s “History of New England Witchcraft”, and, like the rest of the village folk, is not immune to superstitions and the thrill of tall tales. A wonderful description of Sleepy Hollow and its inhabitants really exemplifies the expressiveness of the prose: "Certain it is, the place still continues under the sway of some witching power, that holds a spell over the minds of the good people, causing them to walk in a continual reverie. They are given to all kinds of marvelous beliefs, are subject to trances and visions, and frequently see strange sights, and hear music and voices in the air. The whole neighborhood abounds with local tales, haunted spots, and twilight superstitions; stars shoot and meteors glare oftener across the valley than in any other part of the country, and the nightmare, with her whole ninefold, seems to make it the favorite scene of her gambols. The dominant spirit, however, that haunts this enchanted region, and seems to be commander-in-chief of all the powers of the air, is the apparition of a figure on horseback, without a head." What happens to those with a lively imagination? You’ll have to take this wild ride through the valley with Ichabod to find out. You most likely won’t tremble with fear, but you may become just a wee bit spooked by the dark phantom. Even if you don’t feel the least bit rattled, you will be entertained! You may even muster up a little chuckle, just like my old pal Brom Bones who always managed a laugh whenever this story was re-told.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James

    I spent a few weeks every summer in the Catskill Mountains at a resort with my godparents, parents and grandparents. I used to walk around the forest, searching for the headless horsemen. The cottages we always stayed in were either "Rip Van Winkle" or "Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Such good memories on the place and this book. Even before the movie, it launched my thirst for mystery and the hunt! And when they used this to make a few movies and then the TV show, I loved the whole concept. A must-r I spent a few weeks every summer in the Catskill Mountains at a resort with my godparents, parents and grandparents. I used to walk around the forest, searching for the headless horsemen. The cottages we always stayed in were either "Rip Van Winkle" or "Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Such good memories on the place and this book. Even before the movie, it launched my thirst for mystery and the hunt! And when they used this to make a few movies and then the TV show, I loved the whole concept. A must-read for folks interested in mystery and a little bit of the gothic... in the classics realm. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brina

    The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is the old school classic read in catching up on classics for October 2016. I read an illustrated version of the Washington Irving's tale, which I finished in under an hour, and for which I rate three stars. I was familiar with the story of the Headless Horseman, especially as it has been used in Harry Potter in the form of the ghost Nearly Headless Nick. Consequently, I was looking for an action packed story featuring the aforementioned headless horse. Even though th The Legend of Sleepy Hollow is the old school classic read in catching up on classics for October 2016. I read an illustrated version of the Washington Irving's tale, which I finished in under an hour, and for which I rate three stars. I was familiar with the story of the Headless Horseman, especially as it has been used in Harry Potter in the form of the ghost Nearly Headless Nick. Consequently, I was looking for an action packed story featuring the aforementioned headless horse. Even though the horseman does play a small role in the tale, he is not the central part of the story or even the prose. Irving's story, however, is the tale of Ichabod Crane the schoolmaster in his attempt to woo heiress Katrina Van Tassel in Sleephollow, also known as Tarrytown, New York. The story focuses on Crane's futile attempt to win Van Tassel away from Brom Bones, which only angers Brom, causing him to woo Van Tassel as well. The climax is the tale that has survived over time-- the myth of the headless horseman. Is there a horseman or not? No one knows. Unfortunately, the scene with the horseman is only a page long and for me not scary at all. Because I was looking forward to a scary ghost story, this was a major letdown for me. The best part of the tale-- Irving's prose and descriptions of life in Tarrytown which have survived the test of time and made Irving into one of America's original master story tellers. Perhaps I will enjoy his other stories better, especially the adult version of Rip Van Winkle, another story I am already familiar with. In the meantime I am looking forward to discussing this ghost story in group.

  8. 4 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    Fun read and a great way to kick off my month of Halloween reads. I know the story, watched countless movie versions of the story, but never actually read the book. Still didn't....I listed to this one via audio. A fun read, but I wanted more gothic, creepy-ness. I wanted more Headless Horseman. The audio narration was wonderful! The narrator's voice had an edge of spookiness to it (a very good thing). Glad I read this one but yeah, I prefer the movie version 'Sleepy Hollow', which I watch ever Fun read and a great way to kick off my month of Halloween reads. I know the story, watched countless movie versions of the story, but never actually read the book. Still didn't....I listed to this one via audio. A fun read, but I wanted more gothic, creepy-ness. I wanted more Headless Horseman. The audio narration was wonderful! The narrator's voice had an edge of spookiness to it (a very good thing). Glad I read this one but yeah, I prefer the movie version 'Sleepy Hollow', which I watch every Halloween.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sid

    Equal parts hilarious, creepy, classical and of course legendary! A part of the story was included in our fourth grade course book, I never understood what it meant. Now had an amazing time reading it. Specially the funny use of Headless Horseman! Loved the ending!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    A reread for me, quite a humdinger of a little story with the silly, scarecrow of a school teacher and his stupendous imagination getting the best of him and leaving the girl as a prize for his clever rival.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Though I've seen the movie versions countless times and listened to Bing Crosby croon about Brom Bones every Halloween for decades, this was my first time reading the story and it was MAGICAL! I really enjoyed Irving's style. His descriptions paint joyful pictures without being too wordy or grandiose. The passages about Icabod's boundless appetite and his lust for Katrina's huge . . . tracts of land are priceless. Reading this story has given me a new appreciation for Irving. My goals now are: 1) R Though I've seen the movie versions countless times and listened to Bing Crosby croon about Brom Bones every Halloween for decades, this was my first time reading the story and it was MAGICAL! I really enjoyed Irving's style. His descriptions paint joyful pictures without being too wordy or grandiose. The passages about Icabod's boundless appetite and his lust for Katrina's huge . . . tracts of land are priceless. Reading this story has given me a new appreciation for Irving. My goals now are: 1) Read Rip Van Winkle and Tales of the Alhambra posthaste. and 2) Win millions of dollars ASAP so I can buy a farm in the Hudson River Valley. I feel the need for my own picturesque tracts of land. Sleepy Hollow, New York

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

    Ichabod Crane goes for a wild ride. Washington Irving first published The Legend of Sleepy Hollow in 1820. Besides being an iconic story and a fine example of early American literature, this is also a revealing historic illustration of life in the Dutch portions of early nineteenth century New York. We get to spend some time with the corpulent and satisfied Dutch farmers and glimpse early American culture. Irving’s language is typical of narrative fiction from his time, but is also resplendent as Ichabod Crane goes for a wild ride. Washington Irving first published The Legend of Sleepy Hollow in 1820. Besides being an iconic story and a fine example of early American literature, this is also a revealing historic illustration of life in the Dutch portions of early nineteenth century New York. We get to spend some time with the corpulent and satisfied Dutch farmers and glimpse early American culture. Irving’s language is typical of narrative fiction from his time, but is also resplendent as very early speculative fiction. Ichabod’s fear of the occult is well placed but fans of Disney’s 1949 animation will be pleased to note a charming and more sophisticated original vision.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    Let's get the rotten parts out of the way first - the story has flaws. Painful to admit, but it's long-winded and rambling, too much focus and writing concentrates on irrelevant scenes and parts and character trails, drawing out the wrong things. Sometimes it's for clarity, at times for snuck-in humor, but just maybe it was either because the author was writing without pre-planning or trying to pad. Irregardless, pacing is inconsistent besides the strong beginning and unforgettable ending, so so Let's get the rotten parts out of the way first - the story has flaws. Painful to admit, but it's long-winded and rambling, too much focus and writing concentrates on irrelevant scenes and parts and character trails, drawing out the wrong things. Sometimes it's for clarity, at times for snuck-in humor, but just maybe it was either because the author was writing without pre-planning or trying to pad. Irregardless, pacing is inconsistent besides the strong beginning and unforgettable ending, so sometimes the attention wilts. But really who cares, because this is the epic 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow'. Where else do you get the inventions of wicked trails in foggy forests with undead Pumpkinheaded legends on top of black, hell-driven steeds? Small town with a small-minded but lovable schoolmarm with a name as cool as Ichabod Crane. Yes that may be an insult of a name now if invented in these modern times, but associated with the story and our memories it's now considered a groovy name. I like the additions to the story that have come over through the years in cinema form -- I'm actually a fan of the Johnny Depp comedy version, even if reviews were mixed on the Burton production. I think it's my favorite version, but all that aside, the book is beautifully written in a flowing style and humorous with character description. I'm not an Audiobook fan, but this one worked well with the voice of the actor from the show, Sleepy Hollow, Tom Mison. His voice suited the story perfectly, and I enjoyed the music at the beginning and conclusion. Recommended for all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    This book isn't exactly "scary", conventionally speaking, nor is it cheerful like the cartoon Disney adaptation, but it's certainly atmospheric and serves also as a pioneering urban legend. There's an ever-present dark humour which makes this book a lot of fun, and Irving's vivid depictions of scenes and characters come to life in a very timeless way. Ichabod Crane's many vices for food and for the woman he harbours a thing for are certainly much more bold here than in any of the adaptational ve This book isn't exactly "scary", conventionally speaking, nor is it cheerful like the cartoon Disney adaptation, but it's certainly atmospheric and serves also as a pioneering urban legend. There's an ever-present dark humour which makes this book a lot of fun, and Irving's vivid depictions of scenes and characters come to life in a very timeless way. Ichabod Crane's many vices for food and for the woman he harbours a thing for are certainly much more bold here than in any of the adaptational versions, and he's not such a sympathetic character, but in a way this original version makes it all the more funny and bizarre. When thinking back on gothic Halloween classics, it's easy to see why The Legend of Sleepy Hollow has become such a valued staple of books to read for the occasion. Spooky sightings at night, tales of a decapitated ghost, the dreaded events of the ending, it all builds up to be quite a thrilling work. This is definitely a story that's better read at night, or told aloud to a small group of friends or family members next to a fireplace (my not-so-warm and not-very-glamorous propane fireplace littered with inherited Hummel figurines, in my case).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leonard Gaya

    This is a short story. Certainly one of the most famous (at least by name) of early American literature. Perhaps one of the first examples of the “gothic” genre, before Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft. It is however interesting to note that, for the most part, this piece of writing is a description of the Dutch community and rural life in the early 19th century New York suburban area. Irving provides vivid descriptions of the peasant’s occupations, the animal farms, the chirping of birds, the This is a short story. Certainly one of the most famous (at least by name) of early American literature. Perhaps one of the first examples of the “gothic” genre, before Edgar Allan Poe and H.P. Lovecraft. It is however interesting to note that, for the most part, this piece of writing is a description of the Dutch community and rural life in the early 19th century New York suburban area. Irving provides vivid descriptions of the peasant’s occupations, the animal farms, the chirping of birds, the hills and meadows around the Hudson River during the fall. He also lingers on meals and local groceries, of which the protagonist, a school teacher by the name of Ichabod Crane, is highly fond. It is, more than anything else, a love triangle story, and, in fact, the ghost story with the headless rider, which made this novella so famous, is a device (a bad Halloween joke to deter a rival) that appears almost by the by within the plot, and takes place at the denouement. Two centuries after Washinton Irving, Tim Burton directed a movie adaptation of the same title that is probably his masterpiece and certainly one of the best horror pictures of the 1990s. Only a tiny part of Burton’s film is indebted to Washington Irving.

  16. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    It felt nostalgic to read Washington Irving's The Legend of Sleepy Hollow after many, many years. It was also fun to read some of the details that I'd forgotten about in this iconic story. There is definitely more to it than Ichabod Crane meeting his fate with the Headless Horseman. It might be worth a quick read for these reasons--it was for me--however, beyond that, the story didn't really do all that much for me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    I have to say that re-reading this as an adult is a much different and more wonderful experience than as a snot-nosed kid of 15. I was able to appreciate the nuances much more, enjoying just how established Mr. Crane could be as a realistic and sympathetic character, even if he was slightly foolish. In other words, he felt real, I felt invested, and as any lover of horror knows, we must also feel superior to our victims before their inevitable and somewhat moralistic demise by supernatural or nef I have to say that re-reading this as an adult is a much different and more wonderful experience than as a snot-nosed kid of 15. I was able to appreciate the nuances much more, enjoying just how established Mr. Crane could be as a realistic and sympathetic character, even if he was slightly foolish. In other words, he felt real, I felt invested, and as any lover of horror knows, we must also feel superior to our victims before their inevitable and somewhat moralistic demise by supernatural or nefarious deeds. Now, whether this was a mortal practical joke played on a lover of the fantastic and the horrible or whether this was actually a real-life ghost story, as the Dutch Wives would insist, is a matter for debate. Either way, it was nice and ghoulish and ramped up perfectly to a thrown screaming head. :) Quick tale, fascinating, and expertly described. :) And an eternal Halloween Treat. :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    For most classics that I read it is easy to discern how they have stood the test of time and attain their classic status. However, a few titles, like Moby-Dick; or, The Whale and Three Men in a Boat hold little or no appeal to me at all, and why would anybody want to read them is beyond me. I am consigning The Legend of Sleepy Hollow to the “not for me” pile (though I am careful not disrespect any classics because they are still being read more than a hundred years after first publication, just For most classics that I read it is easy to discern how they have stood the test of time and attain their classic status. However, a few titles, like Moby-Dick; or, The Whale and Three Men in a Boat hold little or no appeal to me at all, and why would anybody want to read them is beyond me. I am consigning The Legend of Sleepy Hollow to the “not for me” pile (though I am careful not disrespect any classics because they are still being read more than a hundred years after first publication, just because I don’t like them doesn't mean they are not any good). I was expecting a quick and creepy Halloween read but found the story to be lyrical and jocular in tone but entirely devoid of any “fear factor”. The prose style is indeed a pleasure to read. I like how Ichabod Crane is characterized and described as looking like a “scarecrow eloped from a cornfield”. Crane’s predilection for fanciful tales also resonates with me and beautifully described: "His appetite for the marvelous, and his powers of digesting it, were equally extraordinary; and both had been increased by his residence in this spell-bound region. No tale was too gross or monstrous for his capacious swallow." Unfortunately, after the half-way point has passed by with nothing very interesting happening the author’s breezy style begins to outstay its welcome. I find myself losing interest in Irving’s prolonged descriptions of inconsequential things like birds and trees and such, and the complete absence of any dialogue does not help. To cap it all off the “horrific” climax turns out to be very much an anti-climax for me, and the epilogue renders the entire story rather pointless. It's ironic that in today’s popular culture Icabod Crane is usually depicted as a heroic figure. The original Crane as featured in this story is very much an anti-hero, he is not brave, decent, honest or even good looking. The Headless Horseman in Irving’s story eventually turns out to be something is a lame duck (I hope this is sufficiently vague not to be a spoiler). Both the 1999 Tim Burton movie and the new Sleepy Hollow TV series (2013) have taken the image of the Horseman from this story and upgraded him into a much more frightening and supernatural antagonist. As a general rule, movie and TV adaptations are always inferior to the literary source material. Here is an exception that proves the rule, I find both the movie and TV show (series 1 only) much more entertaining, dark and intense than Irving’s original story. So I suppose I do have something to be grateful to Washington Irving for after all. Not my pick for a Halloween read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Thanks Stephanie - your review led me to read this and I am so glad I did:) I suppose it is because I had my education in England that this book was not part of my school reading nor had I come across it since. So it was a first time read for me and it was delightful! I always love stories written in this kind of old fashioned and extremely literate prose. The descriptions are just superb, especially the one of Ichabod Crane. At the end of that the reader knows exactly what he looked like to the Thanks Stephanie - your review led me to read this and I am so glad I did:) I suppose it is because I had my education in England that this book was not part of my school reading nor had I come across it since. So it was a first time read for me and it was delightful! I always love stories written in this kind of old fashioned and extremely literate prose. The descriptions are just superb, especially the one of Ichabod Crane. At the end of that the reader knows exactly what he looked like to the point of being able to draw his picture! Compared to the literature available today I would not describe this book as horror. Just a little bit spooky maybe. But very well written and extremely entertaining.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mackey

    Here in Indiana (US) there is a town called Irvington that has absolutely no historic connection to Washington Irving at all but never-the-less each year produces a marvelous and quite large Halloween festival in his honor. It lasts a week and centers around the characters from The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. I decided it was time re-read the story to catch up on all things forgotten. It's a simple tale really. A schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, is trying to woo a young woman from town and it angers th Here in Indiana (US) there is a town called Irvington that has absolutely no historic connection to Washington Irving at all but never-the-less each year produces a marvelous and quite large Halloween festival in his honor. It lasts a week and centers around the characters from The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. I decided it was time re-read the story to catch up on all things forgotten. It's a simple tale really. A schoolmaster, Ichabod Crane, is trying to woo a young woman from town and it angers the town bully. This leads to the "frightening" scene of the headless horseman and Crane's demise. Although it's a very short read, one that is perfect for Halloween, it is a beautiful example of Irving's writing ability. As a reporter for many years, he writes about the town and people in such great detail that you will remember them long after you've put down the book, perhaps even years later. If you've never read the story then now is a great time. If you have read it, I encourage you to read it once more. You will be amazed at what you've forgotten.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alex ☣ Deranged KittyCat ☣

    Well, hello there, Mr. Ichabod Crane! I cannot believe I waited so long before meeting you. I really don't see the horror part in this classic. I found myself smiling throughout the entire story. And it was all Irving's fault. He's just so funny and charming. There was no dialogue at all. I became aware of that at some point and wandered how come I still enjoyed it. The ending fit the character perfectly. I would have not wanted it any other way. Well, hello there, Mr. Ichabod Crane! I cannot believe I waited so long before meeting you. I really don't see the horror part in this classic. I found myself smiling throughout the entire story. And it was all Irving's fault. He's just so funny and charming. There was no dialogue at all. I became aware of that at some point and wandered how come I still enjoyed it. The ending fit the character perfectly. I would have not wanted it any other way.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jay Schutt

    A quick, fun read reminiscent of my fondest Halloween memories.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)

    I loved the narration of this story. Tom Mison (the actor from the Sleepy Hollow television show) narrates this book and I could seriously listen to his voice all day long. Unfortunately, I didn't liked the actual story as much as I thought I would. I really wish the story was a bit darker and less descriptive. I would give the narration 5 stars and the story 3 stars so I'm going with 4 stars overall. I grabbed this audiobook for free from audible a while ago and it appears that it is no longer f I loved the narration of this story. Tom Mison (the actor from the Sleepy Hollow television show) narrates this book and I could seriously listen to his voice all day long. Unfortunately, I didn't liked the actual story as much as I thought I would. I really wish the story was a bit darker and less descriptive. I would give the narration 5 stars and the story 3 stars so I'm going with 4 stars overall. I grabbed this audiobook for free from audible a while ago and it appears that it is no longer free. I thought it was an enjoyable way to spend an hour or so.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    I finished this book just before going to bed last night, and I must say, it took me a while to get to sleep because I couldn’t stop thinking about the headless horseman. Then sometime in the middle of the night I heard a ringing, clicking sound on the metal footboard of my bed. I sat up with a startle, just as I saw the headless horseman on his horse leaping over my bed and out through the closed French doors into the backyard. I could not sleep for the remainder of the night or so I thought, b I finished this book just before going to bed last night, and I must say, it took me a while to get to sleep because I couldn’t stop thinking about the headless horseman. Then sometime in the middle of the night I heard a ringing, clicking sound on the metal footboard of my bed. I sat up with a startle, just as I saw the headless horseman on his horse leaping over my bed and out through the closed French doors into the backyard. I could not sleep for the remainder of the night or so I thought, but the next morning when I woke up I realized that I had slept some, but the dream was still vivid in my mind. I began making the bed, and just as began pulling the covers to the top of the bed, I found an old horse shoe near the footboard. I shuttered! It hadn’t been a dream after all. This book was a wonderful tale, Sleepy Hollow sounded like such a beautiful glen that is filled with peace and quiet during the day with only the sounds of a quail or the tapping of a woodpecker. But even so, stories abound of visions and other strange sights. Sometimes people who walk its roads hear music and voices, but this, more than likely, was only during the night. How can such a peaceful glen become so spooky at night, you might ask? Well, I think it is because of the people’s big imaginations. The most frightening story is that of a headless horseman, the ghost of a man who had been killed in the Revolutionary War. It is said that at night he gallops along the roads and is especially fond of the church cemetery nearby where he is buried. Why is he so frightening? I did not know at first. What harm does he cause? I did not know this either, except that he was headless and that is enough to frighten someone to death if they have a bad heart. But who is out that late anyway? I don’t know, except for one man, Ichabod Crane. Why is the horseman headless? That I know. A cannon ball had taken off his head during the war. And who was Ichabod Crane that he should be out on that road at night? He was the school master. His life in Sleepy Hollow was yet another tale. He was the man that I have remembered most of my life, some 60 plus years when I was a young girl in the 8th grade listening to the teacher describe him from this book. And the teacher, I believe, or wish to believe, was Mr. Bailey, who was my favorite teacher, as well as my brother’s. Mr. Bailey loved telling ghost stories, and that is why I think it was he who told us this story. Here is what was read to us students about Ichabod Crane: “He was tall, but exceedingly lank, with narrow shoulders, a long arms and legs, hands that dangled a mile out of his sleeves, feet that might have served for shovels, and his whole frame most loosely hung together. His head was small, and flat at top, with huge ears, large green glassy eyes, and a long snipe nose, so that it looked like a weather-cock perched upon his sprinkle neck to tell which way the wind blew. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending up the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield.” Why was Ichabod Crane out on the road that fateful night? I cannot tell. You need to read the story. I will tell you this much: If you read this book and finish it just before you go Trick or Treating, you may be sorry, for you may just draw the headless horseman to you, being so late in the evening. You may just find yourself alone walking from house to house asking for treats, and instead you may find a trick, for what happened to Ichabod Crane, as I later found out, could very well happen to you. Then if you read this book late at night, you may also be visited by the headless horseman after you go to sleep just as I was. Or maybe even worse, you may have these visits for many nights thereafter, as I may have, because you will have drawn him to you, again, being so late at night with this story so heavy on your mind. So, if you read this book, read it in the morning when the world is still peaceful and quiet. When, perhaps, all that you can hear is the whippoorwill and the songbirds waking up in the morning or as in the book, the tapping of a woodpecker or the sound of quails.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    3 STARS! I thought I would like The Legend of Sleepy Hollow more but that wasn't the case. This old tale of a headless rider was just okay in my opinion. I think my expectations were way to high! A couple of things: 1. Washington Irving spent so much time describing Sleepy Hollow and the countryside that when the spook factor finally showed up in the last 1/3 of the book, it didn't really scare me. 2. I wasn't creeped out or scared at anytime while reading this. I still liked the concept of the stor 3 STARS! I thought I would like The Legend of Sleepy Hollow more but that wasn't the case. This old tale of a headless rider was just okay in my opinion. I think my expectations were way to high! A couple of things: 1. Washington Irving spent so much time describing Sleepy Hollow and the countryside that when the spook factor finally showed up in the last 1/3 of the book, it didn't really scare me. 2. I wasn't creeped out or scared at anytime while reading this. I still liked the concept of the story of a headless rider but that's about it. I did like that it ended with a big question of what really happened to Ichabod Crane?! Was it really the (view spoiler)[Headless Horseman or was it Ichabod's rival doing a prank on him? (hide spoiler)] 3. Yes, I'm glad I read The Legend of Sleepy Hollow to check it off my list of classics! I don’t regret reading it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    A great short story! Ichabard Crane becomes a cautionary tale in Sleepy Hollow, but what really happened to him? Did his rival scare him off with a pumpkin or did the headless horseman get him?!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Jeanette

    I really enjoyed this book. After having just watched the Johny Depp movie version, I was surprised to find the book had almost nothing in common. I read it mostly at night and I enjoyed the spooky moments (though I admit my idea of spooky is pretty low on the scale for some). Ichabod is mildly detestable as a character; he seems like he has all the foundational qualities to make a wonderful villain, were this another story. I laughed at his envisioning the Van Tassel's animals as sumptuously co I really enjoyed this book. After having just watched the Johny Depp movie version, I was surprised to find the book had almost nothing in common. I read it mostly at night and I enjoyed the spooky moments (though I admit my idea of spooky is pretty low on the scale for some). Ichabod is mildly detestable as a character; he seems like he has all the foundational qualities to make a wonderful villain, were this another story. I laughed at his envisioning the Van Tassel's animals as sumptuously cooked dishes which he hoped to enjoy throughout the winter. This is a tale clearly written for the sensibilities of another time, and as such, I enjoyed the historical value. As other reviewers have noted, his descriptions of the people and the period were marvelous. I loved the descriptions of the countryside, which is unusual for me. Since it was such a short read, I didn't mind slowing down to imagine the scenery. This is one of my favorite bits: "To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, with his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield." I don't often want to read a book more than once, but I plan on revisiting this on Halloween to relish all the descriptive phrases and the fun story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Antill

    So after reading The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, there are two things I feel like I know about Washington Irving. Number one: he is a very wordy man and Number two: he must have been very hungry when he wrote this book because he spent more time describing food than he did talking about the headless horseman. I'm glad I read this book but I don't think I would ever do a reread. However, I would happily make a sandwich and go watch the Tim Burton version of Sleepy Hollow, which I found to be way mor So after reading The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, there are two things I feel like I know about Washington Irving. Number one: he is a very wordy man and Number two: he must have been very hungry when he wrote this book because he spent more time describing food than he did talking about the headless horseman. I'm glad I read this book but I don't think I would ever do a reread. However, I would happily make a sandwich and go watch the Tim Burton version of Sleepy Hollow, which I found to be way more interesting.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    I really wanted to like this story but it definitely wasn't my cup of tea. Honestly, I found the story boring. The author spent too much time on description, so the story was quite slow and it dragged. I was also really disappointed with the end. I expected that the ending will scare me at least a little but, but it didn't. The story ended pretty abruptly, and now that I've finished it, I'm glad it did. Even though this was a pretty short story, it sure felt like a long one. Now I'm off to see t I really wanted to like this story but it definitely wasn't my cup of tea. Honestly, I found the story boring. The author spent too much time on description, so the story was quite slow and it dragged. I was also really disappointed with the end. I expected that the ending will scare me at least a little but, but it didn't. The story ended pretty abruptly, and now that I've finished it, I'm glad it did. Even though this was a pretty short story, it sure felt like a long one. Now I'm off to see the movie. Hopefully I'll enjoyed it more than I enjoyed this short story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    K. Elizabeth

    Great writing but mediocre Gothic story. I could see myself enjoying this more around fall/winter time or during Halloween.

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