Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Leadership Is an Art

Availability: Ready to download

LEADERSHIP IS AN ART has long been a must-read not only within the business community but also in professions ranging from academia to medical practices, to the political arena. First published in 1989, the book has sold more than 800,000 copies in hardcover and paperback. This revised edition brings Max De Pree’s timeless words and practical philosophy to a new generation LEADERSHIP IS AN ART has long been a must-read not only within the business community but also in professions ranging from academia to medical practices, to the political arena. First published in 1989, the book has sold more than 800,000 copies in hardcover and paperback. This revised edition brings Max De Pree’s timeless words and practical philosophy to a new generation of readers.De Pree looks at leadership as a kind of stewardship, stressing the importance of building relationships, initiating ideas, and creating a lasting value system within an organization. Rather than focusing on the “hows” of corporate life, he explains the “whys.” He shows that the first responsibility of a leader is to define reality and the last is to say thank you. Along the way, the artful leader must: • Stimulate effectiveness by enabling others to reach both their personal potential and their institutional potential • Take a role in developing, expressing, and defending civility and values • Nurture new leaders and ensure the continuation of the corporate culture LEADERSHIP IS AN ART offers a proven design for achieving success by developing the generous spirit within all of us. Now more than ever, it provides the insights and guidelines leaders in every field need.


Compare
Ads Banner

LEADERSHIP IS AN ART has long been a must-read not only within the business community but also in professions ranging from academia to medical practices, to the political arena. First published in 1989, the book has sold more than 800,000 copies in hardcover and paperback. This revised edition brings Max De Pree’s timeless words and practical philosophy to a new generation LEADERSHIP IS AN ART has long been a must-read not only within the business community but also in professions ranging from academia to medical practices, to the political arena. First published in 1989, the book has sold more than 800,000 copies in hardcover and paperback. This revised edition brings Max De Pree’s timeless words and practical philosophy to a new generation of readers.De Pree looks at leadership as a kind of stewardship, stressing the importance of building relationships, initiating ideas, and creating a lasting value system within an organization. Rather than focusing on the “hows” of corporate life, he explains the “whys.” He shows that the first responsibility of a leader is to define reality and the last is to say thank you. Along the way, the artful leader must: • Stimulate effectiveness by enabling others to reach both their personal potential and their institutional potential • Take a role in developing, expressing, and defending civility and values • Nurture new leaders and ensure the continuation of the corporate culture LEADERSHIP IS AN ART offers a proven design for achieving success by developing the generous spirit within all of us. Now more than ever, it provides the insights and guidelines leaders in every field need.

30 review for Leadership Is an Art

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This book came to me highly recommended and I really wanted to like it. A leadership book based on treating people like people? Sounds good. Unfortunately, I found the meandering writing style frustrating and barely made it half way through. I would have preferred a clearer structure and more cleanly delineated concepts. Each chapter bled into another, circling around the same points. Really, it all does boil down to "be nice to other people" but really, who needs a book to tell you that?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Omar Halabieh

    I recently finished reading Leadership is an Art by Max De Pree. As Max best puts it: "This book is about the art of leadership: liberating people to do what is required of them in the most effective and humane way possible. It is not a book of facts or history. Though I like to tell stories, the book is not filled with anecdotes. Since it deals more with ideas and beliefs and relationships, it has to do with the "why" of institutional and corporate life rather than the "how"..Those results, I recently finished reading Leadership is an Art by Max De Pree. As Max best puts it: "This book is about the art of leadership: liberating people to do what is required of them in the most effective and humane way possible. It is not a book of facts or history. Though I like to tell stories, the book is not filled with anecdotes. Since it deals more with ideas and beliefs and relationships, it has to do with the "why" of institutional and corporate life rather than the "how"..Those results, however, are only a way to measure our resourcefulness at a point in time, mile markets on a long road. Why we get those results is more important. That's what this book is about." The book is covers various leadership topics such as communication, engagement, story telling etc. in a very concise and illustrated manner. Max adds a number of stories from his own experience at Herman Miller. This book forms a great leadership/management handbook, that should be kept at hand to server as a refresher and primer. As the author words it: "It will be worth a lot more to you if you finish it, if you have made it truly your own book." Below are selected excerpts from the book that I found particularly insightful: 1- "Any concept of work rises from an understanding of the relationship between pitchers and catchers alike...The right to be needed...The right to be involved...The right to a covenantal relationships...The right to understand...The right to affect one's own destiny...The right to be accountable...The right to appeal...The right to make a commitment." 2- "Roving leaders are those indispensable people in our lives who are there when we need them...Roving leadership is an issue-oriented idea. Roving leadership is the expression of the ability of hierarchical leaders to permit others to share ownership of problems - in effect, to take possession of a situation." 3- "Just as any relationship requires honest and open communication to stay healthy, so the relationships within corporations improve when information is shared accurately and freely. The best way to communicate the basis of a corporation's or institution's common bonds and values is through behavior...What is good communication? What does it accomplish? It is a prerequisite for teaching and learning. It is the way people can bridge the gaps formed by a growing company, stay in touch, build trust, ask for help, monitor for performance, and share their vision. Communication clarifies the vision of participative ownership as a way of building relationships within and without the corporation." 4- "Good communication liberates us to do our jobs better. It is a simple as that. Good corporate communication allows us to respond to the demands placed on us and to carry out our responsibilities. This really means, too, that leaders can use communication to free the people they lead. To liberate people, communication must be based on logic, compassion, and sound reasoning." 5- "As a culture or a corporation grows older and more complex, the communications naturally and inevitably become more sophisticate and crucial. An increasingly large part that communication plays in expanding cultures is to pass along values to new members and reaffirm those values to old hands. A corporation's values are its life's blood. Without effective communication, actively practiced, without the art of scrutiny, those values will disappear in a sea of trivial memos and impertinent reports." 6- "Performance reviews, done well, are a good way of re-examining goals, realigning principles and practices, and gauging progress. Everyone should do this. Reviewing performance should be done in a timely way, with the direct involvement of the person whose performance is being reviewed. Both the people and the process should be directed toward reaching human potential." 7- "...While understanding is an essential part of organized activity, it just is not possible for everybody to know everything and understand everything. The following is essential: We must trust one another to be accountable for our own assignments. When that kind of trust is present, it is a beautifully liberating thing. "

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tom Schulte

    A concise and well-supported treatise of leading in ways that empower employees (broad profit sharing to encourage a sense of ownership) and leading with humility, as a first-servant in the corporation. Much may seem like adages here, but there is much wisdom distilled from years in leadership at Zeeland, Michigan's Herman Miller.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    Dozens upon dozens of quotable insights in the first 2/3 of this book. A short, insightful and enjoyable read for anyone in a leadership capacity.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    A book of Max's wisdom, gathered from decades of leadership in business, mixed with some of his Christian worldview peeking through. Some very quotable, even poetic moments, but also some pretty pedantic parts, with long lists and extended prose that gets tiresome. He emphasizes the value of persons, whatever level of the company, and collaborative leadership. Its more than just technique and recipes. Herman Miller gets more than its share of accolades in the book. It is also a high-end company A book of Max's wisdom, gathered from decades of leadership in business, mixed with some of his Christian worldview peeking through. Some very quotable, even poetic moments, but also some pretty pedantic parts, with long lists and extended prose that gets tiresome. He emphasizes the value of persons, whatever level of the company, and collaborative leadership. Its more than just technique and recipes. Herman Miller gets more than its share of accolades in the book. It is also a high-end company with upper-class values, which may not fit with some settings. I wonder if more "lessons learned" would have been equally instructive, even if risky for the owner to share.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    This book was mentioned by my pastor in a sermon. The author, former CEO of Hermann Miller, Max De Pree, describes it as a series of essays. Specifically as a "compendium of ideas about organizational leadership". Indeed, it is a book of ideas and not practices, as he claims. Although I agree with many of his statements, the book's structure seemed random, without a clear direction. At times, the leadership related terminology used was not familiar (e.g roving leaders, giants) and seemed to be of This book was mentioned by my pastor in a sermon. The author, former CEO of Hermann Miller, Max De Pree, describes it as a series of essays. Specifically as a "compendium of ideas about organizational leadership". Indeed, it is a book of ideas and not practices, as he claims. Although I agree with many of his statements, the book's structure seemed random, without a clear direction. At times, the leadership related terminology used was not familiar (e.g roving leaders, giants) and seemed to be of the author's own making. Also, given the way it was written, it's hard to remember any "take aways". I'm thinking that a month from now I'll probably have forgotten that I read it! Regardless of its flaws, here are a few of the thoughts that I liked: -"The measure of leadership is not the quality of the head, but the tone of the body." p. 12 -Contrary opinions are an important source of vitality. -Having a say differs from having a vote. p. 23 -Style is a consequence of what we believe; what's in our hearts. p. 24 -Leadership is a condition of indebtedness. p. 59 -Leaders are liable for what happens in the future rather than what is happening day to day. p. 102 -Today's performance from a leader succeeds or fails only in the months or years to come -Leaders tell why rather than how. p. 120 He also speaks of the three key elements in the "art of working together" as how to: deal with change, deal with conflict, reach our full potential. Beyond these isolated tidbits (which are generally not elaborated on in the writing), I see little value in the book for those reading in the leadership literature. Partially, this may be a function of it's age. We've learned a lot about leadership since 1989. But, it is also it's style. I found it to be weak in it's use of stories and examples. I also found myself not understanding the author's point, regularly. I often re-read paragraphs feeling that it was Confucius-like!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    The author, former CEO and chairman of the board of directors at furniture maker Herman Miller, shares his viewpoint on leadership. It’s an idealistic account of what companies can be when leaders are open and understanding. One of his main ideas is that leaders owe a great deal to the companies they lead: they need to provide a statement of values, space for employees to grow, a vision for present and future, momentum (“a debt to the future”), and effectiveness, among other things. De Pree The author, former CEO and chairman of the board of directors at furniture maker Herman Miller, shares his viewpoint on leadership. It’s an idealistic account of what companies can be when leaders are open and understanding. One of his main ideas is that leaders owe a great deal to the companies they lead: they need to provide a statement of values, space for employees to grow, a vision for present and future, momentum (“a debt to the future”), and effectiveness, among other things. De Pree defines effectiveness as “doing the right thing” as opposed to just doing the thing right. He also sets a high premium on Roving Leadership (the ability of others to lead temporarily when their unique talents call for it), and participative management (encouraging others to have a say, fostering a culture of respect for diversity of talents, the importance of covenants – an understanding that work has value and meaning – as opposed to impersonal contracts). In sum, he rejects “the dry rules of business school” and pushes liberation over control, ritual and storytelling, trust over hierarchy, people over structures, civility over rules, and wisdom over manuals. It’s an impressive philosophy, and I’m astonished to see it so closely adhere to that of my current workplace (I was asked to read this for work). Knowing what the alternative could be makes me even more gratified and amazed that such places do exist.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David

    I'm not really a huge fan of leadership books, I'm more of a history/theology nerd, but I know reading books like this can be helpful from time to time. This book is brief, to the point and filled with lots of great insights. DePree was the CEO of a large company and has a lot of wisdom to share. Further, he is a Christian which is either a bonus for you or maybe a negative, depending what you think of Christianity. This is not a "Christian" book though as the ideas can apply in any leadership I'm not really a huge fan of leadership books, I'm more of a history/theology nerd, but I know reading books like this can be helpful from time to time. This book is brief, to the point and filled with lots of great insights. DePree was the CEO of a large company and has a lot of wisdom to share. Further, he is a Christian which is either a bonus for you or maybe a negative, depending what you think of Christianity. This is not a "Christian" book though as the ideas can apply in any leadership capacity, from church to business.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sia Karamalegos

    I think Max has some great concepts, but they get lost in the confusing writing style. I think taken together, his ideas illustrate the values of a successful leader, but my fear is because of his incoherent writing style, people read this like a horoscope - they find the things that validate their own leadership style but skim over the rest of the very important characteristics of great leadership (partially because the concepts aren't clearly laid out).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    This is one of the most powerful books on leadership I've ever read. Written like a personal manifesto, former Herman Miller CEO Max De Pree talks about leadership in terms of intimacy, elegance, joy and grace. He talks about how at great organizations, it's not about what you do but who you want to become. The book is filled with many "aha" moments, and I know this will be one I'll go back to over and over again for years to come.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Silva

    As the author said, it's less of a book and more of a collection of thoughts. Overall it was an easy listen. I can appreciate the focus on the idea of a leaders job being to support and build their team. This means talking to them, and putting them in positions to be successful. It's pretty short overall (maybe like 4 hours or something) so not a big commitment. Good ROI.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ann Moody

    One of the best books about leadership. Sometimes criticized for being too simplistic, this book is needed more than ever because people have little common sense. The vast majority of leaders fail to inspire, develop, nurture or maximize the potential of their “human resources,” the people themselves who we rely on to give their best work. That’s right. Human resources are not the people running the department with that name. They are the people running your company across the board via their One of the best books about leadership. Sometimes criticized for being too simplistic, this book is needed more than ever because people have little common sense. The vast majority of leaders fail to inspire, develop, nurture or maximize the potential of their “human resources,” the people themselves who we rely on to give their best work. That’s right. Human resources are not the people running the department with that name. They are the people running your company across the board via their daily efforts. The leader’s job is to realize and reap their full potential which only occurs with the kind of leadership Max describes. I could go on for a long time and in fact I may one day write my own book about servant leadership, but I’ll just say this. If you don’t get what Max is trying to explain in this little manual, you aren’t a servant leader and you can’t fake it. It’s a philosophy, a calling that has to be at the core of your beliefs to be effective. I was recently asked what I thought was the biggest challenge about being promoted to a supervisor position. My answer: If you’re a servant leader, your biggest challenge is removing obstacles to your peoples’ success. If you’re not a servant leader, your biggest challenge is your people. I can’t defend any other leadership style, because none works as well, and nobody presented it better than the late Max DePree.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan Florin

    Leadership is an art is a masterpiece. Max the Pree, the CEO and son of furniture company Herman Miller, shares the learnings of leading a fast growing company, dealing with crisis, and becoming an inclusive corporation in the late 80s. Long after the book has been published the furniture company is being one of the most respected companies in the world. Time magazines reviewed this book as a valuable lesson in grace, style, and the elements of success. I could not agree more. It’s one of those Leadership is an art is a masterpiece. Max the Pree, the CEO and son of furniture company Herman Miller, shares the learnings of leading a fast growing company, dealing with crisis, and becoming an inclusive corporation in the late 80s. Long after the book has been published the furniture company is being one of the most respected companies in the world. Time magazines reviewed this book as a valuable lesson in grace, style, and the elements of success. I could not agree more. It’s one of those books that helps to understand how to be more effective, more elegant, more clear and convincing in taking decisions, developing corporate culture, building management skills and stimulating staff potential for the long run. I would put this book very close to High Output Management from Andy Groove, because it touches a lot of corporate development, management aspects, and people issues with a lot of thought! Both books are must-reads for the business professionals in terms of how to develop successful business philosophies. In the end here is one quote from the book that worths reflecting on: “In the end, it is important to remember that we cannot become what we need to be, by remaining what we are.” Enjoy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Fitzsimmons

    I read this book as a requirement for a class. This is not a book I would have read on my own. I'll start by saying that the book was a very easy read. The author used vocabulary that I could understand and stories that really engaged me in the reading. I did not think that a book on leadership could have sucked me in the way it did. I paid attention to every word. As for the content itself, the author did an excellent job of expressing leadership as an art which has to be learned and crafted I read this book as a requirement for a class. This is not a book I would have read on my own. I'll start by saying that the book was a very easy read. The author used vocabulary that I could understand and stories that really engaged me in the reading. I did not think that a book on leadership could have sucked me in the way it did. I paid attention to every word. As for the content itself, the author did an excellent job of expressing leadership as an art which has to be learned and crafted over the years. He backed every principle and point with an example from the company he ran and the examples made sense and did not feel like it was a stretch. One of the most important things I learned early on in the book is that there is a difference between a manager and leader. The author lays out all of the qualities needed to be a leader with the examples to back them. I feel equipped to identify the qualities of leadership I possess and those I need to work on and how to sharpen those skills.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    I was about to pass this book along to a colleague after telling her that it was the best book on leadership I'd ever read, but I found I couldn't part with it before rereading it. Turns out, while it is still the best book on leadership I've read, and I wish every leader ... .political, business, school ... would read it and apply the ethical and spiritual values it contains to their work ... it is more about business than I remembered and less about education applications ... which I must have I was about to pass this book along to a colleague after telling her that it was the best book on leadership I'd ever read, but I found I couldn't part with it before rereading it. Turns out, while it is still the best book on leadership I've read, and I wish every leader ... .political, business, school ... would read it and apply the ethical and spiritual values it contains to their work ... it is more about business than I remembered and less about education applications ... which I must have made on my own. This book is a classic, written by a very wise and kind leader who was CEO of Herman Miller for many years, and it contains ideas and ideals of leadership that anyone charged with leading others would do well to follow. I wish our current president would follow its precepts ... such as, treat others with respect, welcome opposing opinions, maintain as part of your value system a sense of caring and a sense of integrity. I believe anyone assuming a position of leadership could insure her or his success by following the model DePree describes in this little gem.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marcus Perales

    The book Leadership is an Art by Max Depree is a book that you can learn from. The book talks about the meaning of leadership in the authors own words. He talks about the experiences that he has had with this company that you get introduced to in the book. The author also introduces characters that have helped him in his journey. By the end of his journey, he knows the answer to his question? I really liked the book and thought that the book had some good points. I like how the author gives The book Leadership is an Art by Max Depree is a book that you can learn from. The book talks about the meaning of leadership in the authors own words. He talks about the experiences that he has had with this company that you get introduced to in the book. The author also introduces characters that have helped him in his journey. By the end of his journey, he knows the answer to his question? I really liked the book and thought that the book had some good points. I like how the author gives really good evidence to back up what he is saying. I liked the flow of the book also it had like a rhythm to it. One thing that I disliked about the book was that the pieces of evidence that the author gave really bored me. Overall it was a great book and I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to find out what true leadership is.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reid Mccormick

    Upon the recommendation of a respected leader, I picked up two books from Max DePree, Leadership Jazz and Leadership is an Art. I decided to read Jazz first and I really enjoyed that book. It made me excited for Art. However, my expectations may have been a bit too high. Leadership is an Art is a fine book on leadership. The message is authentic and great, but in the end, the book was rather forgettable. Nothing stood out to me. Perhaps if I read this book first and Jazz second, I would be Upon the recommendation of a respected leader, I picked up two books from Max DePree, Leadership Jazz and Leadership is an Art. I decided to read Jazz first and I really enjoyed that book. It made me excited for Art. However, my expectations may have been a bit too high. Leadership is an Art is a fine book on leadership. The message is authentic and great, but in the end, the book was rather forgettable. Nothing stood out to me. Perhaps if I read this book first and Jazz second, I would be writing a more positive review. So, in my opinion, I would tell someone to read Leadership Jazz over this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I read this book about 20 years ago. It became the foundation of the leader I hoped to become and hope I am now. I reread it today because I’m in the midst of a job change and wanted to see where I could approach this new opportunity as a better leader. I was both humbled and blessed to realized I have indeed applied most of these principals to my leadership style. Sure, I have a ways to go and new things to learn and develop. But this book was a good foundation 20 years ago and an excellent one I read this book about 20 years ago. It became the foundation of the leader I hoped to become and hope I am now. I reread it today because I’m in the midst of a job change and wanted to see where I could approach this new opportunity as a better leader. I was both humbled and blessed to realized I have indeed applied most of these principals to my leadership style. Sure, I have a ways to go and new things to learn and develop. But this book was a good foundation 20 years ago and an excellent one today as well. The art of leadership does not change, it’s the individuals that must in order for success to happen. This book had as huge an impact on my career back then as it does now.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caro

    These is my first book that I read related to my job. Was giving to me by one of the high managers in the company. I really apreciatte the gesture and I must admit that at the beginning I was afraid that I will not like it that it will only include motivational quotes the true is that it teach me a lot. It can be short but is full of lessons, it tell stories and provide perspective. I now think that everybody that wants to be a manager can start by getting ideas from this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Duncan E. Braswell

    There are some good points and concepts presented in this book; however, there were times that the writing was flowery rather than insightful. DePree has a tendency to drift his writing into the philosophical and poetic. The useful or insightful sections of the book specifically addressed the practical application of the leadership philosophy employed at Herman Miller.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Rosser

    From what I have read, this is refreshing leadership book. This book is not a giant collection of quotes, but antidotes from his own experience. He seemed to genuinely care about people and practice servant leadership. Short, well written, and will be valuable to return to in the future.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe Stack

    Out of all the books on leadership, this is one of the better ones. It is not a step by step instruction manual. It is an engaging exploration of the philosophy of leadership. Anyone who is interesting in a management position, or is in such a position, should find this book worth reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Matt Diephouse

    This book was a mess. It lacks any overall structure or direction, leaving each page disconnected. Hidden inside are some good ideas about recognizing the humanity in people and treating them as whole persons. But I'm sure there are better books to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Great book on leadership.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brian Tucker

    All sound principles here. I especially liked covenant management topic.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dagny

    The beauty and grace of employees is cherished in this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Feroz Fernandes

    Amazing! Worth a read for anyone at any time.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Butler

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Anecdotal business memoir with story telling. Mostly common sense conclusions.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hà Nguyệt Linh

    Sorry but nein. Not kind of leadership I’m seeking...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Clint Davison

    Good book, just not for me. It's a little wordy, but has really good principles.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.