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Berisi 3 cerita : 1. Hilangnya Lady Frances Arfax 2. Tiga Orang yang Bernama Garridebs 3. Wisteria House


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Berisi 3 cerita : 1. Hilangnya Lady Frances Arfax 2. Tiga Orang yang Bernama Garridebs 3. Wisteria House

30 review for The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge Ebook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aishu Rehman

    In this short story, Holmes is visited by a perturbed proper English gentleman, John Scott Eccles, who wishes to discuss something “grotesque”. No sooner has he arrived at 221B Baker Street than Inspector Gregson also shows up, along with Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Constabulary. They wish a statement from Eccles about the murder near Esher last night. A note in the dead man’s pocket indicates that Eccles said that he would be at the victim’s house that night. Eccles is shocked to hear of Aloy In this short story, Holmes is visited by a perturbed proper English gentleman, John Scott Eccles, who wishes to discuss something “grotesque”. No sooner has he arrived at 221B Baker Street than Inspector Gregson also shows up, along with Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Constabulary. They wish a statement from Eccles about the murder near Esher last night. A note in the dead man’s pocket indicates that Eccles said that he would be at the victim’s house that night. Eccles is shocked to hear of Aloysius Garcia’s beating death. Yes, he spent the night at Wisteria Lodge, Garcia’s rented house, but when he woke up in the morning, he found that Garcia and his servants had all disappeared. He was alone in an empty house. He last remembers seeing Garcia at about one o’clock in the morning when he came to Eccles’s room to ask if he had rung.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge" is the first story in the His Last Bow: 8 Stories story collection, the eighth publication in the Sherlock Holmes series. Holmes receives a visit from John Eccles, who tells him how he was invited to stay last night at a new friend, Mr Garcia's, lodge, only to awake to everyone having vanished. But in the middle of telling his story, the police arrive with the news that Garcia has been found murdered. Holmes investigates. This was a typical Doyle story, but so "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge" is the first story in the His Last Bow: 8 Stories story collection, the eighth publication in the Sherlock Holmes series. Holmes receives a visit from John Eccles, who tells him how he was invited to stay last night at a new friend, Mr Garcia's, lodge, only to awake to everyone having vanished. But in the middle of telling his story, the police arrive with the news that Garcia has been found murdered. Holmes investigates. This was a typical Doyle story, but something about it I found a little dull for some reason.

  3. 5 out of 5

    LGandT

    Well the Granada series surely toned this one down to a palatable taste. Aside from some parts I liked this one

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jason Parent

    Have gone through 40 hours plus of Holmes, I've learned that "elementary" is not even close to one of the most used words. In fact, it was used maybe three times that I've noticed. "Singular," on the other hand, is not a very singular word.

  5. 4 out of 5

    AhmEd MokhTar

    Review of this story: According this story, Sherlock Holmes is a private detective as well as hero of the story and Dr. Watson is another one important person of this story. Following Sherlock Holmes through a series of his investigations with Watson is really engaging. Most of them always start with some form of peculiar detail and then turns around to change around just from the little details that he observes. That is the charm of Sherlock Holmes and it keeps us wondering what his next step Review of this story: According this story, Sherlock Holmes is a private detective as well as hero of the story and Dr. Watson is another one important person of this story. Following Sherlock Holmes through a series of his investigations with Watson is really engaging. Most of them always start with some form of peculiar detail and then turns around to change around just from the little details that he observes. That is the charm of Sherlock Holmes and it keeps us wondering what his next step is and how each case will end. It’s a very enjoyable read. Dr. Watson, his trusted companion, is the narrator of each of these stories. He documents each one through his eyes and his experience. My Experience: I recently had the opportunity to read the Arthur Conan Doyle story “The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge;” which I was a bit surprised I hadn’t read this story before considering I love Sherlock Holmes stories. This one is actually one of the better Holmes stories I’ve come across too. It starts out with a man coming to Holmes after visiting a friend and discovering the entire household gone the next morning. Shortly after arriving, the police show up and reveal his host has been found murdered and, even though he isn’t really a suspect, they have a feeling his invitation to the lodge was related to the actual … crime committed. The story has everything from a possible affair to voodoo and it is a very gripping tale, even though it is somewhat shorter than I usually bother reading. I like the fact Holmes has competition from an inspector who doesn’t want his help because he wants to make a name for himself and actually ends up coming to the same conclusion as Holmes, albeit through a few different ways. The ending is a bit confusing and I had to read it a couple times to understand everything completely. But, overall, I feel this is a story that is worth reading; especially if you like Sherlock Holmes books and short stories.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Saman

    Sherlock's client Mr.John Scott Eccles is a suspect in the murder of Mr.Aloysius Garcia of Wisteria Lodge, whose house Eccles visited the previous night on his invitation. The cook and servant fled after their master's death. Sherlock, yet, is of the opinion that Garcia invited Eccles because he had a criminal enterprise and desired to establish an alibi. As Sherlock and Inspector Baynes proceed in their investigation, they come across Old Jacobean Grange of High Gables less than half a mile acr Sherlock's client Mr.John Scott Eccles is a suspect in the murder of Mr.Aloysius Garcia of Wisteria Lodge, whose house Eccles visited the previous night on his invitation. The cook and servant fled after their master's death. Sherlock, yet, is of the opinion that Garcia invited Eccles because he had a criminal enterprise and desired to establish an alibi. As Sherlock and Inspector Baynes proceed in their investigation, they come across Old Jacobean Grange of High Gables less than half a mile across from the scene of the tragedy. There they find Mr.Henderson, his children, their English governess, Miss Burnet and his friend and secretary Mr.Lucas. They also discover the secret of the Tiger of San Pedro. What is it? Are these clues beads on the same necklace that will help Sherlock unravel the mystery? Or are they scattered enough to deviate him from his path? While the inclusion of voodooism was both unnecessary and frivolous, the story was well written. But it lacked excitement and the essence of mystery.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Abi_88

    The only reason I didn't rate it five stars is because I did not like some of the themes presented in this story. Some of the description used for the mulatto servant seemed very racist but I also understand that the author belonged to a different era. However, the story was still as interesting as any other of Doyle's stories.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Ahronian

    My first experience with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I was not accustomed to his writing style, which meant I had to re-read certain passages to fully get their meaning, but over all an enjoyable short story.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd Hughes

    For once the the official police prove clever. 5 stars because I consider SH essential reading for people who like to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Roberto Mattos

    In this short story, Holmes is visited by a perturbed proper English gentleman, John Scott Eccles, who wishes to discuss something “grotesque”. No sooner has he arrived at 221B Baker Street than Inspector Gregson also shows up, along with Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Constabulary. They wish a statement from Eccles about the murder near Esher last night. A note in the dead man’s pocket indicates that Eccles said that he would be at the victim’s house that night. Eccles is shocked to hear of Aloy In this short story, Holmes is visited by a perturbed proper English gentleman, John Scott Eccles, who wishes to discuss something “grotesque”. No sooner has he arrived at 221B Baker Street than Inspector Gregson also shows up, along with Inspector Baynes of the Surrey Constabulary. They wish a statement from Eccles about the murder near Esher last night. A note in the dead man’s pocket indicates that Eccles said that he would be at the victim’s house that night. Eccles is shocked to hear of Aloysius Garcia’s beating death. Yes, he spent the night at Wisteria Lodge, Garcia’s rented house, but when he woke up in the morning, he found that Garcia and his servants had all disappeared. He was alone in an empty house. He last remembers seeing Garcia at about one o’clock in the morning when he came to Eccles’s room to ask if he had rung. Eccles met Garcia, a Spaniard, through an acquaintance, and seemed to form an unlikely friendship right away. Garcia invited Eccles to stay at his house for a few days, but when Eccles got there, he could tell that something was amiss. Garcia seemed distracted by something, and the whole mood of the visit seemed quite sombre. Indeed, Garcia’s mood became even darker once his servant handed him a note that evening. Eccles left Wisteria Lodge and inquired about the place at the estate agent’s, and was surprised to find that the rent on the house had been paid in full. Odder still, no-one at the Spanish Embassy in London had heard of Garcia. Inspector Baynes produces the note that Eccles saw Garcia receive. It reads “Our own colours, green and white. Green open, white shut. Main stair, first corridor, seventh right, green baize. Godspeed. D.”, in a woman’s handwriting. Could it have been a tryst? Could a jealous husband be behind Garcia’s death? It emerges that Baynes has deduced that Garcia’s body had been lying out in the open since one o’clock, but Eccles says that this is impossible, as Garcia came to his room about then. Holmes theorizes that Garcia may have tampered with the clocks to get Eccles to bed earlier than he thought it was, and that the whole business of coming to his room and making a point of mentioning that it was one o’clock — when it was probably much earlier — was likely aimed at setting up an alibi, but for what? All that Holmes can deduce is that the murderer lives near Wisteria Lodge, and in a big house. Holmes and Dr. Watson go to Esher to see Wisteria Lodge with Inspector Baynes. The constable guarding the house reports a hair-raising experience. A brutish-looking man — the devil himself, thought the constable — looked in the window. The constable gave chase, but the intruder got away. Holmes establishes by the footmarks that the constable did not imagine this. Inside the house, a number of odd items are to be seen. Something resembling a mummified baby, a bird torn to pieces, a pail of blood, and a platter full of charred bones. Holmes later links these to voodoo, providing an important clue. Suddenly, however, five days after the murder, Holmes is astonished to read in the newspaper that Baynes has arrested someone, Garcia’s cook, the brutish fellow who had given the constable such a start. He provides little information, though — only grunts. Holmes is sure that the cook is not the murderer, and warns Baynes. Baynes, however, declines Holmes's assistance and advice. Holmes spends the next day reconnoitering the local country houses, and finds one of interest, the Henderson household, whose master has obviously spent time in the tropics, and whose servant is a dark-skinned foreigner. Henderson’s two girls have an English governess named Burnet. Holmes also learns from a sacked gardener that Henderson is rich, and scared of something, although no-one can say what. Nor can anyone say where he came from. Henderson is also violent. Holmes believes that the cryptic note came from this household, High Gable, and the writer could only be Miss Burnet, who has not been seen since the night of the murder. Holmes decides to go to High Gable, at night, to see whether he can “strike at the very heart of the mystery”. He does not get the chance. Warner, the sacked gardener, comes in and announces that the Hendersons have fled by train, and tried to take Miss Burnet with them. He, however, wrestled her into a cab and brought her to the inn where Holmes and Watson are staying. She was obviously unwilling to go with Henderson for she had been drugged with opium. “Henderson” has also been identified, by Inspector Baynes. He is Don Juan Murillo, the Tiger of San Pedro, a hated and feared overthrown dictator from Central America. Garcia, who was from San Pedro, not Spain, got himself killed in a revenge plot, it turns out. Miss Burnet was also part of the plot. Yes, she wrote the note, but Murillo’s secretary caught her doing it, Murillo confined her, and then awaited Garcia’s move, killing him. Miss Burnet’s real name is Mrs. Victor Durando. Her late husband was from San Pedro, its ambassador to Britain and a potential political rival to Murillo. Murillo had him recalled and shot so that he could not pose a threat to Murillo's position. Out of the entire collection of Holmes stories by Doyle, this is the only story in which a police inspector (specifically, Inspector Baynes) is as competent as Holmes. Holmes has nothing but praise for Inspector Baynes, believing that he will rise high in his profession, for he has instinct and intuition. Inspector Lestrade rarely received this kind of appreciation from Holmes. San Pedro is a fictitious country; its colors are green and white, explaining one part of the cryptic note. Murillo and his companions give the police the slip in London, and resurface in Madrid under new aliases. However, they are both murdered, apparently by Nihilists and their killers are never caught. Excellent plot, I recommend this book to any reader that appreciates a well written mystery short story. It will keep them entertained for a couple of hours.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marthese Formosa

    I'm practically reading a Holmes mystery a day. I enjoy them. Wisteria Lodge starts with Mr. Scott Eccles going to Holmes with a peculiar case and soon after, he is joined by two police constables. Mr. Scott Eccles had visited a new friend, Mr. Garcia but when he wakes up, no one is in the house. The police come with news that Mr. Garcia had been murdered. What follows in an investigation (or rather investigations as Mr.Banes also investigates) to see what occurred. The second part of the story is I'm practically reading a Holmes mystery a day. I enjoy them. Wisteria Lodge starts with Mr. Scott Eccles going to Holmes with a peculiar case and soon after, he is joined by two police constables. Mr. Scott Eccles had visited a new friend, Mr. Garcia but when he wakes up, no one is in the house. The police come with news that Mr. Garcia had been murdered. What follows in an investigation (or rather investigations as Mr.Banes also investigates) to see what occurred. The second part of the story is a separate story, 'The Tiger of San Pedro'. Holmes has many tropes. One of them is disguises or people going under different names which is present here. Something that Watson mentions in passing, always proves a clue as to Holmes' methods. Lastly, I enjoy them because they are simple and intricate at once and because bless A.C.Doyle, romance is almost never a feature.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vineeta Tyagi

    Racist Watson is just so weird, after enjoying this character in adaptations. I mean look at this : "I thought that it was a mummified negro baby, and then it seemed a very twisted and ancient monkey." Not cool Arthur! I mean I get that this was written in another era, but it's good that Holmes does most of the analyzing, because despite being a doctor, Watson's anatomical judgements make him sound like some illiterate small minded peasant. Though, this story is Arthur Conan Doyle at peak racism Racist Watson is just so weird, after enjoying this character in adaptations. I mean look at this : "I thought that it was a mummified negro baby, and then it seemed a very twisted and ancient monkey." Not cool Arthur! I mean I get that this was written in another era, but it's good that Holmes does most of the analyzing, because despite being a doctor, Watson's anatomical judgements make him sound like some illiterate small minded peasant. Though, this story is Arthur Conan Doyle at peak racism, with nothing even remotely brilliant to say.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charles Junkin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed this tale as a short, simple source of entertainment. I was a bit disappointed that the reader is not given enough information to try to solve the crime; Holmes is able to solve it only with unfair advantage of having investigated the neighbors long before the crime takes place, which he does not reveal until all the leads have been found to lead nowhere. Still, it’s always fun to throw some Sherlock Holmes into my reading cue.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Darinda

    The first short story in His Last Bow by Arthur Conan Doyle. A man visits Sherlock Holmes to ask for help when his friend is missing, and soon the missing friend is found dead. Complex and entertaining.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Azuma-chan

    I found this case rather complicated that I had to re-read the second part again. I know complications make the story interesting, but it wasn't that sort. I felt like he wanted to twist things to make it incredible or something but it didn't feel like that.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paroma

    Sherlock Holmes— one of the most favorite detectives This story was one of Sherlock Holmes’ classics. Nice and light really liked it! Highly recommend this book to all crime fiction lovers

  17. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Harvey

    Quick enjoyable read I can’t believe I missed this morning, I thought I had read all of the holes works. This one is perhaps a little less satisfying than a lot of the stores, it’s not incredibly intricate, but still a pleasure to read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amy Ingalls

    This one was just OK. It was missing something-- I didn't feel like the reader was given the chance to solve the mystery along with Holmes. I did like the inclusion of a very intelligent police inspector.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ashly Lynn

    By god, I've done it! I've read my first Sherlock story ever! And I quite enjoyed it. FRTC

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roger Catlett

    always a big fan of these short stories about Sherlock Holmes, especially like to hear them dramatized

  21. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    Doyle definitely has themes that he likes to stick to in his stories, but I liked the fact that the police officer wasn't a complete idiot in this one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This was a long and drawn out Sherlock Holmes mystery, but it's a good mystery nonetheless, with excellent deductions of clues from the master detective.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Redwan Hasan

    Promising development ended in rather simple ending.

  24. 5 out of 5

    JayeL

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was free on Amazon for the Kindle and a very quick read. It is a short story. I don't think it is one of Conan Doyle's best. I would have preferred it to be included in the short story compilation The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, I read previously, though it was clearly longer than those stories. I did like the back story to the resolution of this murder and wonder if the uncaught villan will reappear in another story?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Collin A.

    Aside from the occasional racially-tinged passage, The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge is easily one if the best Holmes stories above read. What truly establishes this story as a testament to Doyle's writing is the amount of characterization and story pacing that compose this story. The plot flowed a a fantastic pace with plenty of developments to spice things up while the many characters involved in the affair all bristled with individuality and played a role in the story. A fantastic read!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Somdutta

    Another of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's marvelous mystery stories.At the outset , the plot seemed to be quite complex but as it unraveled through Holmes's intelligent scheme of deduction by gaining evidence, things fell into place. A fresh thing which I found in this story was , a character who did in a way match up to the ways to deduction and reasoning to solve a crime like Holmes.The character was Inspector Baynes. He seems to have quite a bright future in his field.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Skye Gwynn

    What can I possibly say about Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and his incredibly famous creation, Sherlock Holmes? I don’t know what I was thinking by not reading any of these novels and short stories for the first twenty-four-years of my life, but I have now (at least somewhat) amended this grievous error. To read the rest of my review, please visit my book blog: http://mrsgwynnsbookclub.wordpress.co...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abbey

    Not my favourite Sherlock Holmes adventure by a while, but still a good read. I always feel that Holmes is not particularly likable, though also not easy to dislike - he just is. This is one of the books where that comes across for me, although of course Watson is his likeable self. A nice short mystery with a satisfactory ending, the Inspector was great too!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rao Javed

    in spite of all my fondness towards Sherlock, only this part was unable to amuse or appeal me. Perhaps is my mistake that I use to fell a sleep while reading it, which left a bit of details vague for me still it was fine mystery. Which fine end.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashish Seth

    First Doyle gives very unrelated clues. Then in the other half he give a simple cause of crime. But as always the story was gripping and intense. He managed such complexity without the use of forensics and technology which is quite appreciable.

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