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The Complete Knifepoint Horror

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Knifepoint Horror is an original genre which strips tales of supernatural suspense down to such a raw, minimalist form that literally nothing is left over to allow the mind a respite of even a single paragraph. To accomplish this, the most primal element of storytelling--a single human voice describing events exactly as it experienced them--is adhered to without embellishm Knifepoint Horror is an original genre which strips tales of supernatural suspense down to such a raw, minimalist form that literally nothing is left over to allow the mind a respite of even a single paragraph. To accomplish this, the most primal element of storytelling--a single human voice describing events exactly as it experienced them--is adhered to without embellishment or exception. Within these pages lie taut, unadorned first person narratives from agonized souls, minus all the stylish techniques which dilute, stretch, and burden tales of terror with unnecessary detail. Here you will find no entry into the thoughts of any characters other than the narrator's, no standard passages of dialogue, no humor, no extraneous gore, no romance. The twenty untitled stories inside this book spill forward without page or even paragraph breaks, taking the form of uninterrupted confessions, creating an effect of pure campfire terror. Knifepoint strips away all the tired conventions which water down traditional horror fiction, leaving nothing but the story's riveting spine to compel and chill you to the core. If this collection is expanded in the future, those possessing a copy of any particular edition need only send a page from it to the author to receive a free copy of the new one.


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Knifepoint Horror is an original genre which strips tales of supernatural suspense down to such a raw, minimalist form that literally nothing is left over to allow the mind a respite of even a single paragraph. To accomplish this, the most primal element of storytelling--a single human voice describing events exactly as it experienced them--is adhered to without embellishm Knifepoint Horror is an original genre which strips tales of supernatural suspense down to such a raw, minimalist form that literally nothing is left over to allow the mind a respite of even a single paragraph. To accomplish this, the most primal element of storytelling--a single human voice describing events exactly as it experienced them--is adhered to without embellishment or exception. Within these pages lie taut, unadorned first person narratives from agonized souls, minus all the stylish techniques which dilute, stretch, and burden tales of terror with unnecessary detail. Here you will find no entry into the thoughts of any characters other than the narrator's, no standard passages of dialogue, no humor, no extraneous gore, no romance. The twenty untitled stories inside this book spill forward without page or even paragraph breaks, taking the form of uninterrupted confessions, creating an effect of pure campfire terror. Knifepoint strips away all the tired conventions which water down traditional horror fiction, leaving nothing but the story's riveting spine to compel and chill you to the core. If this collection is expanded in the future, those possessing a copy of any particular edition need only send a page from it to the author to receive a free copy of the new one.

30 review for The Complete Knifepoint Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    I now join the legions of Soren Narnia's hand-picked victims. I entered the First-Reads giveaway, but didn't win it - nonetheless, Soren Narnia was kind (or perhaps sadistic) enough to send me one. I'm uncertain whether to be thankful or wary. Knifepoint Horror, to those not in the know, is an experimental form of horror developed by the author himself. The short fiction herein is devoid of capitalization, story titles, and paragraph breaks - the last is signified by a simple / and slightly greater I now join the legions of Soren Narnia's hand-picked victims. I entered the First-Reads giveaway, but didn't win it - nonetheless, Soren Narnia was kind (or perhaps sadistic) enough to send me one. I'm uncertain whether to be thankful or wary. Knifepoint Horror, to those not in the know, is an experimental form of horror developed by the author himself. The short fiction herein is devoid of capitalization, story titles, and paragraph breaks - the last is signified by a simple / and slightly greater spacing. In addition to creating a purely claustrophobic feel, this also creates a more immediate and urgent aura to each of the stories. The action is relentless, the horror truly terrifying, and the gore revolting. This is a book that I enjoyed hating. The Complete Knifepoint Horror deserves a spot alongside H.P. Lovecraft on the shelves. It deserves to be read, studied, and remembered - not that anyone would have a chance of forgetting the book after reading it. These stories disgusted me, they terrified me, and they made it difficult to fall asleep. Reading this book while alone, at night, in an unfamiliar house was also a massive mistake. I didn't feel as well protected as I would have liked by the Australian Shepherd I forced to share the room with me. Soren Narnia you are a genius, if a terribly twisted one. I can't wait to see what you come up with next.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Some of the most terrifying tales I have ever heard, and I'm saying that as an admitted horror buff constantly looking for things that will actually scare me. "Outcast" in particular is a beautiful, memorable yet extremely disturbing story. (note: I was sent a copy of this book, but had already heard all the stories read in podcast form before reading)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brigid Keely

    I received this book as a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. "The Complete Knifepoint Horror," by Soren Narnia, is a self-published collection of 20 horror stories. While most of them have excellent cores of lurking creepiness, the stories as a whole are damaged by lack of competent beta readers and/or editing. While most of the stories are related by different people in different areas, they all are expressed in the same voice, same tone, same expressions, same cadence, etc. This is esp I received this book as a Goodreads First Reads giveaway. "The Complete Knifepoint Horror," by Soren Narnia, is a self-published collection of 20 horror stories. While most of them have excellent cores of lurking creepiness, the stories as a whole are damaged by lack of competent beta readers and/or editing. While most of the stories are related by different people in different areas, they all are expressed in the same voice, same tone, same expressions, same cadence, etc. This is especially noticeable in a story set 200 years ago in France. I had to keep checking the introductory date/location blurb. Several of the stories go on for far too long, containing too much extraneous stuff (for instance, one story features a dude attacked by a creepy/crazy woman, becoming addicted to weirdly-named prescription medication, become an alcoholic, working for a crime scene clean up business until his boss vanishes possibly murdered by a ghost, fell in with satanists, etc. It's just TOO MUCH for a SHORT STORY and feels like it should have been split into several stories or at least chapters). Narnia also uses a lot of really big/fancy words that are jarringly out of place. I'm a big fan of creepypasta and this really feels like that. It's horrific urban legends and things lurking around the corners and schoolyard rumors of demonic possession that are actually true. I wanted to like this book, but the roughness of the writing and lack of editing really hampered that, which is a shame because as I said there are good ideas here. Narnia especially handles written communication from the dead/spirits in interesting way. He's a creative writer who is very familiar with the horror genre. Narnia made some stylistic choices with the design of the book involving the layout. Everything's in lower case letters and there are no paragraph breaks, chapter titles/index, or page numbers. The margins are pretty narrow. The lack of white space makes the book physically fatiguing to read. I understand why he made the choice, it's an interesting one, and I love it when authors/creators play with format and design in fiction. So points to him for trying something like this. However, I don't think it adds anything to the stories, and I think it takes away quite a bit from them. There were times when I literally felt like I was slogging through a story not in an emotional way (oh gosh so scary what's happening!) but in a physical way (ugh when's this going to end my eyes are tired and I have a headache) and that kept me from enjoying the stories as much as I might have. If you're a big fan of horror that hinges more on psychological terror than gore, if you like creepypasta a lot, if you enjoyed "John Dies At The End" but could do without the humor and dick jokes/homophobia then you will probably like this. Maybe. I wanted to like it. I would have enjoyed it a lot more with a competent and strict editor ruthlessly trimming dead weight and five-dollar words and unneeded exposition, really sharpening the stories. I'm hoping that Narnia can produce horror that's properly edited, because he's got something going on. Unfortunately it's bogged down in less than ideal writing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Zimmerman

    My fiance received this book through a Goodreads giveaway. I entered the same drawing but didn't win a copy so he lent the book to me so I could read it too. The Complete Knifepoint Horror consists of short stories that are unconnected to each other. The formatting was a surprise to me but it wasn't as difficult to read as I thought it might be. Reading without paragraphs or any capitalization was a novel way to read and it really did strip away a lot of the 'distractions' of reading. My fiance received this book through a Goodreads giveaway. I entered the same drawing but didn't win a copy so he lent the book to me so I could read it too. The Complete Knifepoint Horror consists of short stories that are unconnected to each other. The formatting was a surprise to me but it wasn't as difficult to read as I thought it might be. Reading without paragraphs or any capitalization was a novel way to read and it really did strip away a lot of the 'distractions' of reading. Occasionally I had to re-read a couple of sentences because I might not have noticed a period at the end of a sentence but overall, the absence of capital letters didn't detract from the writing. I noted that the pace of my reading increased during sections that were escalating to a climax, as if I had been swept into a quickening current. There were no paragraph breaks or page breaks to slow the movement of the writing, which I found to be exhilarating. Each of the stories, although not connected to each other, has an element of the unknown/paranormal/unexplainable. I was unable to predict the ending of any of the stories, which was unsettling and also exhilarating. Some of the stories end with seemingly no resolution, leaving me (the reader) thinking "huh, what NOW?" Others have some resolution by the end but there are unfinished or unresolved aspects to each story. Creepy, disturbing, unsettling, and ominous are just a few of the words I would use to describe the stories in this collection. The author has done a masterful job of going outside the norm of typical horror writing and taking the reader on an eerie trip into uncharted, unpredictable territory.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    Soren was kind enough to forward a copy at the end of the Giveaway even though I wasn't selected; makes me a handpicked victim. Looking it over, as one does before reading any book (akin to pacing the edge of a pool) I have to say that it is devoid of capitalization and paragraph breaks, giving it a stream-of-consiousness look; both dense and daunting. This is a collection of roughly fifteen, or so, short stories each of which start off with "My name is..." Each of the tale Soren was kind enough to forward a copy at the end of the Giveaway even though I wasn't selected; makes me a handpicked victim. Looking it over, as one does before reading any book (akin to pacing the edge of a pool) I have to say that it is devoid of capitalization and paragraph breaks, giving it a stream-of-consiousness look; both dense and daunting. This is a collection of roughly fifteen, or so, short stories each of which start off with "My name is..." Each of the tales told here are pretty cool (except for the one I didn't finish; something about billion hands 5). Some have a sort of convoluted weirdness like the first one in which the guy hired himself out to be the cameraman for this other guy. The other guy actually had him sign a contract to do just that—film him for the day, all day—and not ask questions. They wind up in the cameraman's grandfather's house and the employer-guy dies. It was just messed up, in a good way. These stories touch on odd occurences, rituals, alternate realities, sporangela, the grin man, subway incidents...it is really quite a collection, very entertaining. The lack of capitalization wasn't really a problem. But having absolutely no paragraph breaks is complete and utter madness for the eyes. I had to remember to finger my reading position just to take a sip of tea. I would sometimes get lost trying to find where the hell I was and wound up rereading whold pages sometimes. I loved the stories, but I hated the assembly. Still, you know, these stories...okay...assembly aside: four stars... Now off to something with good paragraph breaks and a bigger font.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Katie Hilton

    *******This is a GoodReads Giveaway******* Honestly, this is the best collection of spooky stories I’ve read in a LONG time! The stories are written as first-person recounts and the way Soren Narnia plays with punctuation gives the stories an authentic vibe. It took me much longer than I expected to read it because I couldn’t read it before I went to bed. At one point in the book, I was getting goose bumps I was so scared. I had to stop reading because I was freaking myself *******This is a GoodReads Giveaway******* Honestly, this is the best collection of spooky stories I’ve read in a LONG time! The stories are written as first-person recounts and the way Soren Narnia plays with punctuation gives the stories an authentic vibe. It took me much longer than I expected to read it because I couldn’t read it before I went to bed. At one point in the book, I was getting goose bumps I was so scared. I had to stop reading because I was freaking myself out! I really enjoyed reading this collection. The stories varied in subject matter and setting. It was a little bit of everything for a horror enthusiast—possession and demons, ghost sightings, to historic ghost towns and curses. It was a cornucopia of dreadful things. In terms of what you can expect, when I tell my friends about it, I describe it as a 'Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark' for adults. You may be entertained, you may be scared, and some of the stories may leave a lasting impression. Thank you Soren Narnia and thank you GoodReads for the opportunity to read this book

  7. 5 out of 5

    Red

    I have to confess that although I'm a big fan of the podcast, I haven't "read" Knifepoint Horror. However, I feel comfortable leaving a 5-star review anyway. Partly, it's because I want to show my appreciation for the audio version of these tales. They're smart, well-told (when read, at least) and genuinely creepy. I'm also happy to give 5-stars because I want to offset the pretentious 1-star reviews from people who "won" the book and decided to give it a long-winded version of "I di I have to confess that although I'm a big fan of the podcast, I haven't "read" Knifepoint Horror. However, I feel comfortable leaving a 5-star review anyway. Partly, it's because I want to show my appreciation for the audio version of these tales. They're smart, well-told (when read, at least) and genuinely creepy. I'm also happy to give 5-stars because I want to offset the pretentious 1-star reviews from people who "won" the book and decided to give it a long-winded version of "I didn't like this very much because it's not the sort of thing that interests me." 1-star reviews are for things you HATE, everybody, especially if you got that thing for FREE FROM A RAFFLE. If you're JUST bored or disinterested, you should go LITERALLY masturbate instead figuratively doing it in front of all of us on goodreads. Don't be an asshole.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I recieved this as a goodreads giveaway and I absolutely loved it. It is rare that a book actually scares me but the stories in this book were quite chilling and creepy. Each story starts off with "My name is..." and then continues on down a dark twisted path. I was not sure how I would feel about this book but I absolutely loved it. I have already loaned it to my friend who said she was reading one of the stories downstairs late at night and had to stop and go upstairs so she wouldn't be alone I recieved this as a goodreads giveaway and I absolutely loved it. It is rare that a book actually scares me but the stories in this book were quite chilling and creepy. Each story starts off with "My name is..." and then continues on down a dark twisted path. I was not sure how I would feel about this book but I absolutely loved it. I have already loaned it to my friend who said she was reading one of the stories downstairs late at night and had to stop and go upstairs so she wouldn't be alone =) Great read for any horror fan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Doreena

    This is yet another of those times where I really wish Goodreads used half stars. I would give this one 3.5. I liked it, the stories had a lot of punch for how short they were. I found myself engrossed in them. They were descriptive enough to keep you into them, but left enough to the imagination. Daisy, this would be a good one for you IF you can overlook the way it is written. :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    NOT the kindle edition, I listen to Soren's stories on the knifepoint horror podcast. Not all stories are 5 stars, but as a whole, it's a pretty awesome podcast with some seriously weird and creepy stuff....that ostrich... ewww...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Kaniasty

    Not much to say about this book. Found nothing scary about any of the stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rix D.

    Absolutely love short storys. This author nailed it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Super creepy tales (esp The Staircase and Fields) to listen to in the dark.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel

    (won in a Goodreads First Reads Contest) First things first, the stories in this book range from the truly scary (like House of Leaves scary and Rosemary's Baby scary) to the real good to the "well, I can at least see what he tried to do." Most of them are on the closer to "should be considered a classic" status, but definitely not all of them. That said, the advertisement/synopsis/summary above is completely and utterly false. "Within these pages lie ... first person narratives ... (won in a Goodreads First Reads Contest) First things first, the stories in this book range from the truly scary (like House of Leaves scary and Rosemary's Baby scary) to the real good to the "well, I can at least see what he tried to do." Most of them are on the closer to "should be considered a classic" status, but definitely not all of them. That said, the advertisement/synopsis/summary above is completely and utterly false. "Within these pages lie ... first person narratives ... minus all the stylish techniques which dilute, stretch and burden tales of terror with unnecessary detail" is a completely false statement. It also holds a false assumption: that the story is what makes a story scary; not the way it is told. Time and again that has been shown to be false (a prime example even mentioned in this book with zombie movies). It is precisely the style of the stories that has made Poe and Lovecraft and even King as "last name reference worthy" as they are. More importantly, it is the stylistic tricks of these stories that give them their complete and utter power. Those that verge closer to Lovecraft (and there are many of those) are often the most powerful. In fact, those that are longest almost completely overwhelm any of the shorter pieces ... precisely because of the "unnecessary details" that the summary decries. And let's be clear, there are a ton of "unnecessary details" included in these stories. All but two start out with the phrase "my name is [first name] [last name]." For the first person narrative, this is an unnecessary detail. Only in one story is the narrator referred to by name anywhere else. What is that phrase? A stylistic trick. A way of beginning a ritual. And so many of these stories are paced as rituals into the unknown. They are wonderful examples of how style and technique and font tricks (no uppercase letters except for a few typos - "Saturday" is jarring ... but my favorite typo was "i am in an innkeeper" - no paragraph breaks - unless you include the "/" that separate entire scenes - and the wonder of a serif font held constant throughout) intensify the experience of reading the stories. Not since the aforementioned House of Leaves has typography played such an important role in the horror. But these are stylistic tricks. The entire premise of these stories is a stylistic choice and an overall fantastically executed choice. But to deny the very thing that gives this book and these stories (which, by the way, includes one of the few amazing zombie stories ever written and a ton of fantastic ghost stories and great "strange cult" stories also) the power they have is like saying all vampire stories are equal or even - gulp - that the Dune books by Brian Herbert are comparable to Dune by Frank Herbert since they take place in the same universe and are based off of similar notes. ----- Stories: If you are interested in horror, you need to find this book right now. Do it and read it (I don't want to listen to the free podcasts ... there is no way they will hold the same sway over my mind). Now if possible. The ones that are awesome - at least half of them - are more than worth your time and money. I will probably seek this man's other work out. I hope it's as good as his best stories here. I don't know if I could wish for better.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlynn

    this book was received as an arc copy through goodreads firstreads. this book is the sad case of the medium destroying the message of obfuscating the purpose of the prose. the complete knifepoint horror is a horror anthology written without any of the needless yokes of english including proper punctuation capitalization or syntax. there are not even page numbers or page breaks in the novel. one should consider themselves lucky there are paragraph breaks. the actual horror stories this book was received as an arc copy through goodreads firstreads. this book is the sad case of the medium destroying the message of obfuscating the purpose of the prose. the complete knifepoint horror is a horror anthology written without any of the needless yokes of english including proper punctuation capitalization or syntax. there are not even page numbers or page breaks in the novel. one should consider themselves lucky there are paragraph breaks. the actual horror stories themselves were decent and alone would have earned the book at least three stars. a slight lovecraft vibe was present with ancient evils and unknowable menaces behind the scenes at every turn. there are some awesome monster descriptions including a spectral alligator centipede hybrid. what holds the stories back is the sheer number of run on sentences and lack of focus. we get a description of one thing that leads to another that leads to another and back to the first thing then on to a fourth etc. there is quite a bit of telling as opposed to showing. what killed this completely and utterly was the choice in writing style. as stated, the author eschewed any of the standard rules of english stating that they were only getting in the way of experiencing the horror. this unique take on stream of consciousness style was intended to feel more like the inner workings of someones mind and give us a sharper feeling of their experience. instead it made the work all by incomprehensible. this book took months to complete despite its short length. why? because it was mentally exhausting. my eyes would lose their place on the page and i needed to get a piece of paper to use to keep track of where i was. all the subtle tools that show emotion, tone, attributions etc are missing in this work. the author seems to feel that these things are fetters from the man and like cursive can be forgotten once learned. it screamed to me that the author fundamentally does not understand the written word. i should note that the giveaway did state that there was precious little in the realm of proper writing in this book. i was curious and decided to forge ahead anyway so part of the blame falls to me. however it is interesting to note that even the back jacket of the book is written with perfect punctuation capitalization and syntax. someone knew itd throw potential readers off alright. if you are curious as to how i finished this book let me share a link with you. http://knifepointhorror.libsyn.com/ nearly every story in the book is available as a free audiobook podcast. the quality of the podcasts are excellent. every time i finished a chapter on my own i would listen to the corresponding podcast to help me follow what happened. i could not have finished the book without that help. tldr this book will give you a massive headache and eyestrain with confusion as the only reward for your perseverance. listen to the free podcasts instead.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    What an incredible collection of horror and weird fiction. Narnia rightfully deserves a place on the shelf next to Lovecraft, of who you can feel his heavy influencing hand in the majority of these stories to great effect. Each of these tales is told from the perspective of a voice, reiterating their raw experience through some incredibly atmospheric story-telling. In my opinion, Narnia manages to meet, and potentially surpass, the lofty definition of 'Lovecraftian' with so many of these stories What an incredible collection of horror and weird fiction. Narnia rightfully deserves a place on the shelf next to Lovecraft, of who you can feel his heavy influencing hand in the majority of these stories to great effect. Each of these tales is told from the perspective of a voice, reiterating their raw experience through some incredibly atmospheric story-telling. In my opinion, Narnia manages to meet, and potentially surpass, the lofty definition of 'Lovecraftian' with so many of these stories, and potentially creating his own 'Narnian' modern form of atmospheric weird fiction. As with any good horror story, Ambrose Bierce would suggest that you place yourself in the suitable surroundings if you want to truly relish in the desired effect. I can promise you, that if you sit in a dimly lit room reading (or listening) to some of the selections included here, you won't be disappointed. Narnia manages to bring the haunting experiences of many of Lovecraft's protagonists into the modern age, and does so with such convincing force that I genuinely hope that he continues to write this genre. With additional exposure I believe that Narnia would enjoy a large cult following (pun intended). As in any anthology each reader will have their favorites; some stories may bore you, while others will have you so focused on the page that you'll be fleeing through the woods with a deaf fugitive, exploring the abandoned cult town of Lenore with a hack documentary film maker, or wondering where the sudden plague of the mold 'sporangela' originated. The formatting the author uses, and for which he has coined the term 'knifepoint horror' works wonderfully. The tight, numberless, pages, lack of any real capitalization, and the consistent use of a single narrating voice create just the sort of claustrophobic atmosphere the author is looking for. It's as if you're reading something you know you shouldn't be, each story an obscure, and archived official report of some event that had actually taken place. For those who can't get past the formatting the author had a podcast featuring stories from the book, with excellent atmospheric music, and is available here: http://knifepointhorror.libsyn.com/ Bonus points if you listen to it in the dark, eyes closed. Personal Favorites (stories titled by the podcast): Sounds Plague Proof Rebirth Return Possession Highly recommended for anyone who enjoys Lovecraft, Poe, Maupassant, Dunsany, and the weird fiction genre in general.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah

    Cross posted on my personal book review blog mibookreviews.wordpress.com I won this book in the Goodreads First Reads program. In exchange for a free copy of the book I have to review the book. I wanted to read this book because I am a horror fan and this was a whole new genre of horror. The idea that the author was going to take me on a horrific journey, but skip all the parts of horror novels I hated was so appealing that I had to read the book. The way the book was writt Cross posted on my personal book review blog mibookreviews.wordpress.com I won this book in the Goodreads First Reads program. In exchange for a free copy of the book I have to review the book. I wanted to read this book because I am a horror fan and this was a whole new genre of horror. The idea that the author was going to take me on a horrific journey, but skip all the parts of horror novels I hated was so appealing that I had to read the book. The way the book was written was so unique that I was drawn in for no other reason since as you can see from the description you aren’t sure what happens. The only downside to this format of writing is there are no page numbers so I was often was lost if the book accidentally shut because of the wind. The plots of the stories were often unsettling or creepy. Most of the stories were not scary. There was often too much left to my imagination about what was happening or not enough to be actually scary. There are a few stories that have stuck with me ever since reading it though. The main story that stuck with me is about a man riding on the New York subway one night. He was pretty much alone in the car except for a small number of other riders. Suddenly the lights flashed and there was another car behind them, which was impossible since he was in the last car. The car behind them started filling with rocks and dirty and it was really creepy how everything was described. It probably didn’t help that I ride a train daily to get to work that goes underground for most of my trip. While many of the stories were unsettling, many of them were just weird. I was often confused at where the author was going so while the suspense was rising I was lagging behind. I would rather read this book a dozen more times than touch some of the more famous horror authors. This book is a great conversation starter, it is unique, and there is a deal with the author that if the book ever gets updated you just send him a page from the version you have and you get the newest version for free. The fact that the author is more loyal to fans than he is to profits is refreshing. He can count me in the list of his fans from this point forward.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    Disclosure: I received this book as part of a Firstreads giveaway on the premise that I would read and review it. One of the interesting aspects of writing is the self-imposed challenge. Poems in a rigid format, an exact number of words, not using gendered words--it can stretch a writer's skills, even if the product isn't always great art. As described in the blurb, "The Complete Knifepoint Horror" is an entire volume of short horror fiction stripped down to essentials. Tig Disclosure: I received this book as part of a Firstreads giveaway on the premise that I would read and review it. One of the interesting aspects of writing is the self-imposed challenge. Poems in a rigid format, an exact number of words, not using gendered words--it can stretch a writer's skills, even if the product isn't always great art. As described in the blurb, "The Complete Knifepoint Horror" is an entire volume of short horror fiction stripped down to essentials. Tight first-person narration (a couple of pieces do cheat on this), no capital letter, paragraphs, page numbers or titles. No gratuitous mood-setting, fancy typography, anything like that. For the most part, this works pretty well. When the author is "on", the narrow format makes the story especially intense. On the other hand, it tends to flatten the contrast between narrators. Nineteenth-Century and Twentyfirst-Century people "sound" identical in word choice and grammar. Sometimes if I put the book down for a moment, it was hard to tell where I'd left off, even with the aid of a bookmark. As you might expect, full explanations are rare in these stories. Some come across as a series of random creepy events which may or may not be connected with the final horrific moment. Others leave the "monster" half-glimpsed and barely described, though there are a couple of straight-up ghost stories and a particularly good zombie apocalypse piece. I'd also like to point out the "moss" story and the one with the deaf protagonist as innovative and especially worthwhile. This collection should do well in audiobook or podfic format, though I would recommend having more than one reader to offset the flattening effect I mentioned above. For more horror reviews, see http://www.skjam.com/tag/horror/

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    Won this book from the GoodReads Giveaway last year and decided to start reading it for some nighttime "horror" stories before bed. I started the first story and it was a bore so i skipped it. This immediately put me off to a bad start. Then I started to read the next few stories and I sort of enjoyed the Halloween Carriage ride one. I started to get a bit lazy so then I ended up listening to the podcasts of each story and spread it out a bit to try and find those hidden gems in this collection. Won this book from the GoodReads Giveaway last year and decided to start reading it for some nighttime "horror" stories before bed. I started the first story and it was a bore so i skipped it. This immediately put me off to a bad start. Then I started to read the next few stories and I sort of enjoyed the Halloween Carriage ride one. I started to get a bit lazy so then I ended up listening to the podcasts of each story and spread it out a bit to try and find those hidden gems in this collection. In the end I was left majorly disappointed. I rarely ever quit reading a book or put it down, but I just could not read/listen to this whole book. It was just dull and boring and monotone. There was no excitement or even horror! Each story was one note and did not scare me at all. Some were filled with useless information and they would drag on and on where I ended up forgetting the point of what I was reading. I was expecting it to be like those "Scary stories to tell in the dark" collection. Those used to freak me out and given me nightmares as a child. This on the other-hand wanted to put me to sleep. To add on top of the wretchedness, the style that Soren uses by not capitalizing words and making each story essentially one giant paragraph is a major eyesore. Go ahead and squint your eyes as well. He wants you to read it in a monotone way so that the horror can supposedly impact you more. I kept getting lost and just blah. Sorry for such a harsh, yet honest review. If there were pictures maybe, or more enthusiasm in the audio versions then maybe it could get a slightly higher rating.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brady

    When's the last time you were actually scared by a ghost story? If you're ready to risk that dread enjoyment again it is my privilege to encourage you to sample the work of Soren Narnia. I first encountered The Complete Knifepoint Horror when I entered a Goodreads Giveaway drawing for a copy. The cover art alone is the stuff of nightmares. I didn't win, but every time I saw the image on the cover - something horrible recoiling from something even more horrible* - I was draw When's the last time you were actually scared by a ghost story? If you're ready to risk that dread enjoyment again it is my privilege to encourage you to sample the work of Soren Narnia. I first encountered The Complete Knifepoint Horror when I entered a Goodreads Giveaway drawing for a copy. The cover art alone is the stuff of nightmares. I didn't win, but every time I saw the image on the cover - something horrible recoiling from something even more horrible* - I was drawn back to it. I did a little digging and learned that it's available in all the usual places in all the formats one expects these days. If you visit his website the author will even give you a copy, just so there is no rational reason not to come to where he is. Still, the best - or worst - way to encounter Soren Narnia's stories is to have them read to you https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/k... Me, I listen to Knifepoint Horror at night, in the dark, with my bedsheets pulled up to my chin, just the way I enjoyed such stories as a child. My fitful sleep, and my night terrors, have not been the same since. Soren Narnia has written many other stories, but first I must survive my exposure to this anthology. There is no turning back. These stories will leave little indelible burn marks on your soul like the afterimage that floats on your retina after you look at the sun a little too long. Your decision. *I think the cover art is a detail cropped from a Hieronymus Bosch painting, but I don't the have stomach to find out for sure http://www.hieronymus-bosch.org/

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle Roth

    I won this book as a first reads give-away on this site. When I signed up to win it I thought it would be really interesting. When I got it and looked at it a little bit I became a little nervous that I wouldn't like it because of the writing style, it has no capital letters, no chapter or story names, no page numbers just one page breaks in between each story and I have never read something written like that before. After I started to read it I got used to the writing style, some of the stories I won this book as a first reads give-away on this site. When I signed up to win it I thought it would be really interesting. When I got it and looked at it a little bit I became a little nervous that I wouldn't like it because of the writing style, it has no capital letters, no chapter or story names, no page numbers just one page breaks in between each story and I have never read something written like that before. After I started to read it I got used to the writing style, some of the stories were really creepy and were hard to read at night while some of the stories were not really scary at all. It seems that some just went on and on with no real point to them and they had pointless details that I think ended up not being at all important to the story. It was like something that a college student would write knowing that they had to get so many words into the story to get a good grade. It took me a little more time to read because like I said before some were just too creepy to read right before bed and that's when I usually do all my reading. I think it was a decent enough book and I know that I would recommend it to my friends and family, actually I have a friend and a family member that I will be passing it along to very soon so they can read it. I would also read it again. It would be interesting to know where Soren Narnia got his ideas for the stories if some of them are based on real folk-lore or if it all came from his imagination, if it did he has an awesome imagination! Thank you for choosing me for this give away another one not wasted!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    I've loved the horror genre since I read H.P. Lovecraft at the age of 12. I was excited to win this book through Goodreads but a little intimidated by the description of the format. It turned out to be a great book. Every story starts with "My name is _____" and goes on from there. The story is told from the speakers' point of view and I thought it worked very well. The stories are creepy,scary rather than gory, gross outs. The narrators tell their stories matter of factly with little emotion or I've loved the horror genre since I read H.P. Lovecraft at the age of 12. I was excited to win this book through Goodreads but a little intimidated by the description of the format. It turned out to be a great book. Every story starts with "My name is _____" and goes on from there. The story is told from the speakers' point of view and I thought it worked very well. The stories are creepy,scary rather than gory, gross outs. The narrators tell their stories matter of factly with little emotion or exclamations of horror. There are no capital letters, paragraph breaks or page numbers. Instead, there is an accumulation of details that often left me tired and unnerved, much like the narrator's themselves. Several stories stayed with me for days afterwards: a young man paid to follow and videotape another man's search through a haunted town, a tale of another young man's introduction to satan worshipers and the demon they raise, and the horrific experience of a congressman's investigation of a seance. I enjoyed the book and while I like the effect of the format it makes for difficult reading. I never realized how much paragraph breaks brought to the reading experience. Not only do they allow for a natural break for the eyes, it was difficult to stop mid-story without them. It also made it very easy to lose my place. I ended up having to dogear the pages since if a bookmark fell out it would be impossible to find my place.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krystal Hickam

    First off I want to say that I won this book as a goodreads first reads winner. I have to thank the author and the goodreads website for allowing me the chance to read the book. With that out of the way I will give my review of the book. The Complete Knifepoint Horror: This book is quite different in the way it is presented than any other book I have read. This is a good thing and in a small way a negative thing. It gives a fresh take on writing and makes you put more effort into First off I want to say that I won this book as a goodreads first reads winner. I have to thank the author and the goodreads website for allowing me the chance to read the book. With that out of the way I will give my review of the book. The Complete Knifepoint Horror: This book is quite different in the way it is presented than any other book I have read. This is a good thing and in a small way a negative thing. It gives a fresh take on writing and makes you put more effort into reading, that engrosses you into the story. On the other hand people who do not read alot or have difficulty reading may have a hard time reading this book. It gives its reason for why it was written this way which is good but I feel that having no capital letters and no paragraph breaks in the books slightly detracts from the reading experience. Besides that the book flows well and it was a quick read for me. Each story was different and you could distinguish that easily. There was a difference in quality between some stories. There were many that were suspenseful and kept you wanting more than just a few pages. Then there were some that did not hold up to the same standards and you kinda wanted to just be done with them. Overall though I think that it was good book and I would recommend it to others. Before printing the book for the masses I would take a look at producing another copy that is written in a normal way so the majority of people will be able to enjoy it the way I have.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    When I first received this book, the cover failed to impress. But the premise really intrigued me. As a publishing student with a focus on editing, I found myself wondering: How do you edit a book like this? Soren Narnia – easily one of the greatest names – uses very little punctuation, even the minor ones we take for granted. I noticed some of it immediately, like no capitalization or story titles. Others I realized later. Ironically, the missing major grammatical elements did not hinder m When I first received this book, the cover failed to impress. But the premise really intrigued me. As a publishing student with a focus on editing, I found myself wondering: How do you edit a book like this? Soren Narnia – easily one of the greatest names – uses very little punctuation, even the minor ones we take for granted. I noticed some of it immediately, like no capitalization or story titles. Others I realized later. Ironically, the missing major grammatical elements did not hinder my reading. I certainly noticed their absence, but I still really enjoyed the stories. In time, I became used to the style and stopped quietly noting everywhere I would mark with a red pen. It was the little things that made this a bit of a challenge. I found not having page numbers disorientating. I like to know exactly how far along I am and how much further I have of a story. Also, no paragraphs made it very hard to remember where I left off. After a bit of searching, I would find my place and jump back into the story. But the slightest distraction sent me searching again. Overall, a very good book. I loved the stories and their order was perfect. Shorter stories always followed long ones, allowing me some breathing room. I definitely got chills from some of them. A great night time read. Just make sure you stop somewhere easy to remember for the next night.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Wolf

    Disclaimer *won in a Goodreads First Read giveaway* my name is vanessa wolf. in january of 2013 I received a copy of the complete knifepoint horror, having read the description i was eager to engage the works within. what followed was not a collection of short stories, but rather a collection of accounts of events. told much in the manner of a police statement. without page numbers, capitalization, paragraph spaces, navigation became an increasingly difficult task. suddenly i realized that would not have provid Disclaimer *won in a Goodreads First Read giveaway* my name is vanessa wolf. in january of 2013 I received a copy of the complete knifepoint horror, having read the description i was eager to engage the works within. what followed was not a collection of short stories, but rather a collection of accounts of events. told much in the manner of a police statement. without page numbers, capitalization, paragraph spaces, navigation became an increasingly difficult task. suddenly i realized that would not have provided a map but minimize the affect the text produces. /themes of resurrection and influences beyond control surfaced only to submerge under the horrifying realization that what is sold as a collection of stories is a vessel of pure terror. i am, perhaps, unfairly critical of texts that experiment, and so i found myself surprised at how deeply i enjoyed the accounts of armis churchton, robert tathala, and others. too late i realized the text had turned upon me, consuming my thoughts as i found connections in the accounts to other accounts. too late to turn back. it is a masterpiece of horror, joining the likes of house of leaves, in structural cohesive pacing and shaming authors like joe hill in ability. i recommend this with caution however, do not read alone. do not read in the dark with a flashlight. this book has teeth.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Scearce

    Disclaimer: I was given an e-book copy of this book by the author, with whom I have no personal association. "The Complete Knifepoint Horror" is a collection of horror short stories that covers all sorts of bases, from ghosts to zombies to cults. I found this book to actually be pretty scary. I tend to do most of my reading at night, and so I started this book around 11pm-12am. By around 2am, at the story of Seacrist Elementary School, I started to hear "bumps in the night," as did my Disclaimer: I was given an e-book copy of this book by the author, with whom I have no personal association. "The Complete Knifepoint Horror" is a collection of horror short stories that covers all sorts of bases, from ghosts to zombies to cults. I found this book to actually be pretty scary. I tend to do most of my reading at night, and so I started this book around 11pm-12am. By around 2am, at the story of Seacrist Elementary School, I started to hear "bumps in the night," as did my dog, and it was at that point that I decided night-reading might not have been such a good idea. However, I did not heed that decision, and the next night, the same thing happened. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes a good scare, and especially to those with varied tastes in their horror genres. The only reason I denoted a star (and wish it could have only been a half-star) is the author's stylistic decision to keep everything lower-case with no paragraph separation. Perhaps it's just me, but I found it a little hard to read, and there were several occasions where I had to go back and read over certain portions because I had ran two sentences together and was confused. Other than that, this was an absolutely wonderful collection of horror, and I would definitely read it again. Although, during the day, this time. 4 1/2 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I just want to preface this by saying that horror books/films, the horror genre in general, are not my kinda thing. I was reading it because it was scary and because it's my second year of my now-annual Halloween reading. Basically, I'm an enormous chicken. And that being said, some of the stories in this collection scared the pants of me. Ghosts freak me out. Serial killers don't. So the ghost stories terrified me. Demonic/cult stuff spooked me a little too, sometimes, dependin I just want to preface this by saying that horror books/films, the horror genre in general, are not my kinda thing. I was reading it because it was scary and because it's my second year of my now-annual Halloween reading. Basically, I'm an enormous chicken. And that being said, some of the stories in this collection scared the pants of me. Ghosts freak me out. Serial killers don't. So the ghost stories terrified me. Demonic/cult stuff spooked me a little too, sometimes, depending on what happened. But for more than one of the stories, I got quite confused. I felt like, for a few at least, there was "scary" stuff added in that in no way contributed to the overall plot of the story except to make you feel uneasy. Like, a random creepy truck at the gas station, for example. I mean, it added to the overall skittish feeling of the story in that way, but I finished more than one story just kinda feeling like, "Wait... what?" Anyway, like I said, some of them really scared me. I think if you're looking for a nice collection of a wide variety of topics within the horror genre, you won't be disappointed. We go from ghosts to Satanists to zombies and back again, and that's always fun!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Aurora Dimitre

    ~This book was won from a Goodreads giveaway~ This book. I just. Wow. I'm a fan of horror. John Saul, Stephen King, authors like that are what make up a big chunk of my bookshelf. I've read books filled with horror short stories... but nothing really quite like The Complete Knifepoint Horror. Part of it, I think, is the way that it's written. No capitalization, no paragraph breaks, no titles. Just constant, uninterrupted narrative. Even though the stories are com ~This book was won from a Goodreads giveaway~ This book. I just. Wow. I'm a fan of horror. John Saul, Stephen King, authors like that are what make up a big chunk of my bookshelf. I've read books filled with horror short stories... but nothing really quite like The Complete Knifepoint Horror. Part of it, I think, is the way that it's written. No capitalization, no paragraph breaks, no titles. Just constant, uninterrupted narrative. Even though the stories are completely different, as soon as you finish one, you have to go on to the next. There's everything from ghosts to schools to creepy teenagers. You don't get a break until the end of the book - and maybe not even then. The stories themselves are imaginative and original. My favorites would have to be the one with the elementary school that wasn't quite right, the one with Father Hall, and the one with Garrett whatever-his-last-name-was, but all of them were fantastic. I seriously enjoyed reading them, and all of them had that unsettling feel to them. Last night, when I was reading a few before going to sleep, I didn't think I was scared, but then the dog barked outside and I nearly jumped out of my skin. Overall, these are awesome stories that any fan of horror should read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    "Disclaimer: I was given an e-book copy of this book by the author, with whom I have no personal association." I entered the first reads giveaway but did not win. So, I sent the author an email on Goodreads and he was kind enough to provide a free eBook through Amazon. Although I wanted the actual book badly, this was the next best thing. Although, the audiobook would be GREAT as well. I had listened to a few stories through podcasts and fell in love with them. The reader of the stori "Disclaimer: I was given an e-book copy of this book by the author, with whom I have no personal association." I entered the first reads giveaway but did not win. So, I sent the author an email on Goodreads and he was kind enough to provide a free eBook through Amazon. Although I wanted the actual book badly, this was the next best thing. Although, the audiobook would be GREAT as well. I had listened to a few stories through podcasts and fell in love with them. The reader of the stories on podcasts has no emotional reaction in the story, so you have no clue as to when you are about to hear something scary, odd, creepy, gross, exciting, etc. The book is written that way too. There is no capitalization and no paragraph separation. Commas and periods are the only punctuation used, so the reader gets the same effect. Although I've never read a book like this before, I understand the authors intention and had no problem with it. Not all of the stories are scary, but they will make you think, give you goosebumps, make the hair stand up on the back of your neck or have you cuddle up by whomever is available (even if that is your cat). I thoroughly enjoyed the book and can hardly wait for more.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Firetog

    When I first received this book, I was caught slightly off guard. I was expecting something simpler. More along the lines of a collection of horror/thriller stories. Boy, I was wrong. And I'm glad I was wrong. Make no mistake, every one of these stories is intense. It's remarkable how the first few lines of every story just seem to grab on to you and not let you go. These are stories that are stripped down from all the details and nonsense. Instead, they focus on the horror When I first received this book, I was caught slightly off guard. I was expecting something simpler. More along the lines of a collection of horror/thriller stories. Boy, I was wrong. And I'm glad I was wrong. Make no mistake, every one of these stories is intense. It's remarkable how the first few lines of every story just seem to grab on to you and not let you go. These are stories that are stripped down from all the details and nonsense. Instead, they focus on the horror. These are all written in first person, and they are the telling of the most frightening and dreadful experiences that happened in peoples lives. Even without a lot of details they still manage to be horrifying. These stories are better than some of the more famous horror books out there. The stories are scary, but with hints of dark fantasy. It's really satisfying. My one complaint, is that these stories are untitled, but there is a reason for that and I get it. In reality, you don't give a title to the most haunting part of your life. Instead, you try to shun it away until it feeds on your mind to the point where it needs to be told. That's when you'll find it in The Complete Knifepoint Horror.

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