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Profanation

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Véritable phénomène d'édition dans les pays où il a été publié, Miséricorde, le premier roman du Danois Jussi Adler-Olsen, s'est imposé en France comme la découverte scandinave de 2011. Profanation, le deuxième tome de la série, ne décevra pas les fans du tandem atypique et attachant que forment le cynique inspecteur Carl Morck et son mystérieux assistant syrien, Assad. Su Véritable phénomène d'édition dans les pays où il a été publié, Miséricorde, le premier roman du Danois Jussi Adler-Olsen, s'est imposé en France comme la découverte scandinave de 2011. Profanation, le deuxième tome de la série, ne décevra pas les fans du tandem atypique et attachant que forment le cynique inspecteur Carl Morck et son mystérieux assistant syrien, Assad. Sur le bureau de Morck, le dossier d'un double meurtre impliquant une bande de fils de famille, innocentée par les aveux "spontanés" de l'assassin. Mais très vite l'inspecteur s'aperçoit que l'affaire, hâtivement bouclée, comportait des zones d'ombre. Quel rôle ont vraiment joué, il y a vingt ans, trois des hommes les plus puissants du Danemark ? Cercles très fermés des milieux d'affaires, corruption au plus haut niveau, secrets nauséabonds de la grande bourgeoisie... Adler-Olsen mêle à la perfection suspense implacable et regard acerbe sur son pays.


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Véritable phénomène d'édition dans les pays où il a été publié, Miséricorde, le premier roman du Danois Jussi Adler-Olsen, s'est imposé en France comme la découverte scandinave de 2011. Profanation, le deuxième tome de la série, ne décevra pas les fans du tandem atypique et attachant que forment le cynique inspecteur Carl Morck et son mystérieux assistant syrien, Assad. Su Véritable phénomène d'édition dans les pays où il a été publié, Miséricorde, le premier roman du Danois Jussi Adler-Olsen, s'est imposé en France comme la découverte scandinave de 2011. Profanation, le deuxième tome de la série, ne décevra pas les fans du tandem atypique et attachant que forment le cynique inspecteur Carl Morck et son mystérieux assistant syrien, Assad. Sur le bureau de Morck, le dossier d'un double meurtre impliquant une bande de fils de famille, innocentée par les aveux "spontanés" de l'assassin. Mais très vite l'inspecteur s'aperçoit que l'affaire, hâtivement bouclée, comportait des zones d'ombre. Quel rôle ont vraiment joué, il y a vingt ans, trois des hommes les plus puissants du Danemark ? Cercles très fermés des milieux d'affaires, corruption au plus haut niveau, secrets nauséabonds de la grande bourgeoisie... Adler-Olsen mêle à la perfection suspense implacable et regard acerbe sur son pays.

30 review for Profanation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (B+) 76% | Good Notes: What's "absent" here is mystery. The investigation only matters inasmuch as it reveals backstory and clarifies motive.

  2. 5 out of 5

    AMEERA

    i'm so glad this series getting better and better 🙆🏻💜💜’

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 stars In this second book in the 'Department Q' series, Detective Morck investigates a double murder in a boarding school two decades ago. The book can be read as a standalone. Boarding School (FYI: The book was adapted into a movie. The illustrations are from the film.) Movie Poster ***** Detective Carl Morck's 'Department Q' in Copenhagen, Denmark - which investigates cold cases - has a new task. Two boarding school students, a brother and sister, were killed twenty years ago and a clique of 3.5 stars In this second book in the 'Department Q' series, Detective Morck investigates a double murder in a boarding school two decades ago. The book can be read as a standalone. Boarding School (FYI: The book was adapted into a movie. The illustrations are from the film.) Movie Poster ***** Detective Carl Morck's 'Department Q' in Copenhagen, Denmark - which investigates cold cases - has a new task. Two boarding school students, a brother and sister, were killed twenty years ago and a clique of unruly fellow students were suspects. Evidence was lacking, however, and the students weren't charged. Two unruly students in the clique Then, almost a decade later, one of the students confessed and went to prison. The others went on their way, the men becoming rich, successful businessmen and the lone woman in the group becoming a homeless bag lady. Morck believes the whole clique committed the murders and decides to re-investigate the case. The male students grow up to be successful businessmen The female student, Kimmie, grows up to be a homeless vagrant The delinquent boarding school students are psychopaths who delight in beating up and killing people among other things. The clique of psychopaths Their activities continue into adulthood and Morck's team uncovers a series of crimes the clique may have committed. The men in the group feel invulnerable because they have connections in high places and, in fact, certain police officials and politicians attempt to thwart Morck's investigation. Businessman feels invulnerable Nevertheless the criminals are concerned. They know Kimmie (the bag lady) has a box of trophies from their victims and they're desperate to get the box. Thus Kimmie is being sought by thugs as well as the police. The lifestyles, debauchery, and criminal inclinations of Kimmie and the men are described in some detail and it's clear that the men are evil and Kimmie is deranged. Kimmie defends herself On the lighter side, Department Q - which started out with Morck and his very clever assistant Assad - is deemed to merit a new employee, secretary Rose Knudsen. Rose is a smart, strong-willed woman who's determined to enhance the basement facilities of Morck's squad. Morck doesn't like Rose though and - in his curmudgeonly fashion - plots to get rid of her. The interactions between Morck and Rose provide some of the more amusing moments in this very dark story. Morck and Assad Rose Morck's team works hard to overcome obstacles and collect clues. Meanwhile, Morck is dealing with his personal issues, which include lusting after the department psychologist, worrying about his paralyzed former partner Hardy, and living with his teenage stepson. The book is well-written, interesting, and comes to a satisfactory conclusion. However I didn't enjoy it as much as the first book in the Department Q series (The Keeper of Lost Causes) - which seems more balanced in terms of evil people/horrible crimes vs. amusing characters/scenes. Nevertheless, this is a good book, recommended for mystery fans. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot....

  4. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Another really good book in what I can see is going to be an excellent series. Maybe The Absent One was not quite as good as The Keeper of Lost Causes but it was still an exciting and entertaining read. Carl was as snarky as ever and Assad was just as strange and mysterious. Something big must be going to happen with him in a future book. The plot was maybe just a little over the top but it was still gripping and at times I could not imagine how it was going to end. The answer was very satisfactor Another really good book in what I can see is going to be an excellent series. Maybe The Absent One was not quite as good as The Keeper of Lost Causes but it was still an exciting and entertaining read. Carl was as snarky as ever and Assad was just as strange and mysterious. Something big must be going to happen with him in a future book. The plot was maybe just a little over the top but it was still gripping and at times I could not imagine how it was going to end. The answer was very satisfactory indeed, with appropriate solutions all round. So much so that as soon as I turned the last page I gave the book straight to my husband and said "You have to read this." Now I am looking forward very much to book 3 which I notice gets very good ratings.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Thomson

    I can't tell you how much I was looking forward to the second offering by this author. Sadly, Disgrace was a major disappointment and I couldn't even finish it. In fact, I was so disappointed that I did something I've never done before and asked for a refund. I had three problems with the book. 1. There wasn't enough of Assad, the brilliantly drawn assistant of Carl Morck. For me, it was Assad who was the stand out character in the first book. In this book, he wasn't used enough. 2. The characte I can't tell you how much I was looking forward to the second offering by this author. Sadly, Disgrace was a major disappointment and I couldn't even finish it. In fact, I was so disappointed that I did something I've never done before and asked for a refund. I had three problems with the book. 1. There wasn't enough of Assad, the brilliantly drawn assistant of Carl Morck. For me, it was Assad who was the stand out character in the first book. In this book, he wasn't used enough. 2. The characterisation was amateurish. The main baddie if you like was so irredeemably evil he was like a pantomime villain. About the only thing he didn't do was kick someone's crutches away. He didn't come across as real. 3. Not content to tell us that the main baddies enjoyed hunting animals the author went into great detail about the animals and what would happen them. Being a great writer is all about knowing what not to write as much as knowing what to write. By including so much hunting I found myself skipping parts because I wasn't only repulsed, I was also bored. It also made me wonder if the author was padding out the book to reach a certain page count. Overall, this was a disappointing book. Hopefully the next one will be better.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Re-visit Winter 2015 - Film Only Translated by K E Semmel Dedicated to the three Graces and iron ladies: Anne, Lene and Charlotte. Opening: When she ventured down the pedestrian street called Strøget, she was poised as if on the edge of a knife. With her face half covered by a dirty shawl, she slipped passed well-lit shop windows, alert eyes scanning the street. M has just cracked open #3 in this series as swedish audio file. FYI - have discovered this is not a series where you can jump in at any po Re-visit Winter 2015 - Film Only Translated by K E Semmel Dedicated to the three Graces and iron ladies: Anne, Lene and Charlotte. Opening: When she ventured down the pedestrian street called Strøget, she was poised as if on the edge of a knife. With her face half covered by a dirty shawl, she slipped passed well-lit shop windows, alert eyes scanning the street. M has just cracked open #3 in this series as swedish audio file. FYI - have discovered this is not a series where you can jump in at any point, they need to be read in order. Gone is the humour from book one, there is ah-but a few lines that will make you smile here. The action is not off-stage and there is reference to a teacher at the boarding school for the rich and privilged who showed 'Clockwork Orange' and 'If...' in the English Culture class. That is the sort of dehumanised violence that is on show in this story. The translation is, for the most, good, although some of the choppy moments leave one having to rely on intuition; those patches don't hinder the flow of this brutal tale but might leave you feeling a bit miffed. Riveting reading but not for the faint-hearted. The third book will be available in English language from Penguin in spring 2013 and it looks as if there is a change in translator - Martin Aitken. M was not so keen on this second book but is thoroughly enjoying #3. 4* Mercy (Afdeling Q #1) 4* Disgrace (Afdeling Q #2)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Harry

    Book Review: Note: this is not a who-dun-it (we know the "Who" of it from the get go). So, if the lack of this doesn't hit your sweet spot, it might not appeal. The Absent One is Adler-Olsen's nod towards psychiatry (sociopathy), youth gangs, and his ever-present criticism of just about everything: a judgment that comes across as a razor blade deftly plunged into the soft flesh of Danish politics and wealth. "In tiny Denmark the system was so ingenious that if you knew dirt about somebody, they al Book Review: Note: this is not a who-dun-it (we know the "Who" of it from the get go). So, if the lack of this doesn't hit your sweet spot, it might not appeal. The Absent One is Adler-Olsen's nod towards psychiatry (sociopathy), youth gangs, and his ever-present criticism of just about everything: a judgment that comes across as a razor blade deftly plunged into the soft flesh of Danish politics and wealth. "In tiny Denmark the system was so ingenious that if you knew dirt about somebody, they also knew something just as bad about you. If it wasn't hushed up, the one person's offense quickly infected the other's. A strange, practical principle that meant no one would say anything about anyone else, not even if they were caught with their hands in the biscuit tin." In typical Adler-Olson fashion, his critical sniper scope isn't just aimed at the wealthy in general as the above implies; Adler-Olson is just as intent at targeting all millieus through the eyes of his politically incorrect protagonist Carl MØrck. As we learn through a reading of The Sociopath Next Door, about 1 in 10 in society are sociopaths, hiding in plain sight, and often quite successful in society. Is there redemption for a sociopath? To that, Adler-Olson replies: "There's nothing sadder than a candle without a flame." And yet, strangely enough, it is a story about sociopathic redemption (I can hear the echo of laughter in the halls of psychiatry at this, and they would not be wrong to scorn the thought). After all, what is empathy to a sociopath - it being a requirement for redemption - when the lack of it is part of the prognosis? For the first time in her life she saw a victim for precisely what it was; a human being who had possessed a will of its own and the right to live. It surprised her that she had never had this feeling before. Where then can this redemption be found? A tour-de-force of genetic inheritance, inordinate violence and societal abuse we find that Adler-Olson places it to slumber inside the absent one. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Series Review: Jussi Adler-Olsen was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1950. Known for his 3 stand-alones (The alphabet House, The Company Basher, and Washington Decree and the famous Department Q novels his popularity in Denmark has finally migrated over to the U.S. All Department Q novels are set in Denmark and reveal the writings of an author intensely interested in criticizing politics while simultaenously being agnostic to parties in general. Not that this is any great revelation as for the most part politics is the mainstay of most European dinner table conversations. On this topic of politics, the author says: "If you with that ask me whether I'm critical of the political system, then yes. If you ask me whether I have a tendency to defend party-political opinions, then no. My agenda political wise is firstly to criticize regardless of what is to criticize, and no matter what the basis of view is, and secondly to appeal to the politicians in power that they should understand that they are our servants and not our masters, and that they first and foremost on their fields of activity should learn to acknowledge mistakes and to evaluate their own actions." Through his protagonist Carl MØrck, a lone detective absconded to the basement of police headquarters, heading a cold case department of one, and for all the world a detective ostracized for his unsociable and arrogant manner we bump head-on into the political machinations of Denmark's finest if not the corruption of a government beyond. Not that corruption threatens to take over the story. The author is careful about that: It's all about having and keeping empathy. If you have this ability in your writings, it will never be the corruption in itself that is the story's starting point, but the people and the relations that the corruption affects. It is as simple as that! If you want to be a writer, you have to learn to turn everything upside down. Born a son to a father with a psychiatric degree and living on the premises of such mental institutions a portion of his life, Jussi Adler-Olsen has developed a keen insight into a human's boundlessness, self-centeredness if not the degree to which human beings can succumb to a lack of affection. If it wasn't for these issues, there wouldn't be any thriller novels in the world. And the consequences of these character flaws give me a lot to work with. Revenge, strive for justice, and insanity. As with most Nordic thrillers (Jo Nesbo, Henning Mankell, Larson, etc), there's a certain ennui that pervades the populace. Perhaps that is due to the unique form of Scandinavian democracy that today seems to be under siege by more globalistic tendencies, a slight leaning to the right that highly values the individual instead of the public society so prominent in Scandinavian countries. As with these other thriller writers, we view a somber if not morose society...practical, but not affluent in that affection mentioned by the author. We have had a very negative and sad period, but the right to criticize and reject bad ideas in their unblemished form still holds. And there is no other place on earth, in my opinion, that uses this right as frequently and thoughtfully, which I'm proud of. But what is it about novels that is captivating readers across the globe? I can only speak for myself. As always, translations must be kept in mind and my hat's off to those who attempt to translate a foreign language into English. It is an art in and of itself. Especially when one considers that it is possible to have thoughts in one language that are not possible in another. Being bilingual myself, I still wrestle with certain idioms not available to me when communicating in English. In this sense, Lisa Hartford does an excellent job in her translation from Danish to English. Indeed, in terms of immediate and enduring attention grabbing, Adler-Olsen is in the Chandler class. As with most European and Scandinavian mystery/crime novels, the causation behind the crime is usually a simple event rationalized by an unhealthy mind. I love this about Nordic thrillers...how we are brought to fully understand motivation as part of the unravelling of a mystery. You could say that this is exactly what is wrong with Hollywood where everything is sensationalized, instead of sprung forth out of ordinary life. Junior Detective Superintendent Carl MØrck has a brilliant mind and as is usually the case, brilliance inspires envy, and envy destroys achievements. The way Jussi Adler-Olsen portrays this within the Danish police force cannot be dismissed. Ever critical, he has created a character both perfectly ordinary as well as constantly critical of everything set before him. There is a quiet humor behind the man who has no qualms about doing nothing but placing his feet on his desk and complain that he is too busy...until of course he becomes interested at which point he becomes a Danish bloodhound. The plots are exquisite, driven not by the unveiling of a carefully kept ending held close to the chest by the author (I've read reviews where some partially dismiss this author for guessing the who-dun-it half way through) but rather by the unveiling of the true motivation behind the crime which gives the reader an entirely different satisfaction. Cold cases are tough and most of them are not solved. But, as Adler-Olson says: It's all about having and keeping empathy. This review will be the same for all Department Q novels...so if you've read this one, you've read 'em all. Updates will be included in subsequent novels in this series, if warranted. Enjoy!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    When I finally gave in to the "Dragon Tattoo Nordic" wave (and no, I still haven't read that series), I started with Adler-Olsen's chilling "The Keeper of Lost Causes." It was diabolically excellent, and although it didn't launch me into Nordic Frenzy, I couldn't wait for the next Department Q installment. This is the second in what I feel certain is going to be a long relationship -- "The Absent One" was diabolical in a whole 'nother way. As concentrated as the evil was in "The Keeper of Lost Ca When I finally gave in to the "Dragon Tattoo Nordic" wave (and no, I still haven't read that series), I started with Adler-Olsen's chilling "The Keeper of Lost Causes." It was diabolically excellent, and although it didn't launch me into Nordic Frenzy, I couldn't wait for the next Department Q installment. This is the second in what I feel certain is going to be a long relationship -- "The Absent One" was diabolical in a whole 'nother way. As concentrated as the evil was in "The Keeper of Lost Causes" (which created claustrophobia anxiety in this reader!), in "The Absent One," the evil comes from every direction, including the innermost workings of the most damaged minds. Adler-Olsen does the reader a huge favor by giving us time with Carl Morck and his none-too-hapless assistant, the mysterious (and unintentionally hilarious) Assad. Without frequent trips back to Department Q and the repartee between these two (and Rose, a spectacular addition), I don't know if I would have been able to stand the tension. Although I understand that the scope of this story made it necessary to pay only scant attention to Carl's son and tenant, I missed them -- but there is every reason to expect that they will both play much larger roles in (please, please, please, hurry!) the third in the series. Note: BOOK RELEASE DATE -- AUGUST 21, 2012

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz Pruski

    A disappointment! I liked Jussi Adler-Olsen's "Keeper of the Lost Causes" quite a lot. "The Absent One" is definitely not in the same class. Carl Morcks's character is still interesting, but the characterizations of two other protagonists, Assad and Rosa, are just caricatures. "The Absent One" could have been a great revenge story, yet it veered into a totally unbelievable territory. Would you believe rich industrialists and fashion celebrities to be mass murderers? No, I guess not. But the book A disappointment! I liked Jussi Adler-Olsen's "Keeper of the Lost Causes" quite a lot. "The Absent One" is definitely not in the same class. Carl Morcks's character is still interesting, but the characterizations of two other protagonists, Assad and Rosa, are just caricatures. "The Absent One" could have been a great revenge story, yet it veered into a totally unbelievable territory. Would you believe rich industrialists and fashion celebrities to be mass murderers? No, I guess not. But the book asks us to. Add to it a rabid fox. A hungry hyaena. Hunting wild animals in the heart of Denmark? Come on, man! Be serious. The novel reads pretty well for about 300 pages, and then it deteriorates into a totally ridiculous mess of utterly contrived fast-paced action of the worst Hollywood variety. This is globalization of rubbish. This is crap on the order of "Da Vinci Code". Three and a half stars for the first 300 pages. Zero stars for the last 100 pages. What an utter waste of human talent! I am hesitant to read any more stuff from this author. Two stars.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    This second book in the series held my interest, but I don't think it was as good as the first. Typical? There was a higher level of cruelty and depravity in this book. I like Carl, Assad, and the addition of Rose. I had hoped to learn more about Assad, but not from this book. I'm curious to see where the next books go with these characters.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jaksen

    Excellent second book in this series by Danish writer Jussi Adler-Olsen. When Detective Carl Mørck is assigned to head Department Q - in charge of cold cases - it's seen as a way to keep him out of the way - and keep him busy, maybe. The fact that Carl takes the job seriously is surprising to his superiors, but his successful first case - Book #1, the Keeper of Lost Causes - establishes Carl's reputation. (Almost to his own surprise.) In this second book, Carl does an even better job, determined Excellent second book in this series by Danish writer Jussi Adler-Olsen. When Detective Carl Mørck is assigned to head Department Q - in charge of cold cases - it's seen as a way to keep him out of the way - and keep him busy, maybe. The fact that Carl takes the job seriously is surprising to his superiors, but his successful first case - Book #1, the Keeper of Lost Causes - establishes Carl's reputation. (Almost to his own surprise.) In this second book, Carl does an even better job, determined to find the real killers behind the deaths of a young woman and her brother which happened twenty years ago. Kind of a warning here: there is rather graphic sex AND murder in this book, but nothing that most readers couldn't handle. Assad, a recent Syrian immigrant is back again as Carl's (civil servant) assistant, along with a 'secretary,' Rose, an interesting addition to the cast of regulars. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, another of my 'read-it-in-two-days.' I intend to stick with this series as Carl and crew are perfect for any reader of mysteries which have a slightly hard-boiled edge. Plus the writing is terrific; there's humor between the regulars, but it's not overdone. There are undercurrents and a few subplots which only add to the tension and reality of the series. So far I am loving it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    fleurette

    This is my first book by Jussi Adler-Olsen and I believe that I will read another book by this author one day. The beginning of this story is rather slow and I had some trouble with getting into it. I couldn’t truly involved into the plot. But after a while I really enjoyed the whole thing. The plot is very good. Even though we know from the beginning who are the killers, there are so many other questions and twists in plot that once you get into the story, you can’t stop reading it. The whole ide This is my first book by Jussi Adler-Olsen and I believe that I will read another book by this author one day. The beginning of this story is rather slow and I had some trouble with getting into it. I couldn’t truly involved into the plot. But after a while I really enjoyed the whole thing. The plot is very good. Even though we know from the beginning who are the killers, there are so many other questions and twists in plot that once you get into the story, you can’t stop reading it. The whole idea may not be the most innovative but it’s well executed and developed. However, in my opinion one of the best things about this book is Kimmie. At first I underestimated her importance for the story. But later on I noticed the whole complexity of her character. She is such a complicated, ambiguous, tormented person. Definitely one of the best and most interesting characters I found in a book lastly. I also quite like Carl Mørck after getting used to him. He may not be the most distinguish hero (to me he is a lot like some other detectives I read about) but nice to follow and likeable after all. This my by my first book by this author but, like I already said, probably not my last one.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Here we return to the world of The Keeper of Lost Causes with Mørck and Assad investigating the 20 year old murder of two siblings. This is a fairly dark and disturbing book and is not for the faint of heart. We have a group of entitled prep school kids who commit violent physical and sexual assaults throughout the entirety of the book. There's one girl that's involved with them and we spend most of the book trying to figure out just what the hell is wrong with her. The answer, when we get it, i Here we return to the world of The Keeper of Lost Causes with Mørck and Assad investigating the 20 year old murder of two siblings. This is a fairly dark and disturbing book and is not for the faint of heart. We have a group of entitled prep school kids who commit violent physical and sexual assaults throughout the entirety of the book. There's one girl that's involved with them and we spend most of the book trying to figure out just what the hell is wrong with her. The answer, when we get it, is both truly awful and extremely realistic and understandable. This is a very good book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    I really like the story line a lot. I could see this happening. Jussi made Assad seem real in this story, giving people a hard time and then in the end he was so human. It's a good story for you to sink your teeth into. Not for the lite hearted.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paula Kalin

    Enjoying the series, but did like the 1st better.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Unfortunately, I didn't find this one nearly as engrossing as the first book in this series. As a matter of preference, I tend to prefer books where the culprit isn't revealed until the very end (as opposed to ones where the reader knows from the start who the villain is, and the story is all about the detective finding the proof) -- so that was one disappointment with this book. A worse disappointment was the story of the crimes -- bored, sadistic rich people hurting people just for the rush -- Unfortunately, I didn't find this one nearly as engrossing as the first book in this series. As a matter of preference, I tend to prefer books where the culprit isn't revealed until the very end (as opposed to ones where the reader knows from the start who the villain is, and the story is all about the detective finding the proof) -- so that was one disappointment with this book. A worse disappointment was the story of the crimes -- bored, sadistic rich people hurting people just for the rush -- which is a story that's been done FAR too many times for this to be anything but a boring retread of something I've read and watched before. Rose isn't really a great character, and I found Assad more annoyingly wrong-headed (as opposed to sneakily competent) as compared with the last one. And since all the baddies, and almost every other character in the book, are so completely contemptible, their story didn't give me any more than sweeping sense of indifference and an urge to finish this thing as soon as I possibly could. So all in all, a disappointment. I guess I'm still interested in Carl and some of the other characters in his life, and I'll probably read the third book at some point, but it will have to be a significant improvement for me to keep going from there.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Violence in the book isn’t graphic which is as well as some of the scenes are indeed brutal & others would be quite disturbing if played out blow by blow I think. There is indeed a noir theme throughout the book with respect to (all) the perpetrators who are right nasty pieces of work. You find out early on who has done what & so its more a case of will they get caught? Or will something else befall them..... its a very good story & really enjoyed it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    The Danes (and Swedes and Finns and Norwegians) write great detective novels. The detectives are always intense, conflicted, troubled, real. In this case, the detective Carl Morck and his Dept Q are also quite humorous. Assistants Assad and Rose are complements to Morck's darkness. Morck himself is a one-man Greek Chorus whose comments, both internal and explicitly verbal, made me laugh out loud more than once. But the mystery itself is gruesome. It's one of those where the guilty parties are kno The Danes (and Swedes and Finns and Norwegians) write great detective novels. The detectives are always intense, conflicted, troubled, real. In this case, the detective Carl Morck and his Dept Q are also quite humorous. Assistants Assad and Rose are complements to Morck's darkness. Morck himself is a one-man Greek Chorus whose comments, both internal and explicitly verbal, made me laugh out loud more than once. But the mystery itself is gruesome. It's one of those where the guilty parties are known to us almost from page 1. The point of the story, then, is how Morck and his team discover adequate evidence to prove guilt. Perhaps by coincidence this story also included a seriously insane woman, after I'd just finished the Dublin Murder Squad #4 which shared the slow and steady descent of one of the suspects into a dark and irrecovable hell of mental illness. I've gotta find something less dark. Next up is Henning Mankell and Kurt Wallender. That should help. (read sarcasm, please.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hermien

    Started off a bit slow but after that gripping to the end.

  20. 4 out of 5

    aPriL does feral sometimes

    What could be worse than a murder club of rich adult psychopaths? Answer: a murder gang of 14-year-old psychopaths... Department Q, the department of cold cases, is semi-famous now because of the publicity around junior Superintendent Carl Mørck's previous case, The Keeper of Lost Causes. However, the positive press has not sweetened Carl's morose personality or expectations. He is well aware the brass are supportive only as long he doesn't make them look bad, even if corruption must be swept un What could be worse than a murder club of rich adult psychopaths? Answer: a murder gang of 14-year-old psychopaths... Department Q, the department of cold cases, is semi-famous now because of the publicity around junior Superintendent Carl Mørck's previous case, The Keeper of Lost Causes. However, the positive press has not sweetened Carl's morose personality or expectations. He is well aware the brass are supportive only as long he doesn't make them look bad, even if corruption must be swept under the rug if it improves career opportunities. Carl does not want to advance and he turned down a promotion. He was content when his superiors gave him the job as boss of Department Q and buried him in an office in the basement. When it was determined that he needed an assistant, he found that Hafez el-Assad, a Muslim immigrant with a sunny disposition and a mysterious past assigned to him by Homicide Chief Marcus Jacobsen, a mixed blessing. But after Assad's skill set had proven invaluable in the last case, Carl grumpily decided he was a good man. But in 'The Absent One', he discovers he now has a new secretary, Rose Knudsen. Alarmed, he gives her a variety of assignments he hopes will keep her out of his hair - and discovers she is as efficient as she is mouthy. The indomitable Assad has placed a new cold case file which looked interesting to him in front of Carl, recently returned from a three-week vacation. Studying the information on the 1987 murders - a brother and sister who were discovered beaten to death - he sees the suspects were a pack of boarding-school students who were staying at the residence of one of their wealthy parents. Before the murder, the gang of young men and one girl had been causing fights at local nightclubs. All of them were now wealthy powerful businessmen, with the exception of the girl, now woman, Kirsten-Marie Lassen, who was missing. As Carl and Assad dig deeper into the backgrounds of Ditlev Pram, founder of exclusive hospitals, Torsten Florin, designer, Ulrik Dybbøl, stock-market analyst, and Kirsten-Marie, 'Kimmie', they find first how the original investigation went wrong, partially because many current important people also went to the same elite school as the suspects, and then later disturbing evidence the suspects may have truly committed these murders - and others.... The novel is not a mystery, but more of a thriller. Gentle reader, we know all almost from the beginning - what occurs is a filling in of backstory blanks, the chase of justice, and the not-so-small matter of which characters survive. I was very very entertained. I thought the book full of horrific realism and delightful, if thoughtful, suspense. Jussi Adler-Olsen knows what people really do. If sugar-coats please you more, only Assad and Rose provide warmth. Perhaps this is not the right novel if you prefer a nice rainbow glow to your fictional reads. This can be read as a standalone, but Carl has a backstory which is fully laid out in the first book. It completely explains his friendships and involvements in this story which are only skimmed in passing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marty Fried

    Almost 5 stars - I enjoyed this audiobook very much, and liked the narrator much better than the first one of the series. This series is a pretty dark police mystery, starting off with a person being hunted by a group of people with various deadly weapons. Like the first one, we don't really know who it is, or the context until late in the book, but I guess it's done that way to let you know right away that there will be violence. And there is. Along with a large number of psychotics from all wal Almost 5 stars - I enjoyed this audiobook very much, and liked the narrator much better than the first one of the series. This series is a pretty dark police mystery, starting off with a person being hunted by a group of people with various deadly weapons. Like the first one, we don't really know who it is, or the context until late in the book, but I guess it's done that way to let you know right away that there will be violence. And there is. Along with a large number of psychotics from all walks of life. In fact, it's pretty hard to believe there are this many murderous psychos at one time in a place like Holland. Probably not, but it makes for pretty exciting reading. If you're a fan of dark fiction, serial killers, police mysteries, etc, you should give this series a try. There is some comic relief in the form of Assad, his assistant from the first book, and a new secretary Rose, who is outspoken but competent, both of which Carl has trouble dealing with at times, especially when she starts buying office furniture.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    The first book in the Station Q mysteries, set in Denmark, was a pleasant surprise last year. I was worried about the sophomore jinx with this second book, but I needn't have been. The story was different and excellent. Detective Inspector Morck is such an interesting character, intelligent, troubled, thoughtful and funny. His assistant, Assad, is a wily, hard working character and I still want to find out more about him. Added to the mix in this second story is Rose, an unwanted assistant thrus The first book in the Station Q mysteries, set in Denmark, was a pleasant surprise last year. I was worried about the sophomore jinx with this second book, but I needn't have been. The story was different and excellent. Detective Inspector Morck is such an interesting character, intelligent, troubled, thoughtful and funny. His assistant, Assad, is a wily, hard working character and I still want to find out more about him. Added to the mix in this second story is Rose, an unwanted assistant thrust upon Morck by his boss. But we find that Rose, even though she is outspoken and irritates Morc to no end, she also proves to be a smart, independent thinking and hard working. I like how Olsen presents his stories, alternating from the point of view of Morck and that of the suspect(s). It's a dark story, edgy and hard hitting but engrossing all the same. If you enjoyed the first book, you won't be disappointed with the next in the series. Give it a try.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    4.5 Stars. I am loving this series. This is the second book in the author's Department Q series. It features Carl Morck who has been put in charge of Department Q, a department of one, with a stack of Copenhagen’s coldest cases to review. In the first book he is given an assistant, Assad, who brings levity to the book. In this second installment he has been given a second assistant, Rose, who is equally entertaining. It's a dark story but engrossing and entertaining all the same. I loved the grea 4.5 Stars. I am loving this series. This is the second book in the author's Department Q series. It features Carl Morck who has been put in charge of Department Q, a department of one, with a stack of Copenhagen’s coldest cases to review. In the first book he is given an assistant, Assad, who brings levity to the book. In this second installment he has been given a second assistant, Rose, who is equally entertaining. It's a dark story but engrossing and entertaining all the same. I loved the great characters, the humor and the suspense. I am looking forward to Book #3.

  24. 4 out of 5

    ~✡~Dαni(ela) ♥ ♂♂ love & semi-colons~✡~

    This was quite a disappointment after the first book. The writing/translating was clunky, and there was no mystery to solve. The bad guys were really, really bad, and the good guy (girl) wasn't very good. Assad wasn't funny, and neither was Carl. So much of the plot was so absurdly unbelievable, and a lot of the cruelty felt gratuitous and repetitive. There were also too many extra characters, and I refused to believe that someone like Rose could work in a professional setting (don't you at leas This was quite a disappointment after the first book. The writing/translating was clunky, and there was no mystery to solve. The bad guys were really, really bad, and the good guy (girl) wasn't very good. Assad wasn't funny, and neither was Carl. So much of the plot was so absurdly unbelievable, and a lot of the cruelty felt gratuitous and repetitive. There were also too many extra characters, and I refused to believe that someone like Rose could work in a professional setting (don't you at least have to try to get along with people?). I didn't laugh or even smile once, and there seemed to be these random reveals (Assad fighting with another man, for example) that went nowhere. I loved the first book and eagerly waited for this one, but I was let down. It was a throwaway.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lewis Weinstein

    This book had its good points but also weaknesses. The criminals were among the most odious of characters and I got tired of reading about their disgusting behavior. Which brings me to the major flaw. IMO, too much of the book is written from the POV of the bad guys. The better parts have to do with tracking them down and even more with the interactions between the lead detective and his most unusual assistants, which showed consistent intelligence and humor, as well as the difficulties of deali This book had its good points but also weaknesses. The criminals were among the most odious of characters and I got tired of reading about their disgusting behavior. Which brings me to the major flaw. IMO, too much of the book is written from the POV of the bad guys. The better parts have to do with tracking them down and even more with the interactions between the lead detective and his most unusual assistants, which showed consistent intelligence and humor, as well as the difficulties of dealing with a complicated set of cold cases.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rob Kitchin

    Disgrace is a fairly straightforward police procedural thriller that slowly builds to a suspenseful climax. The strengths of the book are the characterisation, pacing, and page-turning prose. Carl Morck, Assad his Syrian colleague, and Rose his new administrator, are all well constructed characters whose prejudices and personalities lead to some entertaining exchanges. Where the book has some serious problems, depending on how much you want to suspend your sense of realism, is the plot. I’m will Disgrace is a fairly straightforward police procedural thriller that slowly builds to a suspenseful climax. The strengths of the book are the characterisation, pacing, and page-turning prose. Carl Morck, Assad his Syrian colleague, and Rose his new administrator, are all well constructed characters whose prejudices and personalities lead to some entertaining exchanges. Where the book has some serious problems, depending on how much you want to suspend your sense of realism, is the plot. I’m willing to believe that an elite, rich group of people can hide isolated actions and draw on networks and favours to cover up their sadistic assaults. But to do so over twenty odd years with no rumours or accusations or cases is not credible. Nor is the fact that they can’t find a homeless person in Copenhagen over a twelve year period using professional private detectives (especially when Assad finds her in less than an hour) or that the file Morck is using has enough circumstantial evidence in it that the person who has been compiling it could have acted several years earlier. Nor is the fact that the cold case unit consists of three people - a detective, a non-police helper and an administrator, and they are afforded no additional resources, even when the scope of the investigation becomes apparent. In fact, there are loads of elements of the story that make little sense when reflected on. That’s hardly the point though in this kind of tale, where realism is not going to stand in the way of a good story. And for the most part it is an engaging story. It’s just a shame that I didn’t believe large chunks of it. Nonetheless, an entertaining enough tale, with a strong central cast of characters.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gaby

    I came across this in the airport. It was advertised as something for fans of ”The Killing” and the cover portrays a Sarah Lund lookalike. I thought some crime/detective thriller along the lines of the Millennium series was just what I needed: non-demanding yet engrossing. I didn't realize it was the 2nd book in a series until it was too late, so admittedly, perhaps I missed some crucial character development that would make ”Disgrace” more enjoyable. I disliked the cartoony, manichean villains I came across this in the airport. It was advertised as something for fans of ”The Killing” and the cover portrays a Sarah Lund lookalike. I thought some crime/detective thriller along the lines of the Millennium series was just what I needed: non-demanding yet engrossing. I didn't realize it was the 2nd book in a series until it was too late, so admittedly, perhaps I missed some crucial character development that would make ”Disgrace” more enjoyable. I disliked the cartoony, manichean villains and the fact that their evil habits (hunting) were described over and over in a very repetitive way, instead of maybe shedding some light into their motivations, histories, justifications or views on themselves. The ”hero”, Mørck, was more balanced, but I found his eternal judgements and complaints on everything (excluding Danish monarchy, which funnily enough escaped his otherwise omnipresent scathing criticism) very tiresome. But the most annoying bit was the ”comic relief” in the form of immigrant Assad: yes, we get it, he doesn't speak Danish perfectly, what an idiot, LOL. Other than a cliche both as a sidekick and as an immigrant, he didn't have any personality. The book developed in a typical and unoriginal way, the only unexpected thing being a display of corniness and sentimentality from a character that frankly I didn't care about. In other words... I struggled to get through this book, and by the end I kind of wished the bad guys would win. I'm giving it a 2 because not having read the first book might have been part of the problem... but I still think any book in a series should be able to sort of stand on its own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    A very dark Scandinavian thriller, #2 in the Department Q series. Carl Morck is asked to investigate the cold case murder of a brother and sister, even though a confession was obtained. The supposed killer attended a prestigious school and was close with some of Denmark's wealthiest citizens. A homeless women, Kimmie, also ran with this crowd and possesses deep dark secrets that are a large threat. Both Morck and Kimmie become targets, but eventually, Morck's dogged pursuit bring them all togeth A very dark Scandinavian thriller, #2 in the Department Q series. Carl Morck is asked to investigate the cold case murder of a brother and sister, even though a confession was obtained. The supposed killer attended a prestigious school and was close with some of Denmark's wealthiest citizens. A homeless women, Kimmie, also ran with this crowd and possesses deep dark secrets that are a large threat. Both Morck and Kimmie become targets, but eventually, Morck's dogged pursuit bring them all together for a violent climax.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ancestral Gael

    Why did I read it? Because it an unproofed copy was offered to me in exchange for a review and I really enjoyed The Keeper of Lost Causes by the same author, but in audio format. What's it about? Comprised of some of the elite of Danish society, a pack of hunters are seeking the ultimate adrenaline rush when one of their former members, long since disappeared, decides she has had enough of hiding from them in plain sight. Kimmie is on the move, and dangerous because Kimmie knows their darkest sec Why did I read it? Because it an unproofed copy was offered to me in exchange for a review and I really enjoyed The Keeper of Lost Causes by the same author, but in audio format. What's it about? Comprised of some of the elite of Danish society, a pack of hunters are seeking the ultimate adrenaline rush when one of their former members, long since disappeared, decides she has had enough of hiding from them in plain sight. Kimmie is on the move, and dangerous because Kimmie knows their darkest secrets. They must find her before she finds them. This is the second in what I believe will be a ten book series about Department Q of the Danish police, which consists of just two staff: the investigator Carl Mørck; and his Syrian assistant with the mysterious past, Assad and, now a new member joins the team, Rose who has been reassigned after causing a stir in another division. In Disgrace, Carl finds a file on his desk relating to the murder of a brother and sister 20 years ago. One of a number of suspects from a boarding school was convicted and is serving his time in gaol for the crime, so why has this file appeared at the top of Carl's pile? And, why now? What did I like? Disgrace was a surprisingly easy, and short read being a mere 500 pages. Despite having come across a similar plot in the past, I was still drawn into the storyline, with it's little tweaks. It was also nice to see things developing in the background for the regular characters; i.e. hints, here and there, of what might be revealed later in the Department Q series. I am certainly looking forward to learning more about the mysterious Assad, who appears to have grown in Carl's estimation since the last book, and whose ability as an investigator now seems sharper, too. The surprise was the appointment of a woman to Department Q: Rose who, right from the start, seemed more than capable at her job, as well as being a match for both the less-than-personable Carl, and the more sociable Assad. The light touch of humour was present in Disgrace, but only between Carl and Assad, and it wasn't as marked as it had been in The Keeper of Lost Causes. I must confess I think I shall wait until all the books in the Department Q series are in audio format, as the narrator of The Keeper of Lost Causes, Erik Davies, did a wonderful job of voicing Carl and Assad, so much so, it was his voices I heard when reading the paperback copy of Disgrace. What didn't I like? Never again an unproofed copy. There was whole sentences I could not comprehend, despite reading over and over again. I think these were odd bits of bad translation to English, and as these often occurred when a character was speaking, I got a little bit lost. I found the overall plot/crime a little limp in Disgrace especially when compared to that of the method employed by the perpetrator(s) in the first book, The Keeper of Lost Causes . I also felt this story lacked a little of the mystery (although easily guessed) of The Keeper of Lost Causes , but it didn't make it any less enjoyable. Unless a reader has read the first book in the Department Q series, also known as Mercy , they will not have much of an idea of Carl's personality or how he interacts with others, who the ongoing characters are, or be aware of how Assad and Carl have come to work together which basically shapes their working relationship and determines the division of labour. In Disgrace , the focus seems to be more on the lives, and personalities of the hunters rather than the investigators, but I would have preferred more light on Carl, Assad and, now, Rose, too. Would I recommend it? Oh, yes. Once again, however, with the caveat that the first book - The Keeper of Lost Causes a.k.a. Mercy - be read first.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    3.5 stars!

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