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Not Quite the Classics

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Colin Mochrie, a man known worldwide for working without a script, has penned a collection of stories destined to make its own mark in the literary community. Borrowing from a well-known improve game, Mochrie takes the first and last lines from familiar classics and reimagines everything in between. With the same engaging humour he exhibits on stage, television, and film, Colin Mochrie, a man known worldwide for working without a script, has penned a collection of stories destined to make its own mark in the literary community. Borrowing from a well-known improve game, Mochrie takes the first and last lines from familiar classics and reimagines everything in between. With the same engaging humour he exhibits on stage, television, and film, he takes the reader in bizarre and hilarious new directions, using the original writer's words as a launch and landing point. Imagine A Tale of Two Cities in which Wile E. Coyote gets his revenge on the Road Runner, Dr. Seuss's The Cat in the Hat with zombies, or The Night Before Christmas with a time travelling twist. Imagine Sherlock Holmes devising a foolproof method for eliciting laughter and then taking the stage at a Victorian comedy club in Old London. This inspired collection is comical, quirky, and clever classic Mochrie.


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Colin Mochrie, a man known worldwide for working without a script, has penned a collection of stories destined to make its own mark in the literary community. Borrowing from a well-known improve game, Mochrie takes the first and last lines from familiar classics and reimagines everything in between. With the same engaging humour he exhibits on stage, television, and film, Colin Mochrie, a man known worldwide for working without a script, has penned a collection of stories destined to make its own mark in the literary community. Borrowing from a well-known improve game, Mochrie takes the first and last lines from familiar classics and reimagines everything in between. With the same engaging humour he exhibits on stage, television, and film, he takes the reader in bizarre and hilarious new directions, using the original writer's words as a launch and landing point. Imagine A Tale of Two Cities in which Wile E. Coyote gets his revenge on the Road Runner, Dr. Seuss's The Cat in the Hat with zombies, or The Night Before Christmas with a time travelling twist. Imagine Sherlock Holmes devising a foolproof method for eliciting laughter and then taking the stage at a Victorian comedy club in Old London. This inspired collection is comical, quirky, and clever classic Mochrie.

30 review for Not Quite the Classics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This collection is by the famous Colin Mochrie, and if you do not know who he is, we can't really be friends (unless you are from a non-English speaking country, cause you get a pass). What Mochrie has done is take the first and last lines from famous novels and construct his own stories around them. Three of the stories are relatively in the same view as the origin. "A Study in Ha-Ha" feature Sherlock Holmes and his study of comedy. "Casey at the Bar" is a Canadian take on the famous Casey at This collection is by the famous Colin Mochrie, and if you do not know who he is, we can't really be friends (unless you are from a non-English speaking country, cause you get a pass). What Mochrie has done is take the first and last lines from famous novels and construct his own stories around them. Three of the stories are relatively in the same view as the origin. "A Study in Ha-Ha" feature Sherlock Holmes and his study of comedy. "Casey at the Bar" is a Canadian take on the famous Casey at the Bat, and quite frankly, far better than the original. "Twas Not Right Before Christmas" is the Christmas special that you never knew you needed until you read it. There is also a homage to zombies and Loony Tunes. It is a great and funny collection.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    If you're even a casual fan of Colin Mochrie, then you already know that he is a funny, funny man. He has a peculiar sort of humor, blending Canadian stereotypical politeness with an often surprising edge, but he is as clever as he is frantic. When I first hear he was taking the Whose Line is it Anyway approach to a short story collection with Not Quite the Classics, I knew I was going to have to read it. A Study in Ha Ha opens the collection with a Sherlock Holmes homage so absurd, so If you're even a casual fan of Colin Mochrie, then you already know that he is a funny, funny man. He has a peculiar sort of humor, blending Canadian stereotypical politeness with an often surprising edge, but he is as clever as he is frantic. When I first hear he was taking the Whose Line is it Anyway approach to a short story collection with Not Quite the Classics, I knew I was going to have to read it. A Study in Ha Ha opens the collection with a Sherlock Holmes homage so absurd, so inconceivable, it works astoundingly well. In it, Holmes decides to make a study of jokes, with the intention of becoming the world's first stand-up comic. Moby: Toupee or Not Toupee is a tale of a different sort, a blackly comic horror story about a bald man who lacks confidence, and the living toupee that does far more than just boost his self-esteem. One of the early highlights of the collection is Casey at the Bar, a straight up homage of Casey at the bat, with Colin's version being the story of a washed up Leaf's goalie. Funny stuff, and as it enjoys a few wildly humorous tangents. My favorite entry, however, has to be A Tale of Two Critters. It's written as a very stuffy Dickensian tale, capturing the narrative essence of the original, which actually suits the story of poor old Wile E. Coyote very well. Without spoiling it, let's just say that anybody who's ever wanted to see the roadrunner get his due won't be disappointed! The Cat and My Dad is another rhyming tale, this time putting a very Seussian spin on the post-apocalyptic zombie story. It's a fun story, surprisingly dark given the singsong verse, and it reminds us precisely why polite, law-abiding, poorly-armed Canadians would have a hard time with zombies. Along the same lines, Twas Not Right Before Christmas continues the rhyming lyrical theme, offering up a Twilight Zone mash-up of all the holiday standards, coming together under one man's roof. If there's any justice in the world, this will be the next animated holiday special . . . just please don't let Tim Allen or Adam Sandler be involved. While I had hopes that Not Quite the Classics would be funny, I honestly did not expect it to be as clever and as well-written as it is. Clearly, Mochrie put a lot of thought and imagination into his story choices, and while a few missed my funny bone, others had me laughing out loud (and driving my wife crazy with my insistence on reading passages aloud). How each story will hit you depends as much on your sense of humor as your familiarity with the source material, but it's an entertaining bunch of tales. Originally reviewed at Beauty in Ruins

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Canadian author Colin Mochrie's reimaginings of classic fiction, from old nursery rhymes to 20th century picture books, are hilarious and very creative.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm Smith

    If you are at all familiar with who Colin Mochrie is you won't be surprised to hear that the stories are funny, quirky, and sometimes just plain weird. Mochrie is that joking Canadian who stars on Who's Line is it Anyways? (and is also a part of the This Hour Has 22 Minutes - The Classic Canadian political satire show anyone?), so he has the chops to make people laugh...but, you ask, does his humour translate well onto the written page? For the most part, yes. And, to my surprise his overall If you are at all familiar with who Colin Mochrie is you won't be surprised to hear that the stories are funny, quirky, and sometimes just plain weird. Mochrie is that joking Canadian who stars on Who's Line is it Anyways? (and is also a part of the This Hour Has 22 Minutes - The Classic Canadian political satire show anyone?), so he has the chops to make people laugh...but, you ask, does his humour translate well onto the written page? For the most part, yes. And, to my surprise his overall writing skills are extraordinary. I was happily surprised at the high quality of the writing. It was so good it almost fools one into believing the absurd topics and storylines are the 'real' Classic writings of Doyle, Orwell, Fitzgerald, or even Seuss. I was especially impressed with Colin's ability to mimic the tone and feel of these Classics. His choice of words and phrases were bang on with the originals. Again, it was so easy to fall into the feeling that you were reading a strange story written 100 years ago by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle ...albeit, a strange story about Sherlock Holmes doing stand up comedy, but, none-the-less believable. I went into this book thinking it was going to be a work of low grade nonsensical writing, with a few easy Moby Dick jokes (which I will assure you there were none of). But, it was not. It was the exact opposite. It was an extremely well written collection of short stories that were funny on so many levels, from the spot on impersonation of the Classic writer's style to the farcical/bizarre tales Mochrie brought to life. The only thing missing was a talking pickle.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicola Mansfield

    Colin Mochrie, famous for his improv, has put his talent into story format and written a book! Not Quite the Classics is not quite literature but is full of a dozen rollicking good yarns. Each story starts with the first sentence of a classic piece of literature and ends with its last sentence. These are printed in bold so the reader knows when they start and stop. In between those appropriated words are rambling pieces of comedic buffoonery that could only come from the mind of Colin Mochrie. I Colin Mochrie, famous for his improv, has put his talent into story format and written a book! Not Quite the Classics is not quite literature but is full of a dozen rollicking good yarns. Each story starts with the first sentence of a classic piece of literature and ends with its last sentence. These are printed in bold so the reader knows when they start and stop. In between those appropriated words are rambling pieces of comedic buffoonery that could only come from the mind of Colin Mochrie. I read this book but for the first time in my life as a non-audio book person, I was hearing Mochrie's voice in my head and actually wishing I was listening to the audio version. Only one of the twelve didn't amuse me, the others had me laughing out loud from giggles to outright guffaws. Mochrie may not quite be the best writer, but he is quite certainly one of the funniest Canadians plying the craft today. I 'd certainly pick up a second volume of these humorous literary gems if he offers us more! 1. A Study in Ha Ha (inspired by Arthur Conan Doyle's A Study in Scarlet) - Fun. Sherlock takes on the study and science of humour and decides to become a stand-up comic performing at a local pub's weekly talent show. Mochrie capture's Holmes' essence quite well and it is an amusing story. Mochrie's own voice is loud and clear; I could hear him inside my head telling the story. Fun but not great. (3/5) 2. Moby (inspired by Herman Melville's Moby-Dick) - A horror story about Ishmael Moby, a balding actor, whose life changes when he meets a toupee with a mind and power of its own. Silly but fun. (3/5) 3. Casey at the Bar (inspired by Ernest Thayer's "Casey at the Bat") - Haha! Loved this! Truly Canadian all the way as Mochrie re-writes the famous poem making it about an old disgraced hockey player at a bar. (5/5) 4. The Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Fourth (inspired by George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four) - The first long story; this is a total farce. Keeping a dystopian plot like the original, Mochrie turns it into a cross between a fairy tale and a fantasy channeling Terry Pratchett. Outrageous fun as a magic shop owner is recruited by the rebels to overthrow the tyrannical King because they have been led to him by the Oracle. A few nods to Orwell's 1984 are included such as a siamese set of twins named Big Brother and Little Brother. (4/5) 5. A Tale of Two Critters (inspired by Charles Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities) - Wow. A serious, violent and touching story written from Wile E. Coyote's point of view. Darkly hilarious as well! (5/5) 6. The Cat and my Dad (inspired by Dr. Seuss's The Cat in the Hat) - The author cheats a bit for this one by paraphrasing the first stanza, then changing the words to the last sentence to reference his own story, but that didn't stop me from loving this Seussian zombie apocalypse rhyme. (5/5) 7. Franken's Time (inspired by Mary Shelly's Frankenstein) - Black humour and horror combine in this ludicrous tale of a man and his close relationship with a rooster. Mochrie manages to keep many elements of the original and writes a morbidly funny tale. (4/5) 8. Waterhouse Five (inspired by Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five) - This is the first story where I haven't read the original book so any humorous references are lost on me. However, this is a totally comic story of the most outrageous proctal exam anyone could possibly imagine. Undergone by poor Billy, the world's most unfortunate soul. LOL (4/5) 9. 'Twas Not Right Before Christmas (inspired by Clement Moore's "Twas the Night Before Christmas) - Hilarious! These poems are my favourite parts of the book. There's been a shift in the space-time continuum and when the narrator gets up in the night he's visited by the Ghost of Christmas Past accidentally, then in pops Clarence the Angel, they start arguing, and eventually all mayhem breaks lose as the characters from all Christmas classics and TV shows and movies turn up. Wild. (5/5) 10. The Grateful Gatsby (inspired by F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby) - A delightful British farce! An impoverished British Lord is trying to save his estate by making an advantageous marriage for his daughter. This is where the wild American comes in. Set during World War I. Quirky and lots of fun. Probably the best-written story in the book so far. (5/5) 11. Re: Becker (inspired by Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca) - A delightfully morbid tale. A man find's out he's just inherited his only friend's vast estate after a sudden death. But the will comes with one very strange condition that he, however, has no qualms over. The second story I haven't actually read the book of, but I have seen the movie more than once; Mochrie keeps several nods to the original here for fans in this darkly humorous and very British tale. (3/5) 12. Faren Heights Bin 451 (inspired by Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451) - Boy, a bit of a dud to end the book with. A noir private eye has the private dick searching for a missing set of keys for the lovely dame who came into his office. Things get convoluted with a cast including a midget, but the humour of this one fell flat on me. (2/5)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Roy Bou Hadir

    This book is in short-story format and takes the first and last line of 12 classics and makes his own story in-between. If you've read all 12 of them (Sherlock Holmes, Moby-Dick, Casey at the Bat, 1984, A Tale of Two Cities, The Cat in the Hat, Frankenstein, Slaughterhouse-five, Twas the Night Before Christmas, The Great Gatsby, Rebecca and Fahrenheit 451), you'd notice that each short story reflects the writing style and personalities that come from every one of those books. If you've enjoyed This book is in short-story format and takes the first and last line of 12 classics and makes his own story in-between. If you've read all 12 of them (Sherlock Holmes, Moby-Dick, Casey at the Bat, 1984, A Tale of Two Cities, The Cat in the Hat, Frankenstein, Slaughterhouse-five, Twas the Night Before Christmas, The Great Gatsby, Rebecca and Fahrenheit 451), you'd notice that each short story reflects the writing style and personalities that come from every one of those books. If you've enjoyed all 12 of these books, then this is a 5 star book for you. It was fun and the author kept it short and sweet. If you've never read any of these classics, the book immediately loses its value as you won't appreciate the work Colin put into it nor will you enjoy the very fresh take on the first/last line of the classics you know. It's a 4 star book for me because I didn't enjoy all 12 of the original books. Some of them were somewhat tiring reads for me (like 1984, gatsby and fahrenheit 451). My favorite was A Tale of Two Critters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Avery (ThePagemaster)

    YAY! I'VE REACHED 500 BOOKS READ ON GOODREADS! *cue confetti and fireworks and explosions* DAB! Now, I've been a fan of Colin Mochrie ever since I discovered "Whose Line is it Anyway?", and for those of you that don't know that show, first off, move out of that rock you're living in. Anyway, WLiiA is a improv comedy show where four improv comics are given certain scenarios, objects or even impressions of famous people and make a quick scene with it. Colin Mochrie OWNED every episode with his YAY! I'VE REACHED 500 BOOKS READ ON GOODREADS! *cue confetti and fireworks and explosions* DAB! Now, I've been a fan of Colin Mochrie ever since I discovered "Whose Line is it Anyway?", and for those of you that don't know that show, first off, move out of that rock you're living in. Anyway, WLiiA is a improv comedy show where four improv comics are given certain scenarios, objects or even impressions of famous people and make a quick scene with it. Colin Mochrie OWNED every episode with his quick, witty, and sometimes dark humor. When I heard he wrote a short story collection, I just had to have it. What's most interesting about Mochrie's collection, is that he takes first and last lines of famous, classics(For example, A Tale of Two Cities, Great Gatsby, etc.) and fills in the middle with his own, original stories. Other than, like, one or two stories, I enjoyed a great deal of book. It has his typical humor, as expected, which I enjoyed more than the actual stories. Even if you haven't heard of Colin Mochrie or Whose Line is it Anyway?(Which is a sin lol) this is definitely worth giving a try.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Colin Mochrie is best known for being a master of improvisational comedy. By his own admission he went into improv because he does not like to work; “One of the reasons I became an improvisor was so that my workload would be light. I don’t have to learn lines or go for wardrobe fittings … I just need a stage and someone to work with”. When encouraged to write a book – he balked – after all how can you translate improv into the written word and it sounded like a lot of work. Unrelenting, he was Colin Mochrie is best known for being a master of improvisational comedy. By his own admission he went into improv because he does not like to work; “One of the reasons I became an improvisor was so that my workload would be light. I don’t have to learn lines or go for wardrobe fittings … I just need a stage and someone to work with”. When encouraged to write a book – he balked – after all how can you translate improv into the written word and it sounded like a lot of work. Unrelenting, he was challenged to write a book of short stories, taking the first line and the last line of classic works of literature and inventing a new story that fits between. The challenge was taken resulting in Not Quite the Classics and in my opinion the challenge was well met. With his undeniable comedic talent and his slightly off-beat sense of humor Mr. Mochrie has taken 12 well known classics and transformed them into entertaining works of humor. Although he in no way stays true to the setting, the story, or even the characters I was impressed with how he managed to maintain the feel of the original through language and dialogue. Whether it was Sherlock Holmes trying to learn stand-up comedy in “A Study in Ha-Ha” (A Study in Scarlett), finally getting the history behind the coyote and the roadrunner in “A Tale of Two Critters” (A Tale of Two Cities) or reworking both “Twas the Night Before Christmas” and “Casey At The Bat” this book had me giggling, groaning and laughing out loud. Obviously, never taking himself too seriously, the pictures of Mr. Mochrie in full costume as the main character at the beginning of each rework made me chuckle before I even started reading. Well done … I hope there might be another one coming with even more first-line/last-line reworks.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Renny Barcelos

    That's it, I'm now sure that there's nothing Colin Mochrie could do that I wouldn't love and laugh hysterically at. Seriously, this man is absolutely brilliant. I had to listen to this audiobook only at home, alone, so I wouldn't end up in a straightjacket, laughing by myself on the train. There's no way to control yourself while listening to Colin himself read these stories. This book is dangerous! Be prepared to laugh like you've never laughed before with a book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    I didn't read every story in this book, some were just too long or not funny. The ones I liked were really good though, especially the Night Before Christmas one, lol. Did I laugh out loud, not really, but I did giggle a few times. This book wasn't what I was expecting but I'm glad I gave it a go.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    I borrowed this book from my local book. It was a good comedy fiction book of stories that were classic stories with his comedic twist on them. I enjoyed reading it. I also enjoyed when he stared in the improve show on TV called whose line is it anyway. I liked that show.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Some stories were better than others. I liked the idea about using first and last lines of classic stories. I enjoyed the Night before Christmas poem - quite funny.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Froof

    Great concept with mostly mixed results. The Night before Xmas tale, and Sherlock stories were good.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phoenix

    Moch 12 The clever premise of this book of 12 short stories, is that Mochrie starts from the first and last line of a famous novel and weaves his own narrative in between with a nod or two to the original for comic effect. It’s a literary form of improv. Most are successful, which is good in improv terms. I agree with other reviewers that the best pieces are based on familiar poems, “Casey at the Bar” - Casey as a former Leaf’s goalie striking out as a ladies man; “The Cat and My Dad” - a Moch 12 The clever premise of this book of 12 short stories, is that Mochrie starts from the first and last line of a famous novel and weaves his own narrative in between with a nod or two to the original for comic effect. It’s a literary form of improv. Most are successful, which is good in improv terms. I agree with other reviewers that the best pieces are based on familiar poems, “Casey at the Bar” - Casey as a former Leaf’s goalie striking out as a ladies man; “The Cat and My Dad” - a hilarious Zombie Apocalypse as told by Dr. Seus, and “’Twas Not Right Before Christmas” : In which the author is accidentally visited by the Ghost of Christmas Past, Clarence the Angel, Santa Claus and Dr. Who in a case of mistaken addresses on the eve of the holiday. All would make wonderful set pieces if read aloud to an older child or used for an audition. In “A Tale of Two Critters” a coyote with human intelligence copes with loneliness and, with the help of products from “The Company”, takes on a damnable adversary. The angst over his social exclusion is downright palpable. meep meep. Add to this “A Study in Haha” where Sherlock Holmes tries standup comedy, and “Moby: Toupée or Not Toupée” a mild horror story where balding actor Ishmael is ensnared by a demonic toupee which changes his life and his career. In Franken’s Time: A sapient rooster in love, and the best reason ever for why a chicken crossed the road. “Farben Heights Bin 451” comicly captures the film noire detective genre where wayward dame Madelyn hatches a scheme to steal the secret of a supergrape belonging to a rival grower. More forced is “The Nineteen Hundred and Eighty Fourth” - a fractured gothic tale where a poor magic monger is raised to heroic stature for the love of Queen Madwyn, sister to an evil king, which also features a pair of Siamese Twin fighters, one larger than the other, joined at the butt; Waterhouse Five: A perpetually unlucky actor visits his doctor for a long overdue checkup in the titular building; The Grateful Gatsby: Lord Gatsby, in a comedy of manners, seeks to save the family fortune by marrying off his daughter Jane to her childhood friend, Rockefeller Manly and lastly `”Re:Becker” in which Morley fulfills his dear friend Becker’s last request – a mild revenge fantasy where Becker’s ashes are tossed into the faces of those who wronged him in life. Overall enjoyable with a tendency towards puns.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ben Lund

    Loved this book, not every one of the stories may work for every person, but you can't deny the humour in the simple idea of what Colin has done here. The concept sounds like it shouldn't work, but it really does. Fitting the stories between the first and last lines requires some subtle wordplay and some verbal gymnastics but the nature of Colin's improv background really shines as he gave me story after story that I was not expecting. I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall of his Loved this book, not every one of the stories may work for every person, but you can't deny the humour in the simple idea of what Colin has done here. The concept sounds like it shouldn't work, but it really does. Fitting the stories between the first and last lines requires some subtle wordplay and some verbal gymnastics but the nature of Colin's improv background really shines as he gave me story after story that I was not expecting. I would have loved to have been a fly on the wall of his thought process to understand how he ended up where he did, but I enjoyed the end result immensely. The best part of reading this book was that I found it while getting another book at my local library and just noticed his face on the cover. Being a fan of all three iterations of Whose Line is it Anyway (less so, the newest one), I couldn't help but be intrigued, and I'm so glad that I decided to take a look. If you are familiar with Colin through WLiiA, or if you just want to relax and rediscover an old(new) classic, take a few minutes of you time and pick one of the stories at random, if you have a single funny bone in your body, you won't be able to help reading just one more, and just one more...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Stoeckel

    “There is an improv game called First Line, Last Line, in which the beginning and the ending are supplied by the audience and the improvisers make up the rest. I could do that in a book. Take the first and last line of famous novels, make up the middle, and voila! So I found twelve classics with first and last lines that inspired me....” I normally don’t buy ebooks from a regular email I get- going for the “freebies”. However, wave ANYTHING by Colin Mochrie in front of me, and I’m there. In this “There is an improv game called First Line, Last Line, in which the beginning and the ending are supplied by the audience and the improvisers make up the rest. I could do that in a book. Take the first and last line of famous novels, make up the middle, and voila! So I found twelve classics with first and last lines that inspired me....” I normally don’t buy ebooks from a regular email I get- going for the “freebies”. However, wave ANYTHING by Colin Mochrie in front of me, and I’m there. In this compilation, Mochrie shares some of his improvs around 12 classics. From The Great Gatsby to Sherlock Holmes, these stories are side splittingly funny, with enough of the author’s own thoughts to make you go....whiskey, tango, foxtrot(try ‘Twas not Right Before Christmas” to see what I mean) and haunting enough to make you laugh when you sleep. Highly Recommended 5/5

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    I love Colin Mochrie and his improv comedy, but when it comes to humor writing, he's really hit or miss. Not Quite the Classics is a collection of short stories with a cool concept: Take the first and last line of classics and then write a completely new story around them. However, I couldn't help but feel like Mochrie was a college creative writing student trying to meet a deadline and just crank out as much as possible (or more likely, his agent told him he had to write a book and this is what I love Colin Mochrie and his improv comedy, but when it comes to humor writing, he's really hit or miss. Not Quite the Classics is a collection of short stories with a cool concept: Take the first and last line of classics and then write a completely new story around them. However, I couldn't help but feel like Mochrie was a college creative writing student trying to meet a deadline and just crank out as much as possible (or more likely, his agent told him he had to write a book and this is what happened after weeks of procrastination). Some of the stories, like the "Night Before Christmas" and "Of Mice and Men," were hilarious. Others really had nothing worthy of note and I felt like I had missed something when I hadn't smiled once.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I ordered this book once I found out that it was for sale. I began watching Whose Line Is It Anyway before it was ABC---when Colin Mochrie was on the BBC version. The man is hilarious. And so is this book. I have only found his spin-off on "The Great Gatsby" to be a little long and hard to follow, but I was half asleep when I read it. Colin Mochrie did an amazing job of writing funny stories, just as he does an amazing job on Whose Line Is It Anyway. I have been laughing ever since I bought this I ordered this book once I found out that it was for sale. I began watching Whose Line Is It Anyway before it was ABC---when Colin Mochrie was on the BBC version. The man is hilarious. And so is this book. I have only found his spin-off on "The Great Gatsby" to be a little long and hard to follow, but I was half asleep when I read it. Colin Mochrie did an amazing job of writing funny stories, just as he does an amazing job on Whose Line Is It Anyway. I have been laughing ever since I bought this book, started it and finished it. Thank you, Mr. Mochrie. We need more people like you in the world.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Ambrose

    What a fun book! If I didn't know who had written this book, my guess probably would have been Colin Mochire. It definitely carries his sense of humor. And what a perfect book for an improv performer - I had fun guessing where the stories were going to go, especially the ones I knew the last lines of. I particularly enjoyed "A Tale of Two Citters," "Franken's Time," and "'Twas Not Right Before Christmas." That's not to say the otheres weren't good because they all are! Those are just my What a fun book! If I didn't know who had written this book, my guess probably would have been Colin Mochire. It definitely carries his sense of humor. And what a perfect book for an improv performer - I had fun guessing where the stories were going to go, especially the ones I knew the last lines of. I particularly enjoyed "A Tale of Two Citters," "Franken's Time," and "'Twas Not Right Before Christmas." That's not to say the otheres weren't good because they all are! Those are just my favorites. Definitely worth checking out if your a fan of the classics and maybe more so if you're not.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cindyann

    Ebook This makes me sad. I love his comedy, his quick wit, his off kilter style. I did not, however, love his book. It left me more confused than entertained. I give him credit for his ability to switch writing themes. Maybe it was the nasty head cold that kept me from laughing more than I had expected.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kay Cammack

    A classic of Its Own This book is hilarious, sweet, perverse and definitely worth the read! The concept is brilliant. A Tale of Two Critters had me laughing from the first paragraph on, although it’s a somewhat melancholy tale. I absolutely love this book. Highly recommend it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

    A creative tour de force, with imaginative storytelling and a wit like no other, Colin Mochire makes for an amazing selection of short stories based off of classic literature that most anyone is sure to enjoy.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jennae

    Everything I've ever wanted in a book Utterly charming. Deliciously written. Profoundly hilarious. I devoured this book. A good time read for those days when average prose starts to get you down.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    This is a book of short stories and poems. I really enjoyed most of them. Some were not so great, but that is only my opinion. I love Colin on the Who's Line show and he does say at the beginning of the book that writing is hard. Enjoy! BTW some of it is really funny!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Absolutely fabulous! I loved each story..

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    I was so excited when I learned Colin Mochrie wrote a book. 'Would love the rest of the Whose Line cast to follow suit.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nishant

    Original stories of classic tales. Very improvisation.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lorne Phillips

    I just found while it should have been interesting I took forever to get through this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nanci Pattenden

    Some parts were laugh out loud funny, other not so much.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Might have rated this as 1.5 stars if it were available. Mochrie tried, so I give him credit, but where's the humor? I never smiled once.

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