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The Mysticism of Sound and Music

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Music, according to Sufi teaching, is really a small expression of the overwhelming and perfect harmony of the whole universe—and that is the secret of its amazing power to move us. The Indian Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first teacher to bring the Islamic mystical tradition to the West, was an accomplished musician himself. His lucid exposition of Music, according to Sufi teaching, is really a small expression of the overwhelming and perfect harmony of the whole universe—and that is the secret of its amazing power to move us. The Indian Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first teacher to bring the Islamic mystical tradition to the West, was an accomplished musician himself. His lucid exposition of music's divine nature has become a modern classic, beloved not only by those interested in Sufism but by musicians of all kinds.


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Music, according to Sufi teaching, is really a small expression of the overwhelming and perfect harmony of the whole universe—and that is the secret of its amazing power to move us. The Indian Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first teacher to bring the Islamic mystical tradition to the West, was an accomplished musician himself. His lucid exposition of Music, according to Sufi teaching, is really a small expression of the overwhelming and perfect harmony of the whole universe—and that is the secret of its amazing power to move us. The Indian Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927), the first teacher to bring the Islamic mystical tradition to the West, was an accomplished musician himself. His lucid exposition of music's divine nature has become a modern classic, beloved not only by those interested in Sufism but by musicians of all kinds.

30 review for The Mysticism of Sound and Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hartmark

    I sometimes watch suspense movies for the hidden love story, or comedies for the political satire. Likewise, it's not so much the insight into music but the hidden stories, the side stories that make this book transforming. I am quite taken by any writer who attempts to access a theory via intuition. It is a nearly impossible task. It is, as Andre Breton wrote, "reaching for the impossible while standing on the possible ground." Khan does this, and the journey is quite wonderful. It's like being I sometimes watch suspense movies for the hidden love story, or comedies for the political satire. Likewise, it's not so much the insight into music but the hidden stories, the side stories that make this book transforming. I am quite taken by any writer who attempts to access a theory via intuition. It is a nearly impossible task. It is, as Andre Breton wrote, "reaching for the impossible while standing on the possible ground." Khan does this, and the journey is quite wonderful. It's like being blindfolded on a speeding train with a delightful companion. It's hard to know the destination, but I hoped the journey would never end. Re-reading my favorite passages in this book cures tummy aches.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gabriel Monticello

    I loved this book. It has very little to do with music as we think of it. This is a book about spirituality. It draws from all religions and shows how they are similar. I would recommend this book to anyone. It was (for me)and a slow read, as I would stop reading to ponder and think about the concepts.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Josh Giunta

    heavy stuff... music is the closest representation of the wholeness of the universe that humans have. "The further we advance, the more difficult and the more important becomes our part in the symphony of life; and the more conscious we are of this responsibility, the more efficient we become at accomplishing the task." The ideas are really profound, but the writing style can be pretty poor...seems like it was poorly translated from oral lectures. The structure detracts from the beauty of the heavy stuff... music is the closest representation of the wholeness of the universe that humans have. "The further we advance, the more difficult and the more important becomes our part in the symphony of life; and the more conscious we are of this responsibility, the more efficient we become at accomplishing the task." The ideas are really profound, but the writing style can be pretty poor...seems like it was poorly translated from oral lectures. The structure detracts from the beauty of the concepts.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Alcantara

    I'm a musician myself, and this book helped me understand and sense music as a potential divine healing force.

  5. 5 out of 5

    S.

    Best Book i ever read in my life up to this point!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Miles

    2.5/5 I read this book slowly over a year or so, it is...a lot. There are some insightful and thought provoking bits buried in here - I found it very hard to read overall. The writing is overly ornamented and I wonder if it also suffers from its translation. Big ideas and sweeping statements are made with little explanation, let alone evidence or background (not that "hard evidence" is really to be expected in this type of book). The book is split into two main sections, "Music", and "Aphorisms". 2.5/5 I read this book slowly over a year or so, it is...a lot. There are some insightful and thought provoking bits buried in here - I found it very hard to read overall. The writing is overly ornamented and I wonder if it also suffers from its translation. Big ideas and sweeping statements are made with little explanation, let alone evidence or background (not that "hard evidence" is really to be expected in this type of book). The book is split into two main sections, "Music", and "Aphorisms". I recommend skipping the second section. I wish I'd made highlights/taken notes because there are some great ideas, but you really have to dig through a pile of words to find them here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    A beautiful compilation of the lectures and teachings of Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan. Topics include the origins and significance of sound and language, the power of thought, music, words and names, the relationship between sound and light. Khan does a wonderful job explaining the basic teachings on Sound which have been shared and practiced throughout time and which can be found at the heart of each of the major world religions. Although, he reminds us, a complete understanding of Sound is   A beautiful compilation of the lectures and teachings of Sufi master Hazrat Inayat Khan. Topics include the origins and significance of sound and language, the power of thought, music, words and names, the relationship between sound and light. Khan does a wonderful job explaining the basic teachings on Sound which have been shared and practiced throughout time and which can be found at the heart of each of the major world religions. Although, he reminds us, a complete understanding of Sound is to be found within. Science (just another language of Spirit ; ) has shown us – particularly through Cymatics and also the work of Dr. Masaru Emoto – that vibration produces shape. The more harmonious the vibration, the more harmonious the shape. Through Cymatics we see that certain sounds and frequencies produce amazingly intricate geometric patterns. “If that is true,” Khan tells us, “then every person, from morning till evening, is making invisible forms in space by what he says. He is creating invisible vibrations around him, and so he is producing an atmosphere” (43). “If one were so sensitive about words, one would have to leave all language alone” (267). ... I remember being profoundly struck by two scriptural ideas when I was little - the Word and the I Am. When I heard these phrases in the sacred literature and was finally old enough to read them for myself, I was deeply moved, but had no idea why. “There’s something here,” I would think, just the vaguest sense of it as something I once knew but had forgotten. “Something more to this. Something important…”, and I would read the words over and over again, keeping the feeling of the Something it meant – that happy Something – deep, deep inside – like a promise that might reveal itself in time, the long-waited echoed response to my “Hello!” spoken at the edge of a canyon. Over time I would catch glimpses of this deeply held promise – in other languages, in other ideas… But it was always there. It would take years for me to put my finger on it, always thinking it was something outside myself – something out there, something up There. And it is, up There. But it is also very much here. “‘In the beginning was the Word…’ Here is a thought which may be pondered over for years…” (248). Khan tells us, “Sound gives to the consciousness an evidence of its existence, although it is in fact the active part of consciousness itself which turns into sound. The knower, so to speak, becomes known to himself; in other words the consciousness bears witness to its own voice. It is therefore that sound appeals to man. All things being derived from and formed of vibrations have sound hidden within them, as fire is hidden in flint. And each atom of the universe confesses by its tone: ‘My sole origin is sound’. If any solid or sonorous body is struck it will answer back: ‘I am sound’” (121). “The word is everywhere and the word is continually speaking. ... The idea is simply that all that exists has come out of the word, and goes back to the word, and in its own being all is a word” (286). Many people find it most easily in nature – near the ocean, in the woods. “But the one whose heart is open,” Khan tells us, “– he need not go as far as the forest; in the midst of the crowd he can find music” (19). “Souls at different stages of evolution wish to search after this word that was lost, in the form in which they are accustomed to search. Ways have been made to search for this word which have become right ways and wrong ways, sins and virtues. It is therefore that the wise are tolerant to all, for they see that every soul has his own way to follow, his own purpose to accomplish. But in the accomplishment of all these purposes is the one purpose, and that is the finding of the word that was lost” (278). “The one who seeks through science, the one who searches through religion, the one who finds it through philosophy, the one who finds it through mysticism – in whatever manner they seek the truth, they find it in the end” (39).  

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ken Hastings

    "This book is a revised and enlarged edition of the second volume in the series of 'The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan'. It contains a Sufi vision on music, sound, language and the power of words.... Almost all chapters of this book - 'The Mystery of Sound' excepted - were originally lectures and addresses, delivered in various circumstances. Some were addressed to pupils and students who were already acquainted with the Sufi teachings; others were public lectures, and some reports show that "This book is a revised and enlarged edition of the second volume in the series of 'The Sufi Message of Hazrat Inayat Khan'. It contains a Sufi vision on music, sound, language and the power of words.... Almost all chapters of this book - 'The Mystery of Sound' excepted - were originally lectures and addresses, delivered in various circumstances. Some were addressed to pupils and students who were already acquainted with the Sufi teachings; others were public lectures, and some reports show that an address was given on the occasion of a musical performance. (from the preface) I found the book to be very readable and intelligently organised. No matter what your spiritual tradition I suspect you'll find something of value here. It has certainly had an impact on me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Brown

    This is certainly a book that you read over several years. It is meant to be studied, not sped-read. That being said, it's a beautiful book for those who have a deep, meaningful relationship with music and the power of sound (you know who you are). The author's insights are accurate in a way that can't be described as scientific, but rather heart- (and soul) felt.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Don't enjoy this one as much as The Music of Life. Author skips around a great deal and here and there. Antagonists toward mysticism in general might have a field day with his theories, although those (like myself) who approach music esoterically will probably find it deep enough in spots. But not as well written as the former, I feel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Russell Eric Dobda

    This book took me about 3 years to finish reading becuase it is very dense. Each individual sentence opens pandoras boxes of enlightenment, and it can be hard to fully digest it, but it's definitely a classic,.. especially if you are a musician.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Daria Kutuzova

    Интересные идеи про резонанс, разум, волю, выбор - и, само собой, звук и музыку - с суфийской точки зрения. Заставляет задуматься и многое проясняет.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abelrecknold

    Amazing!

  14. 5 out of 5

    5 Track

    Wow ... Sufi insight applied to my area of obsession ... very nearly blinding

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Interesting to anyone who is interested in Sufism, mysticism, or the spiritual aspect of music. The book is compiled from the author's lectures and articles. Consequently, he often restates the same points, which makes for a repetitious read. After the first section, you may find yourself skimming.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pankaj

    Very profound thoughts expressed simply for a lay person. However, as these chapters appear to have been collated from talks delivered over a period of time, there is repetition and I had to literally skim through the last hundred or so pages to avoid boredom.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rob O'Hearn

    Beautiful and inspiring

  18. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    The author has a great deal of love for life and music and it shines through. It wasn't quite dense enough to hold my interest.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Josh Eustis

    This is another book that changed my perspective on music and how the world is really shit without it. It also showed me some very important ideas about how music is not really created by the people who 'write' it...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Valerie

    Full of truth and beauty.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wahyudinata Denny

    jika anda suka dg psikologi, sastra, puisi, mistisisme, tasawuf, esoterisme, agama, dan lainnya....maka anda harus baca buku ini, untuk menangkap sisi esoterisme segala sesuatu dlm hidup manusia..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Tolliver

    Some memorable moments. Really great for a music or physics lover.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    i only read the first 3 chapters. it was that good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    awesome

  25. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Beautiful in its expanse. The first section is my favorite. Spiritual, insightful, and sound.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ruta Juzulenaite

    true gem for each music lover

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    Fascinating blend of metaphors and taken-for-granted arcane knowledge. Cool beans!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Billid

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maxwell

  30. 5 out of 5

    Muddy Boots

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