Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Pulp Fiction: A Quentin Tarantino Screenplay

Availability: Ready to download

Quentin Tarantino - director of "Reservoir Dogs" and writer of "True Romance" - won the Palme d'Or for best film at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival for "Pulp Fiction, " his unique vision of the underworld, starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Samuel Jackson, and Harvey Keitel. Taking his inspiration from the popular, and often lurid, "pulp" crime stories of the Quentin Tarantino - director of "Reservoir Dogs" and writer of "True Romance" - won the Palme d'Or for best film at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival for "Pulp Fiction, " his unique vision of the underworld, starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Samuel Jackson, and Harvey Keitel. Taking his inspiration from the popular, and often lurid, "pulp" crime stories of the thirties and forties, Tarantino intertwines three narratives and introduces a variety of fascinating characters; thick-witted hit men, a double-crossing prizefighter on the run, his absent-minded French girlfriend, the hit men-hiring mob boss, his exotic but drug-addled wife, and two young lovers contemplating a career change - namely whether to start sticking up restaurants instead of liquor stores. Full of wicked humor, dazzling dialogue, and riveting action, "Pulp Fiction" is a master screenwriter's look at today's Hollywood and its dark criminal culture.


Compare
Ads Banner

Quentin Tarantino - director of "Reservoir Dogs" and writer of "True Romance" - won the Palme d'Or for best film at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival for "Pulp Fiction, " his unique vision of the underworld, starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Samuel Jackson, and Harvey Keitel. Taking his inspiration from the popular, and often lurid, "pulp" crime stories of the Quentin Tarantino - director of "Reservoir Dogs" and writer of "True Romance" - won the Palme d'Or for best film at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival for "Pulp Fiction, " his unique vision of the underworld, starring John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Bruce Willis, Samuel Jackson, and Harvey Keitel. Taking his inspiration from the popular, and often lurid, "pulp" crime stories of the thirties and forties, Tarantino intertwines three narratives and introduces a variety of fascinating characters; thick-witted hit men, a double-crossing prizefighter on the run, his absent-minded French girlfriend, the hit men-hiring mob boss, his exotic but drug-addled wife, and two young lovers contemplating a career change - namely whether to start sticking up restaurants instead of liquor stores. Full of wicked humor, dazzling dialogue, and riveting action, "Pulp Fiction" is a master screenwriter's look at today's Hollywood and its dark criminal culture.

30 review for Pulp Fiction: A Quentin Tarantino Screenplay

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neil Walker

    After the four authors listed as influences on my author page - Stephen King, William Shakespeare, Bret Easton Ellis and Chuck Palahniuk - Quentin Tarantino is probably the next biggest influence on my writing. When I say Quentin Tarantino is an influence, I am not only talking about Quentin Tarantino the filmmaker, I am also talking about Quentin Tarantino the writer. While those who have watched his films will be aware of his great storytelling and his amazing dialogue, when you read his After the four authors listed as influences on my author page - Stephen King, William Shakespeare, Bret Easton Ellis and Chuck Palahniuk - Quentin Tarantino is probably the next biggest influence on my writing. When I say Quentin Tarantino is an influence, I am not only talking about Quentin Tarantino the filmmaker, I am also talking about Quentin Tarantino the writer. While those who have watched his films will be aware of his great storytelling and his amazing dialogue, when you read his screenplays you are also struck by just how good his descriptive writing is. It is easy to see how his screenplays became hot property in Hollywood, even before Reservoir Dogs made his name as a filmmaker. The words just jump off the page and paint pictures in your mind. While Pulp Fiction may not be my favourite Quentin Tarantino film (although it is excellent), it is certainly my favourite Quentin Tarantino screenplay. If they ever make a film out of Drug Gang, I would like Quentin Tarantino to direct…and I might even let him help me with the screenplay! ;-)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Alot of attention is given to the ultra profane modern jive that Tarantino's characters tend to use in this movie. But there's another reason it gets so much attention. Here is a script that anyone can look through and use as an example as to how to build character through dialog--not just by what a character says and how they say it, but just the simple choice of topic. Even as the action takes place around them and through them, the characters remain distinctly and philosophically themselves. Alot of attention is given to the ultra profane modern jive that Tarantino's characters tend to use in this movie. But there's another reason it gets so much attention. Here is a script that anyone can look through and use as an example as to how to build character through dialog--not just by what a character says and how they say it, but just the simple choice of topic. Even as the action takes place around them and through them, the characters remain distinctly and philosophically themselves. For example, without the previous scene and dialog that took place therein, the scene where Butch get's angry enough at Fabiana to smash a TV to pieces would color our perception unsympathetic and out of balance. By grounding his characters with dialog that usually has nothing to do with plot directly, Tarantino can immerse them in the most extraordinary circumstances and keep the audience riveted. Contrast this with movies like Transformers 2 where the dialog (when it's quiet enough for it) serves as a mouthpiece for exposition or cheap attemtps at humor--boring!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Asghar Abbas

    Pump it! Louder. Black Eyed Peas, anyone ? I don't know, there is something about Tarantino's visual style that extends even to the written form. High off Hateful Eight. QT, one of my personal heroes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    I mean, you pretty much know what you’re getting here. This is literally the screenplay for the Tarantino movie, and because of that it’s hard to give it anything below a 4.5/5. It’s a fantastic movie and the screenplay is just as good on its own. Better still, it comes with a bunch of photographs included in there as well as some scenes that were either removed or changed for the final thing. It’ll probably help if you’ve seen the movie at least a couple of times because you’ll be more familiar I mean, you pretty much know what you’re getting here. This is literally the screenplay for the Tarantino movie, and because of that it’s hard to give it anything below a 4.5/5. It’s a fantastic movie and the screenplay is just as good on its own. Better still, it comes with a bunch of photographs included in there as well as some scenes that were either removed or changed for the final thing. It’ll probably help if you’ve seen the movie at least a couple of times because you’ll be more familiar with that and you’ll start to understand why those decisions were made. I ended up reading it and then watching the movie in the same day, and that’s probably the best way to go about it if you ask me. I had lots of fun with it and I’m glad that I read it, but it helped that I was a fan of the movie already and that I’ve studied screenplays and even written one of my own before. What more do you want me to say?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Great read. Brought my screenwriting game up. Plus I couldn't stop laughing while reading the exchange between Jules and Brett. "Say what again, I dare ya, I double dare ya motherfucker!" You serious? See, my only issue with QT is his overuse of the word 'nigger'. His defense is he grew up around african-american folk, but if this is true, he would know that the way the word would be used by Jules and Marsellus would be "Nigga" not "nigger". And Samuel and Ving caught onto this which is why it Great read. Brought my screenwriting game up. Plus I couldn't stop laughing while reading the exchange between Jules and Brett. "Say what again, I dare ya, I double dare ya motherfucker!" You serious? See, my only issue with QT is his overuse of the word 'nigger'. His defense is he grew up around african-american folk, but if this is true, he would know that the way the word would be used by Jules and Marsellus would be "Nigga" not "nigger". And Samuel and Ving caught onto this which is why it changed from the script to screen. But as a whole, good stuff.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    Tarantino's work is timeless and above all memorable. The story focuses on more than one story which makes it interesting enough to stay engaged. Reading the screenplay was a different experience than watching the film because you get to read the scenes that were added and deleted. Being able to read the screenplay and visualize the scenes was also a plus. I would recommend any Tarantino and/or Pulp Fiction fan to read this screenplay as it makes the Pulp Fiction experience a little more Tarantino's work is timeless and above all memorable. The story focuses on more than one story which makes it interesting enough to stay engaged. Reading the screenplay was a different experience than watching the film because you get to read the scenes that were added and deleted. Being able to read the screenplay and visualize the scenes was also a plus. I would recommend any Tarantino and/or Pulp Fiction fan to read this screenplay as it makes the Pulp Fiction experience a little more interesting and different. "Zed's dead, baby, Zed's dead."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Baker

    What I love about Quentin Tarantino's writing is the delicately written and well placed dialogue that makes every line just as great as the last. The lines written in this film make even the smallest character seem badass. It's like with each descriptive and quotable line you are put in that charater's place, which is awesome because you could only dream of hearing those perpectual quotes come out of your mouth in real life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Just read this again and it is so freaking over-the-top. What's amazing is how far QT stretched. Not easy to go that far out-of-bounds.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mo

    the path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. blessed is he, who in the name of charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. and i will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. and you will know my name is the Lord when i lay my vengeance upon thee.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elvira Atvara

    The best script I have read so far. Almost beats my all time favourites - The Royal Tenenbaums. I would even go as far as to say they are on the same level of awesomeness. I haven't seen the movie and I doubt I will (don't want anyone to ruin this script for me; even if they have Turman and Travolta). This a screenplay masterpiece, Tarantino at his very best.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luke

    May 1993. Last draft.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    1994 was a golden year for film. Quentin Tarantino’s PULP FICTION runs at 2 hours and 58 minutes. In regards to this script format, we are treated to how the writer and director, Tarantino, presents his ideas and stories created with Roger Avary. The cover page title is CAPITALIZED, underlined, and features spaces between each letter I.e. : P U L P. May 1993 is listed as the “last draft,” Blue: revised 8/18/93, Pink: revised 9/8/93, and Green: revised 10/5/93. Unfortunately, the pages in this 1994 was a golden year for film. Quentin Tarantino’s PULP FICTION runs at 2 hours and 58 minutes. In regards to this script format, we are treated to how the writer and director, Tarantino, presents his ideas and stories created with Roger Avary. The cover page title is CAPITALIZED, underlined, and features spaces between each letter I.e. : P U L P. May 1993 is listed as the “last draft,” Blue: revised 8/18/93, Pink: revised 9/8/93, and Green: revised 10/5/93. Unfortunately, the pages in this reproduction are not color coded. The film is broken down into 93 scenes, properly numbered on both sides of the page on the same line upon scene introduction. There are roughly three indents before CHARACTERS are identified for speech. (directions, if any) are under their designated name. Page numbers are listed in the top right corner. SCENES, intro of NEW CHARACTERS, SPEAKING CHARACTERS, ACTIONS, NOISES, and OTHER FILMS REFERENCED, are all capitalized. Some CHARACTERS’ names are underlined with descriptions underneath. Underlined words in dialogue are for emphasis. SHOT STYLE, INSERTS, CUTS, etc are CAPITALIZED. Examples include: CREDIT SEQUENCE:, STEADICAM, DOLLY into a MEDIUM, OUT OF FRAME, COLORFUL PROCESS SHOT, VINCENT’S POV:, ZOOM, WE JUXTAPOSE, CAMERA, HIGH ANGLE SHOT, LOW ANGLE MEDIUM SHOT, INSERT SPEEDOMETER, WE HEAR, like a DOCUMENTARY in an emergency ward, WE MOVE, WE FOLLOW, OFF SCREEN, FADE UP:, DISSOLVE TO:, FISH-TAILING, BOXER’S PUNCHES, SEE, THROUGH THE WINSHIELD, DOUBLE-TAKE:, SHINES., and FADE TO BLACK. CU = close up. b.g. = background Presented chronologically are unique words and phrases used throughout the entirety of the script (apologies if some are repeats): Spires-like, healthy number, munching, “HIS GIRL FRIDAY” fashion, persona, in-control professional, psychopathic, hair-triggered, loose cannon Gas guzzling, homeless-ridden, dusters, hacienda-style, beeline, in over their heads, “Flock of Seagulls” haircut, preppy-looking, blow-dry haircut, transfixed, imploding, “vengeance is mine” expression, “what the fuck” blank look, cherry-red, bellies up to the bar, manners-teaching business, ponder, wooly, case of works (utensils for shooting up), imanating, bubbly, saucy, bobby socks, bullshit, mamou, surly, quaint, wannabe beboppers (actually Melrose types), paging Phillip Morris, drink their milk, acting a fool, uncomfortable silence, powders her nose, hellspopinish, oldie-but-goodie, devilish twist, swiveling rhythm, shaking their asses, the john, k.d. lang, fancy style, happy clam, cool drag, madman, unbeknownst-to-her heroin, trusty, human Dust Buster, on fucking fire, slack-jawed, greased lighting, shifting like Robocop, posture of a bag of water, bon vivant, moth-ridden, stripe-assed ape, knocking over shit, ready to do this, scooted, see-no-evil, hear-no-evil, speak-no-evil 35ish, zzzzzz’s, fireplug, pandemonium, ape shit, strangeness, dunking for bees, having their way, for the life of him, rooting around, not on your life, like a rag doll, whimpering rapist, Chrome Chopper, teardrop gas tank, like a rocket fighting for orbit, humping a hot hog named “GRACE,” lovebirds Exactly the same time, dry firing, late-20s, easily doing 135 mph, the plan of action, gobs, pantomimes like he’s in a “DEAD ZONE” trance, with gusto, far way in thought, we recognize, like lightning, till, more on guard, like a rattlesnake, dead-aimed, two bass-ass dudes Other examples of unique descriptive language include: “smokes cigarettes like they’re going out of style” (1) “A smiles breaks out on the young woman’s face” (6) Smiles? “Mia’s version of the twist is that of a sexy cat.” (50) “Imitating what he did earlier, licks the paper and rolls it into a pretty good cigarette. Maybe a little too fat, but not bad for a first try. Mia thinks so anyway.” (51) “Brett has just shit his pants. He’s not crying or whimpering, but he’s so full of fear, it’s as if his body is imploding.” (22) “like a political prisoner” (26) “Lance demonstrates a stabbing motion, which looks like ‘The Shape’ killing its victims in ‘HALLOWEEN.’” (62) “The sky is PISSIN’ DOWN RAIN.” (69) “This weapon seems made to order for the Brothers Grimm downstairs.” (106) “KABOOM!!!” (107) “Bursting out the door and blowing them all away while they’re fucking around is the way to go.” (113) “Jules starts to ‘Jimmie’ him.” (123) “The same light SHINES from the case. Pumpkin’s expression goes to amazement. Honey Bunny across the room, can’t see shit.” (153) THE END is underlined.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Tarantino's script - or playbook - (Faber 1999) contains a few minor excerpts which were cut from the film, a few minor insertions into the film post-script, and a single point of replacement, that being the scene where Vincent goes into Marcellus's house to pick up Mia (pp.43-51). The drop-outs and inclusions are minor; the replacement scene in Marcellus's house with Vincent and Mia is cooler than the original draft - principally because it is less revealing about the quieter development of the Tarantino's script - or playbook - (Faber 1999) contains a few minor excerpts which were cut from the film, a few minor insertions into the film post-script, and a single point of replacement, that being the scene where Vincent goes into Marcellus's house to pick up Mia (pp.43-51). The drop-outs and inclusions are minor; the replacement scene in Marcellus's house with Vincent and Mia is cooler than the original draft - principally because it is less revealing about the quieter development of the relationship between Vincent and Mia, which is more subtly drawn in the restaurant scene. In this case, less is more. Otherwise, the script pretty much conveys the character, events and f**ked-up brilliance of this grossly macabre black-comedy of a brutal drama that the film portrays; the only thing it can’t properly convey to a non-American is a correct sense of place. Having watched the film several times I can see the locations - the 'typical' coffee-shop, Marcellus's house interior, the Jack-Rabbit restaurant, the pawnshop, the motel, the crossroads, etc. - but I wouldn't otherwise have been able to imagine some of these locations with any sense of place - because a coffee shop in England is not typically a huge eatery at the crossroads of a matrix, as many such joints are in American towns; it's a quaint little Elizabethan higgledy-piggledy building up a cobbled lane... Having seen the film [1994], of course, the entire script makes sense, bookended - as Prologue and Epilogue - with the young Pumpkin and Honey Bunch holding up the coffee-shop/breakfast joint. Tarantino uses time-chunking to break the conventional Hollywood linear story arc: i.e. that of 1st turning point, 2nd turning point, climax/resolution finale. Instead, he commences the film with one sub-plot (Pumpkin and Honey Bunch) and drops it to develop the first main plot (Vincent and Jules), Act 1, if you like, which seems to hit the 1st TP in the slaughter of the young men, but which actually hits that point in that story arc much later towards the end of the film with the accidental killing of Marvin in the back of the car, the commencement of Act 3. Inbetween this and the concluding event (the Epilogue). Act 1 is about Mia and Vincent at Marcellus's home, the restaurant, then back, and the cocaine overdose and climax of the adrenaline injection. It ends with a pact of secrecy between Mia and Vincent, who have grown fond of each other, and trust each other, after one date. This is the 1st TP. Then we cut to the second main plot - The Gold Watch, Act 2 - between Butch and Marcellus. The TP here (#2) is the reconciliation in the basement of the pawnshop, where their feud ends, Butch leaving Marcellus to his vengeance while he goes and collects Fabienne to clear out of town and head off with his betting wins to some sunny island. Act 3 - The Bonnie Situation - recommences with the Fourth Man, Marvin, now in the back of Vincent and Jules's car, and culminates in Mr. Wolf cleaning up and dropping their car off at the scrap yard. This act runs in an earlier timeframe as Act 2, between Butch and Marcellus, because Vincent is still with Jules. The time-chunking is used to disrupt the conventional 3TP waveform of the archetypal Hollywood linear filmmaking process, typically used in action/adventure films where mystery and suspense are non-essential to the plot of all-out action. Here, Tarantino plays slightly with the sequence of events to develop, even invert, some of the relationships in the film, and to tell a couple of stories of love (Pumpkin and Honey Bunch; Butch and Fabienne), but also to tell a couple of stories of deep friendship (Vincent and Jules, and Vincent and Mia) - all set around the power centre of Marcellus. But the final 'act' of redemption, the Epilogue, is where Jules sees the error of his ways (through the inability of the Fourth Man to kill him and Vincent), in letting the young coffee-shop robbers go, and not killing them. But, in fact, this epilogue is the moral epilogue, not the temporal epilogue, because Vincent is 'later' killed by Butch, placing the epilogue roughly two-thirds through the film in linear temporality. Despite all the violence, gore and perversions in the film (armed robbery, the OD, several young men getting shot, one his head blown off; a boxer punched to death, an enforcer [Vincent] ended, Butch driving into Marcellus, the gimp, Marcellus's rape, Marcellus's imagined revenge on the two hillbilly brothers, the bloody car and its disposal), the story is full of powerful and moving developments of trust and love and is bound by a perverse series of loyalties, enmities and reconciliations, and ends in a moment of redemption for Jules, who finally saves two lives instead of ending them - effectively retiring, while not (we get the irony and the pun). But the moral prevarications aside - and immorality is central to the film, contrasting with all these loyalties and reconciliations - there are streams interwoven of deep friendship, respect and new-found love, blended amidst a violent web of gangland retribution, drug-dealing and violent enforcement of tribal competition. Is it a good script? You bet your mother**kin' ass it is. It reads superbly, it directs concisely, it describes perhaps a little overlong on details of Americana unfamiliar (cars, franchises, quotidian American references), but it is fluid, absorbing, repelling and gripping all at once, just this side of the razor blade of its violence. Scenes like the Air Force man Captain Koons's visit are at once profound and messily comic, and it's this mix of strange loyalties and its brutality that makes Pulp Fiction a great script. What makes it a good film is that it is superbly cast in all parts except the minor female ones (Arquette as Jody, de Medeiro as Fabienne, the unseen Jimmie's wife, and the anonymous - and non-essential - Raquel and Trudi). But the part of Mia is central to the film not merely in plot terms, but as a moral fulcrum about which the rest of the characters and action in some way or other pivot and revolve, and Act 2, "Vincent Vega and Marcellus Wallace's Wife" is the heartening centre of an otherwise brutal script/film, and yet does not even mention Mia's name in it: she is, merely, it seems, Marcellus Wallace's wife.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Polley

    I was a child when I first saw Pulp Fiction (my parents didn't really care about age restrictions). When it got to the anal rape bit, I turned it off because it was just a bit too much for me. At Uni, we had to read the screenplay of Pulp Fiction and I absolutely loved it. I figured I had misjudged the film as I had been so young so rewatched it. However, I still struggled to enjoy the film, which I felt was weird as it is exactly the same as the screenplay. Rereading the screenplay again now, I I was a child when I first saw Pulp Fiction (my parents didn't really care about age restrictions). When it got to the anal rape bit, I turned it off because it was just a bit too much for me. At Uni, we had to read the screenplay of Pulp Fiction and I absolutely loved it. I figured I had misjudged the film as I had been so young so rewatched it. However, I still struggled to enjoy the film, which I felt was weird as it is exactly the same as the screenplay. Rereading the screenplay again now, I love it again. So I am now wondering whether to give the film another chance! Such a crazy ass plot and it is typical Tarantino. I would recommend reading the screenplay rather than watching the film!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Prudence (Marina Puente)

    Totally recommend reading the scripts of your favourite films. This has reminded me why I like Tarantino so much; he builds characters through meaningless conversation. He makes up little phrases for them (like Mia’s ‘Disco’ instead of ‘Bingo’). His descriptions of the scenes and characters are also cool, for instance comparing the rapists Maynard and Zed to animals ‘where Maynard is a vicious pitbull, Zed is a deadly cobra’.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Better than the movie? Hmm... includes all the cut scenes so I guess gives the reader great insight into Tarantino’s thinking. But I just love Tarantino and his films so I’m winning whether I read the script or watch the movie! Better than the movie? Hmm... includes all the cut scenes so I guess gives the reader great insight into Tarantino’s thinking. But I just love Tarantino and his films so I’m winning whether I read the script or watch the movie!🤘

  17. 5 out of 5

    Marthe Bozart

    "Pulp Fiction" was the first work by Quentin Tarantino I ever read. Since then I've moved on and I've read "Reservoir Dogs" too. I'd heard a lot about Quentin's writing and I'd seen snippets of the Kill Bill-movies. I don't think I was prepared for the style of Pulp Fiction though, very surprising and fun. Quentin Tarantino is (obviously) not a literary writer, he's a moviemaker: "Pulp Fiction" is a screenplay. This might not matter to some people, but for me it really changed my reading "Pulp Fiction" was the first work by Quentin Tarantino I ever read. Since then I've moved on and I've read "Reservoir Dogs" too. I'd heard a lot about Quentin's writing and I'd seen snippets of the Kill Bill-movies. I don't think I was prepared for the style of Pulp Fiction though, very surprising and fun. Quentin Tarantino is (obviously) not a literary writer, he's a moviemaker: "Pulp Fiction" is a screenplay. This might not matter to some people, but for me it really changed my reading experience. Every "chapter" is a different scene in the movie, and the writing describes how every scene starts and ends. The descriptions are different from descriptions in a 'normal' novel, they are very much playing on the visual. You can literally see the story happening before your eyes, much more than with a novel. All the dialogue is written out underneath eachother, which makes this book a very quick read. On the other hand, you an't hear the thoughts of any of the characters, which is a bit strange. The story-teller is completely outside of the story, like a spectator, he's not following anyone, not acknowledging anyone's thoughts our emotions or motives. Very different from literature I think, but fascinating. The story follows 3 different storylines, all different, colourfull people who in the end connect together to give a beautiful overview of an underworld-network. The piece is full of drugs, violence and lots of swearing. It's was a bit shocking in the beginning to be honest. But after a couple pages I really got into the mood of the story and it was f***ing great! The dialogue in this book is hilarious and the characters are so big and bad, it’s almost satire. The story is written really well: this book could easily have become one of those ‘look at how badass we are’-stories, but Tarantino sprinkles in so many funny lines, it becomes really bizarre and clever. And eventhough the story is bloody and 'ugly', it never became too 'flat' for me. Not that the story was emotional, but it was witty and fun, without being to much of a joke. The balance is very fine I think and Quentin did it exactly right. It’s a short book, she just read it, because honestly I can’t explain how great this book is. Read it, you’ll see.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I have seen this movie but many years ago when I didn't understand it. I remember little of the experience other than it was too long. Well, that kid doesn't know what he's talking about. Pulp Fiction is really fantastic, at least in script form. Sure, it's not a traditional narrative, and sure, I would understand how 'one story about three stories' might be confusing. But I loved it. It is truly genius the way each story passes by each other from time to time. Sometimes they brush against each I have seen this movie but many years ago when I didn't understand it. I remember little of the experience other than it was too long. Well, that kid doesn't know what he's talking about. Pulp Fiction is really fantastic, at least in script form. Sure, it's not a traditional narrative, and sure, I would understand how 'one story about three stories' might be confusing. But I loved it. It is truly genius the way each story passes by each other from time to time. Sometimes they brush against each other tangentially, imparting just a pinch of influence before dissapearing again. The stories don't need more or less from each other. Each touch is just enough to remind me that I'm in the same world, in the same broad arc, while allowing each narrative to maintain their own tone and pace. It's unlike anything I've read. A large part of what makes it work is the character and dialogue. There's a lot of talk. And in any other script, I would have complained that this is amateurish: get to the plot already! You're not fooling anyone with this overly clever veneer! But this is how Tarantino shines. The talk is entertaining and useful. It's revealing and often necessary to move the plot along. He crams just a few pages with as much personality as possible so that he doesn't have to worry about it in the more active moments. This would read excellently as a novel. Kudos Quentin.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bradley Valentine

    I love Tarantino. Obviously his writing is wonderful. He changed the game for a lot of years. This work is a blast and we’re all lucky to have it. My one complaint would be about its influence, haha. Tarantino makes it look easy. However, whenever we see imitators, it’s hard not to cringe. Probably only P.T. Anderson really got away with the QT influence, and it’s probably arguable how influenced he actually was, given P.T. was already releasing films when PF hit. If you’re a student or trying I love Tarantino. Obviously his writing is wonderful. He changed the game for a lot of years. This work is a blast and we’re all lucky to have it. My one complaint would be about its influence, haha. Tarantino makes it look easy. However, whenever we see imitators, it’s hard not to cringe. Probably only P.T. Anderson really got away with the QT influence, and it’s probably arguable how influenced he actually was, given P.T. was already releasing films when PF hit. If you’re a student or trying to learn how to write a screenplay, I’d advise you WAIT before diving into this book (or any QT work). People who will end up reading your work likely won’t see its merits as much as be distracted by whatever liberties you take with traditional form. In other words, it might come off like you don’t know how to write a screenplay. If you’re new to screenwriting and jumping right to QT because he’s the best, I’d say beware. He is the best. However this great work could be a bit misleading as far as that goes. QT knew this script would likely be funded and get made when writing PF. Most of us have to worry more about formality before we make it and can start experimenting. In most cases, for most writers, the QT style doesn’t come off as QT as much as undisciplined and indulgent.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Curran

    Posted : 9 years, 8 months ago on 17 August 2008 10:50 (A review of Pulp Fiction film...) ''Say what again. Say what again, motherfucker, say what one more Goddamn time!'' The lives of two mob hit men, a boxer, a gangster's wife, and a pair of diner bandits intertwine in four tales of violence and redemption. John Travolta: Vincent Vega Samuel L. Jackson: Jules Winnfield Pulp Fiction becomes a bit easier to understand once you realize that it's essentially a black comedy dressed up as a criminal Posted : 9 years, 8 months ago on 17 August 2008 10:50 (A review of Pulp Fiction film...) ''Say what again. Say what again, motherfucker, say what one more Goddamn time!'' The lives of two mob hit men, a boxer, a gangster's wife, and a pair of diner bandits intertwine in four tales of violence and redemption. John Travolta: Vincent Vega Samuel L. Jackson: Jules Winnfield Pulp Fiction becomes a bit easier to understand once you realize that it's essentially a black comedy dressed up as a criminal drama. Each of the three main stories begins with a situation that could easily form the subplot of any separate drug comic movie. But something always goes wrong, some small unexpected accident that causes the whole situation to come crashing down, leading the increasingly desperate characters to hilarious conclusions. Tarantino's originality floods from his ability to focus on small details and follow them where they lead, even if they move the story away from conventional plot developments. ''You see, this profession is filled to the brim with unrealistic motherfuckers. Motherfuckers who thought their ass would age like wine. If you mean it turns to vinegar, it does. If you mean it gets better with age, it don't.'' Pulp Fiction received its share of acclaim and awards, and deservedly so. But that being said, while seen by most as a good film, Pulp Fiction is not regarded as another old vintage classic, or Pulp Fiction is not ensconced in the pantheon of the greatest of the great Hollywood films of all time. Those are for a reason. As good a cinematic achievement as Pulp Fiction is, the fact is that as a film it plows turf that's just way too coarse for comfort. Over-the-top blood, guts, and brains-blown-out violence. Gritty gutter language. Subject matter dwelling in the underbelly of life that goes way beyond seedy or unseemly. And it's all presented in a very graphic way. Some people really like it that way. Hey, I understand. That's what Tarantino wanted too, right? But the simple fact is that such fare isn't for everyone but I loved. In this way its own intentional and unrelenting coarse nature is what self-selects it out of the greatness category. To achieve greatest of the greats greatness it has to be seen that way across the board, amongst every audience. Pulp Fiction by Tarantino's design isn't intended to appeal to everyone. Cleverly he wants to offend and he wants to shock and good old Tarantino pulls it off, just take a look at that basement scene for one of the best shocks in film I've seen. Also a worry for anyone traveling to the US. In addition to these layers, Pulp Fiction also has a lot of humour in it, much of it at times when you know you shouldn't laugh but you do, and also out of situations that you wouldn't laugh at usually. I'm sure some of the parts I laughed at were just because I wasn't expecting something to happen, or maybe I just have a morbid mind, but a lot of the humour came out of the violence. ''What now? Let me tell you what now. I'ma call a coupla hard, pipe-hittin' niggers, who'll go to work on the homes here with a pair of pliers and a blow torch. You hear me talkin', hillbilly boy? I ain't through with you by a damn sight. I'ma get medieval on your ass.'' What is the movie's purpose exactly? It's a complex question,one side of it also is its theme of power. Marsellus is the sort of character who looms over the entire film while being invisible most of the time. The whole point of the big date sequence, which happens to be one of my favourite segments within the film, is the power that Marsellus has over his men without even being there. This power extends to Vincent, compelling him to act in ways you would not ordinarily expect from a dumb, stoned gangster, faced with an attractive woman whose husband has gone away. The power theme also helps explain one of the more controversial aspects of the film, its liberal use of the N-word. In this, the word isn't just used as a adjective to describe blacks: Jules, for instance, at one point applies the term to Vincent. It has more to do with power, rather than with race or colour. The powerful characters utter the word to express their dominance over weaker characters. Most of these gangsters are not racist in practice at all. Indeed, they are intermingled racially, and have achieved a level of equality that surpasses the habits of many law-abiding citizens in our society. They resort to racial epithets because it's a patter that establishes their separateness from the non-criminal world. There's a nice moral progression to the stories. We presume that Vincent hesitates to sleep with Mia out of fear rather than loyalty. Later, Butch's act of heroism could be motivated by honour, but we're never sure. The film ends, however, with Jules making a clear moral choice. Thus, the movie seems to be exploring whether violent outlaws can act other than for self-preservation. Everyone in the cast had amazing chemistry and bonding with each other, which added believability to a somewhat unbelievable story. The only reason that Pulp Fiction did not get a perfect score is that one scene with Butch and a cab driver went on for a tad too long. Knowing me, though, I'll soon change my mind, but it can still be said that Pulp Fiction is one of the most influential, most adult graphic novel-like movies of the 90's. ''That was pretty fucking trippy...''

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sagar

    What's in the briefcase? I still don't know :( It was fun reading it and visualising the movie in my head. Throughout the writing, my brain picturised Samuel L Jackson (Jules) and John Travolta (Vincent), which was the also the best part of the movie.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dr Zorlak

    As brilliant on paper as it was on screen. Roger Avery is the unsung hero in Tarantino's glorious journey. Lots of scenes got cut out, definitely for the better. The part where Vincent admits to being related to Suzanne Vega (first cousins!): priceless.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Conor Adams

    Pulp Fiction: Its Greatness is no fiction Disclaimer: This movie, and the book to an extent, is full of graphic scenes not suitable for the light of heart — AKA, Quentin Tarantino’s specialty. If you react negatively to such violent scenes or adult content, do not read it, and for the love of all that is good and holy do NOT watch it. First choice: If you were to choose a director to direct your movie, would you choose a run of the mill director or would you choose one of the most acclaimed Pulp Fiction: Its Greatness is no fiction Disclaimer: This movie, and the book to an extent, is full of graphic scenes not suitable for the light of heart — AKA, Quentin Tarantino’s specialty. If you react negatively to such violent scenes or adult content, do not read it, and for the love of all that is good and holy do NOT watch it. First choice: If you were to choose a director to direct your movie, would you choose a run of the mill director or would you choose one of the most acclaimed directors in the industry with numerous acclamations in film and directing, not to mention having directed some of the most popular films on record? Well, I would hope you chose the second one, because that’s what you get from Quentin Tarantino, Pulp Fiction’s director and writer. (acclaimed director, move to next choice) Second choice: Good choice. Now, if you were to choose a movie to watch, would you prefer a lovey-dovey romance or a gritty, tension-ridden action movie. Let me just say that if you chose the former, steer clear of all that is Quentin Tarantino, not just Pulp Fiction. These movies pack a punch, and are definitely not suited for the light of heart. (action, move to next choice) Third choice: So you chose action movie, eh? Then, if you were to choose an action movie, would you prefer one that is just blindly action with a simple plot, such as James Bond, or one where the plot is the most important part? Many like both kinds, myself included, but if you are not a fan of the latter choice, which is certainly more limited in excitement, I would NOT recommend this book or movie. While there are certainly a few exciting sequences sprinkled in, the movie really shines in plot, tension, and dialogue. There’s one quote in particular that sums up this tension and excellent dialogue all in one. Sam L Jackson’s mafioso character Jules is known to be one of the most “Bad*ss Motherf***ers” of all time, and his scene when he interrogates Brett is a prefect example. The quote I mentioned is one which he says during this interrogation as an intimidation tactic, but later repeats as a life motto to live by. As Jules said, “Ezekiel 25;17 "The path of the righteous man is beset of all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil me. Blessed is he who, in the name of the charity and good will, shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee.”(plot-driven, move to next choice) Fourth choice: If you made it this far, chances are you’ll make it past this choice: Can you stomach brutal gore, explicit scenes, and foul language and themes, or are you a light-of-heart individual who prefer the prettier things in life and could go the rest of their life without experiencing violence? My guess is, you answered as the first choice, and, surprise surprise, you get what you asked for. This movie is known for its violence, cussing, and adult scenes all wrapped around an exquisitely-crafted plot that has a real theme, and if you would prefer a nicer read while sacrificing plot, then avoid this movie. However, if you avoid this movie, you would be missing out, big time. This is quite definitely in my top-5 favorite movies of all time, and I strongly advise anyone who feels they are able to to watch it, because it isn’t as bad in any category as some of Tarantino’s other films (Kill Bill, Hateful Eight, etc), but you can still experience his expertise. His dialogue is crafted exceptionally, there is plenty of comedy, and the plot is fantastic. All in all, I would never miss a movie of this caliber, especially one with Sam L Jackson.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nick Clark

    Pulp Fiction Beats Other Movies to a Pulp All I can say is wow. I knew Quentin Tarantino was a fantastic writer and director, but I still manage to be blown away by his best works. His best work in my opinion, is Pulp Fiction. It has so many elements that combine to make a final product that I enjoyed the first time I watched it, and when I read the screenplay. Tarantino’s ability to tell a story from multiple perspectives at the same time is so unique, and he keeps the audience/reader’s Pulp Fiction Beats Other Movies to a Pulp All I can say is wow. I knew Quentin Tarantino was a fantastic writer and director, but I still manage to be blown away by his best works. His best work in my opinion, is Pulp Fiction. It has so many elements that combine to make a final product that I enjoyed the first time I watched it, and when I read the screenplay. Tarantino’s ability to tell a story from multiple perspectives at the same time is so unique, and he keeps the audience/reader’s attention throughout its duration through the scenes of action and dialogue. The story is focused on a few main characters: Jules Winnfield, Vincent Vega, Butch Coolidge, and Mia Wallace. Jules and Vincent are associates of Marsellus Wallace, Mia’s husband, a mob boss in the Los Angeles area. Butch is a boxer near the end of his career. It begins focused on Jules and Vincent doing a job for Marsellus, recovering a briefcase of something that is not disclosed to the audience. “Vincent moves to the bed, reaches under, and pulls out a black snap briefcase. ‘We’re happy’.” After the case is obtained, the story cuts to Butch talking with Marsellus about throwing a fight. In this scene, Vincent is tasked with keeping Mia company while Marsellus is out of town. But later in the movie, a scene that occured between the first and second is shown. Tarantino purposefully bounced around that scene to save it for the end of the film, and to utilize an unprecedented manner of storytelling. Tarantino chose not to tell the story of Pulp Fiction sequentially to captivate the audience and keep them on their toes. The sequence of the story as told is not chronological. Parts of the story are in the beginning, middle, and end when they should be in a different spot. Tarantino does this to keep the stories intersected but at different points in time. Overall, if you are a fan of unique stories then Pulp Fiction is the story for you.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rahique Mirza

    As good as a Royale with Cheese Disclaimer: This movie contains scenes which contain mature and graphic content. Viewer/reader discretion is advised. Pulp Fiction is a perfect example of American pop culture. It’s the story of Hitmen Vincent and Jules and their many interactions with others from their boss Marsellus, his wife Mia, and a boxer named Butch. It has everything from drugs to shoot outs to Samuel L Jackson. Quentin Tarantino created an amazing experience by perfectly blending many As good as a Royale with Cheese Disclaimer: This movie contains scenes which contain mature and graphic content. Viewer/reader discretion is advised. Pulp Fiction is a perfect example of American pop culture. It’s the story of Hitmen Vincent and Jules and their many interactions with others from their boss Marsellus, his wife Mia, and a boxer named Butch. It has everything from drugs to shoot outs to Samuel L Jackson. Quentin Tarantino created an amazing experience by perfectly blending many different perspectives together. While the movie is amazing to watch, It is a completely different experience reading the Script. One of the best parts of Pulp Fiction to me was the fact that it wasn’t told chronologically. At first it was confusing, but by the end, it all fit together into one sea,less story. One scene very close to the beginning of the book is the scene where Jules, the character portrayed by Samuel L. Jackson in the movie, is interrogating Brett. He proceeds to say the iconic line, “English-mother****er-can-you-speak it?” I knew this line even before I even heard of the movie. Many other scenes like this one have helped ingrain pulp fiction into American pop culture. While I feel It didn’t have a fully fledged story, It was a blast til the very end. Reading and/or watching Pulp Fiction is an enjoyable experience. The script and characters are both very unique and kept me entertained the whole time. All I can say is that since the movie is on Netflix, go use your account or someone else's and just watch the movie, you won't regret it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark R.

    The published version of Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” screenplay is ideal for the Tarantino fan who’s seen the movie enough times to know the dialogue almost by heart; providing a chance to read, instead of hear, the words that eventually came out of the mouths of John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, and Uma Thurman. The screenplay comes with a foreword, some black and white photos, and notations that indicate scenes and bits of dialogue cut from the finished film, or not shot at all. The The published version of Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” screenplay is ideal for the Tarantino fan who’s seen the movie enough times to know the dialogue almost by heart; providing a chance to read, instead of hear, the words that eventually came out of the mouths of John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, and Uma Thurman. The screenplay comes with a foreword, some black and white photos, and notations that indicate scenes and bits of dialogue cut from the finished film, or not shot at all. The publishers have also added in bits of dialogue added during production. It’s surprising—or, considering Tarantino’s working style, perhaps not surprising—that most of the dialogue went from page to screen virtually untouched. The man sure knows how to write. He’s been threatening for years to quit filmmaking and take up book writing (specifically film history stuff). I’m in no rush to see him turn away from Hollywood, but the thought of a booked penned by Mr. Tarantino is intriguing.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Castille

    Let's start with this: Pulp Fiction is not at all in my wheelhouse of interests. I have seen the film a few times over the years, as I was growing up, and wasn't impressed in the least. Mobsters, bloodbaths, none of it has ever appealed to me. However, reading Quentin's script made me realize A) his brilliance, and B) the brilliance of Pulp Fiction as a screenplay. Quentin is a masterful writer and creator of characters. I think the characters are actually what make this story rather than the Let's start with this: Pulp Fiction is not at all in my wheelhouse of interests. I have seen the film a few times over the years, as I was growing up, and wasn't impressed in the least. Mobsters, bloodbaths, none of it has ever appealed to me. However, reading Quentin's script made me realize A) his brilliance, and B) the brilliance of Pulp Fiction as a screenplay. Quentin is a masterful writer and creator of characters. I think the characters are actually what make this story rather than the plot. After reading, I'm now looking forward to revisiting the film and seeing if I have a different impression.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Ross

    Even on the page this film zips along at an incredible, exhilarating pace. It oozes charm and cool at every turn. Obviously it retrospectively benefits from the voices of Samuel L & co being burned into your consciousness but this is only possible if the material and the performances are perfect. When you read it on the page, it is obvious that the former is there in spades. Still one of the most influential films for me , especially now that I'm a filmmaker myself. The pacing and style of Even on the page this film zips along at an incredible, exhilarating pace. It oozes charm and cool at every turn. Obviously it retrospectively benefits from the voices of Samuel L & co being burned into your consciousness but this is only possible if the material and the performances are perfect. When you read it on the page, it is obvious that the former is there in spades. Still one of the most influential films for me , especially now that I'm a filmmaker myself. The pacing and style of the piece is historic and well worth a study for any budding director.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Pieters

    What can I give this BUT 5 stars? A movie that changed moviemaking. Deleted scenes. Hilarious antics. Shocking outcomes. Seemingly unrelated and separate stories all woven together as one. I've seen this movie maybe 20 times, and it never gets old. Amazing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Iara

    pretty exact to the film. few improvisation from the actor. one of the most perfects, inspirining for a young filmmaker scripts there is.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.