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Selected Verse from the Iliad and the Odyssey (Everyman Poetry)

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This is a collection of extracts on war and adventure taken from the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey".


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This is a collection of extracts on war and adventure taken from the "Iliad" and the "Odyssey".

30 review for Selected Verse from the Iliad and the Odyssey (Everyman Poetry)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Ἰλιάς ; Ὀδύσσεια = The Iliad and Odyssey, Homer The Iliad is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. The Iliad Characters: Ajax, Odysseus, Helen of Troy, Menelaus, Paris, Hector, Achilles, Agamemnon, Aeneas, Sarpedon, Priam, Cassandra, Patroclus,/>The Ἰλιάς ; Ὀδύσσεια = The Iliad and Odyssey, Homer The Iliad is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer. Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. The Iliad Characters: Ajax, Odysseus, Helen of Troy, Menelaus, Paris, Hector, Achilles, Agamemnon, Aeneas, Sarpedon, Priam, Cassandra, Patroclus, Diomedes, Ajax Oileus, Andromache, Briseis, Hecuba, Nestor, Akhilleus The Odyssey is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey is fundamental to the modern Western canon, and is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature; the Iliad is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia. The Odyssey Characters: Odysseus, Penelope, Helen of Troy, Achilles, Agamemnon, Telemachus, Minerva, Polyphemus تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز نخست ماه دسامبر سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: ایلیاد و اودیسه (ادیسه)؛ هومر؛ مترجم: سعید نفیسی؛ تهران، هرمس، 1387، در 1005 ص، شابک: 9789643634568؛ این کتاب پیشتر با برگردان همین مترجم با دو عنوان جداگانه «ایلیاد» و «ادیسه» نیز چاپ شده است آثار به جای مانده از «هومر»، دو گلچین شعر به نام‌های «ایلیاد» و «ادیسه» است. همه‌ ی آنچه که درباره ی تاریخ و افسانه‌ های یونان باستان می‌دانیم، از همین شعرها برگرفته شده‌؛ در «ایلیاد»، «هومر» داستان جنگ «تروا» را، و در «ادیسه» ده سال سفر «ادیسئوس» در بازگشت از جنگ «تروا» را میسرایند. ...؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lucinda Reed-Nowland

    The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be quite a feat. I've read it several times, I never get The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be quite a feat. I've read it several times, I never get tired of it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Other than the gruesome, violent images often presented in magnificent detail (hey, it is a war!), I really enjoy reading Homer's epic poem. Where else are we given such insight into stubborn Agamemnon, noble Hector, intelligent and well-spoken Odysseus, lazy and spineless Paris, guilt-ridden Helen, the wrath of the warrior Achille's and how vain he can be? We can identify with Trojan and Greek alike, agonizing with both sides over the destructiveness of war. We get the inside story on all the G Other than the gruesome, violent images often presented in magnificent detail (hey, it is a war!), I really enjoy reading Homer's epic poem. Where else are we given such insight into stubborn Agamemnon, noble Hector, intelligent and well-spoken Odysseus, lazy and spineless Paris, guilt-ridden Helen, the wrath of the warrior Achille's and how vain he can be? We can identify with Trojan and Greek alike, agonizing with both sides over the destructiveness of war. We get the inside story on all the Greek and Trojan heroes and what makes them tick. And best of all, we get a behind-the-scenes, humorous look at the Greek gods; their strengths, weaknesses and all the squabbles and fuss that take place between them. The Iliad is really incomplete without The Odyssey, so I will be reading and reviewing that book as well. I had read a synopsis of the adventures of Odysseus in high school, but it was nice to read the entire epic poem to get the full story. Odysseus is an intelligent, cunning hero and you are really rooting for him by the time he finally makes it home from his long journey and is ready to take action against the usurpers of his household. So many stories of this time period end in tragedy, it's nice that there is a satisfactory end to Odysseus's story after so many years of pain and heartache for him and his family. I enjoyed The Odyssey more than The Iliad because it seems a more intimate story overall. We really come to know the man Odysseus, his son Telemachus and wife, Penelope through their thoughts and interactions with others. The Iliad takes place during the Trojan war and focuses on the Greek and Trojan warriors and what takes place on the battlefield. The Odyssey is not quite a continuation of the Iliad, but takes place 10 years after the end of the Trojan war from which the great warrior Odysseus never returned. It seems he had some trouble on the high seas and on various islands along the way and has been unable to make it home. In the meantime, his home has been invaded by suitors who think he is dead and want to marry Penelope. Telemachus is not strong or powerful enough to throw them out and goes on a journey to find news of his father. With the help of the gods, Odysseus and Telemachus are finally able to defend their home. I would recommend reading both The Iliad and Odyssey together but if you're only going to pick up one, read The Odyssey.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    It didn't take me long to figure out that I'm not a Homer girl. I think the problem was partly that after years of taking in entertaining, probably dumbed down versions of the stories, the reality ended up a bit of a let down. Another problem was I had trouble liking any of the characters. Achilles? Hector? Even Odysseus? Ugh! Whiney, deceitful, and not very likeable! The Iliad was pretty painful to get through. I forced myself to finish and didn't even get a payoff in the end. What h It didn't take me long to figure out that I'm not a Homer girl. I think the problem was partly that after years of taking in entertaining, probably dumbed down versions of the stories, the reality ended up a bit of a let down. Another problem was I had trouble liking any of the characters. Achilles? Hector? Even Odysseus? Ugh! Whiney, deceitful, and not very likeable! The Iliad was pretty painful to get through. I forced myself to finish and didn't even get a payoff in the end. What happened to Troy?! Andromache?! Priam?! The Iliad won't tell you! The sacking of Troy is alluded to in the Odyssey with a brief overview of the Trojan Horse and the men hiding in it. That's it! The Odyssey was better than the Iliad, maybe 2 stars. I have a bit of a complex now that I've read the books and not liked them. I consider myself a fairly intelligent person, but I just couldn't connect with these classic works of literature that have been read by, and enjoyed by countless people for centuries.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Keivan

    The translation was pretty readable. This is part of the Great Books of the western world Collection that I have set out to read. Ulysses is my favorite Greek hero.Always was always will be. I read parts of some butchered version in high-school but this one seems to have satisfied my goddess needs. I think we perhaps need some revitalization of the sentiments present in these books to save America from going down the cultural tubes. When the Odyssey is replaced with the "je The translation was pretty readable. This is part of the Great Books of the western world Collection that I have set out to read. Ulysses is my favorite Greek hero.Always was always will be. I read parts of some butchered version in high-school but this one seems to have satisfied my goddess needs. I think we perhaps need some revitalization of the sentiments present in these books to save America from going down the cultural tubes. When the Odyssey is replaced with the "jersey Shore" cannot possibley turn out well. How could i rate such a classic any less than 5 stars!?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Rollins

    I am reading this to two sets of students and it never gets old. My only complaint is that the Provensons left out Argos. I do believe it is the best children's Homer I have read. I love the chapter breakdowns which are almost parallel to the poems. The Provensons never disappoint, do they?

  7. 4 out of 5

    ✨The Reading

    It's a damn Greek tragedy! The Iliad takes us through the battle of Troy and the Greek invasion. We are able to Marvel at great warriors like Hector and Achilles. We are able to hear of their struggles and their woes and eventually their deaths. The Odyssey takes us through the 10-year struggle to return home after the Trojan War has ended. Odysseus battles mystical creatures and the Wrath of the Gods as he tries desperately to come back home to his throne. Homer is definitely a m It's a damn Greek tragedy! The Iliad takes us through the battle of Troy and the Greek invasion. We are able to Marvel at great warriors like Hector and Achilles. We are able to hear of their struggles and their woes and eventually their deaths. The Odyssey takes us through the 10-year struggle to return home after the Trojan War has ended. Odysseus battles mystical creatures and the Wrath of the Gods as he tries desperately to come back home to his throne. Homer is definitely a master of the Greek epic. His writing resembles that of a playwright of modern day and even harkens back to a bit of Shakespearean feeling in the emotion of the characters. This is definitely a classic for the ages and in my opinion one that should be read once by everyone.

  8. 4 out of 5

    1marcus

    The “Iliad and the Odyssey” keeps you on the edge of your seat from the beginning of the story to the end. I’m not into books like this one but I LOVED this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. All these things made me want to read the book over again and even write a book review on it. First the adventure is wild from the start. Fighting the Cyclopes and winning made me think that no matter what the size of the pers The “Iliad and the Odyssey” keeps you on the edge of your seat from the beginning of the story to the end. I’m not into books like this one but I LOVED this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. All these things made me want to read the book over again and even write a book review on it. First the adventure is wild from the start. Fighting the Cyclopes and winning made me think that no matter what the size of the person or object I can win if I put my mind to it and want it bad enough. Adventure keeps me reading the book. If the book doesn’t have adventure I will close the book and go do something else with my time but I didn’t have to do that once with this book. Next the mystery keeps you guessing you think you know hats going to happen but you don’t. The author “Homer” does a great job of that this makes one keep reading and keep guessing until you get to the end the story. If you know what’s going to happen in the story why keep reading the book that would be a waste of time you can go do something else with your time like go outside and work on your jump shot or something like that. Never will you have to do that with this book. Last the understanding of the pre-history is good for one if they are trying to learn about ancient history. One person said “The "Odyssey" is a magnificent piece of literature that we find absolutely spectacular in the fact of its potential for helping us understand pre-history of many ancient cultures, and because of the fact that it is so well written and perhaps one of the first "books" (epics) ever written down. We hope that you find Homer's "Odyssey" enjoyable whether you are reading it for school, for study, or for pleasure.”(http://library.thinkquest.org/19300/d...) After reading the book I knew so much about ancient history I passed all my test with all A’s with no problem In conclusion I hope my three reasons have you wanting to read this book. The adventure, mystery, and the understanding of pre-history are great for anyone who wants to read this book. Now I have informed you about the book now it’s up to you to see what are you going to do either read this great book or just go on with your life ignorant. What will you do

  9. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    In my view, Stanley Lombardo's is the best translation of Homer's epic poetry. Even though the current rage is Robert Fagles' translation, Stanley Lombardo's is active, passionate, and accessible. Lombardo has full translations of both Iliad and Odyssey, though I don't find them listed on goodreads. The volume pictured here features abridged versions. This is the book I use in my Mythology class. The abridgment is effective -- in fact it improves the narrative pace! Themes like the inevitability of war, the In my view, Stanley Lombardo's is the best translation of Homer's epic poetry. Even though the current rage is Robert Fagles' translation, Stanley Lombardo's is active, passionate, and accessible. Lombardo has full translations of both Iliad and Odyssey, though I don't find them listed on goodreads. The volume pictured here features abridged versions. This is the book I use in my Mythology class. The abridgment is effective -- in fact it improves the narrative pace! Themes like the inevitability of war, the destructive nature of anger, hubris, intelligence, loyalty, courage, greed, ego -- all of humanity's virtues and vices are addressed in these two epic legends -- the earliest texts in western literature. It's also fascinating to see how the Greek's worship of the gods and creation stories are distorted remnants of the truth.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Withun

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  11. 4 out of 5

    Elsa K

    3.5 I only read "The Odyssey" this time through. I haven't read it since high school and have been wanting to read it again. It is obviously well written and a classic. The 'legend/epic' style is different from what I normally read, but I enjoyed it. As a female though I couldn't help but get annoyed with Odysseus sleeping with goddesses etc. while Penelope is pining away for him. Although, I also got annoyed at Penelope's inability to send the suitors away, so maybe they were meant for each oth 3.5 I only read "The Odyssey" this time through. I haven't read it since high school and have been wanting to read it again. It is obviously well written and a classic. The 'legend/epic' style is different from what I normally read, but I enjoyed it. As a female though I couldn't help but get annoyed with Odysseus sleeping with goddesses etc. while Penelope is pining away for him. Although, I also got annoyed at Penelope's inability to send the suitors away, so maybe they were meant for each other? Some of the fighting scenes got too gruesome for me. Also, why is Athena so committed to Odysseus? I started reading "Anna Karenina" in the middle of it and kind of had to force myself to finish this one. Still an enjoyable read that everyone should be familiar with.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Harmonybites)

    Together these two works attributed to Homer are considered among the oldest surviving works of Western literature, dating to probably the eighth century BCE, and are certainly among the most influential. I can't believe I once found Homer boring. In my defense, I was a callow teen, and having a book assigned in school often tends to perversely make you hate it. But then I had a "Keats conversion experience." Keats famously wrote a poem in tribute to a translation of Homer by Chapman who, Keats Together these two works attributed to Homer are considered among the oldest surviving works of Western literature, dating to probably the eighth century BCE, and are certainly among the most influential. I can't believe I once found Homer boring. In my defense, I was a callow teen, and having a book assigned in school often tends to perversely make you hate it. But then I had a "Keats conversion experience." Keats famously wrote a poem in tribute to a translation of Homer by Chapman who, Keats wrote, opened to him "realms of gold." My Chapman was Fitzgerald, although on a reread of The Odyssey I tried the Fagles translation and really enjoyed it. Obviously, the translation is key if you're not reading in the original Greek, and I recommend looking at several side by side to see which one best suits. A friend of mine who is a classicist says she prefers The Illiad--that she thinks it the more mature book. The Illiad deals with just a few weeks in the last year of the decade-long Trojan War. As the opening lines state, it deals with how the quarrel between the Greek's great hero Achilles and their leader Agamemnon "caused the Akhaians loss on bitter loss and crowded brave souls into the undergloom." So, essentially, The Illiad is a war story. One close to three thousand years old with a mindset very alien to ours. One where unending glory was seen as a great good over personal survival or family. One where all felt that their ends were fated. And one with curiously human, or at least petty, gods. Some see the work as jingoistic, even pro-war, and I suppose it can be read that way, but what struck me was the compassion with which Homer wrote of both sides. We certainly care for the Trojan Hector as much as or more (in my case much more) than for the sulky and explosive Achilles. For the Trojan King Priam as much or more (in my case much more) than King Agamemnon. Homer certainly doesn't obscure the pity, the waste, and the grief war brings. And there are plenty of scenes in the work that I found unforgettable: The humorous scene where Aphrodite is wounded and driven from the field. The moving scene between Hector and his wife and child. The grief Helen feels in losing a friend. The confrontation between Priam and Achilles. I do love The Illiad, but I'd give The Odyssey a slight edge. Even just reading general Greek mythology, Odysseus was always a favorite, because unlike figures such as Achilles or Heracles he succeeded on his wits, not muscle. It's true, on this reread, especially in contrast to say The Illiad's Hector, I do see Odysseus' dark side. The man is a pirate and at times rash, hot-tempered, even vicious. But I do feel for his pining for home and The Odyssey is filled with such a wealth of incident--the Cyclops, Circe, Scylla and Charybdis, the Sirens--and especially Hades, the forerunner of Dante's Hell. And though my friend is right that the misogynist ancient Greek culture isn't where you go for strong heroines, I love Penelope; described as the "matchless queen of cunning," she's a worthy match for the crafty Odysseus. The series of recognition scenes on Ithaca are especially moving and memorable--I think my favorite and the most poignant being that of Odysseus' dog Argos. Epic poems about 2,700 years old, in the right translation both works can nevertheless speak to me more eloquently than many a contemporary novel.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eva

    28/04/2018 I've been reading the Oddysey with a book club and I must say that added a lot to my reading experience. I noticed more, I laughed more, I analysed more. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and I'm happy I've done so. I don't have a rating, because it feels wrong to rate a book that has been around for over 2000 years. Who am I in comparison? ----------------------------- 6/12/2018 We've now seen The Illiad in class. That means I've read parts of it in Ancient Gr 28/04/2018 I've been reading the Oddysey with a book club and I must say that added a lot to my reading experience. I noticed more, I laughed more, I analysed more. Overall, I enjoyed reading this book and I'm happy I've done so. I don't have a rating, because it feels wrong to rate a book that has been around for over 2000 years. Who am I in comparison? ----------------------------- 6/12/2018 We've now seen The Illiad in class. That means I've read parts of it in Ancient Greek and parts in Dutch. I've seen the entire story in detail, so I consider it read. We'll see The Oddyssey in class next semester, so I'll also read parts of it in the original Greek. I have read the entire thing in Dutch already.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    September 5th, 2016 3 stars. Finished the Iliad! Finally done. *I've read it for my Foreign literature class. It took me a month, and not because it was boring or anything (although some chapters were less exciting than others), it's just really hard to read because of the metre - hexameter. Not a natural metre for a Russian poetry, so it was unusual. But I did like this book. Especially all those gruesome descriptions of death. It was sort of fascinating. Also I did like a lot of the September 5th, 2016 3 stars. Finished the Iliad! Finally done. *I've read it for my Foreign literature class. It took me a month, and not because it was boring or anything (although some chapters were less exciting than others), it's just really hard to read because of the metre - hexameter. Not a natural metre for a Russian poetry, so it was unusual. But I did like this book. Especially all those gruesome descriptions of death. It was sort of fascinating. Also I did like a lot of the characters - Andromache, Achilles, Hector, Patroklos. There was not much of a beginning or an ending to this story, but Homer truly was a genius of epic poems, even though a lot of people agree he was just a generalized character.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    I really enjoyed reading Homer's Odyssey and Iliad. I actually read this book of my own volition and not because I had to for school. The stories are very unique and captivating. You'll be sitting on the edge of your chair. I recommend this book to anyone who likes mythology of any kind. I enjoyed it so much that I believe I'll give it another read after so many years and an adequate review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Salva

    Couldn't finish it, that's a pity! Lost track of the story as the time gap grew larger... But I may reread it one day as I enjoyed it pretty much.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    In college, I read this book for a Foundations of Western Lit. class. My friends and I took turns reading aloud, doing voices, and generally enjoying the process of reading Homer's work. This translation, in particular, is very accessible to the modern reader (as it would have been to the Greeks at the time of its original telling) while still holding true to Homer's original words (we were assured by our professor, who knows more Greek than we do). It is epic poetry at its best and finest (and In college, I read this book for a Foundations of Western Lit. class. My friends and I took turns reading aloud, doing voices, and generally enjoying the process of reading Homer's work. This translation, in particular, is very accessible to the modern reader (as it would have been to the Greeks at the time of its original telling) while still holding true to Homer's original words (we were assured by our professor, who knows more Greek than we do). It is epic poetry at its best and finest (and we read others in that class, so I feel confident in that judgment). I highly reccommend reading at least the Odyssey, if not the Illiad as well. I just completed a re-reading of the Odyssey, and still absolutely loved it. I mean, sure, Odysseus lets pride lead him to some pretty dumb decisions, and is kind of an asshole sometimes, but every hero has got to have some flaws, and anyway he has Athena on his side, so that's pretty kick-ass. The Odyssey is lots of little espiodes of adventures and stories of other adventures all sewn together into one giant, amazing ten-year epic. The Illiad is about a war, so there's a lot more laboring on about everyone's super awesome armor and everyone's grudges, but there's still a great narrative there chronicling the Trojan War, with some great god/goddess/superhuman battle action. Read it and love it! "Shut up, Eurylochus!"

  18. 4 out of 5

    Friend of Pixie (F.O.P.)

    Logan already knew some of these adventures from the excellent recorded reading by Benedict Flynn The Adventures of Odysseus. But I happened on this copy at a used-books shop in Cannon Beach and had to have it because in 1975, my mother gave me "Myths and Legends" Golden Treasury of Myths and Legends Adapted from the World's Great Classics illustrated by the same couple and I loved the pictures. Logan loved the stories and recommends it to "anyone who likes battles really, because there are lots and lots of them Logan already knew some of these adventures from the excellent recorded reading by Benedict Flynn The Adventures of Odysseus. But I happened on this copy at a used-books shop in Cannon Beach and had to have it because in 1975, my mother gave me "Myths and Legends" Golden Treasury of Myths and Legends Adapted from the World's Great Classics illustrated by the same couple and I loved the pictures. Logan loved the stories and recommends it to "anyone who likes battles really, because there are lots and lots of them." Well, yes. Only too true. Luckily, only the "bad guys and mosters" die. Watson does a good job maintaining the antique sound of the language, while still making it understandable for younger readers.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Greg Pitts

    After being force-fed this epic poem in school I was stunned by how much I loved it! I don't even know who's translation I first read, but I've read The Iliad twice since, and Fagles' translation is the best yet. Beautiful imagery and really exciting battle scenes (really!) explaining the loyalties of The Gods and their favorites on Earth. This book is not a chore like we have been led to believe. Trust me, I don't go out seeking ancient Greek poems. But this is great stuff and Fagles' translati After being force-fed this epic poem in school I was stunned by how much I loved it! I don't even know who's translation I first read, but I've read The Iliad twice since, and Fagles' translation is the best yet. Beautiful imagery and really exciting battle scenes (really!) explaining the loyalties of The Gods and their favorites on Earth. This book is not a chore like we have been led to believe. Trust me, I don't go out seeking ancient Greek poems. But this is great stuff and Fagles' translation led me to buy his Homer's Odyssey to read it for the first time. Simply beautiful! This stuff can get violent so steel yourselves. I was so impressed and moved by his translations I tried to email Dr. Fagles to let him know, only to find out that, sadly, he had passed away a few months earlier. If you have the slightest interest, please do yourselves a favor and dive into his translations of these astounding works of literature. And then...hit the trifecta and do The Aeneid!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maciej Bliziński

    At the core of Western culture, there is ancient Rome and Greece, and at the core of the ancient Roman and Greek culture, there is Homer. When reading, I really did feel that the Iliad and Odyssey contain the basic building blocks of the Western way of thinking. For example, Achilles and Odysseus were arguing about what to do next, and each could make a case that sounded convincing. But the ideas were not equally good. This translation uses plain English, with no hexameter of rhymes, At the core of Western culture, there is ancient Rome and Greece, and at the core of the ancient Roman and Greek culture, there is Homer. When reading, I really did feel that the Iliad and Odyssey contain the basic building blocks of the Western way of thinking. For example, Achilles and Odysseus were arguing about what to do next, and each could make a case that sounded convincing. But the ideas were not equally good. This translation uses plain English, with no hexameter of rhymes, which helped me focus on the story.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bap

    This was a golden book, actually a giant golden book, given to me one Christmas while in grade school, 1960 or thereabouts. Stories from the illiad and the odyssey that captured my imagination. I reread it almost 50 years later and remembered the shock of Hector being dragged from the chariot of Achilles or the thrill of Odysseus returning home after all those years to drive the greedy suiters from his home and to reclaim his wife.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    The illustrations of Alice and Martin Provensen bring this children's book to life. First published in 1956, author Jane Werner Watson boils down the essential elements of the Homer's Iliad and The Odyssey for young readers in a very classy way. If you want to familiarize a child with Myceneaen Greece this is a fantastic introduction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Read for CC1 wk 3,4. Read beginning, middle and end of each book. Difficult to keep all the characters in order at this age but it was an ok book. Now we know what people are talking about when they mention Homer and the Iliad and the Odyssey.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chioma

    I like the Iliad much better than the Odyssey.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Damon

    The Illiad is very rambling and quite boring.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    THE ILIAD The wrath of Achilles not only begins the oldest piece of Western literature, but is also its premise. The Iliad has been the basis of numerous clichés in literature, but at its root it is a story of a war that for centuries was told orally before being put down by Homer in which the great heroes of Greece fought for honor and glory that the men of Homer’s day could only imagine achieving. The story of the Trojan War is well known and most people who have not read The THE ILIAD The wrath of Achilles not only begins the oldest piece of Western literature, but is also its premise. The Iliad has been the basis of numerous clichés in literature, but at its root it is a story of a war that for centuries was told orally before being put down by Homer in which the great heroes of Greece fought for honor and glory that the men of Homer’s day could only imagine achieving. The story of the Trojan War is well known and most people who have not read The Iliad assume they know what happens, but in fact at the end of the poem the city of Troy still stands and a wooden horse has not been mentioned. The Iliad tells of several weeks in the last year of the war that revolve around the dishonorable actions of Agamemnon that leads to Achilles refusing to fight with the rest of the Greeks and the disaster it causes in the resulting engagements against the Trojans. But then Achilles allows his friend Patroclus to lead his men into battle to save the Greek ships from being put to the torch only for Patroclus to advance to the walls of Troy and be slain by Hector. The wrath of Achilles turns from Agamemnon to Hector and the Trojans, leading to the death of Troy’s greatest warrior and the poem ending with his funeral. Although the actions of Achilles and Hector take prominence, there are several other notable “storylines” one doesn’t know unless you’ve read epic. First and foremost is Diomedes, the second greatest fighter amongst the Greeks but oftentimes overlooked when it comes to adaptations especially to other important individuals like Odysseus, Menelaus, and the pivotal Patroclus. The second is how much the Olympians and other minor deities are thought to influence the events during this stretch of the war and how both mortals and immortals had to bow to Fate in all circumstances. The third is how ‘nationalistic’ the epic is in the Greek perspective because even though Hector is acknowledged the greatest mortal-born warrior in the war on both sides, as a Trojan he has to have moments of cowardice that none of the Greek heroes are allowed to exhibit and his most famous kill is enabled by Apollo instead of all by himself. And yet, even though Homer writes The Iliad as a triumphant Greek narrative the sections that have Hector’s flaws almost seem hollow as if Homer and his audience both subconsciously know that his epic is not the heroic wrath of Achilles but the tragic death of Hector. The Iliad is the ultimate classic literature and no matter your reading tastes one must read it to have a better appreciation for all of literature as a whole. Although the it was first written over 2500 years ago, it shows the duality of heroic feats and complete tragedy that is war. THE ODYSSEY The crafty hero of The Iliad is in the last leg of his long ten year journey home, but it not only his story that Homer relates to the reader in this sequel to the first war epic in literature. The Odyssey describes the Odysseus’ return to Ithaca after twenty years along with the emergence of his son Telemachus as a new hero while his faithful wife Penelope staves off suitors who are crowding their home and eating their wealth daily. Although the poem is named after his father, Telemachus’ “arc” begins first as the reader learns about the situation on Ithaca around Odysseus’ home and the search he begins for information on his father’s whereabouts. Then we shift to Odysseus on a beach longing to return home when he is informed his long sojourn is about to end and he sets off on a raft and eventually arrives among the Phaeacians, who he relates the previous ten years of his life to before they take him back home. On Ithaca, Odysseus and his son eventually meet and begin planning their revenge on the Penelope’s suitors that results in slaughter and a long-awaited family reunion with Penelope. First and foremost The Odyssey is about coming home, in both Telemachus’ and Odysseus’ arcs there are tales of successful homecomings, unsuccessful homecomings, and homecoming that never happen of heroes from The Iliad. Going hand-in-hand with homecomings is the wanderings of other heroes whose adventures are not as exciting or as long as Odysseus’. Interwoven throughout the poem with homecomings and wanderings is the relationship between guests and hosts along with the difference between good and bad for both that has long reaching consequences. And finally throughout Odysseus’ long journey there are tests everywhere of all types for him to overcome or fail, but the most important are Penelope’s both physical and intimate. Even though it is a sequel, The Odyssey is in complete contrast to The Iliad as instead of epic battle this poem focuses on a hero overcoming everything even the gods to return home. Suddenly the poet who gave readers a first-hand account of war shows his readers the importance of returning from war from the perspective of warriors and their families. Although they are completely different, The Odyssey in fact compliments The Iliad as well as completing it which means if you read one you have to read the other.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stacie (MagicOfBooks)

    I will also do a video review here at my channel: http://www.youtube.com/magicofbooks Homer's "The Illiad" follows the battle between the Greeks and the Trojans. Homer's "The Odyssey" follows Odysseus who is trying to return home after the war with Troy, but he keeps getting deterred by gods and monsters. It occurred to me during this reading that I think I've fantasized my love of "The Illiad" and "The Odyssey." Don't get me wrong, I still enjoyed my re-reading of these two classics of Greek literature, but I I will also do a video review here at my channel: http://www.youtube.com/magicofbooks Homer's "The Illiad" follows the battle between the Greeks and the Trojans. Homer's "The Odyssey" follows Odysseus who is trying to return home after the war with Troy, but he keeps getting deterred by gods and monsters. It occurred to me during this reading that I think I've fantasized my love of "The Illiad" and "The Odyssey." Don't get me wrong, I still enjoyed my re-reading of these two classics of Greek literature, but I found myself thinking, "wait, didn't this happen a different way? Wasn't there more to the story than this?" The first time I read "The Odyssey" was for high school. I thought I read the complete "Odyssey," but I think I read a condensed version of it. All I remember from my high school reading was Odysseus' journey and the part where he gets home and shoots the arrow through the axes. But I never read all the introductory stuff with Telemachus' journey before Odysseus even tells his story. So much to my shock, I found out during this reading that I never read the complete "Odyssey." As for "The Illiad," I read that for the first time in college and I knew I was reading a condensed version. But I think I've always been mistaken and have held the belief that "The Illiad" tells all aspects of the Trojan war. Instead, the whole focus is primarily on the sides of the Greeks: Agamemnon, Menelaus, and Achilles, with Hector being a minor character and we don't even get the Trojan horse. Once again, I think I've fantasized "The Illiad" in my head. I think I've been so "brainwashed" by pop culture when it comes to the telling of these stories, especially "The Illiad." There's been so many adaptations of "The Illiad," and they all include the runaway of Helen with Paris, the Trojan horse, the fall of Troy, and "The Illiad" had none of that. Add on top of that, I've always seen the Greeks as the villains of the story and the Trojans as the heroes. But here, the Greeks are the heroes and the Trojans more vilified. And Helen is also vilified which I hated! I've always supported Helen because, once again, pop culture has always depicted her as a woman who was in an unhappy marriage and Menelaus is an asshole. But Homer presents her as a woman who should be ashamed and despised and she herself even condemns her "bad behavior" and that Menelaus is her true husband. Once again, I've fantasized the story. I still enjoyed my re-reading. I was just shocked to realize that I horribly mis-remembered these stories. I had an easier time re-reading "The Odyssey" because there is a lot more action to the story and Odysseus is constantly moving around. Whereas "The Illiad" can read a bit more slow and monotonous at times because it strictly focuses on the Greeks and Achilles and the fights are never ending with lists of names of characters I can't pronounce or keep straight. So question: has anyone else had a similar problem like me? Has movies, book retellings, and TV series skewed how you remember these stories?

  28. 5 out of 5

    C.A.

    I absolutely love Greek myth, and after having seen so many renditions of both the Iliad and the Odyssey, I figured it was time to get around to reading the originals. I'll be honest, I wasn't overly impressed with the Iliad in its raw form. Whilst the story of Troy is a classic, I couldn't get past my absolute loathing of Agamemnon. He is truly an awful person. The first book of the Iliad could really be summarised as "Agamemnon throwing a tantrum because someone took his slave girl away a I absolutely love Greek myth, and after having seen so many renditions of both the Iliad and the Odyssey, I figured it was time to get around to reading the originals. I'll be honest, I wasn't overly impressed with the Iliad in its raw form. Whilst the story of Troy is a classic, I couldn't get past my absolute loathing of Agamemnon. He is truly an awful person. The first book of the Iliad could really be summarised as "Agamemnon throwing a tantrum because someone took his slave girl away and now he can't rape her every night." Poor, mistreated Agamemnon. Does no one care about his suffering? The Odyssey was a very different story (and I can see why some scholars suggest the two stories/poems were actually written by different people.) The Odyssey details a wild adventure. There are gods and goddesses, witches, sea monsters, sirens, cyclopes, and more. Odysseus battles incredible odds to get home to his family, with the aid of the goddess Athene (who is the real hero of the story, let's be honest). Meanwhile, we also get to see Penelope, a clever, loyal and honourable woman who has to deal with a crowd of unruly men trying to take her home, while she waits for a husband who might never return. I also found The Odyssey to be much more varied (and therefore interesting) in its narrative, with the characters visiting different locations, and going through much more varied trials, such as outsmarting a monster, or bargaining with a witch, or making the terrible choice of who to sacrifice, as well as the trial of facing an enemy in their own home who they are completely unable to fight against. The Iliad is essentially divided into "men fighting on sand" and "men bickering in tents". All in all, I recommend The Odyssey for those of you who are after a classic tale sat against the backdrop of Greek mythology. If you want to see how a giant wooden horse brought down a city, skip The Iliad and read The Aeneid by Virgil instead.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Pierce

    The Iliad: A cleverly woven tale of courage, honor, love and war. Everyone should read this story at least once because, though it may be a difficult read, it is rich with poetic technique and emotion, leaving something new to discover about oneself and the world around them. This story is a masterpiece through and through. Five stars. The Odyssey: One would probably enjoy being lobotomized more than reading the first nine books of this one as it doesn’t really “get good” until then. The Iliad: A cleverly woven tale of courage, honor, love and war. Everyone should read this story at least once because, though it may be a difficult read, it is rich with poetic technique and emotion, leaving something new to discover about oneself and the world around them. This story is a masterpiece through and through. Five stars. The Odyssey: One would probably enjoy being lobotomized more than reading the first nine books of this one as it doesn’t really “get good” until then. At many points throughout, I thought I was reading an Ancient Greek man’s wet dream. Not only that but the story seemed to lack the poetic depth and emotion through most of the tale which the Iliad had. Homer kinda dropped the ball on this one but did in fact manage to pick it back up again.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hera (asshelvedbyjuno)

    For a long time finally get back to the 1st ever Greek Myth I read when I was child and it was an amazing experience. Still now, I love the character of Achilles, Patroclus and Hector also Andromache. I was slightly disturbed by the narration of the fighting or the deaths but it was still an amazing read for me since I'm such a Greek addict and will definitely reread this again soon. I still hate The Odyssey though, probably gonna rae it a 2 stars for it's parts or perhaps a 2.5. For a long time finally get back to the 1st ever Greek Myth I read when I was child and it was an amazing experience. Still now, I love the character of Achilles, Patroclus and Hector also Andromache. I was slightly disturbed by the narration of the fighting or the deaths but it was still an amazing read for me since I'm such a Greek addict and will definitely reread this again soon. I still hate The Odyssey though, probably gonna rae it a 2 stars for it's parts or perhaps a 2.5. Overall, I recommend this to anyone who wants to start Greek Mythology stories.

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