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The School Revolution: A New Answer for Our Broken Education System

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Twelve-term Texas Congressman, Presidential candidate, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Ron Paul returns with a highly provocative treatise about how we need to fundamentally change the way we think about America's broken education system in order to fix it. Whether or not you have children, you know that education is vital to the prosperity and future of our Twelve-term Texas Congressman, Presidential candidate, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Ron Paul returns with a highly provocative treatise about how we need to fundamentally change the way we think about America's broken education system in order to fix it. Whether or not you have children, you know that education is vital to the prosperity and future of our society. Yet our current system simply doesn't work. Parents feel increasingly powerless, and nearly half of Americans give our schools a grade of "C". Now, in his new book, Ron Paul attacks the problem head-on and provides a focused solution that centers on strong support for home schooling and the application of free market principles to the American education system. Examining the history of education in this country, Dr. Paul identifies where we've gone wrong, what we can do about it, and how we can change the way we think about education in order to provide a brighter future for Americans.


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Twelve-term Texas Congressman, Presidential candidate, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Ron Paul returns with a highly provocative treatise about how we need to fundamentally change the way we think about America's broken education system in order to fix it. Whether or not you have children, you know that education is vital to the prosperity and future of our Twelve-term Texas Congressman, Presidential candidate, and #1 New York Times bestselling author Ron Paul returns with a highly provocative treatise about how we need to fundamentally change the way we think about America's broken education system in order to fix it. Whether or not you have children, you know that education is vital to the prosperity and future of our society. Yet our current system simply doesn't work. Parents feel increasingly powerless, and nearly half of Americans give our schools a grade of "C". Now, in his new book, Ron Paul attacks the problem head-on and provides a focused solution that centers on strong support for home schooling and the application of free market principles to the American education system. Examining the history of education in this country, Dr. Paul identifies where we've gone wrong, what we can do about it, and how we can change the way we think about education in order to provide a brighter future for Americans.

30 review for The School Revolution: A New Answer for Our Broken Education System

  1. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...30-minutes wait to call the firemen...and

    These are a few notes I took from an interview Ron Paul gave to Charlie Rose. The interview started with Rose asking RP about the meaning of “libertarianism”. RP replied it meant “non-intervention”; it’s the “classical liberalism". Then the interview proceeded focusing mainly on politics, economy and foreign policy. Regarding Education, and his book, RP made some very few clarifications: (1) The basis of the ongoing American educational system (in a broken state of being) has been, for the These are a few notes I took from an interview Ron Paul gave to Charlie Rose. The interview started with Rose asking RP about the meaning of “libertarianism”. RP replied it meant “non-intervention”; it’s the “classical liberalism". Then the interview proceeded focusing mainly on politics, economy and foreign policy. Regarding Education, and his book, RP made some very few clarifications: (1) The basis of the ongoing American educational system (in a broken state of being) has been, for the past 150 years, CONFORMITY; it’s been an authoritarian approach contrary to the philosophy of Liberty; and that “abolishes” creativity and curiosity. He favors a non-religious and secular approach to education. RP spoke of "damaging bad philosophy and religion”. (2) Students and parents should be in charge. He pointed out that, quite recently, “kids are bored to death with CORE curriculum”, but also: nobody liked “no child left behind”. To RP, “self-starters” and leaders are needed; therefore, a new school of thought in Economics. Conversation resumed to politics and economics. …and his son’s “more nuanced” approach.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is certainly an interesting book. I like Ron (and Rand) Paul, but I am not a libertarian for many, many reasons. It was quite eye-opening to hear Mr. Paul's predictions for the future of education in this country, as well as his very valid criticisms of the current K-college model. As a libertarian, the author's focus is on the individual, and the ability of people to control their own destinies through hard work, will power, and the magic of Ludwig von Mises. I found myself quite inspired This is certainly an interesting book. I like Ron (and Rand) Paul, but I am not a libertarian for many, many reasons. It was quite eye-opening to hear Mr. Paul's predictions for the future of education in this country, as well as his very valid criticisms of the current K-college model. As a libertarian, the author's focus is on the individual, and the ability of people to control their own destinies through hard work, will power, and the magic of Ludwig von Mises. I found myself quite inspired by Mr. Paul's discussion of leadership, and about how one best becomes a leader. In my own work, and in our larger country, it is the lack of effective leadership that is getting so many of our institutions--schools, businesses, government, churches, you name it--into such trouble. Mr. Paul actually inspired me to look into something I have allowed to sit on the back burner for too long, and for that I am grateful. The author's criticisms of our education system are spot on, but he is far from the only person to have remarked on the difficulties our cites, towns, and states are facing with regard to getting children to learn how to think (not to mention providing something for them to think about!) The technological revolution that is taking place in America and in the world is going to turn what we call school on its head, and--here I think Mr. Paul's arguments were at their strongest--the old, sclerotic models are going to be overturned by those who have the means, and the wherewithal to access this brave new world of education. By means, though, I am not saying money. Much of the new internet-based education is free already. "Means," in my completely unhumble opinion, means things like self-discipline, doggedness, creativity, curiosity, and self-reliance, According to the author, homeschooling is much better than public schools (or private ones, for that matter) since children should be trained to become auto-didactic at as early an age as possible. These uber-children need some pushing and prompting from their parents, of course, but ultimately the goal is to learn how to learn, then to go ahead and do it. Not much to argue about there. Which leads to my greatest criticism of the book: Mr. Paul's program of education would work, wonderfully, for the best and the brightest kids, who have best and bright parents. The problem is, half of all people are below average intelligence. The author acknowledges this point in the later part of the book, saying that his curriculum would really only be suitable for (at best) 20% of our kids. So...what do we do with the other 80%? And what does Mr. Paul make of the fact that many of the kids attending home/cyberschools are simply not learning to read, to write, and to do math as well as their counterparts in public and private schools? Not everyone can learn at the level Ron Paul is suggesting, especially by themselves. I like many of the ideas he lays out, but ultimately, I'm not sure how broadly applicable they are for children and young people today. Ron Paul has certainly given me some great ideas for teaching my own children (and myself, believe it or not), but like all things libertarian, in the end, I think it's simply unrealistic for the vast majority of people. With that said, this was a good, thoughtful book. I'm glad I read it, and I have benefited from doing so.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Roslyn

    School as we know it is obsolete! Anyone with access to the internet knows this intuitively but it is fascinating to learn more about it in this book. What a fun time to be raising children in! I am so excited that, as a parent, there are so many options available to me other than public school (how-to-be-a-sheep boot camp) or private school (how-to-be-a-rich-sheep boot camp). I took a star off for this book being too repetitive. I am also not sold on the curriculum idea. I love Ron Paul's School as we know it is obsolete! Anyone with access to the internet knows this intuitively but it is fascinating to learn more about it in this book. What a fun time to be raising children in! I am so excited that, as a parent, there are so many options available to me other than public school (how-to-be-a-sheep boot camp) or private school (how-to-be-a-rich-sheep boot camp). I took a star off for this book being too repetitive. I am also not sold on the curriculum idea. I love Ron Paul's curriculum, but I am not sold on the idea that people need "top down" curriculums at all. I am currently leaning towards letting learn what they want. Also, Paul's curriculum, though far superior to any other being sold at the moment, doesn't offer the physical and emotional health components that would make me truly consider it. This was my problem with education in the first place--I think physical and emotional health are far more important things to study than physics and calculus. Also, even though this book is hardly political at all, I think it would have been even better if he kept politics out entirely. Such important info it is a shame it will turn people off just because of the politics.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Elkjar

    Great little book that brings up a lot of valid questions and criticisms about the current education system and what lies ahead for the future. Definitely worth reading if you are questioning the quality of education you or your children received or are receiving.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Lau

    "The battle for liberty today is best seen institutionally in the battle over the control over education…liberty in education is basic to liberty in every other area of life." Ron Paul expresses his libertarian views about education in this book. He wants to convince parents to leave the state-controlled, passive education school system and homeschool to build a generation of leaders and informed citizens. Written shortly before the launch of his homeschool curriculum, the book is really a "The battle for liberty today is best seen institutionally in the battle over the control over education…liberty in education is basic to liberty in every other area of life." Ron Paul expresses his libertarian views about education in this book. He wants to convince parents to leave the state-controlled, passive education school system and homeschool to build a generation of leaders and informed citizens. Written shortly before the launch of his homeschool curriculum, the book is really a 206-page sell. I don’t mind because we use this curriculum successfully with our slightly less academic teen. I like the high student-as-learner expectations and being able to drastically reduce her college time and cost or bypass it altogether. Educators usually avoid talking about college being a bad idea, but Dr. Paul addresses it head-on. Except for a few specific fields – law, medicine, engineering, and science - college is unnecessary. Learning real-world skills also prepares a teen for the post-school world: creating a blog, making a YouTube video, and weekly then daily writing. Dr. Paul makes a good case. I appreciate his clear writing, no wasted words or seeking to impress. This makes him easy to read. I will be looking for his other books, starting with Liberty Defined.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Athan Tolis

    I almost never award one star to books, but I'm rather angry with "The School Revolution" I bought the book for legitimate reasons: 1. I have a generally positive impression of Ron Paul as somebody who speaks truth to power 2. All I learned in school was how to quietly (or otherwise) count down 40 minutes 3. My son just started school and I'm giving some serious thought to the idea of home schooling 4. I would not know where to start I just finished this 205 page book (small pages, wide margins, I almost never award one star to books, but I'm rather angry with "The School Revolution" I bought the book for legitimate reasons: 1. I have a generally positive impression of Ron Paul as somebody who speaks truth to power 2. All I learned in school was how to quietly (or otherwise) count down 40 minutes 3. My son just started school and I'm giving some serious thought to the idea of home schooling 4. I would not know where to start I just finished this 205 page book (small pages, wide margins, probably a 150 page book in any other format) and I am none the wiser. This is only tangentially a book about home schooling. It is an advertisement for Ron Paul's forthcoming home schooling curriculum. I've paid GBP 14.99 to read an advertisement. The advertising copy reads as follows: * State school does the bidding of government because government bears the costs and "he who pays the piper calls the tune" * State school teaches our children to depend on government for help. It does not teach freedom and leadership * State school addresses the needs of the worst student, it is lowest-common-denominator schooling * Lecture hall / classroom teaching, which entails students furiously copying from the board, was fine for year 1450, but is now obsolete * These days, technology allows you to play back taped lectures * More to the point, technology brings better teaching tools to bear than lectures * Just as importantly, the Internet has brought down the cost of home schooling to virtually nil * Relative price adjustments are a powerful agent for change. The Post Office is now visibly doomed. State school will follow * Even including the opportunity cost of one parent giving up his/her job, all-in it isn't that costly to home school * ...especially if pupils accumulate through home schooling credits that count toward college. * Parents should steer clear of schools that lavish attention on their children because this stifles independence * A coddled student will find himself/herself lost in college. A good home schooling curriculum will emphasize self-learning * My curriculum will teach your kid how to become a leader and how to think freely * My curriculum will be complete by year 2015 * Spread the word! Lend this book to a friend, but only for one week. Then lend it to somebody else. So there's a bunch of ideas here. Some seem exactly right, some I disagree with, while some are conspicuous through their absence. For example, I cannot agree enough with what Ron Paul has to say about lectures. They are a tragic waste of time. And it is no secret that school was instituted in the UK during the industrial revolution with the express purpose of making it possible for both parents to work a full day. Conversely, there's a bunch of things home schooling will never do. For example, if it wasn't for state school, where exactly would the children of immigrants learn proper English in a country like America that calls itself a melting pot? And the silence of this book on math and science (where in my view our schools fail the most criminally by the standard of this information age) is deafening. But all of this is beside the point. My main point is that this book is an advertisement for a product that is not yet for sale. Suppose I pull my kids out of school, put them on Ron Paul's program and next thing you know he changes his mind. Or he gets run over by a bus. Where am I left? Finish your curriculum, sir, then advertise. And for goodness' sake, DON'T MAKE ME PAY FOR YOUR ADVERTISEMENT. If I'm going to pay 15 quid for a book, don't insult me, show me the bloody curriculum. An outline! Something! I am soooo angry. I genuinely want my money back.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This book is fantastic! Ron Paul dives into one of the greatest issues of our time: Education. He compares America's tax funded school system to the USPS. They are both failing because they are outdated and expensive. Soon people will not choose them because the alternatives are so much better and the price is worth it. Then Paul encourages parents to take an active role in their children's education. Parents are currently being hindered by the public schools because the public schools do not This book is fantastic! Ron Paul dives into one of the greatest issues of our time: Education. He compares America's tax funded school system to the USPS. They are both failing because they are outdated and expensive. Soon people will not choose them because the alternatives are so much better and the price is worth it. Then Paul encourages parents to take an active role in their children's education. Parents are currently being hindered by the public schools because the public schools do not take into account what the local parents want for their children because the money does not come from them....it comes from washington (follow the money). Ron Paul has inspired me with this book to embrace my role as an educator to my chilren. He shows the benefits in homeschooling (though not the only way to do it). He always displays a way to go to college for $15,000. I didnt believe it, but he gives the resources in the book and they all check out. One theme in the book that really sticks out is: "One size does not fit all". Our current education system is focused on not leaving a child behind (testing) or on the common core (self-esteem) and not on the real issues (competence). We cannot fix education by telling all the children to the same thing. Each child learns at a different pace and needs a different type of enviroment. The faster children shouldnt be held back by the slower children. And the slower children shouldnt have their heads in the dirt because the teacher is going to fast for them. The only "downfall" for this book is that Paul is only addressing 20% of children. He is not giving an overall solution. He is just talking to the top 20%. That does not mean that the top IQ but the top self motivated children and parents. The idea is to self-learn and be prepared for college and life. There is a sort of prediction to where public school will go and how it will eventually fail, but not a solution for the 80%. Overall a great book that gives solid facts and a clear solution to parents who care about their children's education.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Another book that leaves me uncertain of how to review it. I like Ron Paul, I agree with much of what he says in this book. But he's...well...Ron Paul. Much like Glenn Beck, he's so "out there" in some ways that it makes it really hard for people to see past that. Specific issues I had with the book: 1) His footnotes/citations were entirely web links. How useful is this going to be in even a year? Links change and become obsolete all the time. I would have preferred citations to original sources, Another book that leaves me uncertain of how to review it. I like Ron Paul, I agree with much of what he says in this book. But he's...well...Ron Paul. Much like Glenn Beck, he's so "out there" in some ways that it makes it really hard for people to see past that. Specific issues I had with the book: 1) His footnotes/citations were entirely web links. How useful is this going to be in even a year? Links change and become obsolete all the time. I would have preferred citations to original sources, and I would have liked more citations. He makes a lot of statements that I agree with, but without actual proof/citation/study to back it up, it's gonna be hard to convince non-believers. 2) He insists that the University of Phoenix is a completely legit means of getting a college degree (really?) and that Wikipedia is a completely legit source of information (again...really?). 3) What really rubbed me wrong was that this book, particularly the last half, appears to be little more than an advertisement for his curriculum. What made this even more irksome is that his curriculum isn't even ready, yet. And frankly, when you go to the curriculum's website, he's pretty snarky about it. He says, "In life, there is always a trade-off between time and money. This portion of the site is free. Therefore, you must pay in the other currency: time. You must wait until September. For some grade levels, you must wait for years. This is the cost of 'free.'" Maybe I'm just too sensitive, but I read this and thought, "Damn. You're pretty bitchy for someone who wants me to turn around and pay for your shit." My ultimate issue with this book is that he is preaching to the choir. The only people who are going to read and enjoy this are people who already like and agree with Ron Paul.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ilib4kids

    370.973 PAU CD 370.973 PAU My review: Very good education book addressing from political point of view. Especially writing in chap 6 Self-instruction, self-motivation, self-evaluation, the essence of self-governed of libertarianism is quite aspiring education ideas. Ron Paul is a physician (deliver babies) became 12-term congressman from Texas and presidential candidate. Chap 1 Educating for liberty p19 Liberty is inescapably associated with responsibility. p20 There can be no extension of liberty 370.973 PAU CD 370.973 PAU My review: Very good education book addressing from political point of view. Especially writing in chap 6 Self-instruction, self-motivation, self-evaluation, the essence of self-governed of libertarianism is quite aspiring education ideas. Ron Paul is a physician (deliver babies) became 12-term congressman from Texas and presidential candidate. Chap 1 Educating for liberty p19 Liberty is inescapably associated with responsibility. p20 There can be no extension of liberty without an accompanying extension of personal responsibility. My review: very good and strong argument of education in liberty. Very worth reading. Chap 2 Education for leadership p33 The essence of leadership is not the mobilization of large numbers of people. The essence of leadership is self-mobilization and self-government, opportunities to explain to others why you believe what you believe. (my words: true leadership is to turn inward, to self-perfection, leadership author advocates is very different from the popular view: leadership of the masses ) Chap 6 Self-instruction (very new and challenging idea) Chap 8 What parents want p138 The student must become increasing self-educated. The entire academic program should be structured in terms of this process maturity through self-education. Parents tend to neglect this aspect of education, especially in the high school years. They want for their children in high school what they wanted for their children in the primary grades. The want individual attention for them. This is a mistake. --- My review: a very good point. The book mentioned this self-instruction several times. p139 A student learns more as a teacher than he does as a student. The experience of teaching somebody else is one of the best possible ways to master course material. My review: the author argue tutoring and online forums are best ways to help students to learn, either for students who are tutors or be tutored. I agree. By helping others to learn, try to articulate is the best way to grasp essence. p140 Schooling is a recruiting process. -- My review: I did not quite agree with author that picking content of curriculum conforming to their first principles. Yes, schooling is a recruiting process. How the parents make sure their worldview is right. Children must be exposed to different kind of worldview of all time. Chap 9 What students need Reading; Writing; Public speaking; Digital Media; Academic Research; Time management; Goal-setting; Job vs. calling; Study Habits; Mathematics; Self-pacing; Tutorials p147 I am convinced that students are probably ready by age of 15 to make the decision what best suits their needs in terms of an academic program. This usually begins no later than the junior year of college. p160 The older the student is, the less he should become dependent upon teacher in a classroom; Parents of high school students seems to believe that they are doing the students a favor by enrolling them in small classes. This crates a sense of dependency in the academic work of student. This dependency will disappear overnight when the student walks onto a college campus..To enroll a student into a class with a low student-teacher ratio is a real disservice. --- my review:good points. Chap 11 The Ron Paul Curriculum . Curriculum must be integrated and coherent (curriculum is self-reinforcing. that is, history course match the English course) .These must be a common theme: the freedom philosophy .The best methodology is self-instruction .Courses should be reinforce each other. .Students must learn to write and speak in public p184 p174 K-3 aimed at helping the teachers, around 4th grade the program shifted to self-instruction, become self-educated in 6th grade. Curriculum is geared to make this transition from 4th - 6th grade. 4th grade is not entirely based on the principle of self-education. p173 Target the students in top 20%. Students have to be self-disciplined, self-motivated, not be dependent on parental nagging. p175 4 tracks: one in social science and humanities one in natural science; 3rd in business, 4th in fine arts A meaning college course in physics require knowing calculus. The kind of physics taught in typical high school is not really equivalent of a college-level physics class. p177 Public high schools have abandoned the teaching of history,instead of social studies.(Ron Paul curriculum) has 2 years of western civilization, college a generation ago required students take 1 year western civ. p178 5 major points of Social theory: God, Man, law, causation, time http://www.ronpaulcurriculum.com/ (free courses k-5) Libertarian books The Road to Serfdom by Friedrich Hayek Elements of Libertarian Leadership by Leonard E. Read p48-50 books of Economic libertarian movement Principles of Economics by Carl Menger Human Action, Bureaucracy by Ludwig Von Mises Man, Economy, and Sate by Murray Rothbard others Ideas Have Consequences by Richard M. Weaver What's the Use of Lectures?5th Edition by Donald Bligh Dedication and Leadership by Douglas Arnold Hyde Dedication and Leadership Techniques by Douglas Arnold Hyde ( a book of author's curriculum) The world in the grip of an idea by Clarence Buford Carson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Austin Clark

    offers a unique perspective on the educational system in america. would recommend for parents or those looking for options outside of the traditional k-12 system

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

    In Aristophanes play The Clouds, the characters gleefully lampoon the brainwashing that occurs under the guise of intellectual fashion to the youth of their age. 2,300 years later, Ron Paul is here to show the futility of state run education and the need for a thorough reform of textbook and curriculum materials. Contrary to the welfare state mentality infused in tax funded textbooks and classroom, Ron Paul proposes a curriculum that emphasizes liberty and personal responsibility. He states, “a In Aristophanes play The Clouds, the characters gleefully lampoon the brainwashing that occurs under the guise of intellectual fashion to the youth of their age. 2,300 years later, Ron Paul is here to show the futility of state run education and the need for a thorough reform of textbook and curriculum materials. Contrary to the welfare state mentality infused in tax funded textbooks and classroom, Ron Paul proposes a curriculum that emphasizes liberty and personal responsibility. He states, “a free society acknowledges the authority over education begins with the family.” If parental authority is constantly undermined by the state, then we shouldn’t be surprised when the ideals expressed in the curriculum run contrary to our beliefs. Ron Paul shows that the free market and use of internet has brought an incredibly diverse array of options to the table when it comes to homeschooling. The curriculum he has developed is all about teaching the student to teach themselves and avoiding costs. There are four different tracks for students: one specializing in social sciences and humanities, one focusing on natural science, one aimed at students wanting to apprentice with a local business, and one focused on the fine arts. He recommends internet resources, such as Youtube and Wordpress, as a platform for the student to gain public speaking and writing skills. With the despairing statistics of college graduates without jobs pertaining to their degree, Dr Paul shows how the model of college itself needs to be revamped and costs need to be eliminated via use of CLEP tests, online universities, etc. As far as I know, Dr Paul’s curriculum is the first of its kind with a libertarian slant that utilizes the resources of the internet.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michael Palkowski

    The entire book felt like a sophisticated advertising campaign to create market place demand for Paul's anti-Keynesian curriculum. Every chapter ends instructing the reader to learn more by emailing externally. Despite this, Paul does argue convincingly at points that his methodology is desirable particularly when he applies free market principles to education and discusses the egalitarian potential that the internet presents. However, the entire book is attempting to cater to a very specific The entire book felt like a sophisticated advertising campaign to create market place demand for Paul's anti-Keynesian curriculum. Every chapter ends instructing the reader to learn more by emailing externally. Despite this, Paul does argue convincingly at points that his methodology is desirable particularly when he applies free market principles to education and discusses the egalitarian potential that the internet presents. However, the entire book is attempting to cater to a very specific type of person. Paul laments that the public education system has became a "drug emporium" where students are bullied and information is delivered to merely cater to the lowest common denominator. This affirms the hyperbolic suspicions of middle class conservative parents. Paul essentially favors an individuated, digitized educational system which will destroy interaction on a massive level. Although he favors Socratic dialog and tutorial sessions, he effectively is gleeful about the ways in which intellectual capital is becoming mechanized and calls for more software programs to test examinations. I think this is disastrous, not only for teachers but also students. It's also relatively unsophisticated to presume that the merits of academic information can be determined by a computer. The principle of education that is free online is fantastic but it shouldn't disavow or create a system where teachers are viewed merely as expendable capital for the whims of the private market to buy and sell. Teachers evolve and contribute to their field of study and provide new insights regularly at college level. I believe he is right to discuss the merits of home schooling and he isn't saying its a panacea, however complete parental autonomy over children is potentially a problem. I think of fundamentalism and bigotry: is it right that parents through daily seminars be allowed to impart anti intellectual barbarism to their children and have it sanctioned and approved under the government? I think children have a right to hear and evaluate differing opinions and ideas about the world. The public education system was conjured to provide a chance for everyone regardless of background and underfunding it even more to favor digitization would only help push 20% of students and hurt the rest who demand intensive and dedicated tuition that parents often cannot provide. Paul's curriculum is essentially to coat people in the doctrine of liberty and anti-state libertarianism but not have the opposite analysis that would allow the student to think about the ideas in context juxtaposed with opposing thoughts. Paul's beef is that the public school is liberal in its outlook and so he essentially is just trading ideologies with his curriculum to serve a market for parents who want to sow their political identities into their children.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachael Larsen Hodson

    I purchased this book for $23.00 on a whim mainly because I am considering pulling my 2 boys out of Public School at the end of this year. I generally like Ron Paul (wouldn't vote for the guy) and respect his knowledge, experience and his willingness to take a stand and stick to his guns. I thought this book would be the smoking gun I could refer people to when questioning my thoughts on homeschool. Yes, there were some very highlight worthy moments but, I was so put off by the use of the words I purchased this book for $23.00 on a whim mainly because I am considering pulling my 2 boys out of Public School at the end of this year. I generally like Ron Paul (wouldn't vote for the guy) and respect his knowledge, experience and his willingness to take a stand and stick to his guns. I thought this book would be the smoking gun I could refer people to when questioning my thoughts on homeschool. Yes, there were some very highlight worthy moments but, I was so put off by the use of the words "I" and "my" that I had a hard time liking this book. Paul likes to go on tangents in this book as well as repeat himself over and over. This entire book could have been condensed down to a manifesto (using all of my highlighted paragraphs of course) and I would have been very pleased. Three stars for the fact that some stats and quotes I have actually repeated and seemed (to the doubters) to be rather educated about Public Education. I'm not throwing the book out either which says something but three stars is still a mighty stretch. Mostly this book is a platform for Ron Paul and his unfinished Libertarian Curriculum. Every chapter ends in a plea to buy/use his online classes. The funny thing is that his curriculum is still a long way out from completion. Idiotic. As much as I respect his ideas, the last thing I want for my kids is to be stuck in front of a computer screen all day! I would rather they sit in their school classes all day than be zoned on an electronic interface for hours on end. I guess I will be going the hands on route with some online classes and give them the best of both worlds. I was so over Paul's personal agenda 3/4 of the way through that I quickly skimmed through to the end. My very favorite part of this book is page 207 where Ron Paul lists 9 of his favorite websites. 4 carry his own name and 2 are platforms for his politics. I seriously laughed out loud. What an EGO!!! Bottom line, don't pay full pop for this one....well, unless the freedom movement moves your insides to butterflies and you are part of the reason the Republicans can't win because your Tea Party is taking all our votes and giving the wins to the Dems:)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shiloah

    Excellent book. I agree with his premise that the schools need an overhaul and one of the best ways to do it is to bring the kids home. He seems to love the internet which I found assuming and eye opening. He gave some great tips for ways to use the Internet with homeschool, and I will be using his YouTube ideas for my scholars. His views on YouTube and blogging were something I needed without realizing it. He believes all of these things will be available to all for 100 years or more. I Excellent book. I agree with his premise that the schools need an overhaul and one of the best ways to do it is to bring the kids home. He seems to love the internet which I found assuming and eye opening. He gave some great tips for ways to use the Internet with homeschool, and I will be using his YouTube ideas for my scholars. His views on YouTube and blogging were something I needed without realizing it. He believes all of these things will be available to all for 100 years or more. I realized I had actually been living with the mindset that it will all disappear at a moments notice. What I didn't like was he tended to repeat himself. His intentions to change education still has a conveyor belt mentality. While he doesn't seem to love the "system" or the aristocracy of those in the decision making process regarding it, his solutions had some holes in it to fix it and for his thinking all roads lead to college...which is all the same system. A leadership, a Christ based leadership education is what is needed. More Unschooling than what we have today is needed. His suggestions sometimes lean this way, but then contradict themselves. All in all, it's a good book and one I'll refer to again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    As a homeschool teacher, I was really interested in reading about Ron Paul's views on the broken public education system and how he thought homeschooling could be implemented to fix these problems. (I admire Ron Paul's constant defense of liberty!) He briefly touched on the broken system and listed some pros to homeschooling. I was disappointed that it wasn't more in-depth. Really he just scratched the surface. He wrote a lot on his ideal homeschool curriculum... but I think most homeschool As a homeschool teacher, I was really interested in reading about Ron Paul's views on the broken public education system and how he thought homeschooling could be implemented to fix these problems. (I admire Ron Paul's constant defense of liberty!) He briefly touched on the broken system and listed some pros to homeschooling. I was disappointed that it wasn't more in-depth. Really he just scratched the surface. He wrote a lot on his ideal homeschool curriculum... but I think most homeschool teachers have already settled into their nitch, so it really didn't fit the bill for my expectations. I was looking more to read a history of the system, where it went wrong, and a good defense for homeschooling addressing these issues. It was a bit lackluster in that department. Overall... This book seemed more to encourage those who 'may' be thinking about homeschooling and gives them suggestions for what to include in a curriculum. (Mostly high-school level suggestions.)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    This is a fast read all parents and students should consider. Dr. Paul's book is a good start. I just wish he went into detail about these two points I make below. I wish Dr. Paul would have mentioned vocational schools. People I went to high school with that went down this route are doing great now. So these are a great option for kids. On the other hand the kids that went to college are knee deep in debt and working in jobs they could have gotten right out of high school. Also college itself This is a fast read all parents and students should consider. Dr. Paul's book is a good start. I just wish he went into detail about these two points I make below. I wish Dr. Paul would have mentioned vocational schools. People I went to high school with that went down this route are doing great now. So these are a great option for kids. On the other hand the kids that went to college are knee deep in debt and working in jobs they could have gotten right out of high school. Also college itself seems like such a waste anymore. People can learn on their own or on the job and then prove themselves in interviews or trial work periods. It you want to start your own business there is no reason at all to go to college. Take that $100,000 and use it on the business instead of handing it over to lazy administrators that will hand you a fancy piece of toilet paper four years later.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alberto

    This book goes into detail on the skills a student should acquire to enter the workforce and to be a productive member of society. Learning public speaking, effective reading, writing, self discipline, time management. Basically the skills an employer would look for in an employee. Homeschooling is definitely something all parents should look into. If you're not able to strictly homeschool, at the very least supplement your child's public or private education with home instruction. The time of This book goes into detail on the skills a student should acquire to enter the workforce and to be a productive member of society. Learning public speaking, effective reading, writing, self discipline, time management. Basically the skills an employer would look for in an employee. Homeschooling is definitely something all parents should look into. If you're not able to strictly homeschool, at the very least supplement your child's public or private education with home instruction. The time of blindly handing our kids to an institution and hoping that they come out prepared, are over. The meaningful reform that needs to happen will never come. TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR CHILD'S EDUCATION AND ASSUME RESPONSIBILITY FOR IT!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Seriously, any parent with school-aged kids should read or listen to this short book. It explains the severe faults of tax funded school systems and their teaching methods from elementary through college. It also explains the many benefits of home schooling as well as the options for it available today - and in the near future. Ron Paul also goes into detail about his own home schooling curriculum and other free formal schooling resources. For anyone with doubts about home/online Seriously, any parent with school-aged kids should read or listen to this short book. It explains the severe faults of tax funded school systems and their teaching methods from elementary through college. It also explains the many benefits of home schooling as well as the options for it available today - and in the near future. Ron Paul also goes into detail about his own home schooling curriculum and other free formal schooling resources. For anyone with doubts about home/online schooling...Harvard, MIT, UCLA and many others have started doing the same. If its good enough for them...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    I was hoping for more. The writing is similar to Ron Paul's other books where he could have presented his thoughts in an essay or blog post rather than a book. In this book, he tries to sell his home school curriculum and reiterates his issues with government run entities. While he brings up a few common sense ideas, most of the his thoughts work to isolate children from the larger world.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Recker

    Seems haphazardly written and repetitive. At times, too much of a commercial for his curriculum. But overall, still replete with lucid points about homeschooling. Some have criticized undeservingly for saying his system only works for the top 20% of students. He said his curriculum is written for that. His recommendation of homeschooling extends to all.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vince

    Always loved Dr. Paul and while I am a special education major, it is good to see an outside viewpoint of the field that I am most interested in. all of my professors are very "pro-government" in education and it is hard to be a libertarian in this field and Dr. Paul has once again gotten in my corner

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    You can't say I didn't try.

  23. 4 out of 5

    The

    I got a lot of ideas from this book, so it will be difficult to rate it poorly but ultimately I believe that is what it deserves. The book is repetitious, poorly organized and lacks flow, which is exacerbated by the suggestion to send emails to various “@aweber.com” email addresses for more information about the Ron Paul Curriculum– it’s almost like reading a poorly-done web marketing pitch page as a book. Also, I am pretty confident this book was ghostwritten by Gary North. Gary North is one of I got a lot of ideas from this book, so it will be difficult to rate it poorly but ultimately I believe that is what it deserves. The book is repetitious, poorly organized and lacks flow, which is exacerbated by the suggestion to send emails to various “@aweber.com” email addresses for more information about the Ron Paul Curriculum– it’s almost like reading a poorly-done web marketing pitch page as a book. Also, I am pretty confident this book was ghostwritten by Gary North. Gary North is one of the people behind the Ron Paul Curriculum, the RPC website looks identical in layout and voice to Gary North’s website (right down to the weird bursting red orb icon that displays in the title tab of each site on my browser) and the repetition and constant reference to “the principle of X is: italicized principle for effect“, which is a Gary North trade mark. That’s disappointing for two reasons: first, Ron Paul, if he’s actually written most of the other books of his I’ve read, is a decent author in his own right and certainly his way of making a point is unique, so it’s a shame to not really hear from him in a book with his byline; second, Gary North is actually a great writer himself (his Mises on Money is a great summary/intro of Mises’s voluminous writings on the subject, and his web essays on economic subjects are thoughtful and methodically argued) but it just doesn’t show up in this book, which makes him seem like a poor communicator because he is constantly repeating himself. So that’s what’s primarily wrong with the book and that’s why it’s going to get a low score from me. But as I said, it gave me a lot of ideas, so I still felt the need to record my thoughts more extensively and what better place than this review? Paul/North have not provided us with a well-researched book on the history of the “rise and decline” of the US public school system. Nor have they provided us with a careful logical demolition of the philosophy behind our current compulsory public education policy (or shown us its Prussian heritage, or how it is designed to serve special interests and not local communities), or investigated the collapse of urban school districts into chaos, violence and low test scores. They mostly take it as given that if you’re reading the book, you understand the public education system could be improved upon in one way or another and you’re sympathetic to cutting ties with it in the meantime. This book is not a recipe or handbook for reforming or revolutionizing the educational system in this country as it stands. It offers no panacea for the system itself. Instead, it suggests something simple: go around it. The author(s) believe that, much like UPS and FedEx carry the truly valuable mail while the USPS schleps around coupon books, catalogs and other junk mail marketing offers no one asked for or intended to receive, the advent of the Internet as an even-lower-cost mass communication medium will allow people who want to have a great education from a top-tier provider get one, and no local district admin or state bureaucrat or federal educational gestapo can say nay or get in the way, devil take the whole system. And surely there is something to this. As the author(s) points out, Harvard, MIT, etc. have already put their imprimatur on the movement by giving free access to their best lecturers on the web. Coursera is one of many other providers competing to provide similar access at similar prices to not-quite-top-tier but pretty close lecturers and content, and then there is the Khan Academy which is seeking to address K-12. While quality, format and specific content may differ, what is similar about all of these services is that they are voluntarily provided and are competing for their audiences, whereas government schooling is a monopoly. The other key piece of the puzzle is who is financing these education systems. With the government, it is tax-financed. You’d think this means tax payers thereby control the system, but that’s the funny thing about government and anyone who isn’t totally naive understands it doesn’t work like that– the tax payers donate, the government does the honors. With these other systems, investors, entrepreneurs and nominally-private (ie, the major research universities) teaching institutions are the financiers and, to the extent that the consumer is paying for it in some way (ads, prestige, subscription fees), they get to call the tune. Without changing the funding method of education, it will be impossible to change the values reflected in it nor the structure by which it is conducted. There is no need to critique the argument too tightly here because I think it’s very sloppily made, even though it could be done in an airtight, holistic fashion. The point is simply that there are ways to get around the public education system if one wants to, and I want to, and utilizing free or low-cost curricula offered on the web is likely going to be part of the tool kit for me and many others. The point is to be the change and not wait for permission or for someone else to make a horrible monopoly better. There are a lot of forceful ethical claims in the book that I think are worth noting: As individuals mature, they must accept greater responsibility for their actions If we want people to believe we are serious (about reforming the world), they must see the consistency in our own lives The statist educators are committed to this principle: parents are not trained nor competent enough to make decisions about their children’s education If parents understood that they are responsible for their children’s education in the same way that they are responsible for their feeding, housing and clothing, we would see far more attention given to the content and structure of educational programs These are claims I agree with. I think it’s impossible to resolve these things with public education. So we are going to opt out. One thing I wondered about was starting an alternative (privately funded) school. One problem revealed to me by this book is that in so far as it’s an “institution”, it’s going to get tangled up in a lot of the same problems that plague the public education system controlled by bureaucrats and regulators. Another problem (besides making the economics of it affordable) is that schools and lecture-based education cater to the least common denominator in the class (that is, the slowest student). The other students who are picking up the material quickly are left frustrated by the process. I was one of those students growing up, and it was miserable. It may be that creating an alternative school is not a practical solution to the problem. It could also be that the alternative school would need to greatly rethink the method of schooling in general to be successful. One thing the author(s) suggest which is a novel idea for me is that the purpose of education is to promote the capability of self-learning. I say this is novel in that I have hovered around this belief for some time and even see it as core to my philosophy of parenting, summarized as follows: parents bring children into the world, without their permission, in a state of total dependence; the process of maturation and growth is a process of increasing independence; the parents’ obligation is to aid the child in the process of learning and self-discovery that will allow them to incrementally gain their complete independence; ideally, the parents’ could provide such an appealing moral example that they could also instill in their child the primary socialization value of interdependence, as well. Therefore, this idea of the purpose of a formal educational program aiming at teaching children how to learn whatever it is they want to learn, makes total sense to me. If the early part of one’s education is centered on meta-learning (how to read and take in new information, how to think about it analytically, how to synthesize new information and understanding from it, and how to communicate it to others), then there is a point in the curriculum of the student where they can take the initiative in their learning and become self-guided and autodidactic. This principle dovetails with the idea of education as an act of self-discovery. Self-discovery can not occur when the self is incapable of thinking and learning on their own. The book has some specific suggestions about important elements of such a curriculum: Reading Writing Public speaking Digital media Academic research Time management Goal-setting Job vs. calling Study habits Mathematics Self-pacing Tutorials You can see quite clearly that this curriculum is aimed much more at the tools of self-learning, rather than specific values or content within categories like “Art, History, Science” etc. (although the author(s) does suggest that part of the advanced curriculum he offers for older students includes specific content tracks that explore these categories in integrated ways based on the student’s interest). So one idea I got from the book in this regard is that I need to do some research and thinking about the curriculum I will follow with my children, at least early on in their education, to try to best prepare them to become self-learners. Another interesting idea for an improved school is as a gathering place for tutorial groups of exceptionally talented and motivated students to pursue a kind of “Socratic dialog” based study of a subject, or as a place to be introduced to new or important ideas. The author(s) suggest that the method of lecturing to students to teach them material is outmoded and ineffective (only 10% of the lecture is retained, on average, 3 weeks after it is received, and which 10% varies per pupil). But they suggest that lectures if short and interesting CAN be useful for informing people of a subject they didn’t know existed or for exciting an interest in the usefulness of studying a particular subject, which they could then engage in a course of self-directed learning on their own. One way to think of how this might apply at an alternative school is that rather than fixed courses with fixed classes and the same teachers droning on, students might pay for individual intro lectures for subjects they’re considering studying, performer by visiting scholars or experts who are actively trying to promote the topic as worthy of study. The school might also have classes which apply a particular methodology for a particular purpose (ie, a Montessori seminar for young students). Finally, as suggested, the school might be a common forum for tutorial groups of excellent students to meet, discuss and coordinate study on a focused topic of inquiry. There were specific things in the book I also really liked. The author(s) is a big proponent of essay writing as a way of practicing the understanding of specific content one is learning about. The suggestion was for the student to start a blog and write essays or blog posts about what they’re learning, not necessarily a journal but more as a kind of conversation or demonstration of what they think the meaning or import is of what they’ve learned. They also recommend the use of YouTube and other social media to practice these skills, practice conveying ideas, and to interact with others with similar interests. Their specific approach is based around creating “leadership”, which is another important value for me that gives me ideas about how I would want to approach this with my own kids. I also like that the book emphasizes individuality and reminds the reader that every student is different and part of designing a good educational program means paying attention to their individual needs– again, not an idea that gets much attention in the public system, nor can it. One thing I thought was bizarre about the book (and the values of most parents in general) is its suggestions on how to make the acquisition of a college degree by homeschooled children affordable and achievable in an accelerated fashion, ie, around age 18. Higher education is largely a scam that wastes time and money and leads to enormous confusion of values and purpose. If you could successfully help a child to gain mastery over their own learning at a young age and watch them develop their own interests and knowledge for an extended period of time, I don’t understand why college (either the acquisition of a degree, or the social experience itself) would be beneficial or interesting for them at that point. What can they get from college that they can’t get on their own pursuing a career, starting a business, etc.? That seemed like a sop suggestion to the parents reading who want to do something radical but aren’t ready to completely intellectually flip out. With any luck, my children will be holding down part-time jobs and/or entrepreneurially making money WHILE they’re pursuing their youthful education. They’ll come to my business and see and learn what I do and be a part of it or do something else they fancy. There won’t be a sudden point at which they stop being a student and start being a self-paying adult; ideally, they’ll incrementally gain both capabilities at once and continuing their life immersed in self-directed learning, growth and productive gain. This approach might not be right for everybody, but then, I don’t think public education is right for anybody, so you could certainly do worse. 2/5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Geise

    "The School Revolution: A New Answer for Our Broken Education System" by Ron Paul is a quick, but necessary, look at the American education system and what can be done to improve it. This book is not for those that just want to tweak the system; this is for those that envision radical change. Paul's basic premise is that public schools will not improve as long as funding continues to come from the state and federal levels. To effect change, parents will explore the multitude of options available "The School Revolution: A New Answer for Our Broken Education System" by Ron Paul is a quick, but necessary, look at the American education system and what can be done to improve it. This book is not for those that just want to tweak the system; this is for those that envision radical change. Paul's basic premise is that public schools will not improve as long as funding continues to come from the state and federal levels. To effect change, parents will explore the multitude of options available via the Internet. Homeschooling is cheaper than ever, and the multitude of options ensures that parents are able to find a product that works for their children and aligns with their outlooks on life. Paul correctly identifies that public schooling has deteriorated as funding has moved from local to state to federal. Though state and federal funding is seductive, it comes with strings attached. Schools have to conform to what the state and federal governments dictate, taking away control from local communities and from parents themselves. Paul does not see this changing any time soon, so parents need to take matters into their own hands. Homeschooling is the best alternative for parents that are fed up with public schooling, and it directly impact the public school system when students are removed (funding is based on number of students). Homeschooling is cheaper than ever with more options than ever. Paul compares public education to the post office multiple times; technology and competition made the post office increasingly obsolete without needing any new legislation. He lays out his plans to develop a curriculum for liberty-minded families. This has since developed into the Ron Paul Homeschool Curriculum, a full K-12 program. I respect Ron Paul and what he done for the liberty movement. Since leaving office, he has continued to work to change the way we educate our children. He states in this book that he believes his talents are needed more in this space than in politics, and I think I have to agree with him. He was able to catalyze a shift toward libertarian ideals among young people wihile in office, but real change will come from disruptive technology and content. Developing Uber and Lyft were far more disruptive to the taxi cartel than any changes in legislation would have been. Developing bitcoin was easier than ending the Federal Reserve, yet it does just as much to change the way people think about money. I wish Ron Paul the best in his quest to spark a homeschooling revolution that directly challenges the viability of public education.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    I listened to about 4.5 out of 5 discs of the audiobook version of this book before finally calling it quits. Some of the thoughts were on par with my own, such as how education seems to be trending toward online, and that that was generally a good idea. There was also some overlap with Salman Khan's The One World Schoolhouse, and Khan Academy was used as an example of a good resource for self-motivated learners. I much preferred Khan's book to this. Unfortunately, Paul seems to be trapped in a I listened to about 4.5 out of 5 discs of the audiobook version of this book before finally calling it quits. Some of the thoughts were on par with my own, such as how education seems to be trending toward online, and that that was generally a good idea. There was also some overlap with Salman Khan's The One World Schoolhouse, and Khan Academy was used as an example of a good resource for self-motivated learners. I much preferred Khan's book to this. Unfortunately, Paul seems to be trapped in a fantasy world of the middle- to upper-class nuclear family. His yet-to-be-created curriculum is geared toward families with two parents who have the means to have one stay at home. As a single parent, I found his recommendations for homeschooling very frustrating, as there is no possible way I would ever be able to homeschool my child. Also (although he does admit his curriculum would be made for the "top 20%" of self-motivated students), picturing how hard it is to get my son to do any homework of any kind, is enough for me to know that he would not thrive in a homeschool environment. What made me finally give up is the fact that his staff is still developing a curriculum and I was tired of hearing about what it would be like. I think this book would have been less frustrating if the curriculum was not only ready, but was being used to some success. It's fine to have grand expectations of what seems on the surface to be well researched and developed but I've lived in the real world too long to know that things never go as planned, and I'd never write a book talking about how my plans to become a thin, famous millionaire are sure to be complete by 2020. Also, the narrator's reading was driving me crazy. If I had to hear him say the word "parent" one more time I think I would have thrown the whole CD set out the car window, then run over it forward and back 10,000 times - one for each "parent" I had to suffer through.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I want to start by saying I thought I liked Ron Paul as a politician when I started reading this book. I'm also glad I read the last chapter as soon as the first chapter mentioned it, because it was then that I realized the entire book is a pitch for Ron Paul's homeschool curriculum. I'm glad I didn't pay $20 for this book like some of the other reviewers apparently did. I bought my copy at the Dollar Tree, so I didn't have to spend the rest of the time reading it being bitter about that. I want to start by saying I thought I liked Ron Paul as a politician when I started reading this book. I'm also glad I read the last chapter as soon as the first chapter mentioned it, because it was then that I realized the entire book is a pitch for Ron Paul's homeschool curriculum. I'm glad I didn't pay $20 for this book like some of the other reviewers apparently did. I bought my copy at the Dollar Tree, so I didn't have to spend the rest of the time reading it being bitter about that. Nevertheless, I was unimpressed. Paul blatantly says it's his goal to create libertarian leaders out of the students who enroll in his homeschool curriculum. He endeavors to teach them what to think. Personally, I'm not a proponent of brainwashing and would rather people be taught *how* to think, yet I continued to read. Despite advocating for persuasive writing, Paul's arguments were flimsy at best. He references public schools as "the equivalent of drug emporiums," where a student's only other major worries are bullying and liberal teachers. He does not clarify what public schools he's been inside other than the one in which he was enrolled as a child outside Pittsburgh, but it certainly wasn't representative of my experience. There were a few good "follow the money"-type tips throughout the book, and I will always appreciate on one level or another an encouragement for parents to always do what they feel truly is in their child's best interest, but I suspect those things can be better obtained through other sources for a far better money value unless you also pick up your copy from the Dollar Tree or your local library.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Della Tingle

    I like Ron Paul; I do. However, I thought there would be more to the book. In a nutshell, the school revolution is to pull children out of public schools and homeschool them. Some of the ideas that really resonated with me are, “I do not think that implementing a welfare state will produce the results that idealistic young people believe or hope it will produce.” My husband constantly says the government cannot do anything better than the private sector and that there should be no public schools I like Ron Paul; I do. However, I thought there would be more to the book. In a nutshell, the school revolution is to pull children out of public schools and homeschool them. Some of the ideas that really resonated with me are, “I do not think that implementing a welfare state will produce the results that idealistic young people believe or hope it will produce.” My husband constantly says the government cannot do anything better than the private sector and that there should be no public schools which he believes to be money pits. Ron Paul agrees that the “existing system” should be replaced “by educational institutions and programs entirely funded by the private sector.” Paul also states, “...parents have a moral and legal responsibility to educate their children. The authority can be delegated, but parents do not escape the responsibility by delegating this responsibility.” As a public school teacher, fall back never touches the parents; every mistake is that if the teacher, the school, and the school system. It is as if families are immune. For me, I see too many parents simply incapable of homeschooling their children, for they lack a basic education themselves. I also see many students lacking the required discipline and motivation to be independent homeschooled students. I do not believe homeschooling is for everyone even though I do believe in homeschooling as an educational option for some.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Congressman Paul once again goes after the establishment, this time, the US education system. He gives a solid overview of the current state of education in the US and provides hard-hitting facts showing how the system has failed and injured our populace. (Just look at the 2016 Presidential Candidate options!) Dr. Paul, as he always does, provides hope and shows that there is light at the end of the tunnel. He provides a roadmap on how we can change the current system of education by taking back Congressman Paul once again goes after the establishment, this time, the US education system. He gives a solid overview of the current state of education in the US and provides hard-hitting facts showing how the system has failed and injured our populace. (Just look at the 2016 Presidential Candidate options!) Dr. Paul, as he always does, provides hope and shows that there is light at the end of the tunnel. He provides a roadmap on how we can change the current system of education by taking back control and responsibility for our individual futures as well as our children's and solve the systematic problems and get rid of the bloated bureaucracies that have ailed education for decades. Another excellent guide in wisdom from Dr. Paul on one of the most important issues facing our country today.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Saraelizabeth

    This book made my heart pound with excitement. I know that sounds nerdy, but it's true. It was so good and and it just resonated with sound, common sense. His application of the U.S. Postal service to the public school system just blew me away, and I think it's already happening. I hear a lot people say (about the public school system) "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". Well, guess what? It is absolutely broken. You just may not realize it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Didn't know Ron Paul was a big proponent of homeschooling and he even created his own online curriculum. A lot of discussion in this book on his curriculum (I'll stick with other curriculums), but there is some good commentary on schooling and why more and more people will opt to teach their own kids.

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