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The Second Jungle Book (eBook)

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Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English author and poet. Kipling was born in Bombay, British India. Many of his works have an Indian flavor and setting. His best known works are The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902). Kipling is the youngest author to receive a Nobel Prize. Kipling wrote two connected story and poetry collections. Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English author and poet. Kipling was born in Bombay, British India. Many of his works have an Indian flavor and setting. His best known works are The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902). Kipling is the youngest author to receive a Nobel Prize. Kipling wrote two connected story and poetry collections. Puck on Pooh's Hill was published in 1906 and four years later Rewards and fairies.


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Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English author and poet. Kipling was born in Bombay, British India. Many of his works have an Indian flavor and setting. His best known works are The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902). Kipling is the youngest author to receive a Nobel Prize. Kipling wrote two connected story and poetry collections. Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was an English author and poet. Kipling was born in Bombay, British India. Many of his works have an Indian flavor and setting. His best known works are The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902). Kipling is the youngest author to receive a Nobel Prize. Kipling wrote two connected story and poetry collections. Puck on Pooh's Hill was published in 1906 and four years later Rewards and fairies.

30 review for The Second Jungle Book (eBook)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett Readz and Runz....Through Novel Time & Distance

    "I am by nature a dealer in words, and words are the most powerful drug known to humanity." - Rudyard Kipling What a feast for the mind and the eye. Vibrant and thoughtful, Kipling chose his words with intent to deliver this captivating and provocative piece, sequel to The Jungle Book, turning worldview from humans to animals of the jungle and we can all learn from it. How Fear Came The stream is shrunk – the pool is dry, And we be comrades, thou and I; With fevered jowl and dusty flank Each jostling "I am by nature a dealer in words, and words are the most powerful drug known to humanity." - Rudyard Kipling What a feast for the mind and the eye. Vibrant and thoughtful, Kipling chose his words with intent to deliver this captivating and provocative piece, sequel to The Jungle Book, turning worldview from humans to animals of the jungle and we can all learn from it. How Fear Came The stream is shrunk – the pool is dry, And we be comrades, thou and I; With fevered jowl and dusty flank Each jostling each along the bank; And by one drouthy fear made still, Forging thought of quest to kill. Now ‘neath his dam the fawn may see, The lean Pack-wolf as cowed as he, And the tall buck, unflinching, note The fangs that tore his father’s throat. The pools are shrunk – the streams are dry, And we the playmates, though and I, Till yonder cloud – Good Hunting! – loose The rain that breaks our Water Truce. Joseph Rudyard Kipling, Nobel Prize winner in Literature in 1907 begins The Second Jungle Book with “The Law of the Jungle – which is by far the oldest law in the world – has arranged for almost every kind of accident that may befall the Jungle People, till now its code is as perfect as time and custom can make it.” He begins to explain how fear became in mythical ways and historically as the animals gather around the drought ridden land telling stories of the past. How did Sher Khan become the most feared predator of the land yet is cursed with the markings of the jungle as his ancestors betrayed a Truce between humans and animals long ago. “When ye say to Tabaqui, ‘My brother!’ when ye call the Hyena to meat, Ye may cry the Full Truce with Jacala – the Belly that runs on four feet” The Jungle Law, The Undertakers Each animal in turn talks about their point of view of the story and the things they remember. The drought is a difficult one…for humans as for the animals. They talk about men that were cave dwellers to men that came on boats and ships. They have learned to fear the men and their weapons. The drought will lead humans to the same water holes as the animals. Their council is wise and they must seek solutions before turning into savage beasts. Mowgli and our beloved animal friends Bagheera, Baloo and yes, even Kaa and Sher Khan are all aging. Kipling seemed to have a keen understanding of the process of appreciation for a life long lived as the animals so wisely speak of the things they have seen and done in their life, all the while needing to pass on their knowledge to the next generation. It is rather humbling how true and sincere these subtle nuances are expressed emphatically and gentle, yet they hit the mark precise and perfectly. Kipling moves on, interspersing songs, quotes and poems into the fabric of the novel. Each of them are food for thought that leads the reader with new clues down a new path of life and Mowgli’s story with a few other random ones featured as well. This particular edition had some old black and white prints, captioned with verse throughout the novel or at the beginning of chapters. For younger readers, there is a quiz and a glossary at the end of the book. I thought this was really a rather humbling novel. I have a dog that is aging right now, and the full circle of life is so well demonstrated in this novel and it’s happening right in front of my eyes…making it bitter sweet in my case. This novel has only 139 reviews on GR, which seems so underrated to me. I guess we all know the Jungle Book in one way or another from childhood or Disney movies and perhaps that is all most care to know. I myself included…until I just so picked up this book and what a surprise. Reading up on Kipling’s life and his works I realized that I have misjudged anything I knew before about the Jungle Book or its origins. Which was very little I have to say. I am sadly ashamed to have never actually read the original Jungle book but mostly the children’s illustrated versions when I was a kid or just browsing bookcases and glancing through. This needs to be mended on my part and I am intending to read some other works from this brilliant mind whose prose and voice are full of wisdom and simply brilliant. If you can set a stigma you may have of the popularized version of the Jungle Book aside and you want to read something classic that holds truth in the wisdom expressed through different kinds of living things and that makes you think, give this a try. No prior knowledge necessary. And after that, perhaps, try the first book. That’s what I am planning to do. Enjoy PS, I also have to admit that I saw parts of the newest movie of the Jungle Book the other day and loved it. Perhaps the best movie version I ever saw. It is part of what prompted me to just so pick this book up. Otherwise, I may never would have, but I am glad I did. As always, Happy Reading Pics and quotes to the book can be found here: https://scarlettreadzandrunz.com/midd...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    "The traitor Dark gives up each mark Of stretched or hooded claw; Then hear the Call: "Good rest to all That keep the Jungle Law!" ― Rudyard Kipling, The Second Jungle Book Sequels, especially YA sequels, seem destined to drop in quality. The first book sold well and was popular. There is a demand, I imagine, from fans and publishers to repeat a proven recipe. But the author's heart isn't in it. It sells, and usually sells well, but sucks. This is not that sequel. Sting once bragged that he could " "The traitor Dark gives up each mark Of stretched or hooded claw; Then hear the Call: "Good rest to all That keep the Jungle Law!" ― Rudyard Kipling, The Second Jungle Book Sequels, especially YA sequels, seem destined to drop in quality. The first book sold well and was popular. There is a demand, I imagine, from fans and publishers to repeat a proven recipe. But the author's heart isn't in it. It sells, and usually sells well, but sucks. This is not that sequel. Sting once bragged that he could "shit a pop song". I'm thinking Kipling could do the same with a short story. There just wasn't much drop in the quality and content from Jungle Book to the Second Jungle Book. So, in my mind, I don't even consider them to be separate works. I liked Kipling threading his poems between the stories. I also enjoyed Kipling not strictly sticking with the Jungle. 'Quiquern' a story of an Inuit boy and his dog reminded me a lot of Jack London (White Fang and Call of the Wild were both published almost a decade after). My favorite stories were: "Letting in the Jungle" "Red Dog" "The Miracle of Purun Bhagat"

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kenchiin

    A solid continuation to The Jungle Book, honestly I never thought I'd like this much a short-stories book, a solid 5!

  4. 4 out of 5

    MK

    Well-written tales. Mowgli tales are my favorite, they're all good, tho, Well-written tales. Mowgli tales are my favorite, they're all good, tho, Quiquern was the most difficult . Killing is in all the tales, but it was very vivid in that one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor

    A reread after some 60 or more years! I read it and its predecessor because my book club read Neil Gaiman's "The Graveyard Book" this month, and I was interested to see how his tribute to Kipling had borrowed from the Mowgli stories. "The King's Ankus" is a very striking predecessor of the ancient tomb under the hill and The Sleer in Gaiman's book. Kipling's language is reminiscent of the King James version of the Bible. It gives all the animals a dignity that is sadly lacking in most modern stor A reread after some 60 or more years! I read it and its predecessor because my book club read Neil Gaiman's "The Graveyard Book" this month, and I was interested to see how his tribute to Kipling had borrowed from the Mowgli stories. "The King's Ankus" is a very striking predecessor of the ancient tomb under the hill and The Sleer in Gaiman's book. Kipling's language is reminiscent of the King James version of the Bible. It gives all the animals a dignity that is sadly lacking in most modern stories with anthropomorphic animals. They are not cute: they kill to eat, they fight among themselves and with other species, and there is death. I had not remembered how powerful the stories were, and I can see why Gaiman wished to celebrate them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    MK

    This review is just for the audible from Trout Lake Media, read by Peter Batchelor, published 8/92016 (ASIN B01JWOHBVA). The book is incomplete, it's missing two tales - "The Spring Running" (a Mowgli tale) "The Outsong" (poem)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hank Hoeft

    Just as with The Jungle Book. Rudyard Kipling's Second Jungle Book is a mixed bag of stories, with the best being the tales of Mowgli. When he saw that I was reading SJB, a fraternity brother and fellow Goodreads member commented that "The King's Anku" read like a proto-Conan story, and I must say that story does have a heavy Robert E. Howard flavor to it, and obviously shows the influence Kipling had on Howard's writing. But Kipling's influence goes beyond REH; all the Mowgli stories are very m Just as with The Jungle Book. Rudyard Kipling's Second Jungle Book is a mixed bag of stories, with the best being the tales of Mowgli. When he saw that I was reading SJB, a fraternity brother and fellow Goodreads member commented that "The King's Anku" read like a proto-Conan story, and I must say that story does have a heavy Robert E. Howard flavor to it, and obviously shows the influence Kipling had on Howard's writing. But Kipling's influence goes beyond REH; all the Mowgli stories are very much like an Indian version of Tarzan--and I think it interesting that Kipling, who accepted without question the supremacy of White Anglo-Saxon culture, made his hero a native of India (while Edgar Rice Burroughs made his hero an Englishman). A final note: Anyone who has read and enjoyed Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book should check out Gaiman's original inspiration and source material, The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James

    Ultimately and overall a wonderful set of works. The second set of The Jungle Book, far better than the first, however, this is marked down, as, unlike Kim and The Man who would be King, which are one book respectively, Kipling chose to do a selection of short stories which, I feel diminishes these works.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Orinoco Womble (tidy bag and all)

    Again, I prefer the non-Mowgli stories. I'm afraid I've outgrown the Master of the Jungle (ha!). Reading it this time, I got the feeling that by the last story Kipling had too.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Yukiraking

    I would actually give this book a 4.5 star rating, as I liked it better than the first book, which I gave 4 stars, but didn't love all the stories. There were only two stories this time around that I didn't like as much, and gave one 3 stars, one 4 stars, while all others got a full 5 stars from me. All the stories with Mowgli in them got the full 5 stars : How Fear Came, Letting in the Jungle, The King Ankus, Red Dog, and finally The Spring Running. Only one story that didn't involve Mowgli (Qui I would actually give this book a 4.5 star rating, as I liked it better than the first book, which I gave 4 stars, but didn't love all the stories. There were only two stories this time around that I didn't like as much, and gave one 3 stars, one 4 stars, while all others got a full 5 stars from me. All the stories with Mowgli in them got the full 5 stars : How Fear Came, Letting in the Jungle, The King Ankus, Red Dog, and finally The Spring Running. Only one story that didn't involve Mowgli (Quiquern) got 5 stars, and the final two stories (The Miracle of Purun Bhagat (4 stars) and The Undertakers (3 stars)) were good, but didn't strike me with the same feelings. I love Mowgli and Baloo and Bagheera and Kaa. They're characters that have stuck with me since I was a little kid. Dad loves Rudyard Kipling's writing. He read us Just So Stories all the time, and talked about Bagheera and Shere Khan, and I remember loving to hear about them. So they hold a special place in my heart. I couldn't help but give them the full five stars, because they evoked such strong feelings within me, while also telling such fascinating stories about the laws of the jungle. The Miracle of Purun Bhagat was a good story. It was. It just wasn't what I wanted for a story in The Second Jungle Book. There were only a few animals involved, and far more people than necessary. It was the same in the first Jungle Book. The stories about the people were my least favourite, because they had nothing to do with the jungle, and more to do with civilization. That being said, Quiquern was mostly about people, and I loved it. It was also set near Baffin Island (if not on it, I was a little bit confused about that) and was about the Inuit people and though they were civilized, and it wasn't about animals, or the jungle, it was about nature. I didn't think it made sense to be a part of the collection of short stories, but I loved the story so much that I didn't care. It was like that with the one about the seals in the first book. It had nothing to do with the jungle either, and it was still one of my favourites. The Undertakers was about animals, but it was also about a small town, and Mugger eating people, and mostly I found it slow, hard to stay focused on, and less interesting than any other story. It's not that I hated it or anything. I just didn't love it. So, yeah. I loved most of this book. I would definitely recommend everyone that loved the Jungle Book movies (I've seen at least 3 different ones by now) to at least read the Mowgli stories, even if they're not interested in any of the others.

  11. 5 out of 5

    B. Zedan

    If you time it correctly, both Jungle Books can hit you perfectly at just the right age. I think that's how they were for me as a kid. The first is a great adventure story, and the second is a level up, sadder and about growing up and everything. I need to make two detours here, the first regarding why I needed to re-read it. About a year ago, this tree I loved was cut down. I'm kind of weird about plants, comes from growing up a loner with a well-wooded acre to play in. Anyway, I get in a fit ab If you time it correctly, both Jungle Books can hit you perfectly at just the right age. I think that's how they were for me as a kid. The first is a great adventure story, and the second is a level up, sadder and about growing up and everything. I need to make two detours here, the first regarding why I needed to re-read it. About a year ago, this tree I loved was cut down. I'm kind of weird about plants, comes from growing up a loner with a well-wooded acre to play in. Anyway, I get in a fit about how humans deal with nature, especially around here, where just about anything grows—except that nasty East coast stuff that just looks sad and out of place and never fills the area it was meant to, but is planted all over anyway. Now, I can't remember my thought process of a year ago, but somehow I dredged up a memory of a book I'd last read at least a decade before and remembered enough to find the right passage. It's just been percolating since then (After London had a bit to do with it) and with my mobile and Project Gutenberg I can indulge in my early chapter books with ease. Second: this book (especially in conjunction with the first) reminds me heavily of how (the movie) Labyrinth is and should have been. At the end of the second book, Kaa, Baloo, Bagheera and the four all pretty much tell Mowgli what Hoggle tells Sarah—that they'll always be there, "should you need us". But the end is so much more satisfying than Labyrinth, because Mowgli stayed in the jungle and became part of the jungle before "growing up" and "being a man", etc. How many of you were totally pissed that Sarah didn't stay with Jared? Most folks I know were. Imagine if she'd stayed there for a few years, raising her brother and finding herself (or whatever) and being the Goblin Queen, before returning to her parents and the human world. Mowgli, in talking with Akela a couple of years before the end of the book has this conversation: “I will never go. I will hunt alone in the Jungle. I have said it.” “After the summer come the Rains, and after the Rains comes the spring. Go back before thou art driven.” “Who will drive me?” “Mowgli will drive Mowgli. Go back to thy people. Go to Man.” “When Mowgli drives Mowgli I will go,” Mowgli answered. What if Sarah had waited until "Sarah drove Sarah"? Instead, (as Wikipedia gives us) "she must overcome [Jared] (and therefore this emotion) in order to fufil her quest." I don't know. Anyway, after that sweet and easy Kipling, I felt like going back to the Russians.

  12. 4 out of 5

    BooksAmL

    Until this year I was not aware that it was a second book to this story, so I was very excited to pick it up and read it. Little did I know that will so different and not have any connection with the previous one. It is such a short book but I had such a hard time reading it, not because is a bad story or told in a different way... no is in the same writing stile but is just strange people, I can not put it in words. I am pretty sure there are people that love this book , maybe my expectation f Until this year I was not aware that it was a second book to this story, so I was very excited to pick it up and read it. Little did I know that will so different and not have any connection with the previous one. It is such a short book but I had such a hard time reading it, not because is a bad story or told in a different way... no is in the same writing stile but is just strange people, I can not put it in words. I am pretty sure there are people that love this book , maybe my expectation for it were way to high, maybe I will re read it sometime and change my mind . I think what got me so sad and completely out of the mood to keep going was the fact that was no Mowgly in it (like how can it be a jungle book without him). If you can get over that (or know ahead of time) I am positive you will enjoy reading this book , because even for me at some parts I had to put it down to stop laughing. Please do not be discourage by this review is just my opinion and how I feel at this moment , but it is a very good book that will make you smile and enjoy the adventures of the jungle.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    For anyone who has loved the Mowgli stories of The Jungle Book, this sequel is a must-read. Mowgli has grown from being the little Man Cub to being Master of the Jungle; he is well on his way to becoming a man. Included are the stories of Mowgli destoying a village, fighting the wild red dogs, and finding an ancient treasure. Also, we have the stories of an old Brahmin holy man, a man-eating crocodile, and (as out of place as Kotick the White Seal in the first volume) an Inuit seal hunter. Mowgli For anyone who has loved the Mowgli stories of The Jungle Book, this sequel is a must-read. Mowgli has grown from being the little Man Cub to being Master of the Jungle; he is well on his way to becoming a man. Included are the stories of Mowgli destoying a village, fighting the wild red dogs, and finding an ancient treasure. Also, we have the stories of an old Brahmin holy man, a man-eating crocodile, and (as out of place as Kotick the White Seal in the first volume) an Inuit seal hunter. Mowgli was one of my favorite fictional heroes when I was a kid, and the stories are just as engaging to me now as they were then. Kipling is an amazing storyteller, and it's hard to believe that all of his Jungle laws and customs are only fiction. I want it to be real. It makes for great reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lacey Louwagie

    I don't have a ton to say about this book that I didn't already say about The Jungle Book. Again, it irritated me that random stories were thrown in with the Mowgli stories, except this time the random stories were not all together at the end; instead, they were interspersed with the Mowgli ones, so that it was more difficult to piece the Mowgli stories back together again. The Mowgli stories in this volume were longer and more sophisticated, the last story where Mowgli feels the pull of humanit I don't have a ton to say about this book that I didn't already say about The Jungle Book. Again, it irritated me that random stories were thrown in with the Mowgli stories, except this time the random stories were not all together at the end; instead, they were interspersed with the Mowgli ones, so that it was more difficult to piece the Mowgli stories back together again. The Mowgli stories in this volume were longer and more sophisticated, the last story where Mowgli feels the pull of humanity especially resonant. I tried to pay attention to the other stories and was only successful in the one about sled dogs. How can Kipling be so good in the jungle and so dull everywhere else? Even though I'm usually a stickler for reading things "in their original form," I would recommend folks interested in The Jungle Book to choose one of the "Mowgli stories" volumes instead.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Clinton King

    I first read these short stories a couple of years ago, but I just recently read some of them to my children. I enjoy them, but there were some complaints about how slow some of the stories seemed to move. If you liked the first Jungle Book, (which is still in print; this one isn't) you'll like this book, as well. Incidentally, the contrast between the Mowgli featured in most of the stories in this book and the Mowgli of Disney fame is even starker that it was in the first collection. In these s I first read these short stories a couple of years ago, but I just recently read some of them to my children. I enjoy them, but there were some complaints about how slow some of the stories seemed to move. If you liked the first Jungle Book, (which is still in print; this one isn't) you'll like this book, as well. Incidentally, the contrast between the Mowgli featured in most of the stories in this book and the Mowgli of Disney fame is even starker that it was in the first collection. In these stories, Mowgli becomes master of the jungle, is best friends with Kaa (the rock python), destroys the village that cast him and his foster mother out, and saves his pack from destruction. Anyway, just read it! Also, if you're interested, there is one more story (not in this book) of how Mowgli gets married and finds a place in British India. It's called, "In the Rukh".

  16. 5 out of 5

    Halley K

    In the beginning, this book was quite confusing for me. But as I read on, it became clearer and clearer what the theme of, not just Mowgli’s story, but other character’s stories was. Kipling, yet again, definitely didn’t miss the mark for me. Although, there are some sections in this book I found non-contributing to the plot line, I still think they were cute additions to the story, re-enforcing that theme of growth again. The best part about it? You don’t even need to read the first book. While In the beginning, this book was quite confusing for me. But as I read on, it became clearer and clearer what the theme of, not just Mowgli’s story, but other character’s stories was. Kipling, yet again, definitely didn’t miss the mark for me. Although, there are some sections in this book I found non-contributing to the plot line, I still think they were cute additions to the story, re-enforcing that theme of growth again. The best part about it? You don’t even need to read the first book. While, yes, I am a seasoned “Jungle Book” reader, this book does not require you to have read the first book. If you’ve seen the movies, or even if you haven’t, you’ll still understand this book just fine. Overall, a lovely read for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ebster Davis

    The structure of this book is really irritating because Mowgli's stories are mixed in with other animal stories. Some of the other stories are really good, but because they set up Mowgli's whole character arc so well they come across as annoying distractions. I like the whole primordial creation legend about tigers and humans. For me it sets Mowgli's later struggles in a different light because he doesn't have a proper adversary anymore, and he wants one. Instead he has to deal with the pettiness The structure of this book is really irritating because Mowgli's stories are mixed in with other animal stories. Some of the other stories are really good, but because they set up Mowgli's whole character arc so well they come across as annoying distractions. I like the whole primordial creation legend about tigers and humans. For me it sets Mowgli's later struggles in a different light because he doesn't have a proper adversary anymore, and he wants one. Instead he has to deal with the pettiness, prejudice, and loss. For most of this book, Mowgli doesn't identify as a man, but it's a very human struggle.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karolien

    To be honest, I liked the first jungle book better than the second. I understand what Kipling wanted to do but frankly it did not have the effect of the first. Kipling wanted to show how society could corrupt a child and become the nemesis of its previous friends. The verses in between the chapters were the best. I love poetry and even more the atmosphere it evokes. It was if the animals were chanting the rhymes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adelaida

    On the trail that thou must tread To the thresholds if our dread, Where the Flower blossoms red; Through the nights when thou shalt lie Prisoned from our Mother-sky, Hearing us, thy loves, go by; In the dawns when this shalt wake To the toil thou candy not break, Heartsick for the Jungle’s sake: *Wood and Water, Wind and Tree, Wisdom, Strenght, and Courtesy, Jungle-Favour go with thee!* The Second Jungle Book - Rudyard Kipling

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nora

    Noooo it's over!!!! Loved that this book had more stories with Mowgli and the squad, because those are my favorites! My favorite story was The King's Ankus, because Mowgli and Bagheera together is the best team! I also wished they had kept Kaa's character true to the books in the movies, because he's just so chill and the best bro. Overall, I liked this book better than the first. But I still want to know more about Mowgli's new life after that last story! ~ Nora

  21. 5 out of 5

    David

    There are a lot of editions and different compilations out there. The one I read had ONLY the non-Mowgli stories. Of those, I really like Rikki-Tikki-Tava and am pretty indifferent to the rest. The edition I read of the first book includes Rikki-Tikki-Tava and all of the wonderful Mowgli stories. My recommendation to non-completeists would be to find and read that edition, and skip the rest.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ketutar Jensen

    I love Rudy. The Second Jungle Book is like the first, with stories about Mowgli, and then about other things. Not all stories are from India. There's a lovely Inuit story, too. (In the first one we had the White Seal). There's also The Day's Work

  23. 5 out of 5

    Anne Boardman

    Although I loved The Jungle Book, this second series of stories felt a littl tacked together. In all fairness there were some interesting details wrapping up Mowgli’s story that I enjoyed. What is Kipling thinking when he throws in a story set in the Arctic in each book?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim O'neill

    Everyöne should read "The King's Ankus," an all-time great short story. The other Mowgli stories were pretty good, altho the last only worked as the final chapter in his book, which really should be published separately. The non-Mowgli-related stories failed to grab me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Marren

    The Second Jungle Book was a better read than the First Jungle Book. My heart quivered when Mogwli was separated from his family in the jungle. The non Mogwli stories were also interesting however I did not like that they were mixed with Mogwli stories. I read for #ReadKidsLit 2017

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jayal Yapa

    I've been in love with Kipling ever since I stumbled across Just So Stories as a kid. And this volume just serves to cement the infatuation. At the end, you're just left with this deep ache that he never intended to write a third Jungle Book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sigrid Fry-Revere

    For those of us who grew up with the Disney version -- this literally Part II of the movie. What I found interesting was the parts that weren't included in the Disney version. This was true of both the books.

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Drent

    I absolutely love these books. There's something about reading about talking animals before Disney gets a hold of them. I love the old disney cartoon but this book shows what the series was meant to be like.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lance

    Not as good as the first one. Obviously. They never are. But well worth the read! There are amazing short stories every other chapter which I enjoyed the most. Except the one with the characters under the bridge. Was just way to confusing so skipped it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    TroTro

    Loved it.

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