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Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time

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Se você já foi surpreendido por quão rápido o mundo está mudando, Scrum é uma das razões. Para aqueles que acreditam que deve haver uma maneira mais eficiente de se fazer as coisas, este é um livro sobre o processo de gestão que está mudando a maneira como vivemos. Desde o advento do método, já foram registrados ganhos de produtividade de até 1.200%. Tecida com insights de Se você já foi surpreendido por quão rápido o mundo está mudando, Scrum é uma das razões. Para aqueles que acreditam que deve haver uma maneira mais eficiente de se fazer as coisas, este é um livro sobre o processo de gestão que está mudando a maneira como vivemos. Desde o advento do método, já foram registrados ganhos de produtividade de até 1.200%. Tecida com insights de artes marciais, tomadas de decisão judicial, combate aéreo avançado, robótica e muitas outras disciplinas, Scrum é sempre fascinante. Seja para inventar uma tecnologia pioneira ou para estabelecer os alicerces de prosperidade de uma família.


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Se você já foi surpreendido por quão rápido o mundo está mudando, Scrum é uma das razões. Para aqueles que acreditam que deve haver uma maneira mais eficiente de se fazer as coisas, este é um livro sobre o processo de gestão que está mudando a maneira como vivemos. Desde o advento do método, já foram registrados ganhos de produtividade de até 1.200%. Tecida com insights de Se você já foi surpreendido por quão rápido o mundo está mudando, Scrum é uma das razões. Para aqueles que acreditam que deve haver uma maneira mais eficiente de se fazer as coisas, este é um livro sobre o processo de gestão que está mudando a maneira como vivemos. Desde o advento do método, já foram registrados ganhos de produtividade de até 1.200%. Tecida com insights de artes marciais, tomadas de decisão judicial, combate aéreo avançado, robótica e muitas outras disciplinas, Scrum é sempre fascinante. Seja para inventar uma tecnologia pioneira ou para estabelecer os alicerces de prosperidade de uma família.

30 review for Scrum: The Art of Doing Twice the Work in Half the Time

  1. 5 out of 5

    Romantical Skeptic

    Once I got over the extremely self-aggrandizing tone of the author, I found some of the points quite useful. Basically this is a way of operationalizing the 80/20 rule. Here are the things I took away from it: 1. Good team size. 4-6 is optimal, 20 is way too many. 2. Multitasking is a myth - people who think they’re good at it, actually are the worst. The truth is people are serial processing, not parallel, and it takes the brain longer to switch gears so all you’re doing is slow Once I got over the extremely self-aggrandizing tone of the author, I found some of the points quite useful. Basically this is a way of operationalizing the 80/20 rule. Here are the things I took away from it: 1. Good team size. 4-6 is optimal, 20 is way too many. 2. Multitasking is a myth - people who think they’re good at it, actually are the worst. The truth is people are serial processing, not parallel, and it takes the brain longer to switch gears so all you’re doing is slowing yourself down. 3. Prioritize based on how much the action will affect your goal (whether that goal is $ or something else) 4. Don’t be a D*ck: Managers need to have zero tolerance for incivility, disrespect, or abuse in the workplace – it actually sucks energy and makes everyone ineffective 5. Don’t waste your time looking for Evil People, look instead for Evil Systems 6. Construct your to do list as follows: To Do, Doing and Done 7. Don’t create Master Plans. Create Micro plans which you can do in time-limited sprints and then iterate. Things I found a bit weird - Given that what we’re essentially talking about are “human systems” and anything human, by definition, is messy and non-standard, I find it hard to believe that this method applies to EVERY BUSINESS EVER. This is what the author seems to suggest (and modestly, he also suggests that if it didn’t work for a business they weren’t doing it right). Hmmm… - The author also fails to mention any examples of where scrum failed even when applied “properly” – I would have liked a few real world examples to have been less “awesome” and go through what the iteration and tweaking process looks like while a company or organization is veering off the path - The author also fails to talk about the negative aspects of scrum – destabilizing to have plans change so often, difficult to redeploy assets to the right place. It would have made for a much more fair read to get the negative along with the positive so that leaders can make a fully informed decision when they choose to adopt scrum.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Sutherland

    After Ken Schwaber and I wrote "Software in 30 Days" I felt we didn't have enough stories about Scrum outside of software development. This book is for the general business reader in any domain. It also tells the personal story of how my 11 years as a fighter pilot and another 11 years as a medical school professor affected the development of Scrum and the writing of the Agile Manifesto.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I was trying to decide what to give this book as a rating. It wasn't what I was hoping for. I really don't want to hear how smart the creator is or how much better what he is doing is compared to other methodologies - what I want to hear is the nuts and bolts of how to make this idea work and what separates it from the rest of the herd. Frankly, nothing presented showed me any of what I was looking for. So it was going to be either a 3 (more or less neutral) or just pass by not giving any rating I was trying to decide what to give this book as a rating. It wasn't what I was hoping for. I really don't want to hear how smart the creator is or how much better what he is doing is compared to other methodologies - what I want to hear is the nuts and bolts of how to make this idea work and what separates it from the rest of the herd. Frankly, nothing presented showed me any of what I was looking for. So it was going to be either a 3 (more or less neutral) or just pass by not giving any rating at all. Until... the first review I see is a five - by the author. Now THAT made an impression on me. Note how I mentioned how smart the creator of scrum is trying to convince me he is? I am unimpressed by his creation at least as presented in this book (everything he is using can be found elsewhere - there is nothing new under the sun apparently), and then I am a bit put off by his hubris. I can only hope that a 1 can help the author find some humility because he seems to need some. And the rest of you passing out the free 5's... wow.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ali

    If you are interested in the historical context of scrum and want to read "around and about" it, this looks like a good book for you. But if you want to learn scrum this is not the book for you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katarina

    I had high expectations for this book, but it left me feeling kinda blah about it. Maybe I have business self-help book overload, I just wasn't blown away by this. The majority of the book got skimmed as I wasn't sucked into reading each word and looking for the gold nuggets, the magic bullet.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Elswick

    Although there are kernels of wisdom and good advice on how to be productive, I found it difficult and tedious to wade through the author's biographical background and the data supporting his theory. This would have made a really good magazine article; a book wasn't necessary.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jose Papo

    The book is basic for someone who already studies and practices Agile Methodologies for a long time. But the book deserves five stars because goes on the Why of Scrum, Why Scrum works and how it is adapted to the new realities of work in the 21st century. Some of the interesting topics: The origins of Scrum, Team principles, Waste management, The importance of priorities and time management and how this fits with 'estimation' and how to begin implementing Scrum in your team or org. So The book is basic for someone who already studies and practices Agile Methodologies for a long time. But the book deserves five stars because goes on the Why of Scrum, Why Scrum works and how it is adapted to the new realities of work in the 21st century. Some of the interesting topics: The origins of Scrum, Team principles, Waste management, The importance of priorities and time management and how this fits with 'estimation' and how to begin implementing Scrum in your team or org. So it's strongly recommended to beginner and intermediate users of Scrum. The book already have a Portuguese translation.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    This isn't a guide to Scrum per-se. Which is probably good, since there are lots of guides to scrum at the practices at varying levels of details. What this book does is talk help you understand the value of scrum through stories. There is an appendix of scrum practices at the end. The book is full of war stories (both literally and figuratively), and Sutherland is clearly proud of how he, his family, and organizations he has worked with, have applied scrum. Reading this book will help energize This isn't a guide to Scrum per-se. Which is probably good, since there are lots of guides to scrum at the practices at varying levels of details. What this book does is talk help you understand the value of scrum through stories. There is an appendix of scrum practices at the end. The book is full of war stories (both literally and figuratively), and Sutherland is clearly proud of how he, his family, and organizations he has worked with, have applied scrum. Reading this book will help energize you to use Scrum to help your team succeed. This is not the only book on Scum you need. But if you want motivation to explore more about Scrum, or if you have been practicing Scrum for a while and are looking for inspiration, give this book a read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Femina Ernest

    I can say , this is a "Myth & Rule Breaker" book. It is a revolution-creating , trend setting , thought-provoking , boldly truth spreading , Modern SDLC patterned , long - awaited successful-system-for-work telling Book. Jeff's metaphor for Scrum " Careful alignment, unity of purpose, and clarity of goal come together" proves that, he really spent worth-time to interrogate , analyse our present organisational system by "looking at how people ACTUALLY work, rather than how they SAY they work" I can say , this is a "Myth & Rule Breaker" book. It is a revolution-creating , trend setting , thought-provoking , boldly truth spreading , Modern SDLC patterned , long - awaited successful-system-for-work telling Book. Jeff's metaphor for Scrum " Careful alignment, unity of purpose, and clarity of goal come together" proves that, he really spent worth-time to interrogate , analyse our present organisational system by "looking at how people ACTUALLY work, rather than how they SAY they work" :) I agree with some of his well defined strategies for win-win state , like Happiness Metric , Make Everything Visible ( Transparency , Delivering happiness , Inspect and adapt , Sprint Style of working etc. If you really let me to review and speak about this book , I can say on and on and on.... But , some books we have tot REALLY read , chew , swallow and follow ;). This is one among them... Great Book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shaw

    Five enthusiastic stars for Scrum. I wish I had read this book a long time ago. While a large part of this book is the "why" of Scrum, there is enough "how" in here to get you started, even though it does just scratch the surface. I dare you to read this book and not want to look for more resources online to help you implement Scrum. Whether you are managing a team of engineers, writing a book, or planning a wedding, Scrum can have a profound impact on your ability to complete a project on time Five enthusiastic stars for Scrum. I wish I had read this book a long time ago. While a large part of this book is the "why" of Scrum, there is enough "how" in here to get you started, even though it does just scratch the surface. I dare you to read this book and not want to look for more resources online to help you implement Scrum. Whether you are managing a team of engineers, writing a book, or planning a wedding, Scrum can have a profound impact on your ability to complete a project on time as well as allow you to harness the power of your team's talent. This book and the Scrum methodology represents a real world example of the principals discussed in Multipliers.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    This is not a Scrum how-to book. Rather, the story of its making and its philosophy. The concepts are highly adaptable to not just software, business, but everyday life as well. He talks of how to increase productivity of teams by improving communication, eliminating waste, and continuous improvement. I especially liked the idea is that team happiness is the greatest predictor of success. I enjoyed the conversational style and the positive, inclusive attitude.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stijn Zanders

    Most valuable book in a long time! Besides that it is an easy and quick read. Don't see any reason not to read it ;)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Maksym Lysak

    A must read for people and teams who cares about their productivity. Key takeaways for me: 1. Great teams are: transcendent (alignment with a higher purpose), cross-functional (have all skills to complete the project), autonomous (influence planning and decision-making process, freedom to decide "how" to deliver). Optimal size 7 (+-2) 2. Iterate fast. Plan => Do => Check => Act. Week or two for each iteration (Sprint). At the end of the iteration have some version of the produ A must read for people and teams who cares about their productivity. Key takeaways for me: 1. Great teams are: transcendent (alignment with a higher purpose), cross-functional (have all skills to complete the project), autonomous (influence planning and decision-making process, freedom to decide "how" to deliver). Optimal size 7 (+-2) 2. Iterate fast. Plan => Do => Check => Act. Week or two for each iteration (Sprint). At the end of the iteration have some version of the product/feature that you can give to your customers to play with and interact. 3. Productivity: Multitasking makes everybody slower. Half-done things create a lot of waste. Avoid to have a lot "in process tasks". Working too hard/long hours makes you less productive in a long run. Focus is a key (switching cost between projects is very high) 4. Scrum Process: - don't plan a lot. Just have a vision (picture where you're heading) - create a list of everything that needs to be done on the project. Prioritize it (start with highest value and the lowest effort tasks) - create a plan to keep your team busy for the next iteration/Sprint (plan it together with team). - visualize. have a board with: Priorities (Backlog/user stories), to do, doing, done columns. - work is a Story: think who you're doing it for, what is it, why the need it. - estimate tasks (stories) complexity relatively (not absolutely), groupdecide on that, track team's velocity and set ambitious goals; - meet every day for 15 min at the same time to update a) what each member done yesterday and b) going to do today to successfully complete the Sprint, c) are there any obstacles? - finish each Sprint with demo (involve stakeholders, customers) - make a Sprint retrospective (what went right, what could have gone better, how to improve the process and make everybody happier during the next Sprint (kaizen)) - transparency in everything

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Fürstenau

    Well, a book about Scrum from the father of Scrum. It is not a book for beginners and it is not a book for experts (are there any books for experts at all?) If you are in the HA state of using/implementing agile, you or team members tend to ask things like "Can we skip this?" or "Can we change this to that?". This book explains the answer to these questions by stating why something is defined like it it is now. All in all a great and amusing audio book Well, a book about Scrum from the father of Scrum. It is not a book for beginners and it is not a book for experts (are there any books for experts at all?) If you are in the HA state of using/implementing agile, you or team members tend to ask things like "Can we skip this?" or "Can we change this to that?". This book explains the answer to these questions by stating why something is defined like it it is now. All in all a great and amusing audio book which I highly recommend.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Romans Karpelcevs

    I already knew quite a lot about Scrum, but it was an interesting short read nonetheless. I forgot some things I learned years ago, and this book served both as reminder and gave me a few new ideas to try. I was surprised to learn Scrum was inspired by Lean, including waste elimination, reducing WIP, all that. The book is a bit overpromising, though, and doesn't mention challenges or overcoming them. It's mostly about selling the idea than about any advanced implementation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robert Lintzen

    I was familiar with the basics of SCRUM and some of the terminology but to read about the origins and the ideas behind it is very impressive. I'm definitely going to use the theory in my daily life!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Francisca Painhas

    One of the most useful books I read, it explores the foundations and principles that make scrum work so successfully, and how it applies not only to the purpose it was created but to most fields.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hennessey

    Get ‘er Done! I LOVED THIS BOOK! Once again, I did the audio / kindle split. However, this time, I utilized Overdrive, the free online public library app - it is AMAZING. I signed up for 3 local libraries online; got my library cards and was off to the races. If you have not tried Overdrive, check it out. There were so many take aways in this book that I absolutely loved. I should probably go back through the book before writing this, but historically, if I do not write now, it won’t get done Get ‘er Done! I LOVED THIS BOOK! Once again, I did the audio / kindle split. However, this time, I utilized Overdrive, the free online public library app - it is AMAZING. I signed up for 3 local libraries online; got my library cards and was off to the races. If you have not tried Overdrive, check it out. There were so many take aways in this book that I absolutely loved. I should probably go back through the book before writing this, but historically, if I do not write now, it won’t get done. By far, my favorite chapter was chapter 3 Teaming. On so many levels, this chapter hit so many points that I really believe. Overall, in reading this book, it made me reflect on the organizations where I have worked - at our best, we had similar “business practices” - transparency, KNOWN priorities, a cadence to re-address work that needed to be done, etc. This book provides a framework to systemized this, or not leave it to chance. I do intend to go back through the book and draft my notes to operationalize the concepts. I believe this book could be a GAME-CHANGER for any organizations. **Almost forgot, I really loved chapter 9 and the stories of how teachers in Denmark are using Scrum as a teach tool - or said differently, a co-creative / collaborative teaching environment where EVERYONE is involved in the Teaching. Whoever is doing the most talking, is also doing the most learning. I recommend this book to leaders and practitioners at EVERY level. Enjoy - Share - Learn TEAMS!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shubhra

    Very well written and engaging! For those who already know about scrum, this book would be a delight. It elaborates the intention behind the processes followed in Scrum rather than just the technique for the sake. If you follow scrum or intend to, this should be your first book to understand the idea. You can drill down on the details later. A must read for managers and CEOs!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    Shared at my office that i liked the concepts (they are applicable not only at my work but also my personal projects, great) and was asked to prepare a presentation (mid January) so decided to listen to the book for the second time. Will also check an ebook version of it just before the presentation. If i had to present on all the books i went through, my rate of material retention would have been much MUCH higher :)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz Nalepa

    This is one of the worst book I've read lately. It is packed full of my personal most hated characteristic: self-righteousness. It is also poorly translated, and it presents the Scrum as the best thing that happened since the decalog... I hate this narration, and I am sick of reading how Jeff single handedly invented Scrum, MVP and probably entire IT industry. Seriously, I can't recall any occurrence of Ken Schwaber in the entire book. Seriously, after reading this book I would be convinced that This is one of the worst book I've read lately. It is packed full of my personal most hated characteristic: self-righteousness. It is also poorly translated, and it presents the Scrum as the best thing that happened since the decalog... I hate this narration, and I am sick of reading how Jeff single handedly invented Scrum, MVP and probably entire IT industry. Seriously, I can't recall any occurrence of Ken Schwaber in the entire book. Seriously, after reading this book I would be convinced that he invented it all by himself (IT industry included). I have been a Scrum Master for 5 years now, and when I see a book that presents the Scrum not only as THE silver bullet, but also as the one and only truth (bow down blasphemers!) I want to put this bullet into my own head. Did I also mentioned the poor translations already? One more "zespół wskroś funkcjonalny" and I will throw up my last month's breakfast. There was even wrong form of Alfred Nobel's name ("z Nagrody Nobela"). Ok, emotions aside - there are three reasons why this book is rated by me as two stars (barely), and not one: - I save one star for the books I am not able to finish (it was a close miss) - This book mentioned eduScrum - If you have absolutely no idea at all, what Scrum is, you may try it Otherwise I recommend that you stay away and do something more productive instead. Count the grains of salt in your kitchen, check how long you can run in circles, or check how many times Gandalf nods his head in the Gandalf Europop Nod video on famous video portal.

  22. 5 out of 5

    BLACK CAT

    Work in small teams (max 17). Sprint: demo/build something that works in a small timeframe. Let the experts choose the way the problem will be solved. This almost opposite from the waterfall model. Daily standup: quick tasks and blocks of the day. Do one thing at a time. Don't do half of something, complete it and release it. User stories: define briefly the "what". INVEST criteria. Epic: collection of small stories. Planning poker not hours. Quantify Work in small teams (max 17). Sprint: demo/build something that works in a small timeframe. Let the experts choose the way the problem will be solved. This almost opposite from the waterfall model. Daily standup: quick tasks and blocks of the day. Do one thing at a time. Don't do half of something, complete it and release it. User stories: define briefly the "what". INVEST criteria. Epic: collection of small stories. Planning poker not hours. Quantify/measure happiness. Visibility in everything. Keep improving, always. Prioritize with your vision in mind. What will deliver the most value or money with the least effort - prioritize. Product owner: decides the work and owns the backlog. The what. The customer poor of view. Minimum viable product iterate with customer feedback. Keywords: Toyota, kaizen, MIT media lab, rugby, waterfall, iterate, lean production, Definition of done.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ayelet

    Scrum isn't just for developers. This book really made me think about how I try to multitask- and why I really can't-- and how I can work more efficiently to get more done, faster.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josh Steimle

    Quite possibly the most important business book I've ever read, in terms of making a tangible impact on how I run my business, and how I want to run my life.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Henrik Haapala

    Contents: 1. The way the world works is broken 2. The origins of Scrum 3. Teams 4. Time 5. Waste is a crime 6. Plan reality, not fantasy 7. Happiness 8. Priorities 9. Change the world Appendix: implementing Scrum – how to begin Autonomy Bandwagon effect Backlog Burn down chart Complex adaptive system Cone of uncertainty Daily stand-ups Delphi method Fundamental attribution error Halo effect< Contents: 1. The way the world works is broken 2. The origins of Scrum 3. Teams 4. Time 5. Waste is a crime 6. Plan reality, not fantasy 7. Happiness 8. Priorities 9. Change the world Appendix: implementing Scrum – how to begin Autonomy Bandwagon effect Backlog Burn down chart Complex adaptive system Cone of uncertainty Daily stand-ups Delphi method Fundamental attribution error Halo effect Happiness Happiness metric “Happy bubbles” Incremental development and delivery Muda = waste through outcomes Mura = waste through inconsistency Muri = waste through unreasonableness Shu Ha Ri, levels of mastery Sprint Teams Toyota production system Waterfall method (Gantt) “We had information that could have stopped 9/11. It was sitting there and was not acted upon… I haven’t seen them correct the problems… we might be in the 22nd century before we get the 21 st-century technology.” Senator Patrick Leahy “It is not an exaggeration that in a low-growth period such waste is a crime against society more than a business loss. Eliminating waste must be a business first objective.” Main takeaways: • OODA – loop (Google it): Observe, Orient, Decide, Act • Special Operations Force or “A-team” with 12 people, small autonomous groups effective • W. Edwards Deming, PDCA cycle: Plan, Do, Check, Act • Planning poker/Fibonacci • Loss to Context Switching, don’t multitask, one thing at a time (p.91) • Look at what is wrong with the systems • We are bad at estimating time energy and effort a project will take but we can estimate it relative to something else: what size dog is it? • Using Scrum in education • 4 chunks: “But the research is fairly clear that we can only remember four “chunks” of data.” 60 • Happiness drop precedes drop in velocity • Velocity x time = delivery • Half done is not done • Work is a story: “As an X, I want Y, so that Z” • Know your velocity: every team should know how much work they can get done each sprint • Set audacious goals • Demo or die: at the end of a sprint something done • Inspect and adapt: check now and then what you have done and if it can be done better • Scrum board: table with columns backlog, to do, in progress, in review/Q&A, done; rows User story 1, user story 2, user story 3 etc. Books mentioned: • “The Toyota production system” Ohno • “Quality Software Management” Weinberg • “Induction: Processes of inference, Learning, and Discovery” Holland • “Mythical Man-Month” Brooks

  26. 4 out of 5

    John

    TL;DR: This is a great book to get anyone involved in business, education, or other group-based activities to think about how they self-organize. Let me say from the start that I really enjoyed this book. There are some true gems throughout, and I have found myself pondering their application in my own life since I finished it. On one hand, I don't want to necessarily list those ideas out, as I think doing so might undercut Sutherland's goal (he wants you to buy the book). On the othe TL;DR: This is a great book to get anyone involved in business, education, or other group-based activities to think about how they self-organize. Let me say from the start that I really enjoyed this book. There are some true gems throughout, and I have found myself pondering their application in my own life since I finished it. On one hand, I don't want to necessarily list those ideas out, as I think doing so might undercut Sutherland's goal (he wants you to buy the book). On the other hand, I have to provide some examples or else I won't be able to convince you, the potential reader, to read his work. I will use just one as a way to navigate that difficulty. Sutherland did a great job of convincing me that it is better to concentrate on one task at a time rather than a multitude of them. He did so through his ability to apply research to a concept and then argue for his view on that topic. He also did so through his engaging anecdotes that drove home how and why he is right. His stories about those who try to multitask really hit home, as I too have been guilty of trying to juggle five or more things at one time. Today I tried out his methods for avoiding the pitfall of trying too many things at once. I got quite a bit done, so this is very much to his credit as a writer and thinker. Kudos to him. So why have I awarded only three stars? Well, it's complicated. I want to give the book three and a half, but Goodreads doesn't allow that. The half deduction from my personal 'good' score (five stars are reserved only for truly magnificent works) is because his book follows the aforementioned pattern, which is as follows. First, he proposes an idea, sometimes in vague terms ('Scrum can do amazing things for accelerating the pace of your work'). He then tells an engaging story about that idea. These stories were the best part of my read since they kept me rolling along; I'm a sucker for good narration in any book, but it especially works well when discussing topics like the organization of business. Third, he recounts his points. This is to the good since it gives his reader a summary of the material he has presented. Sutherland is really good at conveying talking points so that his book is readily accessible for any group ready to jump into his methods. I hope you can see it's that first point that nettles me a bit. I'm an English teacher, so I want to see the thesis presented and pinned down with specific language at some point. It's that vagueness that gets me a bit, especially since Sutherland relegates some of the main points of the book to the appendix, a fact I really struggled to understand as I read the work. Since the appendix is a bulleted list that is three pages long, I feel confident that he could have worked these ideas into the body, thereby improving the flow of his work. He had great points throughout the body of the book, so why put the true methodology at the end? Why not just work those in and then recount them later? He did this in some places, but I found a lot of 'see the appendix for the full details' in his writing. Keep in mind that for a book like this, my critique boils down to both personal preference and the training in my profession. Sutherland is writing in a genre I don't often read, so this could well just be a gripe that bugs me. I want to emphasize that fact because there is (again) some really great, thought-provoking information in this book for those willing to seek it. It was certainly compelling enough for me to burn through the book in two nights, so I think it is worth a try for anyone out there on the fence about the subject.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aleya

    I started reading this because I'd heard that the city I work for was going to start using scrum for projects. I wanted to get ahead and figure out what the fuss was all about. Now I know. Luckily not long after I started reading this book I got put on a scrum team. So, as I was reading I was actively using the scrum method to help my library with a project. Scrum has already shown itself to be a huge impact. It pushes teams to do their best and work to ensure things get done. It allows a diffus I started reading this because I'd heard that the city I work for was going to start using scrum for projects. I wanted to get ahead and figure out what the fuss was all about. Now I know. Luckily not long after I started reading this book I got put on a scrum team. So, as I was reading I was actively using the scrum method to help my library with a project. Scrum has already shown itself to be a huge impact. It pushes teams to do their best and work to ensure things get done. It allows a diffusion of the organization structure that can keep people from doing what needs to be done. There are a ton of great things within this book. I loved that he gave stories to demonstrate how the processes were to work and what they've done for different companies. He started with why we need scrum and that made me want to immediately start using it. It's such a great way to get a team project going. I'm glad I've had the opportunity to be part of a scrum team. I hope to be part of many more in the future. I feel that scrum will impact the world in new and amazing ways.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yaser Awan

    A lot of books about methodologies are too execution oriented, focusing too much on the how. This book on the other hand spends 90% effort on giving an insight into philosophy of scrum. It was enlightening to see Jeff write from heart and really explain the “why” not just for the naysayers but equally important for believers and evangelists. The book not just explains the product scenario but also gives a couple of examples on the project side (though it also goes beyond technology endeavours th A lot of books about methodologies are too execution oriented, focusing too much on the how. This book on the other hand spends 90% effort on giving an insight into philosophy of scrum. It was enlightening to see Jeff write from heart and really explain the “why” not just for the naysayers but equally important for believers and evangelists. The book not just explains the product scenario but also gives a couple of examples on the project side (though it also goes beyond technology endeavours that are using scrum). Like any project though you will need some convincing and education at client end to go for the suggested ways. On product side though there is no doubt that Scrum isn’t just the best way to deliver products but equally important for a healthy culture in an organisation.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anastasiia Plishkanovska

    Quite a nice read. It put all my knowledge of Scrum together and gave complex understanding of methodology. I appreciated especially the way it was written, simple, straight to the point and concise. I think it's a must read even if you are not going to implement Scrum and just want to organise processes more efficiently in your company. It definitely sparked my interest to try it out and adapt to different teams.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Denny Yusuf

    A great book about Scrum. If you're a practitioner of Scrum, besides the eye-opening how-to-use knowledge, reading this book will give you more confidence using Scrum with brilliantly describing the reason why every element of Scrum exists.

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