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Asterix Obelix and Co.: Album #23

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Watch out! Julius Caesar has devised his most cunning attack yet on the indomitable Gauls. He has sent Caius Preposterus, a graduate of the Latin School of Economics, to corrupt them by introducing big business into their little town. But will wealth and success bring the Gauls happiness...or trouble?


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Watch out! Julius Caesar has devised his most cunning attack yet on the indomitable Gauls. He has sent Caius Preposterus, a graduate of the Latin School of Economics, to corrupt them by introducing big business into their little town. But will wealth and success bring the Gauls happiness...or trouble?

30 review for Asterix Obelix and Co.: Album #23

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Obélix et Compagnie = Obelix and Co. (Astérix #23), René Goscinny, Albert Uderzo Obelix and Co. is the twenty-third volume of the Asterix comic book series, by René Goscinny (stories) and Albert Uderzo (illustrations). The book's main focus is on the attempts by the Gaul-occupying Romans to corrupt the one remaining village that still holds out against them by instilling capitalism. It is also the penultimate volume written by Goscinny before his death in 1977; his final volume, Asterix in Belgiu Obélix et Compagnie = Obelix and Co. (Astérix #23), René Goscinny, Albert Uderzo Obelix and Co. is the twenty-third volume of the Asterix comic book series, by René Goscinny (stories) and Albert Uderzo (illustrations). The book's main focus is on the attempts by the Gaul-occupying Romans to corrupt the one remaining village that still holds out against them by instilling capitalism. It is also the penultimate volume written by Goscinny before his death in 1977; his final volume, Asterix in Belgium, was released after his death in 1979. Julius Caesar sends Caius Preposterus, a bright young graduate of the Latin school of Economics, to corrupt the indomitable Gauls by introducing them to big business. Obelix's menhir trade is soon thriving, backed by a heavy advertising campaign - but does wealth bring happiness? And what will happen when the bottom falls out of the menhir market? تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز سی ام ماه می سال 2009 میلادی عنوان: اوبلیکس و شرکا: ماجراهای آستریکس و ابلیکس کتاب 23؛ نویسنده: رنه گوسینی؛ داستان‌های این مجموعه در دهکده‌ ای از مردمان «گل» روی میدهد که در برابر اشغال رومی‌ها مبارزه می‌کنند. پس از درگذشت «گوسینی» در سال 1977 میلادی و تا سال 2009 میلادی، «اودرزو» نگارش داستان کتاب‌ها را نیز خود بردوش گرفت. در ماه دسامبر سال 2008 میلادی، «اودرزو» امتیاز مجموعه «اَستِریکس» را، به شرکت «اشت» واگذار کردند. از آن زمان تا کنون دو کتاب دیگر از این مجموعه منتشر شده‌ است که توسط «ژان ایو فری» نوشته شده و توسط «دیدیه کنراد» ترسیم شده‌ اند. کتاب‌های اَستِریکس در ایران هم توسط انتشارات «سامر» و ... به چاپ رسیده است. ا. شربیانی ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    Another one of my favourites. Financial whiz kid Caius Preposterus has the bright idea of subverting the Gauls through money. His plan is simple - buy up as many menhirs as the Gauls can make at exorbitant prices, so that they will not have the time or the inclination to bash Romans, and the rich lifestyle will make them decadent. Then make a demand for the utterly useless thing by appealing to the vanity of the people, and sell them off at a profit - thus making a killing both way. Things work f Another one of my favourites. Financial whiz kid Caius Preposterus has the bright idea of subverting the Gauls through money. His plan is simple - buy up as many menhirs as the Gauls can make at exorbitant prices, so that they will not have the time or the inclination to bash Romans, and the rich lifestyle will make them decadent. Then make a demand for the utterly useless thing by appealing to the vanity of the people, and sell them off at a profit - thus making a killing both way. Things work fine until more people get into the menhir-making bandwagon: then it all takes a startlingly familiar turn. I loved the satire at the expense of global finance. Especially the panel where Caius Preposterus explains to Ceasar the method of marketing menhirs using a flip chart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    One of the few missing from my dad's collection when I was a kid, I only had a few pages to go on. Here is one of the few instances where there's actually a decent plan to take down the Gauls...this time, revolving around commerce, and the menhir. A Roman economist tells JC (Julius Caesar) that they could keep the Gauls distracted from fighting by making them ruled by coin...ergo, the menhir trade takes off, Obelix becomes wealthy, everyone works for him or makes their own menhirs, which Asterix One of the few missing from my dad's collection when I was a kid, I only had a few pages to go on. Here is one of the few instances where there's actually a decent plan to take down the Gauls...this time, revolving around commerce, and the menhir. A Roman economist tells JC (Julius Caesar) that they could keep the Gauls distracted from fighting by making them ruled by coin...ergo, the menhir trade takes off, Obelix becomes wealthy, everyone works for him or makes their own menhirs, which Asterix sees right through, and convinces Getafix he has it under control. The Romans think they're winning, but in the end, it devalues the Roman economy, and once again the Gauls have the last laugh. It's nice to see Obelix get more focus, and he even has a birthday, where the village lets him thump all the Romans from one new camp all on his own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suzannah

    Apparently Preposterus in this album is a caricature of the French politician Jacques Chirac! Twice in the Asterix series, Goscinny and Uderzo tackled economics, and in each case the result was one of the very best albums in the series (the other is, of course, ASTERIX AND THE CAULDRON). In this series, Caesar tries to corrupt the little village of Gaulish madmen using capitalism to make them decadent. The only problem is, the village's economy runs pretty much on menhirs and wild boar, and menhi Apparently Preposterus in this album is a caricature of the French politician Jacques Chirac! Twice in the Asterix series, Goscinny and Uderzo tackled economics, and in each case the result was one of the very best albums in the series (the other is, of course, ASTERIX AND THE CAULDRON). In this series, Caesar tries to corrupt the little village of Gaulish madmen using capitalism to make them decadent. The only problem is, the village's economy runs pretty much on menhirs and wild boar, and menhirs are not only useless, they also last forever. What results is a breezy little satire in which, once Asterix catches on to the Romans' plan, he gleefully grasps what Caesar does not: the artificial government-sponsored menhir bubble can't last forever. Not only do the Gauls learn that a little with contentment is better than riches with strife, but they also exploit the Romans' mercantilist policies against them. It's an absolute delight.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    I never did understand what the menhirs were actually good for. I guess that's the joke.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tehanu

    I don't understand how I forgot to review this one here. So far my absolute favorite! The genius of Goscinny is that he makes us believe that this stuff almost writes itself. The humor is so effortless and at the same time so earned by the characters and settings. I'm really loving this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Simon Chadwick

    When I was a child a trip to the library meant a beeline to the low-lying shelf that, if you were lucky, would have an Asterix book or two. I discovered many a fantastic tale there, and years later I’ve steadily been rediscovering them by buying the modern re-coloured versions published by Orion. I’m finally up to what couled be, quite possibly, my favourite, so thought I’d share it, just on the off-chance you’d never come across it yourself. From the outset, the very title stands this book aside When I was a child a trip to the library meant a beeline to the low-lying shelf that, if you were lucky, would have an Asterix book or two. I discovered many a fantastic tale there, and years later I’ve steadily been rediscovering them by buying the modern re-coloured versions published by Orion. I’m finally up to what couled be, quite possibly, my favourite, so thought I’d share it, just on the off-chance you’d never come across it yourself. From the outset, the very title stands this book aside from all the others in the series as the focus is very much on Asterix’s rotund friend Obelix. If you’re not aware of quite who Obelix is all you need to know is that he’s very fat, he delivers menhirs, and that he fell in the cauldron of magic potion as a baby so is immensely strong. The book opens with the Roman camp of Totorum in a very relaxed attitude. So afraid of the local Gauls that they rarely stray from the walls, they instead pass their days within the safety of the fort in a very casual manner whilst waiting for their relief, which, when it arrives, comes with a centurion keen to make a mark for himself and who is disgusted by those his small force is replacing. The new Romans head straight for the Gaulish village, but because they’ve been spied in advance Asterix has arranged a little birthday surprise for Obelix and gives the entire garrison to him and him alone. Delighted, Obelix makes mincemeat of them all and the Romans return to Totorum to wait for their relief. To Caesar the Gauls are an impossible task until a young man by the man of Preposterus, from the Latin School of Economics, suggests that they can beat the Gauls with commerce. By tying them up in the knots of supply and demand they’ll be too busy to think about fighting. So Preposterus is duly sent with plenty of gold to break the Gauls, and the first Gaul he encounters is Obelix delivering one of his menhirs upon his back. After a brief and somewhat confused exchange Preposterus presents himself as a menhir buyer and that he needs stock. So Obelix begins to supply, and every time he delivers the price appears to rise and the quantity increase so in no time at all Obelix is employing staff to assist and men from the village to hunt boar. Suddenly he’s the richest man in the village and other villagers decide they want in on the act, and true to Preposterus’s word, the Gaul’s are soon tied up in a competitive race to supply menhirs. Asterix, and the druid Getafix, watch from sidelines bemused. Inevitably it all needs to come to a head as saturation point is reached. So why is this possibly the greatest Asterix book ever? It’s a brilliant study of uncontrolled greed, unchecked capitalism, and one-upmanship. It’s told in such a clever way that I got it as an eight-year-old, but what really makes it are the brilliant character studies and repeating beats of the humour that drive on the farce throughout the book. Whether that’s the recently broken Romans slowly becoming more and more blasé about the ‘big fat brute’ that so recently pummelled them, or the skewed language of business parroted down from one new expert to the next, or the absurd finery the villagers end up adopting to cement their status, it’s all great, and it’s all delivered with a brilliantly tight and witty script and some of Uderzo’s finest panels. If you’ve never indulged yourself with an Asterix book before then this isn’t a bad place to begin. It’ll tick all the boxes and I guarantee you’ll be smiling.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vanja Antonijevic

    Excellent story with...wait for it... an actual message. That's right, it's a comic strip with a goal in mind. But what is the goal? Answer: Marxism. Well, this may be gowing a bit too far, but as Wiki notes: " -The book is a parody of capitalism as, while Obelix could hunt boar before, he begins to overwork for the purpose of buying them (and ridiculous clothing). This pointless circle of money is something Obelix never understands in the first place, when all this stress could be prevented by sim Excellent story with...wait for it... an actual message. That's right, it's a comic strip with a goal in mind. But what is the goal? Answer: Marxism. Well, this may be gowing a bit too far, but as Wiki notes: " -The book is a parody of capitalism as, while Obelix could hunt boar before, he begins to overwork for the purpose of buying them (and ridiculous clothing). This pointless circle of money is something Obelix never understands in the first place, when all this stress could be prevented by simply hunting and living the simple life like before. -Capitalism is also looked at as pointless through the fact that the only thing being bought serves no practical purpose, as a menhir is simply a large stone. -When the makers of Roman menhirs are banned from selling their stock, they block the Roman roads in protest at the loss of their jobs. This is a common tactic by French strikers. " The Wiki summary: "After Obelix single-handedly defeats the newly-arrived Romans from the camp of Totorum as a birthday present, Caesar once again ponders with any possibility to take down the rebellious Gaulish village. A Roman know-it-all known as Preposterus has been studying economics. He proposes to integrate the Gauls into the stream of capitalism. For that purpose he moves into the camp of Totorum and proceeds to make the acquaintance of Obelix, who is carrying a menhir through the forest. Preposterus claims to be a menhir buyer, and buys every menhir Obelix can make, on the pretext that a rich man is a powerful man. Obelix begins by making and delivering a single menhir a day, but when Preposterus demands more menhirs in exchange for more money, Obelix hires other villagers to help him make menhirs and hunt boar so he can eat. Although he tries to include Asterix in this, he will have no part of Obelix's corporation. This corporation later includes a cart-and-oxen with which to deliver half-a-dozen menhirs to the camp in one go. Obelix's workload also means that he neglects Dogmatix. Obelix's increasing wealth causes problems for the village men, whose wives reproach them for not matching his success. Obelix himself shows off this wealth by wearing ostentatious clothes..." Other Wiki Notes: "-The character of Preposterus is a parody of French politician Jacques Chirac, who was, at that time, Prime Minister under President Valéry Giscard d'Estaing, and was himself President of the Republic from 1995 to 2007. Laurel and Hardy make an appearance as Roman legionaries in the comic. -When, on page 2, the Romans leave the camp, two of the legionaries are carrying a drunk on a shield. The bearers are Goscinny and Uderzo themselves and the drunk is their friend Pierre Tchernia. - In this story, camp life for the Roman legionaries is shown as very undisciplined. In other Asterix adventures they are usually clean-shaven and well-organised, but here the men's faces are covered in stubble and life is easy-going to the point of anarchy. This laxity is reflected in the watchtower guard who becomes increasingly dishevelled with every appearance. "

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jerome

    The Romans decide to use Obelix’s notoriously useless menhir business against him: a Roman agent arrives at the Roman camp and persuades Obelix to sell him menhirs at high prices, in hopes that the new flow of wealth and prestige will create competition and jealousy that will eventually corrupt and undermine the village. The resulting boom in the previously non-existent menhir trade creates a wide array of amusing problems for both the Gauls and the Romans. A hilarious tale with a clear lesson ab The Romans decide to use Obelix’s notoriously useless menhir business against him: a Roman agent arrives at the Roman camp and persuades Obelix to sell him menhirs at high prices, in hopes that the new flow of wealth and prestige will create competition and jealousy that will eventually corrupt and undermine the village. The resulting boom in the previously non-existent menhir trade creates a wide array of amusing problems for both the Gauls and the Romans. A hilarious tale with a clear lesson about the pitfalls of greed and corruption, and the redeeming quality of friendship.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amalie

    It was good. There isn't really laugh-out-loud humour so I won't say 4 stars. Over all, it's a satire on capitalism and I didn't get some jokes. some interesting twists: Asterix and Getafix introduce the competitive market. Impedimenta insists on being dropped off at the shops on her husband's official shield. Preposterous (Roman finacial adviser) is a caricature of someone...I'm not sure Menhirs are marketed in Rome as a luxury commodity. Competing Roman menhir hits the market including an Egypti It was good. There isn't really laugh-out-loud humour so I won't say 4 stars. Over all, it's a satire on capitalism and I didn't get some jokes. some interesting twists: Asterix and Getafix introduce the competitive market. Impedimenta insists on being dropped off at the shops on her husband's official shield. Preposterous (Roman finacial adviser) is a caricature of someone...I'm not sure Menhirs are marketed in Rome as a luxury commodity. Competing Roman menhir hits the market including an Egyptian obelisk-shaped menhir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jannah (Cloud Child)

    The jokes a little different which help lessen the predictability. The best part was Obelixs hilarious business outfit with the golden ribbon around his belly.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Francis Pellow

    very clever satire of capitalism within the world of Asterix and friends. Not sure what i saw in it as a child but i particularly remember this one one from my childhood.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Biondatina

    Caius Preposterus, a Roman kid just out of the Latin School of Economics advise Julius Caesar to corrupt the little village of Gauls and distract them from fighting the Roman Army. The plan is very simple. Caius ask for the delivery of menhir and pays a lot of money, and ask more menhirs each day and pays more money...Ovelix, is a business man now, has people working for him, has to change cloths and has to attend meet lunches to talk about business... this issue is a comic parody of capitalism Caius Preposterus, a Roman kid just out of the Latin School of Economics advise Julius Caesar to corrupt the little village of Gauls and distract them from fighting the Roman Army. The plan is very simple. Caius ask for the delivery of menhir and pays a lot of money, and ask more menhirs each day and pays more money...Ovelix, is a business man now, has people working for him, has to change cloths and has to attend meet lunches to talk about business... this issue is a comic parody of capitalism But a pleasant surprise, as Laurel and Hardy make an appearance as Roman legionaries!!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    In this one (which I read in German since we do not seem to own an English version) Ceasar and his new financial advisor hatch a plan to make the gauls soft with money. They start buying all the menhirs that come out of the village and mayhem ensues.

  15. 4 out of 5

    NdL

    Absolutely amazing book. I loved the illustrations in this book as well as the humor. My favorite character is the fun loving Obelix. I admire both Rene Goscinny and Albert Uderzo. I definitely recommend this book to all comic lovers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jc

    Obelix finally gets his title book. Hooray.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Madhuri

    One of the best asterix comics!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ravi Kumar Dandapani

    good

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    this book was very funny and made me laugh a lot. i would recommend reading this book

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pramod

    A brilliant book. Lot of politics, economics and fun.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    A new centurion arrives at a Roman camp. He's Centurion Ignoramus. He plans to attack the Gauls from the village. Its Obelix's birthday, so they're letting him fight the Romans by himself. Some guy from Rome thinks he can corrupt the Gauls and make them weaker. (The way the Roman speaks is basically making fun of Native Americans.) His idea was to get the people in the village to make menhirs and all become so interested in making money they wouldn't devote any time to fighting. Things get out of A new centurion arrives at a Roman camp. He's Centurion Ignoramus. He plans to attack the Gauls from the village. Its Obelix's birthday, so they're letting him fight the Romans by himself. Some guy from Rome thinks he can corrupt the Gauls and make them weaker. (The way the Roman speaks is basically making fun of Native Americans.) His idea was to get the people in the village to make menhirs and all become so interested in making money they wouldn't devote any time to fighting. Things get out of hand not only in the village but in Rome itself. The whole story is a take on the greed and lack of concern for people that is evidenced by many big businesses.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tyrell Patrick

    This is a very funny book with discipline in the Roman camp becoming lax as they get used to a procession of flamboyant Gauls entering their garrison and the absurd clothes the Gauls wear when they become rich are hilarious. This is one of the best in the Asterix series with its satirical look at marketing, capitalism and greed. The Romans are determined to rid themselves of their Gaulish problem and employ Caius Preposterous to corrupt the Gauls by creating huge demand for the useless menhir. D This is a very funny book with discipline in the Roman camp becoming lax as they get used to a procession of flamboyant Gauls entering their garrison and the absurd clothes the Gauls wear when they become rich are hilarious. This is one of the best in the Asterix series with its satirical look at marketing, capitalism and greed. The Romans are determined to rid themselves of their Gaulish problem and employ Caius Preposterous to corrupt the Gauls by creating huge demand for the useless menhir. Demand causes large numbers of Gauls to become menhir merchants and the competition leads to infighting and the breaking up of the village.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bungz

    "The following passage will be difficult for those of you unacquainted with the ancient business world to understand, especially as, these days, such a state of affairs could never exist, since no one would dream of trying to sell something utterly useless..." Hahahahahaha... What a hoot?! One of the best satires i've read on capitalism. And oh, Obelix & Co., has its use - unlike the menhirs. *grin*

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bruce

    Obelix Co. – an excellent companion to Asterix and the Cauldron, flipping the premise to the side of capital; as a recent Roman business school grad prompts Obelix to mass-produce menhirs for Roman consumption

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trupti

    During my childhood, every summer holiday meant a visit to my grandparents house, which had a library of sorts, and a reunion with all my beloved characters from the Asterix and Obelix series. I never get bored of reading these, I've probably read them all a gazillion times over and enjoyed them immensely every time ...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Clicque

    Watch out! Julius Caesar has devised his most cunning attack yet on the indomitable Gauls. He has sent Caius Preposterus, a graduate of the Latin School of Economics, to corrupt them by introducing big business into their little town. But will wealth and success bring the Gauls happiness...or trouble?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nic

    Great book. Absolutely great, I read it about 50 times in a week. I recommend it to readers who love graphic novels. I have read most of the asterix series and I loved them all. It has everything a graphic novel has. It is the best example of a good author and illustrator. Loved it Thanks Nic :-)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    AWESOME!!! There is nothing that comes close to Asterix - I have the whole series, both on e-books and hard-copy and they are some of most treasured possessions. I grew up with them and they are simply the best!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Usama Albastaki

    If you thought that Asterix comics were only for fun, then this particular title will prove that you are wrong. It is clearly showing how is international politics are managed even for our current days.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karhum Ghassan

    Julius Caesar has made his most cunning attack on the Gauls. He has sent Caius Preposterus, a graduate of the Latin School of Economics, to corrupt them by teaching big business in their little town. But will richness and success bring the Gauls happiness...or trouble?

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