Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Constitution of the United States: With Added Internal Cross-Links Formatted and Arranged as an Ebook 2013 Edition

Availability: Ready to download

Revised and updated for 2013. Whether you are a law student or practicing legal professional this ebook will provide you with the an easy to use reference to the current Constitution of the United States. This book has been especially formatted for use on ebook readers with internal cross-links and links back to the Table of Contents which is so important on ebook readers. T Revised and updated for 2013. Whether you are a law student or practicing legal professional this ebook will provide you with the an easy to use reference to the current Constitution of the United States. This book has been especially formatted for use on ebook readers with internal cross-links and links back to the Table of Contents which is so important on ebook readers. This is the most useful version of the Constitution of the United States for small ebook readers with excellent formatting and linking. The document is current as of the date of publication. You won't find an easier more useful ebook source!


Compare
Ads Banner

Revised and updated for 2013. Whether you are a law student or practicing legal professional this ebook will provide you with the an easy to use reference to the current Constitution of the United States. This book has been especially formatted for use on ebook readers with internal cross-links and links back to the Table of Contents which is so important on ebook readers. T Revised and updated for 2013. Whether you are a law student or practicing legal professional this ebook will provide you with the an easy to use reference to the current Constitution of the United States. This book has been especially formatted for use on ebook readers with internal cross-links and links back to the Table of Contents which is so important on ebook readers. This is the most useful version of the Constitution of the United States for small ebook readers with excellent formatting and linking. The document is current as of the date of publication. You won't find an easier more useful ebook source!

30 review for Constitution of the United States: With Added Internal Cross-Links Formatted and Arranged as an Ebook 2013 Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    Has Goodreads got a new recommendations algorithm?! This seemed waaaaay smarter than usual...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scott Sigler

    Every American should read this. Particularly now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Charl(ie|es)

    Extremely antiquated and obfuscated. Predictable ending and almost always misinterpreted. I'm hoping the 2nd edition is revised to make it more relevant and useful to the people it was supposedly written for.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sidharth Vardhan

    Will an American lose his citizenship if he one-stars this book?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Macinnis

    It might seem odd that an Australian would list this—and if you look at the shelves I have it on, Americans may perceive one apparent inconsistency. Folks, if you see 'odd' or 'inconsistent', you don't know the full story. Because Britain had (and has) no written constitution, the Australian constitutional conventions needed to look closely at other examples, and high on their list was the US Constitution. To be blunt, Australia's founding fathers (no women were allowed in) followed the US Constit It might seem odd that an Australian would list this—and if you look at the shelves I have it on, Americans may perceive one apparent inconsistency. Folks, if you see 'odd' or 'inconsistent', you don't know the full story. Because Britain had (and has) no written constitution, the Australian constitutional conventions needed to look closely at other examples, and high on their list was the US Constitution. To be blunt, Australia's founding fathers (no women were allowed in) followed the US Constitution down an alley, mugged it, took its pocket contents, its hat and its shoes, turned them inside out, and claimed them as their own. In some cases, they went the other way, as in the assignment of residual powers, but they drew on the experiences of the US in making their decisions. The Australians were also canny about specifying the taking of censuses, knowing that the US census system was faltering under the huge population growth of the 1890s, not knowing that Herman Hollerith had invented the device that used to be a Hollerith card, but is now referred to as the IBM card, and that made for faster processing. So just as our nation's founding fathers gleaned ideas, we can garner interest from it — if we know how to read it. Not bad thinking and writing in it, either.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ezra

    WOW! What a piece of work. Twists, turns, cliffhangers! This will really leave the Nation on the edge of its seat.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I'm gonna take the first step to understand the laws of the land. Mabey if more people read and studied this book, we would not have the shit-hole government that we do.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    Somehow I don't look at this as a "book" it's more of a document. But I do wish every American would read it. Get through the construction parts, see what's been changed over the life of our country by reading the amendments (the shameful attempt to allow slavery, the repudiation of slavery. the change from senators being selected by the house to being elected directly, etc., etc.). Read, understand and treasure the rights guaranteed to every American in the Bill of Rights...note that, "The Bill Somehow I don't look at this as a "book" it's more of a document. But I do wish every American would read it. Get through the construction parts, see what's been changed over the life of our country by reading the amendments (the shameful attempt to allow slavery, the repudiation of slavery. the change from senators being selected by the house to being elected directly, etc., etc.). Read, understand and treasure the rights guaranteed to every American in the Bill of Rights...note that, "The Bill of RIGHTS". Then realize they apply to all Americans. Learn and treasure what it is to be an American.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    I've probably read this a dozen times. Sometimes in parts, often from beginning to end. I'm a policy analyst by training, so this was essential/core reading in several university classes and really is essential/core reading for US Citizens. Strangely, it has many who treat it with an almost religious reverence without carefully reading the actual words. Hey, so it is like the Bible.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cathleen

    It was time for a re-read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Something something Donald Trump

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    I wanted to find some stuff I didn't know but this version excluded ammendments. I want to read the full version some day. I like knowing my constitutional rights but I didn't find anything I didn't know in this original version. The version lays out the original plan of government. I learned we are protected by the constitution when we talk about how much we make at work. I wanted to learn more. I noted a couple excerpts: To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited I wanted to find some stuff I didn't know but this version excluded ammendments. I want to read the full version some day. I like knowing my constitutional rights but I didn't find anything I didn't know in this original version. The version lays out the original plan of government. I learned we are protected by the constitution when we talk about how much we make at work. I wanted to learn more. I noted a couple excerpts: To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries. The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    R.K. Byers

    a lot of good ideas. except, you know, the 3/5ths part.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cordell

    The most important political document ever created. Unfortunatly it is not as widely read as it should be. Our (USA) government has gone wildly past its oritional scope. More people should read the actual constitution to understand how simple government was meant to be. For example Article 1 section 8 lists the powers of the Congress. There are only 18 of them. Makes me think where does it get the power to take my money and redistribut it to cash for clunkers. Here it is. The Congress shall have The most important political document ever created. Unfortunatly it is not as widely read as it should be. Our (USA) government has gone wildly past its oritional scope. More people should read the actual constitution to understand how simple government was meant to be. For example Article 1 section 8 lists the powers of the Congress. There are only 18 of them. Makes me think where does it get the power to take my money and redistribut it to cash for clunkers. Here it is. The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States; To borrow money on the credit of the United States; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes; To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States; To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the standard of weights and measures; To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the United States; To establish post offices and post roads; To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; To constitute tribunals inferior to the Supreme Court; To define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water; To raise and support armies, but no appropriation of money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; To provide and maintain a navy; To make rules for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces; To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions; To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining, the militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the service of the United States, reserving to the states respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed by Congress; To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession of particular states, and the acceptance of Congress, become the seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings;--And To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all other powers vested by this Constitution in the government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    It's about time I read this, and so grateful. Only as an experienced adult - after being on countless committees & drafting agreements - do I appreciate this expertly crafted work. Got chills reciting the President's Inaugural Oath! Refreshers from the original document : ----------------------- "This Constitution... shall be the supreme Law of the Land" “The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand” "The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and su It's about time I read this, and so grateful. Only as an experienced adult - after being on countless committees & drafting agreements - do I appreciate this expertly crafted work. Got chills reciting the President's Inaugural Oath! Refreshers from the original document : ----------------------- "This Constitution... shall be the supreme Law of the Land" “The Number of Representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty Thousand” "The Congress shall assemble at least once in every Year, and such Meeting shall be on the first Monday in December" "All bills for raising revenue shall originate from the House of Representatives" "The Congress shall have Power To : --- borrow Money on the credit of the United States --- define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas… --- raise and support Armies, but no Appropriation of Money to that Use shall be for a longer Term than two Years" "No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States" "The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate… he may, on extraordinary Occasions, convene both Houses" "No religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is the first time that I've read the Constitution simply because I wanted to read it, and it sure won't be the last. Every citizen of the United States should study this brilliant document closely, because if we don't know and understand it, the rights that it guarantees us will be taken from us. I think most people have a fundamental misunderstanding of the purpose of this document. It was designed, not to give the government power, but to restrict the government's power. To give a limit t This is the first time that I've read the Constitution simply because I wanted to read it, and it sure won't be the last. Every citizen of the United States should study this brilliant document closely, because if we don't know and understand it, the rights that it guarantees us will be taken from us. I think most people have a fundamental misunderstanding of the purpose of this document. It was designed, not to give the government power, but to restrict the government's power. To give a limit to what those in power can do. But those limits have been breached before and will be breached again. But if we don't know what those limits are, we will not be able to hold those people in power accountable. I plan on making my study of the constitution a regular activity, and I would hope that many others would follow suit. On another interesting note, not once is the word "democracy" mentioned in this, the founding governmental document for our country. Perhaps because our country is not a democracy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Clayton Chase

    I read it. I wish Congress would too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kim Blankenship

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Every American adult should read this. Those that haven't read it will be surprised when they understand these few pages. For example, I learned here that there were only 3 individual rights that could be agreed upon before the Bill of Rights was enacted: right to a writ of habeas corpus (any person incarcerated has the right to be called before a court and charged with a crime), no ex post facto laws (laws that restrict a right or privilege that apply backward in time), and no law can be create Every American adult should read this. Those that haven't read it will be surprised when they understand these few pages. For example, I learned here that there were only 3 individual rights that could be agreed upon before the Bill of Rights was enacted: right to a writ of habeas corpus (any person incarcerated has the right to be called before a court and charged with a crime), no ex post facto laws (laws that restrict a right or privilege that apply backward in time), and no law can be created to apply to a single individual, including those written in general language but only one person in the country qualifies. The Framers believed and agreed that these rights were more important than free speech, freedom of religion, the right to be free from unwarranted searches and seizures, and even the right to bear arms.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jerrica

    FIVE STARS FOR FREEDOM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Thought I'd refresh my understanding of the United States Constitution as we prepare for the battles ahead. Essential reading for Americans.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Read in The Constitution of the United States of America and Selected Writings of the Founding Fathers. I decided to reread this in honor of Constitution Day today (9-17-17). This was signed 230 years ago today, though it took 10 months to get officially ratified by nine states, and it would take over two and a half years before the other stragglers would make it fully ratified. This document is ingenious, and more importantly it stays pretty simple. Since then things have gone to hell in a handca Read in The Constitution of the United States of America and Selected Writings of the Founding Fathers. I decided to reread this in honor of Constitution Day today (9-17-17). This was signed 230 years ago today, though it took 10 months to get officially ratified by nine states, and it would take over two and a half years before the other stragglers would make it fully ratified. This document is ingenious, and more importantly it stays pretty simple. Since then things have gone to hell in a handcart, and bureaucratic agencies which are accountable to nobody (unlike congress) and creative interpretations of the laws due to linguistic acrobatics have twisted the founders intentions clearly stated in this document into a system of government it was never intended to be. Tell it, George. Loopholes galore, I tell ya. Thankfully some things in here are rock solid no matter how hard some groups try to change them. Freedom of speech, right to bear arms, etc. That doesn't mean they can't be changed at all. An amendment took care of the 3/5 compromise. One also took care of the problem with the vice presidency which was good in theory but very poor in practice as they found out after the first real election between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two people who couldn't agree on the color of the sky. And if you think elections are dirty nowadays (and I will confess 2016 got a little nasty), you should've seen that one in 1800, Jackson and Quincy Adams in 1828, and Cleveland and Blaine in 1884. They bypassed the mud and flung fecal matter instead. Anyway, it used to be that the person with the second most votes became the vice president. Now that I think about it, I would love to see Clinton as Trump's veep just for shits and giggles. "Thank you for a hard and well-fought campaign Hillary. I appreciate it and wish to give you some intermittent vacation time on your first state visit tour. I've arranged for a flyover of the Bermuda Triangle on the way since it's such a lovely, lovely thing to see, and I thought you'd like it. When you get to Syria you'll be given a Ford Pinto which is very, very reliable transportation. Don't pay any attention to what people say about it. I know more about cars and mechanics than Detroit. You'll see Abu Bakr al-Baghadadi, and you need to tell him he needs to hush that fuss. Once you're done there, it's a camel ride through the Sahara then the Tarzan vine tour through the Congo to Luanda where you'll board a canoe that will take you through the straits of Magellan directly to North Korea where you need to tell Dennis Rodman to wash his hair. I know it sounds like you're going around your ass to get to your elbow, but trust me on this: I know more about maps than Rand McNally. This is the fastest way. Call me when you get there. Love ya, have a nice trip, buh-bye." #bitchisgone4eva Article IV points out one of the most hypocritical aspects of the Civil War with respect to West Virginia. It clearly states you can't make a new state out of parts of an old one without the consent of the existing state. There was also a secession question. There's nothing in the constitution explicitly prohibiting secession, but people make the argument that there are parts that implicitly prohibit it, but if you take that stance you have to concede that the ninth amendment implicitly protects it. During the war there was a lot of jibber-jabber about how the southern states could claim to be seceded but that they were really still part of the Union and simply in a state of revolt. (This was Lincoln's take on the matter). If you believe that, then the formation of West Virginia was unconstitutional, no ifs, ands, or buts about it, but the Yankees had no problem saying that was just fine and dandy. You can't have it both ways if you're being honest about it, but that's what makes history exciting. Of course after the Civil War was over, and Lincoln was dead, and the radical republicans were running reconstruction, the southern states were deemed to have seceded after all, put under martial law, had to reapply to the Union, etc. West Virginia was never put back with Virginia, but we didn't want those chuckle-heads anyway, so it all worked out. I enjoy reading the amendments because you can follow a brief history of the country, including a couple of "Whoops, that was a bad idea" moments like Prohibition. As time progressed, the amendments got more cumbersome and sometimes a bit inane. Freedom of speech, who has the right to vote, etc. all seem like worthy topics for a constitution, but amendment 27 ratified in 1992 after a 202 year wait concerning congressional pay? I guess we know where our congressmen's priorities lie nowadays. That makes me think of something else. Do you ever watch C-SPAN? Have you ever gone to a session at the House of Representatives? You think it's like this... ...when it's really like this: I'm serious. I sat in on one for a bit about 20 years ago. There were six people there. One presenting her bill, someone at the big desk, then four others talking to each other, waiting for their turn to talk to nobody. It's a sick joke. I wish I could get paid for absenteeism. I understand that nowadays most of the congressmen waiting their turns are playing on their smart phones. And they have the temerity to claim they have nothing in common with Trump! Anyway, everyone should read this from time to time so you know how your government is supposed to be operating.

  22. 4 out of 5

    DJ Harris

  23. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    My five-star rating has nothing to do with literary merit and should really just be seen as me chanting "USA! USA!" Still, it's important to read and understand this stuff.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schultz

    4 stars is based on the fact that the bill of rights not included in this printing. the actual document is obviously 5 stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Youjin Koo

    I've been obligated to read this so many times but I'm glad I actually understand what the first and second amendments are, and not the Fox News definitions... It takes like thirty minutes to read all the way through, please do so before you argue about constitutional rights (which you shouldn't even claim expertise in if you aren't a lawyer or judge or some sort of constitutional historian) without even understanding them @Trump supporters

  26. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    It was fine, for a period piece. Pretty predictable until that 2nd amendment - what the HELL was that? I get what the authors were going for but I think I'm just having trouble seeing the long term impact of this text?? I hope there's a sequel soon!!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justine (Milkz)

    I literally just read this twice to make sure I understood everything I didn't understand before lol.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zach Mendelson

    shrug

  29. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Marcher

    I don't understand how thousands of college "educated" coastal elitists can without fail misinterpret this brilliant document!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    The Constution is truly a living document from scholars who knew the history of the world. They knew what kind of government worked and what didn't. They knew what went wrong and did all they could not repeat history. Unfortulately the majority of American people don't know history and are hell-bent on adding America to the list of nations with a tragic decline. My thoughts start with the Legislative branch. Article 1 Section 8 defines the limited powers congress is given. The clause given “to p The Constution is truly a living document from scholars who knew the history of the world. They knew what kind of government worked and what didn't. They knew what went wrong and did all they could not repeat history. Unfortulately the majority of American people don't know history and are hell-bent on adding America to the list of nations with a tragic decline. My thoughts start with the Legislative branch. Article 1 Section 8 defines the limited powers congress is given. The clause given “to provide for the general welfare” should be stricken or modified in some way as to disable any attempt to allow a welfare state. Also, a provision for a balanced budget or some kind of limit might need to be in place to keep the national debt in check. This might not be necessary if the “general welfare” clause is taken care of well enough as to make the creation of a welfare state impossible. Rules for citizenship need to be expounded; including births only from legal citizens can become legal citizens. Some kind of check needs to be in place for printing money, and Congress shouldn’t regulate the value of it. Sadly, being a member of congress has turned into having benefits like royalty. They shouldn’t be able to set their salary or have luxuries like special spas, healthcare and gas stations. For the Executive branch, a note might need to be added to make sure that it is understood that if a power isn’t listed in the Constitution, then the president, or any other branch for that matter, may not exercise it. A check needs to be added to the Judicial branch to protect against the Supreme Court legislating from the bench. Perhaps a Senate review of their decisions might be enough, once the Senate represents the state legislatures again. As for the Amendments, in the 1st Amendment, the relationship between church and state need to be expounded to explain that the state is to stay out of religion and not necessarily vice versa. In the 2nd Amendment, maybe we should spell out the word "period" at the end so that the point is taken. Abolish the 16th Amendment and come up with a better tax, but what that is I don’t know. The 17th Amendment needs to be repealed. The States should be represented in Congress.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.