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The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales

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For almost two centuries, the stories of magic and myth gathered by the Brothers Grimm have been part of the way children — and adults — learn about the vagaries of the real world. Cinderella, Rapunzel, Snow-White, Hänsel and Gretel, Little Red-Cap (a.k.a. Little Red Riding Hood), and Briar-Rose (a.k.a. Sleeping Beauty) are only a few of more than 200 enchanting characters For almost two centuries, the stories of magic and myth gathered by the Brothers Grimm have been part of the way children — and adults — learn about the vagaries of the real world. Cinderella, Rapunzel, Snow-White, Hänsel and Gretel, Little Red-Cap (a.k.a. Little Red Riding Hood), and Briar-Rose (a.k.a. Sleeping Beauty) are only a few of more than 200 enchanting characters included here. Lyrically translated and beautifully illustrated, the tales are presented just as Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm originally set them down: bold, primal, just frightening enough, and endlessly engaging.


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For almost two centuries, the stories of magic and myth gathered by the Brothers Grimm have been part of the way children — and adults — learn about the vagaries of the real world. Cinderella, Rapunzel, Snow-White, Hänsel and Gretel, Little Red-Cap (a.k.a. Little Red Riding Hood), and Briar-Rose (a.k.a. Sleeping Beauty) are only a few of more than 200 enchanting characters For almost two centuries, the stories of magic and myth gathered by the Brothers Grimm have been part of the way children — and adults — learn about the vagaries of the real world. Cinderella, Rapunzel, Snow-White, Hänsel and Gretel, Little Red-Cap (a.k.a. Little Red Riding Hood), and Briar-Rose (a.k.a. Sleeping Beauty) are only a few of more than 200 enchanting characters included here. Lyrically translated and beautifully illustrated, the tales are presented just as Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm originally set them down: bold, primal, just frightening enough, and endlessly engaging.

30 review for The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales

  1. 4 out of 5

    Praveen

    First, I share with you how I decided to read this book. Read my silly coincidence! A prelude fairy tale :) ------------------- It was dark already when I was getting down through the steps, from my rooftop after my lazy late evening walk; I found a little creature jumping over my feet. I got scared for a moment, quickly came down, took a torch in my hand and climbed up back to the stairs. There, not to my surprise, a little frog had placed himself just at the corner of a step. At the ground level First, I share with you how I decided to read this book. Read my silly coincidence! A prelude fairy tale :) ------------------- It was dark already when I was getting down through the steps, from my rooftop after my lazy late evening walk; I found a little creature jumping over my feet. I got scared for a moment, quickly came down, took a torch in my hand and climbed up back to the stairs. There, not to my surprise, a little frog had placed himself just at the corner of a step. At the ground level of my building, there is a good amount of greenery and in and around rainy season small and medium-sized frogs and toads are found hopping here and there but I was surprised how this little frog had reached such a height in the building. As it was dark in the stairs, so I threw light from the torch on his husky little form but he did not jump anywhere. Seeing him stationary I sat one step below him. I noticed, while my torch through its piercing light had been staring at his rumpled form, the little frog’s curious eyes were staring at me. Without the slightest sense of fear, he kept looking at me with a natural throbbing on his part of the body below his mouth, probably his throat. In fact, it was pounding strongly when I tried to touch him, he did not resist and only wiggled his head. His eyes still fixed on me, entire body steadfast, throbbing and beating still there in his throat. I switched on and off my torch several times to get him frightened but this brave frog was still staring at me stiffly with unfailing good spirits. Then clueless of what to do next to scare him, I came down, brought my phone with me to take some of his pictures. To my astonishment, after the first flash of my phone, when the first picture of the frog was captured, he suddenly tilted his body to the left… His head still looking towards the phone, his eyes now fixed on my phone camera. This way he was posing perfectly the right side of his body to my phone. I felt this behavior so strange and human-like that I kept cogitating for some time as if he was anticipating such a photoshoot. Then in a pleased mental state, I took a few more pictures, touched his head and the crusty surface of his back softly. This time he jumped quickly and disappeared in the dark towards the roof side. OK Now, I won’t irritate you further with my silly tale…but before talking anything about the book you have to read what I saw that night! -------- A Dream -------- I saw a dream then at night, a frog was hopping along with me, beside my sluggishly moving bare feet in the green dew filled morning grass in a park. When I bowed down to touch him, he hopped in such a dramatic and frightening way that in his first jump he crossed the entire park and with his next he just flew like a bird… high… high… and very high… up to the clouds… and then within a moment became a cloud. A white cloud....and then turned dark a moment later! --------- The Library --------- Next morning after having finished the daily work I went to the library, as I do frequently when I have time and reached the segment where the books of my taste are found in the shelves. The first book I picked was a bulky one. I read the title. I felt pleased and after sitting in my reading chair when I read the first story in the book, to my greatest surprise … I found the frog here again….Oh ! what a Froggy experience! The title was…“The Frog Prince or the Iron Henry”…and there was a frog in the story that talked like a man. When to get her ball from a deep spring, a princess, the most beautiful daughter of a king, takes help of this frog in the wild and promises him that she will allow him to stay with her and then after getting her ball back, she backs out and runs away to her palace. Then one day someone says at her door, this: “Open the door, my princess dear, Open the door to thy true love here! And mind the words that thou and I said By the fountain cool, in the greenwood shade.” Then the princess runs to the door and opens it, and there she sees the frog, whom she had quite forgotten. Now at this point in time, I remembered my frog as well and saw the pictures I had taken last night on my phone and then looked at the picture of a frog at the door of the princess, made on a page of this book. And I realized then...... Frogs are really powerful creatures ! I underestimated them ! They can’t only hop around ..... they can guide you to your right next book read in a strange dreamy way as well! :) -------------- The book Finally :) -------------- OK!... So this was my fairy tale leading me to this book! Finally, let me say something about the book. A book with 210 fairy tales compiled in it by the Grimm brothers, Jacob, and Wilhelm in the early 19th century. It includes many tales, some of them you might have heard from your parents and grandparents in your childhood. Like... Cinderella, Snow White, Clever Hans, Girl without hands, Gossip wolf and the fox… etc. These tales are full of enchantment and rapture, terror and wisdom, tragedy and beauty. These stories are kept alive by German peasants of the time told around the fireplace to entranced listeners. This book has influenced people worldwide and is a principal source for artists and composers, who are re-creating these tales in new and innovative ways around the world. I did not read all the tales in this book, but the reading of 50 odd tales from this book educated me enough to alter my views that these tales were made for the children only! I think one must read these fairy tales to one’s children. However, the older people should read them twice because these are filled with such wisdom and simplicity that sometimes in the ruckus of life even one fairy tale from this book can fill your heart with childlike innocence and peace! This compilation is truly a legacy of vibrant oral tradition!

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    I adored fairy tales as a child... wait, I've always adored them, even now when I'm... not a child... so many different interpretations -- truly the foundation for many of today's TV shows, movies, children's books... a must read! Who doesn't know the stories of Hansel & Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, etc. These are powerful parables meant to teach us all the lessons we need. Of course, they're fun and imaginative. But their the basics to start from. Love them. About Me For those new to I adored fairy tales as a child... wait, I've always adored them, even now when I'm... not a child... so many different interpretations -- truly the foundation for many of today's TV shows, movies, children's books... a must read! Who doesn't know the stories of Hansel & Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, etc. These are powerful parables meant to teach us all the lessons we need. Of course, they're fun and imaginative. But their the basics to start from. Love them. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jaidee

    3.24180327 stars (pretty close to pi)- the average of tales of 89 to 210 as I lost the ratings of the first 88 stories 2016 - The Most Fun (nest) Review to Write " The folk tale is the primer of the picture-language of the soul" -Joseph Campbell If the Grimms were around today this is the tale I would recount to them: In the near past in the kingdom of Toronto there lived a distinguished middle aged Duke. He was handsome, cool, level-headed and fastiduous. He lived in a grand apartment with his 3.24180327 stars (pretty close to pi)- the average of tales of 89 to 210 as I lost the ratings of the first 88 stories 2016 - The Most Fun (nest) Review to Write " The folk tale is the primer of the picture-language of the soul" -Joseph Campbell If the Grimms were around today this is the tale I would recount to them: In the near past in the kingdom of Toronto there lived a distinguished middle aged Duke. He was handsome, cool, level-headed and fastiduous. He lived in a grand apartment with his gray kitty but after two unhappy marriages was looking to reconnect with another nobleperson and attempt happiness once again. He decided to host a dinner and had three countesses scour the city for suitable candidates. These three countesses were lovely to Duke Xavier and wanted the best for him despite not being able to nab him for themselves. The third countess was especially sweet and asked the Duke if he would consider somebody more pedestrian but pleasant, devoted and a bit odd. Xavier looked at her sweetly and said "Why the hell not?" The dinner day arrived and the four suitors awaited in the lobby. First there was Sir Adonis. Sculpted like a greek god, with a face so handsome that both men and women fainted just by looking. Second there was Lady Haha. Fashionable, brilliant and cooler than her more famous relative Lady G...no we cannot say it. Thirdly there was Dame Cait....sophisticated, intelligent and a tigress in bed (by reputation really.) Lastly there was roly poly Jade. Not a prince or nobility and looked rather bashful in his maroon smoking jacket that his aunty picked out for him for this occasion. The three countesses came down to the lobby of the apartment and saw Lady Haha with her little poodle that had shat three times already on the marble. "Lady Haha...you cannot bring that beast into the sumptuous rooms. The Duke's gorgeous feline will have an epileptic fit" Well if Lady Poodle Rara is not welcome then I am off to find a king that will appreciate me" Off she huffed. Sir Adonis smirked. Dame Cait grimaced. Roly poly Jade quickly applied some lip balm and quickly smelled his armpits as he was oh so nervous. The countesses brought the three to the apartment and seated there in grey and mauve elegance was Duke Xavier. He greeted all warmly and then dismissed the three countesses to the kitchen to finish dinner. The Duke said "the first test is the talent show." Sir Adonis jumped up. He ripped open his shirt and started to pose. His biceps and triceps were oh so delicious and the three countesses were mesmerized at the sight. Duke Xavier snapped and said "Away ladies do not burn our dinner". Dame Cait said "Well I'm feeling rather moist now" Jade looked down at his roly poly stature and lost all courage. Dame Cait pulled out a long cigarette holder, lighted it. She then began to recite Virginia Woolf, Dante, Neruda, Aristotle, Rumi and even Anne Rice by rote memory. She did it with such class and with a british accent that was divine to listen to. Sir Adonis yawned. The three countesses were charmed and Jade headed for the door. Duke Xavier gently said. "Please do not go. Please share your talent" Jade looked up and said. "Duke Xavier do you happen to have a karaoke machine" The three countesses were prepared and slid one out on a very chic dolly. This is what roly poly Jade sang: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdvZa... Sir Adonis yawned. Dame Cait grimaced. The three countesses melted. Duke Xavier got a glimmer in his beautiful sad brown eyes. Dinner was served. Sir Adonis took the choicest pieces of meat. Dame Cait criticized every dish. Roly poly Jade got gravy on his maroon smoking jacket and died of embarassment. Duke Xavier asked the last question of the evening and it was this: "How will you love me?" Sir Adonis answered the question with the question: "No Duke -how will you love me?" Dame Cait answered thoughtfully: "I will organize the nicest soirees, connect you to the most beautiful and intelligent people and spend your money in a thoughtful way so that I always look chic, desirable and you will be the envy of every nobleperson in the entire kingdom" Roly poly Jade uttered quickly: "I am not sure I can love you just like that. I will get to know you, comfort you and make sure that most of the time you are happy. If I do fall in love with you Duke Xavier I will remain devoted to you for the rest of your days. I will eat all your baked goods with relish, I will procrastinate on all the household chores, I will sing endlessly to you especially show tunes and songs from the 1980s. I will always have your best wishes at heart and take care of you and make you laugh. I am not beautiful. I am only semi-smart but my heart will always be open to you forever" The three countesses had tears in their eyes. Duke Xavier stood up and gave Sir Adonis a warm hug. He sweetly kissed Dame Cait on the lips. He held out his hand to roly poly Jade and said "Come on pumpkin, let's Rock" THE END.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    The original Grimm's Brothers fairy tales were a far cry from the Perrault collection of many of the same stories, the Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang, or, God forbid, Walt Disney. The Brothers Grimm told stories with meat on their bones, where the good people were heroes and the bad people were really, really bad. The outcome of a particular story rose and fell on the consequences of the actions of the characters. The evil stepsisters in Cinderella, for example, did not go to the wedding of The original Grimm's Brothers fairy tales were a far cry from the Perrault collection of many of the same stories, the Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang, or, God forbid, Walt Disney. The Brothers Grimm told stories with meat on their bones, where the good people were heroes and the bad people were really, really bad. The outcome of a particular story rose and fell on the consequences of the actions of the characters. The evil stepsisters in Cinderella, for example, did not go to the wedding of Cinderella and the Prince - no - their eyes were pecked out by crows. Bruno Bettleheim had a theory that if children are reared hearing fairy tales and folk tales, they will develop a rich fantasy life while young, and won't need to turn to drugs and alcohol later on. I don't know if that is really the case, but I do know that the Grimm Brothers occupied an enormous space in my psyche as a child, along with Hans Christian Anderson and Carlo Collodi. No wonder children today love J.K. Rowling and Phillip Pulliam. Whatever else you think about their stories, their child heroes inhabit universes where actions are followed by consequences, and not all the good survive. Children are hungry for truth, and in books like Grimm's Fairy Tales, they find it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Note to the Expanded Second Edition Note to the Expanded Third Edition Once There Were Two Brothers Named Grimm, by Jack Zipes A Note on the Translation --1. The Frog King, or Iron Heinrich --2. The Companionship of the Cat and the Mouse --3. The Virgin Mary's Child --4. A Tale About the Boy Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was --5. The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids --6. Faithful Johannes --7. The Good Bargain --8. The Marvellous Minstrel --9. The Twelve Brothers --10. Riffraff --11. Brother and Sister --12. Note to the Expanded Second Edition Note to the Expanded Third Edition Once There Were Two Brothers Named Grimm, by Jack Zipes A Note on the Translation --1. The Frog King, or Iron Heinrich --2. The Companionship of the Cat and the Mouse --3. The Virgin Mary's Child --4. A Tale About the Boy Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was --5. The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids --6. Faithful Johannes --7. The Good Bargain --8. The Marvellous Minstrel --9. The Twelve Brothers --10. Riffraff --11. Brother and Sister --12. Rapunzel --13. The Three Little Gnomes in the Forest --14. The Three Spinners --15. Hansel and Gretel --16. The Three Snake Leaves --17. The White Snake --18. The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean --19. The Fisherman and His Wife --20. The Brave Little Tailor --21. Cinderella --22. The Riddle --23. The Mouse, the Bird, and the Sausage --24. Mother Holle --25. The Seven Ravens --26. Little Red Cap --27. The Bremen Town Musicians --28. The Singing Bone --29. The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs --30. The Louse and the Flea --31. The Maiden Without Hands --32. Clever Hans --33. The Three Languages --34. Clever Else --35. The Tailor in Heaven --36. The Magic Table, the Golden Donkey, and the Club in the Sack --37. Thumbling --38. The Wedding of Mrs Fox --39. The Elves --40. The Robber Bridegroom --41. Herr Korbes --42. The Godfather --43. Mother Trudy --44. Godfather Death --45. Thumbling's Travels --46. Fitcher's Bird --47. The Juniper Tree --48. Old Sultan --49. The Six Swans --50. Brier Rose --51. Foundling --52. King Thrushbeard --53. Snow White --54. The Knapsack, the Hat, and the Horn --55. Rumpelstiltskin --56. Sweetheart Roland --57. The Golden Bird --58. The Dog and the Sparrow --59. Freddy and Katy --60. The Two Brothers --61. Little Farmer --62. The Queen Bee --63. The Three Feathers --64. The Golden Goose --65. All Fur --66. The Hare's Bride --67. The Twelve Huntsmen --68. The Thief and His Master --69. Jorinda and Joringel --70. The Three Sons of Fortune --71. How Six Made Their Way in the World --72. The Wolf and the Man --73. The Wolf and the Fox --74. The Wolf and His Cousin --75. The Fox and the Cat --76. The Pink Flower --77. Clever Gretel --78. The Old Man and His Grandson --79. The Water Nixie --80. The Death of the Hen --81. Brother Lustig --82. Gambling Hans --83. Lucky Hans --84. Hans Gets Married --85. The Golden Children --86. The Fox and the Geese --87. The Poor Man and the Rich Man --88. The Singing, Springing Lark --89. The Goose Girl --90. The Young Giant --91. The Gnome --92. The King of the Golden Mountain --93. The Raven --94. The Clever Farmer's Daughter --95. Old Hildebrand --96. The Three Little Birds --97. The Water of Life --98. Doctor Know-It-All --99. The Spirit in the Glass Bottle --100. The Devil's Sooty Brother --101. Bearskin --102. The Wren and the Bear --103. The Sweet Porridge --104. The Clever People --105. Tales About Toads --106. The Poor Miller's Apprentice and the Cat --107. The Two Travellers --108. Hans My Hedgehog --109. The Little Shroud --110. The Jew in the Thornbush --111. The Expert Huntsman --112. The Fleshing Flail From Heaven --113. The Two Kings' Children --114. The Clever Little Tailor --115. The Bright Sun Will Bring It to Light --116. The Blue Light --117. The Stubborn Child --118. The Three Army Surgeons --119. The Seven Swabians --120. The Three Journeymen --121. The Prince Who Feared Nothing --122. The Lettuce Donkey --123. The Old Woman in the Forest --124. The Three Brothers --125. The Devil and His Grandmother --126. Faithful Ferdinand and Unfaithful Ferdinand --127. The Iron Stove --128. The Lazy Spinner --129. The Four Skilful Brothers --130. One-Eye, Two-Eyes, and Three-Eyes --131. Pretty Katrinelya and Pif Paf Poltree --132. The Fox and the Horse --133. The Worn-out Dancing Shoes --134. The Six Servants --135. The White Bride and the Black Bride --136. Iron Hans --137. The Three Black Princesses --138. Knoist and His Three Sons --139. The Maiden From Brakel --140. The Domestic Servants --141. The Little Lamb and the Little Fish --142. Simelei Mountain --143. Going Travelling --144. The Donkey --145. The Ungrateful Son --146. The Turnip --147. The Rejuvenated Little Old Man --148. The Animals of the Lord and the Devil --149. The Beam --150. The Old Beggar Woman --151. The Three Lazy Sons --152. The Twelve Lazy Servants --153. The Star Coins --154. The Stolen Pennies --155. Choosing a Bride --156. The Leftovers --157. The Sparrow and His Four Children --158. The Tale About the Land of Cockaigne --159. A Tall Tale From Ditmarsh --160. A Tale With a Riddle --161. Snow White and Rose Red --162. The Clever Servant --163. The Glass Coffin --164. Lazy Heinz --165. The Griffin --166. Strong Hans --167. The Peasant in Heaven --168. Lean Lisa --169. The House in the Forest --170. Sharing Joys and Sorrows --171. The Wren --172. The Flounder --173. The Bittern and the Hoopoe --174. The Owl --175. The Moon --176. The Life Span --177. The Messengers of Death --178. Master Pfriem --179. The Goose Girl at the Spring --180. Eve's Unequal Children --181. The Nixie in the Pond --182. The Gifts of the Little Folk --183. The Giant and the Tailor --184. The Nail --185. The Poor Boy in the Grave --186. The True Bride --187. The Hare and the Hedgehog --188. Spindle, Shuttle, and Needle --189. The Peasant and the Devil --190. The Crumbs on the Table --191. The Little Hamster From the Water --192. The Master Thief --193. The Drummer --194. The Ear of Corn --195. The Grave Mound --196. Old Rinkrank --197. The Crystal Ball --198. Maid Maleen --199. The Boots of Buffalo Leather --200. The Golden Key Religious Tales for Children --201. Saint Joseph in the Forest --202. The Twelve Apostles --203. The Rose --204. Poverty and Humility Lead to Heaven --205. God's Food --206. The Three Green Twigs --207. The Blessed Virgin's Little Glass --208. The Little Old Lady --209. The Heavenly Wedding --210. The Hazel Branch The Omitted Tales --211. The Nightingale and the Blindworm --212. The Hand With the Knife --213. Herr Fix-It-Up --214. How Some Children Played at Slaughtering --215. Death and the Goose Boy --216. Puss in Boots --217. The Tablecloth, the Knapsack, the Cannon Hat, and the Horn --218. The Strange Feast --219. Simple Hans --220. Bluebeard --221. Hurleburlebutz --222. Okerlo --223. Princess Mouseskin --224. The Pear Refused to Fall --225. The Castle of Murder --226. The Carpenter and the Turner --227. The Blacksmith and the Devil --228. The Three Sisters --229. The Stepmother --230. Fragments --231. The Faithful Animals --232. The Crows --233. The Lazy One and the Industrious One --234. The Long Nose --235. The Lion and the Frog --236. The Soldier and the Carpenter --237. The Wild Man --238. The Children of Famine --239. Saint Solicitous --240. Misfortune --241. The Pea Test --242. The Robber and His Sons Selected Tales from the Annotations of 1856 --243. The Three Daughters and the Frog King --244. The Young Man Who Went Out in Search of Fear --245. The Golden Maiden --246. The White Dove --247. Fool's Gold --248. The Winter Rose --249. Prince Swan --250. The Short Tale Jacob Grimm's Tales --251. Snow White, Snow White, or The Unfortunate Child (1806) --252. Rumpenstunzchen (1806) --253. Stepmother (1806) --254. The Virgin Mary's Child (1806) --255. The Fox and Mrs Fox (1806) --256. The Moon and His Mother (1806) Published Tales --257. Good Bowling and Card Playing (1810), Wilhelm Grimm --258. The Fairy Tale About the Faithful Sparrow (1812), Jacob Grimm --259. The Little Tale About the Crawling Mouse (1812), Jacob Grimm --260. The Fairy Tale About the Tailor Who Came to Heaven (1818), Wilhelm Grimm --261. The Celebration of the Underground Creatures (1826), Wilhelm Grimm --262. The War of the Wasps and the Donkey (1853), Wilhelm Grimm Selected Tales from the Annotations of 1856 --263. The Fool --264. Small People --265. The Luck of the Dumb --266. Little Kurt Bingeling --267. The Liar --268. The Lazy Ones Selected Tales From the Posthumous Papers of the Brothers Grimm --269. The Grateful Dead Man and the Princess Rescued From Slavery --270. The Faithful Wife --271. The Princess in the Coffin and the Sentry --272. St. Peter's Mother --273. Why Dogs and Cats and Cats and Mice Are Enemies --274. Why Dogs Sniff One Another --275. Sharp Ears, the Runner, the Blower, and the Strongman --276. The Little Mouse and the Little Sausage --277. King Ironhead --278. The Old Soldier and the White Horse --279. The Silver Poplar Notes Index

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    The Lessons of the Brothers Grimm The Golden Bird -- If you are the “Chosen One” you can eschew all advice, screw up constantly, and still come out on top. Hans in Luck -- Half-wits can be happy with anything. Jorinda and Jorindel -- You can trespass unreservedly, so long as “the Other” owns the land. The Traveling Musicians -- Robbing the rich to give to yourself is fine if your victim is a robber. Old Sultan -- Obey your master to the detriment of your friends, especially if your friends threaten The Lessons of the Brothers Grimm The Golden Bird -- If you are the “Chosen One” you can eschew all advice, screw up constantly, and still come out on top. Hans in Luck -- Half-wits can be happy with anything. Jorinda and Jorindel -- You can trespass unreservedly, so long as “the Other” owns the land. The Traveling Musicians -- Robbing the rich to give to yourself is fine if your victim is a robber. Old Sultan -- Obey your master to the detriment of your friends, especially if your friends threaten your master’s property. The Straw, The Coal and The Bean -- Death is the funniest joke of all...and tailors are always nice. Briar Rose -- Disney can reduce anything -- even a story about slights and righteous indignation -- into a ninety minute indoctrination of the fantasy of good and evil. The Dog and The Sparrow -- Vengeance is fine if you are the first person wronged, but if you wrong one, then are wronged in return you may not seek vengeance -- even if the vengeance wrought upon you is out of proportion for your crime. This is also known as the “carpet bomb Afghanistan” fable. The Twelve Dancing Princesses -- Listen to whatever an old hag tells you because her ugliness must equal wisdom. The Fisherman and His Wife -- Be happy with your station in life. Ambition above your station cannot make you happy. Marx would love this one. The Willow-Wren and the Bear -- No matter the idiocy of a war and its cause, the defeated should pay reparations, regardless of how humiliating. The Frog Prince -- Spoiled, nasty, unlikable though one may be, if one is royalty and does what one’s father tells one, living happily ever after is one’s right, and one's inevitable destiny. Cat and Mouse in Partnership -- The meek will inherit nothing. They will be devoured. No idealism here. The Goose Girl -- The ideal wife should be meek and mild and of the right station. Also, beauty will out. The Adventures of Chanticleer and Partlet -- “How They Went to the Mountains to Eat Nuts,” “How Chanticleer and Partlet Went to Visit Mr. Korbes,” & “How Partlet Died and was Buried, and How Chanticleer Died of Grief:” Everyone dies, so live for yourself while you can. Rapunzel -- Vengeance thy name is woman, but if you’re a Prince everything works out in the end. Fundevogel -- If you’re going to be boiled by a crazy cook...run. Unless you are a shape shifter...of course. The Valiant Little Tailor --Make people believe you’re a bad ass and you’ll never have to prove it. Hansel and Gretel -- If you kill a “godless witch” you will be rewarded beyond the dreams of avarice, and if you are a father who abandons your children at the behest of your second wife but feel bad about it, you too will be rewarded. And if you catch the mouse you can make a hat out of it. The Mouse, The Bird and the Sausage -- Stick to your proper social roles or you will DIE! Mother Holle -- If you are ugly you must be lazy. If you are ugly and lazy you will be punished. Your punishment will be having your skin covered in pitch that will never come off, so according to the Grimm Brothers ugly = lazy = black skinned. Yikes. Little Red-Cap -- Listen to your mother because she is always right, and kill all the predatory wildlife you can because it will eat you otherwise. Oh, and if you are “devoured” by a wolf you can be cut out soon and revived. The Robber Bridegroom -- Never leave witnesses, and always check for missing body parts. Tom Thumb -- There’s no place like home is the stated lesson, but the real moral is that cheaters and crooks prosper. Rumpelstiltskin -- The rich and powerful do not have to honour contracts and agreements. That is the lot of the poor. Clever Gretel -- Lie your face off to protect the secret of your eating disorder and your alcoholism. The Old Man and His Grandson (possibly the best story in the tales; it’s certainly one of my favourites) -- Treat others as you’d like to be treated lest you be treated ill. The Little Peasant -- Lie, cheat, steal and commit murder, even mass murder, and you will flourish, so long as you are preying on the idiocy of your neighbours. Frederick and Catherine -- Dizzy blondes always prosper. Sweetheart Roland -- If you love your man and remain faithful, he’ll always come back to you, no matter his own unfaithful transgressions. Snowdrop (also known as Snow White and the Seven Dwarves) -- Creepy men will always come to the rescue of a too-young girl...if she is lovely enough. The Pink -- Apparently pink has always been the colour of homosexuality (of course, it could just be that I was feeling particularly gay when I read that night). Clever Elsie -- Divorce is as simple as a fowling net and bells tied around your moron spouse’s neck. At least if you are a Clever Hans. The Miser in the Bush -- Someone always pays. Ashputtel (aka Cinderella) -- The Brothers Grimm really made no sense at all, and they must have had a wicked step-mother of their own. These boys had issues. The White Snake -- Be kind to lesser beasts and you will some day be rewarded, but you can still kill any domesticated beasts indiscriminately. The Wolf and the Seven Little Kids -- Predators are evil and must die; prey are good and must live. Prey can also torture and kill predators whenever they want. The Queen Bee -- Be nice to animals and they will make you richer than Daffy Duck in the Genie's lair. The Elves and the Shoemaker -- Naked dwarf/elves make kick ass shoes. The Juniper Tree -- Killers should be killed, so their victims will be born again. The Turnip -- There is virtue in con artistry. Clever Hans -- THE BEST STORY EVER! The whole crew giggled their brains out at the escapades of Clever Hans. Of course, it could have been my silly Austrian accent. In fact, every Grimm Tale would be better with an Austrian accent. The Three Languages & Lily and The Lion -- Leave the fairy tales behind for a few days and they are totally forgettable. The Fox and The Horse -- Domesticated animals deserve much better than wild ones. Haven't I seen that somewhere before? The Blue Light -- It’s terrible for a Princess to be forced into menial labour. A capital offence, in fact. The Raven -- Useless men are the perfect men for a wronged princess. The Golden Goose -- Always feed homeless men, it’ll make you a King. And here I thought the most you could get from such a deed was a dipped ice cream cone. The Water of Life -- The good guys always win. Silly isn’t it? The Twelve Huntsman -- Sexism will always help a lady get her man. The King of the Golden Mountain -- Midgets and dwarves are nothing but magical. Bad people have black faces. Kings can steal anything they want. That's the Brothers Grimm in a nutshell. Doctor Knowall -- Idiots are fated to riches. See...there was ntohing new about Forrest Gump. The Seven Ravens -- Father’s are never responsible for their crimes against their children. The Wedding of Mrs. Fox -- First Story: Genetic anomalies are easy to overlook if you are a fox. Second Story: Racial purity must be maintained. Hey...weren't these cats German?! The Salad -- Turn a woman into an ass, and she will drop to her knees and do anything you want, making you happy forever. The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was -- The longer the story (or title) the more idiotic the moral. King Grisly-Beard -- Any shrew can be tamed. Iron Hans -- Cursed Kings will help any knob who can help them break their curse. Cat-Skin -- There are Kings everywhere, and they’re all looking for a Princess who wants to hide her Princessness. I am not sure that PETA would be impressed with this one. Snow-white and Rose-red -- Every talking animal is a Prince in disguise’ every pretty little girl is just waiting to be made a Princess; every dwarf is evil. So who comes out ahead in The Brothers Grimm Fairy Tales: The super rich, the rich, all nobility, the stupid, and cute animals. Who ends up looking bad: any woman who isn’t nobility, step-moms, dwarves, the poor. folks with dark skin. Yep, this book is crap. It is such crap that nearly every Disney adaptation is an improvement -- seriously. The last thing I can say, the thing I need to say, is YUCH. Yuch-yuchity-yuch-yuch-yuch! But Clever Hans...now that was awesome!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Its hard to rate a book when they are filled with multiple stories where some are bad and some are good, hence why it has received a 3 stars I only really read the stories that I were interested in reading. Most of them, after a certain point, I didn't read. The ones that I did read I enjoyed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    Boldly ventured is half won.As always, Grimm Brothers didn't disappoint me. I enjoyed this tale more than I expected. OVERVIEW There is a princess who proclaims that whoever solves her riddle, she will marry him. Princess is 100% sure that nobody can solve it but a tailor solves it. In state of shock, Princess refuses to marry him and gives him another test to pass in exchange of marriage. She puts him in the cage of bear. If he stays alive all the night, princess will marry him. This tale was Boldly ventured is half won.As always, Grimm Brothers didn't disappoint me. I enjoyed this tale more than I expected. OVERVIEW There is a princess who proclaims that whoever solves her riddle, she will marry him. Princess is 100% sure that nobody can solve it but a tailor solves it. In state of shock, Princess refuses to marry him and gives him another test to pass in exchange of marriage. She puts him in the cage of bear. If he stays alive all the night, princess will marry him. This tale was a fun read for me. It shows that no matter how much difficult a task is, don't be discouraged! There are many things we don't try. Because we think we can't do them. Because they seem impossible. I don't know about you guys but I feel this. Look at this tale, when the tailor was ordered to spend a night with bear, he could reject it. But he didn't. He didn't get discouraged. He tried it. And ultimately accomplished his goal by using his mind. Overall, it's great. I would recommend it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    tee

    The copy that I owned as a child had Anderson's stories on the reverse - UPSIDE-MOTHERFUCKING-DOWN. I know, right? Too rad for words? Why don't I own it anymore? I presume it just fell apart from the heady love affair that I had with it. I was besotted. Rapaciously smitten. If rapacious means what I think it does. I just wanted to climb in between the covers and love it good. With or without its consent. Maybe rapacious simply means greedy, which does just as good because I was greedy for it, The copy that I owned as a child had Anderson's stories on the reverse - UPSIDE-MOTHERFUCKING-DOWN. I know, right? Too rad for words? Why don't I own it anymore? I presume it just fell apart from the heady love affair that I had with it. I was besotted. Rapaciously smitten. If rapacious means what I think it does. I just wanted to climb in between the covers and love it good. With or without its consent. Maybe rapacious simply means greedy, which does just as good because I was greedy for it, like a fat kid who mixed butter and sugar together and ate it as a snack. Like I may or may not have done as a kid. Whilst reading Grimm's fairytales. I will love whoever buys me a copy of the version that I had as a child with undying gratitude. It had charm, mystique, it was chunky, fat, just the right size. Just like a good man. Nothing has lived up to it's magnificence since. Oh and the stories were good too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexxy

    I tried. I tried so hard to read this book. I kept telling myself that I can do it. That they're all old fairy tales. That it's nice to know the origin of all those classic stories. But no. I just... I really can't do it anymore. They're all ridiculous, annoying, and so so so much boring. DNF (I'm not sorry)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Do you know kids today don't know how gory fairy tales are? This is a travesty and will not stand while I am a teacher. While we were discussing Paul Bunyan this week I got sidetracked and started talking about how everything in fairy tales happens in threes. Like how in the original Cinderella the stepmother tries to trick the prince by cutting of portions of her stepdaughters feet to fit the shoe. The kids were all riveted and many asked "Where's that book with all the gross stories in it?" Do you know kids today don't know how gory fairy tales are? This is a travesty and will not stand while I am a teacher. While we were discussing Paul Bunyan this week I got sidetracked and started talking about how everything in fairy tales happens in threes. Like how in the original Cinderella the stepmother tries to trick the prince by cutting of portions of her stepdaughters feet to fit the shoe. The kids were all riveted and many asked "Where's that book with all the gross stories in it?" during SSR that day. I was thrilled to tell them it was this one. Grimm indeed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ferdy

    This was a chore to read, I thought it would be brilliant and dark. Sadly, it was anything but, there was the odd moment of slight creepiness but that was about it. Out of the two hundred or so stories, there were only a few that stood out — the rest were all repetitive, it felt like I was reading the same story over and over. I was getting sick of the same themes, characterizations and dynamics used. The message throughout was that: -All stepmothers are bitter, jealous, evil, immoral, lazy and This was a chore to read, I thought it would be brilliant and dark. Sadly, it was anything but, there was the odd moment of slight creepiness but that was about it. Out of the two hundred or so stories, there were only a few that stood out — the rest were all repetitive, it felt like I was reading the same story over and over. I was getting sick of the same themes, characterizations and dynamics used. The message throughout was that: -All stepmothers are bitter, jealous, evil, immoral, lazy and greedy. -Stepdaughters are always treated badly by their stepmothers and stepdaughters are always beautiful, and humble and good. -All ugly people are evil, only beautiful people are good. -Ugly people are cool with murder. -Insta-love will happen as long as the people involved are beautiful and/or royalty. -The youngest son who everyone thinks is dumb will always outsmart his evil older brothers and somehow become a prince/king. -Any character who does something good will be rewarded with all kinds of treasures. -Good girls have to be hard working, self-sacrificing, forgiving and humble. Otherwise they're unworthy of happiness. -Good will always conquer evil. Yea, I wouldn't recommend this to anyone, the stories aren't all that interesting, reading a few is more than enough to get the gist of the Grimm's brothers fairy tales.

  13. 4 out of 5

    C.B. Cook

    I wish I could review each and every story in this individually, but there are soooo many. All I can say is that this has given me quite a few story ideas and its also given me quite a lot of laughter... along with probably scarring me for life, as well. :P Some of those stories are creepy! And if anyone writes a fairytale retelling of The Straw, The Coal, and The Bean... let me know, because that will be HILARIOUS. ;)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie

    I was gifted a lovely edition of this - which was incredibly thoughtful, since there was no occasion for it. So, this is a 'review' as much as it is a perfect bout of nostalgia for me. There are 211 tales in here so I'm not able to, nor would I want to comment on them all. Grimm's tales are known all over the world - Hanzel and Gretel, Rapunzel, Rumpelstiltskin, The Frog Prince - everyone knows these, right? What about The Old Beggar-Woman, One-Eye, Two-Eyes, And Three-Eyes, The White Bride And I was gifted a lovely edition of this - which was incredibly thoughtful, since there was no occasion for it. So, this is a 'review' as much as it is a perfect bout of nostalgia for me. There are 211 tales in here so I'm not able to, nor would I want to comment on them all. Grimm's tales are known all over the world - Hanzel and Gretel, Rapunzel, Rumpelstiltskin, The Frog Prince - everyone knows these, right? What about The Old Beggar-Woman, One-Eye, Two-Eyes, And Three-Eyes, The White Bride And The Black One? I was a bit of a strange child in the sense that I was always fascinated by these beautifully dark tales. So as I peruse through this magical and beautifully bound book, I may make occasional comments on certain tales - and I hope that one day should you be curious enough, that you too pick up an unabridged copy of Grimm's Fairy Tales, and be as delighted as I am over these stories. ~ 1. The Frog-King, or Iron Henry I used to fervently argue that the Frog Prince was never kissed, but then again, not everyone had read the Grimm's version of this childhood classic. Boo-hoo to them, because Iron Henry is perfect!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Storjohann

    I’ve been meaning to read this one for a while. It is fascinating to see how all of the fairy tales which we have grown up with in a sanitized Disnified form, originally came to take their shape. The tales are in as enjoyable a form as any cheerful animation. Whatever translation was done is seamless and there are no ridiculous schisms between the meanings and implications of terms that have different connotations in German (a common trait when words do not match exactly in two different I’ve been meaning to read this one for a while. It is fascinating to see how all of the fairy tales which we have grown up with in a sanitized Disnified form, originally came to take their shape. The tales are in as enjoyable a form as any cheerful animation. Whatever translation was done is seamless and there are no ridiculous schisms between the meanings and implications of terms that have different connotations in German (a common trait when words do not match exactly in two different languages, such as Elf and other fantastic creatures). My only caveat for the reader of this collection is that this is best taken in small doses or all at once. It might get tedious for someone to read all of the different versions of Rumplestiltskin and weaving straw into gold one after another unless one were really in the mindset to do so. That is an occupational hazard of collecting every version of every folktale as Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm did. I’ll spare the reader of this review any details about the brothers’ forays into the countryside to sit at the firesides of old women and write down the stories which had been passed on since time immemorial. Still, the tales are classic, and faithfully rendered. Enjoy. “Open the window, that the lies might fly out!”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nora

    I love fairy tales. I grew up with Disney's cute, timeless renditions of them. I think it's important to point out, though, that Disney definitely made the majority of these stories much more palatable. For example, in the original Sleeping Beauty, the prince basically rapes the princess while she's asleep and by the time she wakes up it turns out she's already had kids by him. In the original The Little Mermaid, the mermaid kills herself after seeing the prince marry a human girl. In the I love fairy tales. I grew up with Disney's cute, timeless renditions of them. I think it's important to point out, though, that Disney definitely made the majority of these stories much more palatable. For example, in the original Sleeping Beauty, the prince basically rapes the princess while she's asleep and by the time she wakes up it turns out she's already had kids by him. In the original The Little Mermaid, the mermaid kills herself after seeing the prince marry a human girl. In the original Cinderella, the stepsisters cut off parts of their feet so they can fit in the glass slipper. It kind of worries me that these types of stories were considered children's stories in the days of yore.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    I'm going to put a star next to the stories I enjoyed the most. < like this. The Frog Prince: (view spoiler)[ I don't see how the princess GOT the kind prince in the first place... I mean she just throws him at the wall (she physically abuse a frog, well what she thought of as a frog. But still !!), she didn't show any kindness what so ever. Everything she did that was 'kind' to him was because her father forced her to do so. I don't know what the moral of this story is. Be unkind and be I'm going to put a star next to the stories I enjoyed the most. ★ < like this. The Frog Prince: (view spoiler)[ I don't see how the princess GOT the kind prince in the first place... I mean she just throws him at the wall (she physically abuse a frog, well what she thought of as a frog. But still !!), she didn't show any kindness what so ever. Everything she did that was 'kind' to him was because her father forced her to do so. I don't know what the moral of this story is. Be unkind and be forced to do good things to someone else and you get your prince and happy ever after? This isn't a good message to anyone, including kids. I did like it in THIS story that the place the frog retrieves her 'ball' was in a well, not a pond because it makes more sense to anyone that a person wouldn't be able to their things from a very deep well, rather than a normal size pond. A well makes more sense for you to need a frog to help you.... I don't know, maybe its just me. And how old is the prince and princess, it doesn't say, I'm guessing between 16 - 21 years of age. (hide spoiler)] Cat and mouse in partnership: ★ This was an interesting story that was a quick read and easy to go through. I knew the eventually outcome of the story but I still enjoyed it. Our Lady's Child/The Story of the Youth Who Went Forth to Learn What Fear Was: I don't have much to say about these two, it was just interesting. The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids: ★ I've always like this tale, even it makes little sense that the wolf didn't kill the kids when he eat them, how did they live through that! Faithful John or Trusty John: ★ This was an interesting telling of this story. I like it. The Good Bargain/The Wonderful Musician/The Twelve Brothers/The Pack of Ragamuffins/Little Brother & Little Sister: These stories I didn't care for much. Not that they where bad but they didn't give me much of a emotional reaction. Rapunzel: (view spoiler)[ I've never really liked this story, I've never liked Rapunzel's birth mother; I found her too selfish as a person as she said 'she would die' if she was able to eat someones greenery in their garden (telling her husband to steal it for her) - which is a gross over exaggeration, no one in history has died from not being able to eat something you crave, regardless of being pregnant or not. (hide spoiler)] The Three Little Men in the Woods/The Three Spinning Women: These where interesting story. Hansel and Grethel: ★ I've always liked this story and I love the brother and sister in the story. Cinderella: ★ I enjoyed this story but I don't like it that Cinder's father lets his new wife treat his daughter so horribly. Little Red Cap: ★ I've always loved the tale of Little Red Riding hood, it was a light fun read. The Elves/The Elves and the Shoemaker: ★ This is quiet a sweet short story that I loved reading when I was young and I still enjoy it. The Six Swans: ★ I've this story before and I still enjoy it. I'm still not sure the wicked Queen got the best justice but I believed it work out the best way. Little Briar-Rose (also Sleeping Beauty): ★ Yeah I love this story. Its one of my favorites. Little Snow White: ★ I didn't know before hand that the story of Snow white was named 'Little Snow White' before the Disney adaption came to past. Still enjoyed the tale and the ending was interesting with the evil Queen dancing at Snow White's wedding in red hot slippers until she fell down dead. Rumpelstiltskin: ★ A short story that I've always enjoyed reading, Rumpel is a bit of an idiot in this - I prefer cunning and extremely clever Rumpel in the Once upon a time TV show. The Poor Man and the Rich Man: Interesting tale that shows being kind and good will reward you in the end. A Riddling Tale: A short tale, it was sweet and short with some magic splashed into it. It was enjoyable. Snow-White and Rose-Red: ★ I've always enjoyed this story, I'm glad I re-read it. I love Snow and Rose, and I love how opposite they are from each other but also alike as well. There was at least 12 of the tales that I loved and I thought a lot of them where ok/enjoyable, and the rest I didn't like very well, but over all I enjoyed myself while I was reading. Especially re-reading my favorite ones.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tyler J [They/He] Gray

    VICTORY IS MINE! It only took me...oh...3 years #HangsHeadInShame (Read 60 stories in the beginning of 2016 and then finally picked it back up again in January of this year, reading so many stories a month to finish it) Average 2.88 I'm not really a fan, but I finally finished it! Of course with 211 stories I hated some, felt meh about some, and loved some (and noted by each story in the table of contents what I rated it).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Penny

    Very interesting, but I can't say I particularly enjoyed the stories themselves all that much. I found the history, context and discussion fascinating and I'm really pleased we read this collection as a group. I was expecting the tales to be darker than they were, although I did think the punishment handed out to the "bad guys" was mostly fairly hardcore. I thought the distress would be worse in the meat of the story as I'd been told that the original fairy tales were far more severe than the Very interesting, but I can't say I particularly enjoyed the stories themselves all that much. I found the history, context and discussion fascinating and I'm really pleased we read this collection as a group. I was expecting the tales to be darker than they were, although I did think the punishment handed out to the "bad guys" was mostly fairly hardcore. I thought the distress would be worse in the meat of the story as I'd been told that the original fairy tales were far more severe than the Disney versions. Mostly I found the originals bizarre. The princess doesn't kiss the frog prince, she throws him against a wall! I mean really?!?! I know anyone who was involved in the group discussion must be sick of me talking about The Frog King which is the first tale in the collection, but I found it such a good example of the weirdness of these stories. It was really strange how it played out, the princess is a horrible lying mean little girl and she gets a handsome prince and goes to marry him and live happily ever after. Oh and there's a servant who loved the prince so much his heart was bound but when the prince came back the bands around his heart snapped. Random. I was very lucky to read The Hard Facts of the Grimms' Fairy Tales while reading this collection which honestly made the stories far more interesting! I was really interested to learn that the commonly read version is the 4th edition that the Grimm brothers edited themselves. Some differences between the first and fourth editions include the frog prince being thrown against the wall and landing on the princess' bed where she joined him and they spent the night together, to them being companions, and also in the first edition the "step mothers" were actually the mothers. That really surprised me. I wish I could have gotten my hands on a first edition! A very interesting read, but not what I'd call a particularly enjoyable one.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    The kids really enjoyed hearing the real story of Cinderella, Snow White, and others. But some of these stories are just so darn WEIRD. The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean . . . is that anyone's favorite story? Yeah, I didn't think so. But this is a beautiful edition: leather-bound, gilt-edged, with a ribbon bookmark and a creepy owl on the endpapers. If you're looking for an old-school edition of Grimm's Fairy Tales, this would definitely be my pick. Oh, and the kids' favorite story? The The kids really enjoyed hearing the real story of Cinderella, Snow White, and others. But some of these stories are just so darn WEIRD. The Straw, the Coal, and the Bean . . . is that anyone's favorite story? Yeah, I didn't think so. But this is a beautiful edition: leather-bound, gilt-edged, with a ribbon bookmark and a creepy owl on the endpapers. If you're looking for an old-school edition of Grimm's Fairy Tales, this would definitely be my pick. Oh, and the kids' favorite story? The Fisherman and his Wife. Just like their father!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Suvi

    Even though I like some of the Disney movies they're mostly watered down and fluffy versions of these incredibly imaginative, dark and grim folk tales that the brothers Grimm collected. Even though not all the tales are interesting I would happily get this to my bookshelf anyway. And finally, I would like to thank you my Finnish teacher who introduced the morbid world of the Grimms to my class when we were 13. She read the most memorable fairy tales to us under a red lamp and it made me travel Even though I like some of the Disney movies they're mostly watered down and fluffy versions of these incredibly imaginative, dark and grim folk tales that the brothers Grimm collected. Even though not all the tales are interesting I would happily get this to my bookshelf anyway. And finally, I would like to thank you my Finnish teacher who introduced the morbid world of the Grimms to my class when we were 13. She read the most memorable fairy tales to us under a red lamp and it made me travel back in time to dark woods in the heart of Europe with buckets of blood.

  22. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    Catching up with the classics #28

  23. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I think this is an absolutely important book for everyone to read. The story tropes are important for appreciation of other later works in all forms of entertainment. So why did I give it three stars? Because so many of the stories in here are not ones that you have heard before, and for good reason, they are either boring, a copy of an earlier story in the same work (there about seven stories of Clever So-and-So that all follow nearly the same story path), or don’t really teach anything. Also, I think this is an absolutely important book for everyone to read. The story tropes are important for appreciation of other later works in all forms of entertainment. So why did I give it three stars? Because so many of the stories in here are not ones that you have heard before, and for good reason, they are either boring, a copy of an earlier story in the same work (there about seven stories of Clever So-and-So that all follow nearly the same story path), or don’t really teach anything. Also, have you ever noticed that about half of these stories involve some sort of cannibalism? I don’t remember that particularly as a child, but then I was normally reading flowered up abridged versions. I’m starting to wonder if this is where my neurotic fear of zombies was originally born. If you want to gift this book to a child, then more power to you, but depending on their age I might go with simply and more energetic translations. As an adult, I wouldn’t plan to sit down and read this in one go, but a few stories here and there is a good way to enjoy this work.

  24. 5 out of 5

    L11_Nick Mamula

    The original collection of tales, that encompasses the foundation of what we base the majority of our present day lessons upon. In particular, Rumpelstiltskin was a story that struck me as very intense and dark for being a children story. The idea that Rumpelstiltskin is portrayed in a devil like fashion, and is the essence of evil, scares even me. In addition, the story contrasts normal gender roles, where the man is wise and the woman is weak and insignificant. Within Rumpelstiltskin, the The original collection of tales, that encompasses the foundation of what we base the majority of our present day lessons upon. In particular, Rumpelstiltskin was a story that struck me as very intense and dark for being a children story. The idea that Rumpelstiltskin is portrayed in a devil like fashion, and is the essence of evil, scares even me. In addition, the story contrasts normal gender roles, where the man is wise and the woman is weak and insignificant. Within Rumpelstiltskin, the roles are reversed, and the woman signifies strength and knowledge. To say the least, I enjoyed the origination of the tale. This allows for a better appreciation of the modern day spin-offs and satires. I would recommend all the other tales within this collection book, and not just Rumpelstiltskin. They all are a bit darker and have a lesson to be learned in the end. The age group I would recommend would be from 10 and up because the themes are a bit darker and the concepts are lesson filtered compared to the modern day versions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hayat

    'When people are too well off they always begin to long for something new.' What an entertaining and enjoyable collection of fairy tales with sharp sprinkling of reality and just a little bit of madness but that's expected from Fairy tales. The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales is not the usual Disney stories we grew up with but an older version with life lessons on the dangers of the world. I guess this is how they used to teach children common sense in the past and it's fantastic because children 'When people are too well off they always begin to long for something new.' What an entertaining and enjoyable collection of fairy tales with sharp sprinkling of reality and just a little bit of madness but that's expected from Fairy tales. The Complete Grimm's Fairy Tales is not the usual Disney stories we grew up with but an older version with life lessons on the dangers of the world. I guess this is how they used to teach children common sense in the past and it's fantastic because children are resilient and they love a bit of horror and fantasy with their happily ever after....well, at least I did at that age. I can't wait to read them to my children.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    I made it through, and WAY on time for the readathon! This was a much faster read than I had anticipated - since fairytales are in an older English, I thought it would be slower and more difficult to get through them, but since I already knew many, many of the fairytales in German and they aren't very complex stories, I flew through these. Obviously there were some I enjoyed more than others, but overall it was a really good read and the ones I loved way outweighed the ones I didn't like so I made it through, and WAY on time for the readathon! This was a much faster read than I had anticipated - since fairytales are in an older English, I thought it would be slower and more difficult to get through them, but since I already knew many, many of the fairytales in German and they aren't very complex stories, I flew through these. Obviously there were some I enjoyed more than others, but overall it was a really good read and the ones I loved way outweighed the ones I didn't like so much, so I can confidently give this one a 4-star-rating because I really love fairytales in general :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chadi Raheb

    After listening to a few stories for the last few days, I couldn’t push myself anymore to go on. I found out that I unfortunately never liked these kind of books, but the delicate sweet taste of little drops of memories of my childhood in them. It’s not these stories that I like; it’s just that I missed those days, now trying to seek and retrieve it through these books... Alas! Not only did I not enjoy the stories as an adult, but I wondered how superficial and sometimes idiotic could they be! After listening to a few stories for the last few days, I couldn’t push myself anymore to go on. I found out that I unfortunately never liked these kind of books, but the delicate sweet taste of little drops of memories of my childhood in them. It’s not these stories that I like; it’s just that I missed those days, now trying to seek and retrieve it through these books... Alas! Not only did I not enjoy the stories as an adult, but I wondered how superficial and sometimes idiotic could they be! If only I could go back in time and meet the child-version of myself, I’d strongly recommend her not to devote her time to it, but to stick more to those anthropology books of hers! P.S. Apart from the content, I listened to the audiobook narrated by Bob Neufeld on LibriVox app. & he had the most perfect & comforting & suitable grandpa voice for such stories. That was the only reason I could make it through for about half an hour & didn’t give up sooner on the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    YouKneeK

    I started reading this book on January 2 of this year and I’ve been slowly, slowly working my way through it. It’s 752 pages and contains 211 stories. I think, if I had tried to read this book all at once, I probably would have given up on it. As it is, I’m not sure finishing it is the wisest thing I’ve ever done. It was entertaining at first, but it grew increasingly repetitive and tiresome. It was tolerable in small portions, though. It also made pretty good bedtime reading. I usually started I started reading this book on January 2 of this year and I’ve been slowly, slowly working my way through it. It’s 752 pages and contains 211 stories. I think, if I had tried to read this book all at once, I probably would have given up on it. As it is, I’m not sure finishing it is the wisest thing I’ve ever done. It was entertaining at first, but it grew increasingly repetitive and tiresome. It was tolerable in small portions, though. It also made pretty good bedtime reading. I usually started off reading my regular book before bed but, if I wasn’t feeling tired as bedtime approached, I’d pull up this one and read a couple stories. More often than not, I was feeling quite sleepy after that. :) The repetition cannot be understated. There were some stories that were nearly identical, with small changes to the details. In other cases, part of one story was cobbled together with part of another story to make a new story. In yet other cases, the story was more changed, but the underlying plot elements were very similar to that of other stories. As far as general themes and character types went, those were repeated constantly. Similar stories tended to be grouped together, which made the repetition that much more obvious. I’m probably making it sound a little worse than it actually was. There were some entertaining stories and some funny stories. It was particularly interesting to see older versions of some of the modernized fairy tales that are well-known today. A few of the stories were so bizarre that I just started at my Kindle in puzzlement for a while before shrugging and moving on. The stories are over 200 years old, and they very much reflect the morals and attitudes from that time. In particular, there is an awful lot of racism. Although I never lost sight of the fact that this was a product of the times in which the stories originated, I think the repetition made it more difficult for me to just acknowledge it and then move on. I would like to leave you with a handful of the oft-repeated lessons that I “learned” from this collection: * Pretty girls are always pure of heart. * Ugly girls are always wicked. * Princes are randomly wandering around all over the place, particularly in the forest, and they’ll marry the first pretty girl they see. Immediately. * Your chances of being married by a prince are greatly increased if you’re poor or if you’ve been mistreated by your family. * If you’re one of three brothers and you’re not the youngest, you’re arrogant and you’ll likely fail miserably at everything you do because you’re rude to people. * If you’re one of three brothers and you are the youngest, your family will think you’re stupid and make fun of you. On the bright side, you’ll likely obtain a kingdom or at least great wealth just by accurately and politely answering nosy questions from random people you meet. * There’s no need to plan ahead for any quest or trip you take. Just take off when the mood strikes, and you’ll meet creatures along the way who happen to have exactly what you need, sometimes before you even know you need it. * If things aren’t going well on your quest, just stand around and look despondent. If you’re a girl, maybe shed a tear or two. Somebody is bound to show up and do all of your work for you.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    It came to me in 3 green leather covered books. I still regret not persuading the librarian to remove them from the shelves cos they are too old.. They would've happily walked home with me. However, lets get to the point. I'm a sucker for fairy tales, give me one any day, I'm a happy woman. Give me 200, you won't hear from me for a while. I'll be walking in a dreamland with all the characters doing all the horrible things that happens in fairy tales. When I read them as an adult, I realized how It came to me in 3 green leather covered books. I still regret not persuading the librarian to remove them from the shelves cos they are too old.. They would've happily walked home with me. However, lets get to the point. I'm a sucker for fairy tales, give me one any day, I'm a happy woman. Give me 200, you won't hear from me for a while. I'll be walking in a dreamland with all the characters doing all the horrible things that happens in fairy tales. When I read them as an adult, I realized how dark fairy tales can be. Oh hell, I'm not a selfish person to keep things to myself. So I decided to share my pleasant findings. 1. Cannibalism - Just cos it's my habit to roast couple of kids in the oven and have them for supper. 2. Serial killers - Men who marries women in order to kill them. 3. Polygamy - well because it's hard to let one go and because I need more than one woman in my bed sort of a scenario 4. Psychotic behaviors - men who tortures women, kills them and keep their dead bodies as trophies. 5. Mass murder - just because it's a sport I'm gonna slay everyone who opposes me. (Niiiiiiiiiiiice) 6. Fratricide - brothers killing brothers out of jealousy. 7. Theft - oh my king wants this and you're not gonna give it to me so I'll simply steal it.. 8. Violence - killing with any means necessary. 9. Kidnapping - oh you didn't pay me what you promised, so I'll just kidnap all your kids. 10. Breaking and entering - you know what? I really need to get to your house cos I need what's yours. So I'll just get into your house when you're not around. Now I know why I like fairy tales. They are grim and dark and very close to the nature of the species who we are.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I love the stories... but dislike the edition. I bought it because it is a nice hardback that looks good on the shelf. Unfortunately, Barnes & Noble doesn't include any forward, afterward or footnotes ~ just presents the stories. Again, I love the stories, but would have also liked a little more information about their origin, etc. But I suppose this is how Barnes & Noble is able to publish such a pretty book for such a low price.

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