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The Age of Innocence - Literature Classics, Complete Edition (Annotated)

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The Age of Innocence - Literature Classics, Complete Edition ADDITIONAL CONTENT : + Active Table of Contents + The Author Biography + Annotations - Plot Summary - Characters Lists - Adaptations OVERVIEW: The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton's 12th novel, published in 1920, which won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper-class New York City in the 1870s. In 1920, The Age of Innocence - Literature Classics, Complete Edition ADDITIONAL CONTENT : + Active Table of Contents + The Author Biography + Annotations - Plot Summary - Characters Lists - Adaptations OVERVIEW: The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton's 12th novel, published in 1920, which won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper-class New York City in the 1870s. In 1920, The Age of Innocence was serialized in four parts in the Pictorial Review magazine, and later released by D. Appleton and Company as a book in New York and in London. SUMMARY: Newland Archer, gentleman lawyer and heir to one of New York City's best families, is happily anticipating a highly desirable marriage to the sheltered and beautiful May Welland. Yet he finds reason to doubt his choice of bride after the appearance of Countess Ellen Olenska, May's exotic, beautiful thirty-year-old cousin, who has been living in Europe. Ellen has returned to New York after scandalously separating herself (per rumor) from a bad marriage to a Polish count. At first, Ellen's arrival and its potential taint to his bride-to-be's family disturbs him, but he becomes intrigued by the worldly Ellen who flouts New York society's fastidious rules. As Newland's admiration for the countess grows, so does his doubt about marrying May, a perfect product of Old New York society; his match with May no longer seems the ideal fate he had imagined. REVIEWS: 5 Stars Review : Elizabeth - Goodreads I saw the film years ago. My mother and I were the only people in the theater laughing. The man behind us turned to his wife and in a loud-but-passive-aggressive-I-wish-you'd-shut-up-voice said, "Is this funny?" Yes. Edith Wharton is a lot funnier than people think. It's that intelligent, subtle, dart-like humor that I am so pleased with. This passage, rivals Jane Austen's opening of Pride and Prejudice for combining a witty criticism of her society's absurdism and establishing that the unalterable and unquestionable and universal will be questioned and, may, or may not, turn out to be alterable or universal. And it does it in a way that has you laughing. [...]since an unalterable and unquestioned law of the musical world required that German text of French operas sung by Swedish artists should be translated into Italian for the clearer understanding of English-speaking audiences. This seemed as natural to Newland Archer as all the other conventions on which his life was moulded: such as the duty of using two silver-backed brushes with his monogram in blue enamel to part his hair, and never appearing in society without a flower (preferably a gardenia) in his buttonhole. How can anyone be so funny and make such a profound point at the same time? All my favorite authors seem to have this ability and I've got to say, I think it may be a bit unfair. We regular mortals should be able do this as well. In fact, I wish more authors did have this ability - But I rant. What I wanted to say about The Age of Innocence is how amazing it is. How wonderful Edith Wharton is for blending humor and such subtle actions with profound emotion. Newland Archer could stare at a woman's hand and the description of the act tells me more than a description of his feelings what he wanted to do (like take it in his own and smother it with kisses and then run away with it - and the woman attached, I think). It was fascinating to have the story from his point of view as well, as it gave us such as distorted view of May (his initial love interest) and their interaction. I realized how unreliable he was as a narrator where she was concerned probably later than it was obvious to others, but I loved that about the book.


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The Age of Innocence - Literature Classics, Complete Edition ADDITIONAL CONTENT : + Active Table of Contents + The Author Biography + Annotations - Plot Summary - Characters Lists - Adaptations OVERVIEW: The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton's 12th novel, published in 1920, which won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper-class New York City in the 1870s. In 1920, The Age of Innocence - Literature Classics, Complete Edition ADDITIONAL CONTENT : + Active Table of Contents + The Author Biography + Annotations - Plot Summary - Characters Lists - Adaptations OVERVIEW: The Age of Innocence is Edith Wharton's 12th novel, published in 1920, which won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize. The story is set in upper-class New York City in the 1870s. In 1920, The Age of Innocence was serialized in four parts in the Pictorial Review magazine, and later released by D. Appleton and Company as a book in New York and in London. SUMMARY: Newland Archer, gentleman lawyer and heir to one of New York City's best families, is happily anticipating a highly desirable marriage to the sheltered and beautiful May Welland. Yet he finds reason to doubt his choice of bride after the appearance of Countess Ellen Olenska, May's exotic, beautiful thirty-year-old cousin, who has been living in Europe. Ellen has returned to New York after scandalously separating herself (per rumor) from a bad marriage to a Polish count. At first, Ellen's arrival and its potential taint to his bride-to-be's family disturbs him, but he becomes intrigued by the worldly Ellen who flouts New York society's fastidious rules. As Newland's admiration for the countess grows, so does his doubt about marrying May, a perfect product of Old New York society; his match with May no longer seems the ideal fate he had imagined. REVIEWS: 5 Stars Review : Elizabeth - Goodreads I saw the film years ago. My mother and I were the only people in the theater laughing. The man behind us turned to his wife and in a loud-but-passive-aggressive-I-wish-you'd-shut-up-voice said, "Is this funny?" Yes. Edith Wharton is a lot funnier than people think. It's that intelligent, subtle, dart-like humor that I am so pleased with. This passage, rivals Jane Austen's opening of Pride and Prejudice for combining a witty criticism of her society's absurdism and establishing that the unalterable and unquestionable and universal will be questioned and, may, or may not, turn out to be alterable or universal. And it does it in a way that has you laughing. [...]since an unalterable and unquestioned law of the musical world required that German text of French operas sung by Swedish artists should be translated into Italian for the clearer understanding of English-speaking audiences. This seemed as natural to Newland Archer as all the other conventions on which his life was moulded: such as the duty of using two silver-backed brushes with his monogram in blue enamel to part his hair, and never appearing in society without a flower (preferably a gardenia) in his buttonhole. How can anyone be so funny and make such a profound point at the same time? All my favorite authors seem to have this ability and I've got to say, I think it may be a bit unfair. We regular mortals should be able do this as well. In fact, I wish more authors did have this ability - But I rant. What I wanted to say about The Age of Innocence is how amazing it is. How wonderful Edith Wharton is for blending humor and such subtle actions with profound emotion. Newland Archer could stare at a woman's hand and the description of the act tells me more than a description of his feelings what he wanted to do (like take it in his own and smother it with kisses and then run away with it - and the woman attached, I think). It was fascinating to have the story from his point of view as well, as it gave us such as distorted view of May (his initial love interest) and their interaction. I realized how unreliable he was as a narrator where she was concerned probably later than it was obvious to others, but I loved that about the book.

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