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Disrupting the Culture of Silence: Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education

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CHOICE 2015 Outstanding Academic Title What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or -hostile- work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women's race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations? How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work clima CHOICE 2015 Outstanding Academic Title What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or -hostile- work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women's race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations? How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work climates? What actions can institutions and individuals-independently and collectively-take toward equity in the academy? Despite tremendous progress toward gender equality and equity in institutions of higher education, deep patterns of discrimination against women in the academy persist. From the -chilly climate- to the -old boys' club, - women academics must navigate structures and cultures that continue to marginalize, penalize, and undermine their success. This book is a -tool kit- for advancing greater gender equality and equity in higher education. It presents the latest research on issues of concern to them, and to anyone interested in a more equitable academy. It documents the challenging, sometimes hostile experiences of women academics through feminist analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, including narratives from women of different races and ethnicities across disciplines, ranks, and university types. The contributors' research draws upon the experiences of women academics including those with under-examined identities such as lesbian, feminist, married or unmarried, and contingent faculty. And, it offers new perspectives on persistent issues such as family policies, pay and promotion inequalities, and disproportionate service burdens. The editors provide case studies of women who have encountered antagonistic workplaces, and offer action steps, best practices, and more than 100 online resources for individuals navigating similar situations. Beyond women in academe, this book is for their allies and for administrators interested in changing the climates, cultures, and policies that allow gender inequality to exist on their campuses, and to researchers/scholars investigating these phenomena. It aims to disrupt complacency amongst those who claim that things are -better- or -good enough- and to provide readers with strategies and resources to counter barriers created by culture, climate, or institutional structures.


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CHOICE 2015 Outstanding Academic Title What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or -hostile- work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women's race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations? How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work clima CHOICE 2015 Outstanding Academic Title What do women academics classify as challenging, inequitable, or -hostile- work environments and experiences? How do these vary by women's race/ethnicity, rank, sexual orientation, or other social locations? How do academic cultures and organizational structures work independently and in tandem to foster or challenge such work climates? What actions can institutions and individuals-independently and collectively-take toward equity in the academy? Despite tremendous progress toward gender equality and equity in institutions of higher education, deep patterns of discrimination against women in the academy persist. From the -chilly climate- to the -old boys' club, - women academics must navigate structures and cultures that continue to marginalize, penalize, and undermine their success. This book is a -tool kit- for advancing greater gender equality and equity in higher education. It presents the latest research on issues of concern to them, and to anyone interested in a more equitable academy. It documents the challenging, sometimes hostile experiences of women academics through feminist analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, including narratives from women of different races and ethnicities across disciplines, ranks, and university types. The contributors' research draws upon the experiences of women academics including those with under-examined identities such as lesbian, feminist, married or unmarried, and contingent faculty. And, it offers new perspectives on persistent issues such as family policies, pay and promotion inequalities, and disproportionate service burdens. The editors provide case studies of women who have encountered antagonistic workplaces, and offer action steps, best practices, and more than 100 online resources for individuals navigating similar situations. Beyond women in academe, this book is for their allies and for administrators interested in changing the climates, cultures, and policies that allow gender inequality to exist on their campuses, and to researchers/scholars investigating these phenomena. It aims to disrupt complacency amongst those who claim that things are -better- or -good enough- and to provide readers with strategies and resources to counter barriers created by culture, climate, or institutional structures.

33 review for Disrupting the Culture of Silence: Confronting Gender Inequality and Making Change in Higher Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    There is some valuable content in this book, but like many other edited volumes, it's sporadically located. Which means that while the editors did a great job of organizing the themes, the individual elements did not quite gel into a compelling whole. (For me. Choice obviously disagreed.) I think if you've never worked in higher ed, or if you're a man or white without any other marginalized identities, maybe this would contain some surprises? But my reaction to most of it was, "yes, of course, wh There is some valuable content in this book, but like many other edited volumes, it's sporadically located. Which means that while the editors did a great job of organizing the themes, the individual elements did not quite gel into a compelling whole. (For me. Choice obviously disagreed.) I think if you've never worked in higher ed, or if you're a man or white without any other marginalized identities, maybe this would contain some surprises? But my reaction to most of it was, "yes, of course, when are we getting to the making change part?" And when we did get to the making change part it was all.... ♪ feelings ♪ and no structure. As was clearly stated in separate chapters, the main driver for the status quo at present is that this is how higher ed organizations are designed. That's why it's called the status quo. So how do we interrupt the status quo? How do we change the structures? *crickets*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zarina

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    Elizabeth

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    Chandani

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    Alice

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    John Cox

  7. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Schaff-Stump

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    378.0082 D613 2015

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Guittar

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    Amanda

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    Kelleen (The Story Graph, try it. Stop giving Amazon your data. See link in my profile)

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    Megan

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    Claire

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    Laura Antonow

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    Claire Meadows-Haworth

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  32. 4 out of 5

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  33. 4 out of 5

    Nicollette Buckle

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