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Noughts Crosses Graphic Novel

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Callum is a nought - an inferior white citizen in a society controlled by the black Crosses. Sephy is a Cross - and the daughter of one of the most powerful, ruthless men in the country. In their hostile, violent world, noughts and Crosses simply don't mix. But when Sephy and Callum's childhood friendship grows into love, they're determined to find a Callum is a nought - an inferior white citizen in a society controlled by the black Crosses. Sephy is a Cross - and the daughter of one of the most powerful, ruthless men in the country. In their hostile, violent world, noughts and Crosses simply don't mix. But when Sephy and Callum's childhood friendship grows into love, they're determined to find a way to be together. And then the bomb explodes . . . The long-awaited graphic novel adaptation of one of the most influential, critically acclaimed and original novels of all time, from multi-award-winning Malorie Blackman.


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Callum is a nought - an inferior white citizen in a society controlled by the black Crosses. Sephy is a Cross - and the daughter of one of the most powerful, ruthless men in the country. In their hostile, violent world, noughts and Crosses simply don't mix. But when Sephy and Callum's childhood friendship grows into love, they're determined to find a Callum is a nought - an inferior white citizen in a society controlled by the black Crosses. Sephy is a Cross - and the daughter of one of the most powerful, ruthless men in the country. In their hostile, violent world, noughts and Crosses simply don't mix. But when Sephy and Callum's childhood friendship grows into love, they're determined to find a way to be together. And then the bomb explodes . . . The long-awaited graphic novel adaptation of one of the most influential, critically acclaimed and original novels of all time, from multi-award-winning Malorie Blackman.

30 review for Noughts Crosses Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Churchill

    This is a FANTASTIC adaptation of the novel, I'm so happy that it translated well and I think they condensed the story really well. The artwork is fairly simplistic, it didn't blow me away but it worked well enough, and although it doesn't have the same level of emotion as the book (probably because of it's reduced format, though I think it could have made me feel a LITTLE more) it did do the story justice I think. I still fully recommend people read the original novel, but if you'd r This is a FANTASTIC adaptation of the novel, I'm so happy that it translated well and I think they condensed the story really well. The artwork is fairly simplistic, it didn't blow me away but it worked well enough, and although it doesn't have the same level of emotion as the book (probably because of it's reduced format, though I think it could have made me feel a LITTLE more) it did do the story justice I think. I still fully recommend people read the original novel, but if you'd rather skip it for some reason this will give a great insight into the story and the ideas surrounding equality, race and society's weaknesses that made Noughts & Crosses famous and award winning.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alyce Hunt

    "D'you ever wonder what it would be like if our positions were reversed? If whites were in charge instead of you crosses?" "I'm not sure I share your faith in a society ruled by noughts. People are people. We'll always find a way to mess it up, doesn't matter who's in charge." I read the 'Noughts and Crosses' series many, many moons ago - back in 2007 and 2008. I've always wanted to reread it, but I haven't had the time: there are so many dystopian series that I haven't tried out "D'you ever wonder what it would be like if our positions were reversed? If whites were in charge instead of you crosses?" "I'm not sure I share your faith in a society ruled by noughts. People are people. We'll always find a way to mess it up, doesn't matter who's in charge." I read the 'Noughts and Crosses' series many, many moons ago - back in 2007 and 2008. I've always wanted to reread it, but I haven't had the time: there are so many dystopian series that I haven't tried out yet, so it feels rude to spend time reliving these novels. However, when I spotted this graphic novel adaptation in the library, I had to pick it up. I could remember the story well enough - it's haunting, so you can't forget it once you've read it - and it was a nice way for me to rediscover the characters and the story without spending too much time. This graphic novel adaptation is very true to the book (from what I can remember - all of the main events are definitely present) and it's perhaps more effective seeing it played out visually: actually seeing the white people being oppressed and the black people ruling society. As the media and the government are still so overwhelmingly whitewashed (proven this week with the Oscar nominations, which completely snubbed black people from the awards) it's a stark contrast to the world that we're living it, and it proves that - despite the fact that ten years have passed since the first novel was published - not much has changed in the world, and there's still a long way to go to reach equality between the races. Because the graphic novel is a speedy read there isn't as much character development, so it's not as emotionally involving (destroying) as the novel, but it's still a very enjoyable read. The art style is rather simplistic, but it adds to the charm of the overall product. I really enjoyed this adaptation, and I sincerely hope the rest of the series undergoes the same treatment.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Diana Simumpande

    I liked this graphic novel. When I was 12 and all the other kids at school were gushing over this book, I was reading Jacqueline Wilson and I think I may have missed an opportunity there. I thought this would be a good chance to get an idea of what the book was about without actually reading the original. I liked the story, I think the concept was amazing but I had a lot of issues with the pacing in this. I think we could have done with two books. It seemed a little cliché at times, and for me, I liked this graphic novel. When I was 12 and all the other kids at school were gushing over this book, I was reading Jacqueline Wilson and I think I may have missed an opportunity there. I thought this would be a good chance to get an idea of what the book was about without actually reading the original. I liked the story, I think the concept was amazing but I had a lot of issues with the pacing in this. I think we could have done with two books. It seemed a little cliché at times, and for me, I didn't connect with it as much as I would have liked. The artwork was okay, nothing too fancy. Overall, a great concept but perhaps a missed opportunity?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Chan

    Didn’t know a single thing going into this but this graphic novel and plot as a whole were so much more than I usually expect from a graphic novel.Trigger warnings for many things so its best for mature and suitable readers but this dystopian society is like an opposite of today-the blacks are the superior ones while the whites are the inferior ones.So I wouldn’t say it challenges today’s society but rather shows me “do not do unto others what you don’t want to be done unto you”.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kit

    Very simplified role reversal about racism. It does make me want to read the novel, though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    "D'you ever wonder what it would be like if our positions were reversed? If Whites were in charge instead of you Crosses?" Noughts & Crosses An Eye for an Eye Callum Knife Edge "D'you ever wonder what it would be like if our positions were reversed? If Whites were in charge instead of you Crosses?" Noughts & Crosses An Eye for an Eye Callum Knife Edge Checkmate Double Cross Noughts & Crosses Graphic Novel Story time, in chronological order: - In early 2015, I read the main four books of Malorie Blackman's Noughts and Crosses series. - There are two short stories which take place between the first two books, titled An Eye for an Eye and Callum. I bought Callum as an eBook, but wanted to read AEFAE first. However, it seemed to be out of print everywhere but in certain editions of Noughts & Crosses and Knife Edge. - I hunted down multiple copies of both of those, but none seemed to include AEFAE. I did end up buying a secondhand copy of Knife Edge. - I gave up to some degree, expecting to never be able to read AEFAE or Callum. - During uni earlier this year, I used the Noughts and Crosses series for an assignment (more to come on that). In the process, I opened my second hand copy of Knife Edge for the first time and to my shock and delight, discovered that it was signed by Malorie Blackman. - I borrowed the Noughts & Crosses graphic novel - I discovered a second hand copy of Noughts & Crosses - no, not signed, but finally including AEFAE. For the first time, I'm going to be able to complete this series! This was an excellent graphic novel adaptation, unlike some others I've read. It's one that really makes sense to adapt to a visual format, where readers can see things like the dark brown band-aids and judges wearing African masks rather than white wigs. One part I thought was especially well-done was the highlighting of Black people who have achieved greatness in the real world but who most people have never heard of. These include Garret Morgan, Charles Drew, Daniel Hale Williams, Matthew Henson and Elijah J. McCoy. One thing to address is that this world only has Black and White people - other races/ethnicities are never mentioned. To quote author Guinevere Tomas: "The diversity is a double-edged sword. There were only Blacks and Whites. It makes sense for the book, but I know I don't live in such a black and white world, so I wondered why I didn't see anything else but. Unless the rest of the world didn't exist anymore, there was no reason why there weren't any Asians, Hispanics, more Mixed race people, Indigenous, Arab and Muslim, the latter." I'd be interested to see reviews addressing the disability representation. Callum's sister Lynette is mentally ill, including her believing that she's a Cross. She commits suicide as a result of this, which is the catalyst for Callum, his brother and their father's character development. Sephy's mother is an alcohol addict and Sephy veers towards also becoming one. Representation: Racial and mentally ill representation as above. Ownvoices/author info: Malorie Blackman is Black British. Content warnings: The whole thing is an examination of anti-Black racism, including prisoner abuse, execution by hanging, suicide of a mentally ill character, terrorism/bombing, internalised racism, racism in the education system, past slavery, fictional slurs, violence/blood, bullying, police brutality. Other warnings include sex scenes, discussion of rape and abortion, alcohol addiction, abusive family, smoking, teen pregnancy, guns, divorce/separation of parents.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liv Wright

    I am surprised that the adaptation was so alike to the story and this made The noughts and crosses graphic novel really intriguing. Everything was incredibly alike and I did honestly rather enjoy it. I think that I couldn't be improved at all. This is my first graphic novel and I think I will read more on the future I could say that this has made me a graphic novel reader. The characters were a lot like how I had imagined them and it was lovely to not just imagine them but to see them. I think t I am surprised that the adaptation was so alike to the story and this made The noughts and crosses graphic novel really intriguing. Everything was incredibly alike and I did honestly rather enjoy it. I think that I couldn't be improved at all. This is my first graphic novel and I think I will read more on the future I could say that this has made me a graphic novel reader. The characters were a lot like how I had imagined them and it was lovely to not just imagine them but to see them. I think that this could really be adapted into a film as well because it just is so interesting. My favourite character is Callum because I like Callum as he is a very diverse character. The ending really upsets me though but it tells such a wonderful story about two lovers that are in a world not allowing them to be together. You could compare it to Romeo and Juliet but not as well. Some parts I think that it could but really it is different. It shows how people can really be and what people can go through. It was a really lovable story, it will always stay close to my heart. I gave it five stars because loving the novel and them being so alike and managing to include all the interesting and important parts was amazing. I recommend the novel and the graphic novel. Loved it...

  8. 4 out of 5

    charlottebibliophile

    'Noughts and Crosses' by Malorie Blackman follows the unlikely friendship of Callum and Sephy - a nought and a cross - in a world where noughts and crosses do not mix, let alone get along. Together they face a series of challenges, but they always come through them stronger - that is, until Callum's family becomes involved in a terrorist organisation, with a plan to bomb a shopping centre, and Callum and Sephy inadvertently become caught up in the madness. Can their relationship survive against 'Noughts and Crosses' by Malorie Blackman follows the unlikely friendship of Callum and Sephy - a nought and a cross - in a world where noughts and crosses do not mix, let alone get along. Together they face a series of challenges, but they always come through them stronger - that is, until Callum's family becomes involved in a terrorist organisation, with a plan to bomb a shopping centre, and Callum and Sephy inadvertently become caught up in the madness. Can their relationship survive against all the odds? This graphic novel is a beautiful representation of the critically acclaimed novel. There are obviously instances where explanations are avoided in this medium, and as a result some of the emotion is lost in translation. The art is simplistic, but I believe it should be, when the whole premise of the book is black and white. Overall it is still a fantastic adaptation of the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura (b00k-witch)

    The novel of Noughts and Crosses is honestly one of my favourites of all time, and this graphic novel adaptation is as close to perfect as you can get. This condenses the story of Callum and Sephy, living on opposite side of a race divide but a different one than we all know. The author switches the roles, making white people, the ‘noughts’, second class citizens, along with the black ‘crosses’, who run the country, run the media etc. The book borrows from real life events and places them in thi The novel of Noughts and Crosses is honestly one of my favourites of all time, and this graphic novel adaptation is as close to perfect as you can get. This condenses the story of Callum and Sephy, living on opposite side of a race divide but a different one than we all know. The author switches the roles, making white people, the ‘noughts’, second class citizens, along with the black ‘crosses’, who run the country, run the media etc. The book borrows from real life events and places them in this context. I found the drawings very simplistic and easy to follow, and I am very fond of this version.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Roxy

    I think I was unprepared going into this. The art style was great and the message was necessary but I found it a bit awkward that literally everyone other than the two main characters were awful people. It might say more about me than the book that i'm calling a novel dealing with racist themes too dark, but I found the grittiness unnecessarily exaggerated and over the top.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    This story works so well as a graphic novel, I absolutely loved it. Such a wonderful story that everyone needs to read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sara Weather

    I am going to review this novel using my status update from 25% and my thoughts from 100%: I. I need to read the novel! 100%: Honestly, I don't know if I want to now. I kind of want to see if the novel goes deeper but ugh I doubt it. II. Does it deal with racism simplistically? 100%: Yes, I can not tell if this is in result of it being an adaptation of a novel. A. It got messy when you have white characters who are supposed to represent black people doing certain things that do not fe I am going to review this novel using my status update from 25% and my thoughts from 100%: I. I need to read the novel! 100%: Honestly, I don't know if I want to now. I kind of want to see if the novel goes deeper but ugh I doubt it. II. Does it deal with racism simplistically? 100%: Yes, I can not tell if this is in result of it being an adaptation of a novel. A. It got messy when you have white characters who are supposed to represent black people doing certain things that do not feel representative of black people at any time period. By race swapping it stepped into messy things about black people because it was not a straight swap and somehow it feels like it made black people still the bad guys. B. Direction of the plot. It started off with potential then slid off into being an average teen dystopia except without the revolutionary change the world aspect. At the core it felt like it did not say anything that isn't already known (but I'm coming from 2018 so the year that this was published, 2001, has to be taken into account). III. Who is the audience for this story? 100%: I'm wondering if this is more of a commentary on non-American racism. IV. Does the world built serve that purpose? 100%: A bigger question is what was the purpose of this story? Is it to teach about racism? Is it enough now in current day to teach about racism? I feel that there was a lost opportunity when the story could have gotten deeper into the insidious systematic impact of racism. V. I like that the manga (i dont know if novel does this too) but it made a quick nod at well even in the racial hierarchy there is still a gender hierarchy (thinking about it there is a quiet undertone on gender) 100%: *Thor does it tho gif* Was there a quiet undertone or did it not exist at all? Or did the story have this quick nod and that's it? The feminist commentary felt like most of the rest of the story not enough if not even less than not enough. There is a few scenes of gender violence (among child abuse and just general violence) I do not know if it helped the story because it was not addressed. I will give it that quick nod said the most about feminism in racial conversations it gets forgotten nonetheless I cannot give the book points for itself pushing the feminism conversation to the back too.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen Mardahl

    I had never heard of the book on which this graphic novel is based, but the blurb on the graphic novel's cover sounded intriguing. It was. I had a sense of "V for Vendetta" and Jo Walton's Farthing series while reading about this dystopian world. Turning a known world upside down for your story does shake up your readers. I assume the book has a lot more details, but I think the graphic medium conveys the main messages very well. (view spoiler)I had never heard of the book on which this graphic novel is based, but the blurb on the graphic novel's cover sounded intriguing. It was. I had a sense of "V for Vendetta" and Jo Walton's Farthing series while reading about this dystopian world. Turning a known world upside down for your story does shake up your readers. I assume the book has a lot more details, but I think the graphic medium conveys the main messages very well. (view spoiler)[Some of the transitions feel a bit too abrupt, and I assume they are explained more in the book. Callum joins the Liberation Militia after Sephy goes to Chivers and is cold toward Sephy when he lures her into an ambush 2 years later. A lot can happen in 2 years, but the graphic novel doesn't really explain how so it felt abrupt. I was also uncertain whether Ryan or Jude are truly guilty of the bombing. In one frame, it sounded like Ryan did make the bomb and Jude's fingerprints were accidentally on some of the material. In other frames, it sounded like Ryan was totally innocent. However, the ambiguity could be intentional. How many people in real life are set up and accused of crimes simply due to their skin color? They never have a chance so guilt or innocence are possibly irrelevant - that could be what Malorie Blackman is trying to say. My first reaction when reading was that the graphic novel had a glitch. When writing these thoughts, I realised the ambiguity could be intentional so I leave it at that - and that is actually OK.(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Alice

    Graphic Novel, Children's Literature Graphic novel of the AMAZING first book in the Noughts and Crosses trilogy by Malorie Blackman. I picked this up because it is basically the only adaptation that I have not seen of this novel. It is excellent. I didn't care for the cartoon style giving everyone abs if we were meant to like them, and normal bodies if we weren't. That made me uncomfortable. And the fact that it is so quick to read stops you from getting as entwined with the couple as the b Graphic Novel, Children's Literature Graphic novel of the AMAZING first book in the Noughts and Crosses trilogy by Malorie Blackman. I picked this up because it is basically the only adaptation that I have not seen of this novel. It is excellent. I didn't care for the cartoon style giving everyone abs if we were meant to like them, and normal bodies if we weren't. That made me uncomfortable. And the fact that it is so quick to read stops you from getting as entwined with the couple as the book does, which made some of the scenes appear to be a bit random? The beauty of Blackman's writing in the original is that the emotion she writes about makes everything seem natural, or understandable, at least. This lacked that. However, I still loved it and cried at the end. But read the books instead of the GN.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dan Allbery

    Two years ago I read Malorie Blackman's original "Noughts & Crosses." It was powerful to see a world where the racial-power balance was flipped. I was excited to see it in graphic novel form and enjoyed the illustrator's decision to make it black and white. I do think some of the novel's power was lost when converting it into a graphic novel. However, it was still a good read. Recommend for high school students.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elle Kay

    An amazing provocative tale of two lovers in a world fueled by racial tension and violence. A world where history has been reversed and the black population, the crosses, have the power and use it to keep the noughts, the white population, in their place. This one will really make you think. Apparently adapted from a novel so I can’t compare the versions except to say that this read feels complete and well written.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maya

    I can’t believe that this was my first graphic novel! It was absolutely amazing. It was fast paced and packed and emotional punch. I have not read the original so I was wondering is this a graphic novel a bind up of all of the books in the series or only the first book, if so is there another graphic novel?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Steuer

    I relatively enjoyed this book, the flow was consistent and the themes it represented were impactful to the reader. My biggest flaws were maybe a bit of character development for a few characters, and that the art style wasn't wow'ing. I would probably read the book over the graphic novel but this was quick, and easy to read for anyone who wants to get a brief on the series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David Wardrop

    Such a simple premise a role reversal black people in power white people as an underclass and from this can come a powerful story. At first I thought it was a unique take on Romeo & Juliet but Malorie Blackman has created something all her own. This is a book that should be read on Martin Luther King Jr. Day January 15th.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Bolton-Phillips

    I really enjoyed this graphic masterpiece! It is a testament to the immense possibility of what a graphic novel can be! I thoroughly appreciated the premise - which forces the reader to see the obvious stupidity inherent in racism. I also understand the need for the ending. The whole thing leaves you unsettled and thinking. Bravo!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tia

    I absolutely loveddddd this. I haven’t read the book but I fancied reading a comic and that’s the one that caught my eye but I would like to read the book in the future. The book made me feel emotion at times but I loved the drawings and the plot and just the characters I loved them. It makes me wish I had a best friend at like 5 😩.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sofia

    omg FUCK * hysterically crying* this was so good, I HAVE to read the book. I don’t know how true this graphic novel was to the actual book, but this messed me up so much. it is so true to our history and also current events. god may save us all

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maziah

    An adaptation of one of the first books to make me stay up all night to finish reading, way back in my teenage years. The graphics are beautiful but the story somehow felt like it ended abruptly and with less of the emotional impact of the novel itself. Still a good read though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kennady

    Amazing, Just as good as the original book, I had to watch and play of noughts and crosses and found reading the graphic novel to be a quicker way to remember what happened in rather than reading the book again .... but I'm definitely going to read thr book anyway haha

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jodie Warner

    I think I really need to read the original to see how true his adaptation is. A powerful story, told with simple graphics, about the noughts, the inferior whites, in a society ruled by the powerful black crosses.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chantelle

    3.5 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Billy Hick

    Amazing An excellent remake of Malorie Blackman's noughts and crosses. I really recommend this comic, though it does have some strong sex scenes.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Salma

    good

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joanne Myers

    I had been told about the Noughts & Crosses series by a few friends and wanted to try it out. Seeing as I am going through a phase at the moment of reading Graphic Novels, I decided to go with this version to kick start the series. Wow! What an intriguing story line. Imagine a world where people are divided into two groups - Noughts are white people and Crosses are people of colour. In this world, the Crosses hold all the power and the best jobs while the Noughts are manual labourers and ser I had been told about the Noughts & Crosses series by a few friends and wanted to try it out. Seeing as I am going through a phase at the moment of reading Graphic Novels, I decided to go with this version to kick start the series. Wow! What an intriguing story line. Imagine a world where people are divided into two groups - Noughts are white people and Crosses are people of colour. In this world, the Crosses hold all the power and the best jobs while the Noughts are manual labourers and servants. What a flip-side this story shows to the world history we all know. A fascinating plot makes for a very interesting thought path. How different the world today could be if this was life. The two main characters, Callum and Sephy, are from different sides of the coin yet they come together over and over in many different ways. I definitely want to read more, the only question is now - Do I wait for Graphic Novel #2 or move onto the written novel?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Charnell (Reviews from a Bookworm)

    The actual book is one of my all time favourites. But I don't like the drawing style here. And it also doesn't pack the same emotional punch that the book did.

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