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Mankiw's Principles of Economics textbooks continue to be the most popular and widely used text in the economics classroom. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS, 4th Edition features a strong revision of content in all 23 chapters while maintaining the clear and accessible writing style that is the hallmark of the highly respected author. The 4th edition also features an expanded Mankiw's Principles of Economics textbooks continue to be the most popular and widely used text in the economics classroom. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS, 4th Edition features a strong revision of content in all 23 chapters while maintaining the clear and accessible writing style that is the hallmark of the highly respected author. The 4th edition also features an expanded instructor's resource package designed to assist instructors in course planning and classroom presentation and full integration of content with Aplia, the leading online Economics education program. In the 4th edition Greg Mankiw has created a full educational program for students and instructors -- Experience Mankiw 4e. "I have tried to put myself in the position of someone seeing economics for the first time. My goal is to emphasize the material that students should and do find interesting about the study of the economy." - N. Gregory Mankiw.


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Mankiw's Principles of Economics textbooks continue to be the most popular and widely used text in the economics classroom. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS, 4th Edition features a strong revision of content in all 23 chapters while maintaining the clear and accessible writing style that is the hallmark of the highly respected author. The 4th edition also features an expanded Mankiw's Principles of Economics textbooks continue to be the most popular and widely used text in the economics classroom. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS, 4th Edition features a strong revision of content in all 23 chapters while maintaining the clear and accessible writing style that is the hallmark of the highly respected author. The 4th edition also features an expanded instructor's resource package designed to assist instructors in course planning and classroom presentation and full integration of content with Aplia, the leading online Economics education program. In the 4th edition Greg Mankiw has created a full educational program for students and instructors -- Experience Mankiw 4e. "I have tried to put myself in the position of someone seeing economics for the first time. My goal is to emphasize the material that students should and do find interesting about the study of the economy." - N. Gregory Mankiw.

30 review for eBook Access Card for Macroeconomics & Aplia Activation Card

  1. 4 out of 5

    Abram Dorrough

    I agree with Mankiw on many issues, and he explains complicated matters clearly, though a little too simply at times. His bias does come through once in a while.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mirek Kukla

    In short: not quite as great as "Principles of Microeconomics", but still well-written, informative, and very accessible. For better or for worse, "Principles of Macroeconomics contains not a shred of math. While this might make for a terrible course textbook, it makes for great leisure reading (well - if you condition on the fact that you are, after all, reading an econ textbook). Mankiw aims to build your intuition, and altogether, he does a pretty good job. You learn about how GDP is measured, In short: not quite as great as "Principles of Microeconomics", but still well-written, informative, and very accessible. For better or for worse, "Principles of Macroeconomics contains not a shred of math. While this might make for a terrible course textbook, it makes for great leisure reading (well - if you condition on the fact that you are, after all, reading an econ textbook). Mankiw aims to build your intuition, and altogether, he does a pretty good job. You learn about how GDP is measured, and more interestingly, about why gross domestic product is an interesting thing to measure in the first place. You'll read about unemployment, federal debt, inflation, and how they relate. You'll discover why short-term economic fluctuations occur, and how they can be affected by fiscal and monetary policy. Hell, you'll finally learn what fiscal and monetary policy are. It's all pretty straightforward, with the exception of one crappy chapter on open-economy macroeconomics. I understand that this is a pretty complex topic, but the treatment here is confusing as hell. As soon as you get to Mankiw's treatment of "net capital outflow," run like hell and hit the internets instead. To conclude: if you're at all interested in fleshing out your economic intuition... this isn't the place to start. Pick up Charles Wheelan's Naked Economics instead. That book is awesome. And then - but only then - check out "Principles of Macroeconomics."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Muhammad al-Khwarizmi

    I want to get a better grasp of mainstream macroeconomic theory, even if I don't necessarily agree with it, so I picked up Mankiw's text, which is considered a standard and is more or less up to date with the Global Financial Crisis of 2007 and 2008 and its aftermath. Unfortunately, I started smelling trouble when I saw that the equation for money demand included an exponent d which was magically whisked away on the page right after it was introduced. If that exponent is supposed to be equal to I want to get a better grasp of mainstream macroeconomic theory, even if I don't necessarily agree with it, so I picked up Mankiw's text, which is considered a standard and is more or less up to date with the Global Financial Crisis of 2007 and 2008 and its aftermath. Unfortunately, I started smelling trouble when I saw that the equation for money demand included an exponent d which was magically whisked away on the page right after it was introduced. If that exponent is supposed to be equal to one, Mankiw never advances an argument for that being the case. I ignored these things for a while but when I reached the chapter on international trade, which I hoped would be really interesting, I saw more sloppy mathematical formatting and this guy ... just has no pedagogical sense at all. I've read quite a lot of economic literature—mostly on microeconomic theory, which is why I need a better understanding of macro—some of it quite advanced and mathematical in nature, but this guy is absolutely obtuse. Absolutely obtuse. Would not recommend. EDIT: I later found out that the notation in question is not an exponent, but indicates "demand", and that this notation is common. One wonders why economists didn't use a subscript instead. That would actually make sense to a typical mathematically literate person. Fuck them.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jurij Fedorov

    For a layman like me this book was not that great. Pro: It does cover much of macroeconomics and covers it with mathematical formulas. This book would be perfect for a university student or someone who likes math. This is also a good book for the student who wants an very easy to go to introduction to his field. Very presice and easy to read. Con: I didn't do the different tests or answer the questions after every chapter as I am a layman reading it to understand the principles not the calculations. For a layman like me this book was not that great. Pro: It does cover much of macroeconomics and covers it with mathematical formulas. This book would be perfect for a university student or someone who likes math. This is also a good book for the student who wants an very easy to go to introduction to his field. Very presice and easy to read. Con: I didn't do the different tests or answer the questions after every chapter as I am a layman reading it to understand the principles not the calculations. So for me it had way to much math in it. I would not recommend it to someone who doesn't want to understand algrbra in macroeconomics. So for a humanist it will probably not be the first choice in economics books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I have never had so much fun reading a textbook in my entire school career. It’s quite obvious that Principles of Macroeconomics was written for someone who has never studied economics before. I felt like I was having a conversation with the author of the textbook rather than reading a textbook.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Steve Carroll

    extremely clear writing about Macro. I found this really useful for understanding at least some of what's going on in the world now. It's very balanced... yes, Mankiw does some punditry but he takes the presentation of all sides of arguments in this text very seriously and it shows.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad Saif

    It concentrates on models more than real economy and many assumptions made are not stated in the book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    This book offers a very good introduction to macroeconomics - everything is exemplified and explained in a very straight forward way (and with a good deal of humour). I highly recommend it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Well, it was my text-book in the university and I liked it pretty much. It's easy-to-read and has a lot of true-to-live interesting examples and articles

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sajjid Khan

    Mr. Mankiw has produced something long overdue: an accessible introduction to modern economics. By writing more in the style of a magazine than a stodgy textbook and explaining even complex ideas in an intuitive, concise way, he will leave few students bored or bewildered ... Most refreshing, though, is the book's even-handedness. Mr Mankiw seems to revel in setting out how different schools of thought have contributed to economists' current state of knowledge.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Habibie Nugroho

    I really love this book. It has clear explanations and good layout as well.

  12. 5 out of 5

    SURAFEL

    WHAT A NICE BOOK

  13. 4 out of 5

    M

    3.5 stars, mostly because I have a collection later today (mock exam) and I'm using the other book more than this one. Sadly does not cover the Mundell-Fleming model (and other things, I just can't think of them right now) in enough detail, and I can't find anything on the balanced budget multiplier. And there isn't enough maths in here. Also, because my lecturer confused me, I'm relying on this book more, which isn't exactly related but probably the reason it's rounded down instead of up.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mjaballah

    I had to read this book for a paper I am setting in. The author is famous for pushing neoliberalist and capitalist ideas, where in 2009 I believe, his class staged a walk out during his basic economics lecture in Harvard. I thought the book clearly suffered from such enforced neoliberal assumptions and economic models. But it overall was not a bad intro in the basics of macroeconomics. He does a good job of pointing out assumptions that are built into the models.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Crwth

    I read parts of this book when I took the course, three or four years ago, as I started yet another undergraduate degree. Now that I'm no longer able to pursue that, I'm finding my interest in economics is still piqued, and thus I'm revisiting this text, along with my others, front-to-back, to keep the knowledge fresh and to learn the material that wasn't covered by my instructors at the time.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Maryam Slim

    An economist must be “mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher, in some degree . . . as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near the earth as a politician.” (Keynes) It's a decent book for mainly new student who are not familiar with the macroeconomics, it can help them to understand new terms and guide them step by step.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David E

    A very thorough book. The author has a clear picture of what is going on in the world's economy. The author gives clear, relevent examples of the subjects discussed in the book. Though "weighty" in spots, I recommend this book to someone wanting more information for a class in Economics. Just read it slowly - and allow time for the material to soak in, Enjoy!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Olga

    An absolute must-read for everyone who hasn't had a maroeconomics ourse in their undergrad. The book offers a simple and concise explanation of the main concepts line interest and exchange rates, monetary and fisal policies etc. After reading this, you'll be able to identify all the bullshit that the FT authors are selling you :)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Lombardozzi

    Good overview of macroeconomics. A little tougher to digest in the later chapters. The book doesn't explore anything post-1999, so I feel like it's missed out on a great deal of useful information. Too much reliance on charts to explain ideas than simple wording. But it's not bad for a textbook.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark Fitz

    My undergrad Macro book. Believe it or not I still have it. I also have a later edition a friend of mine sent me as she works at the publisher who does his book. I actually read his newer text book for recreation. Not cover to cover but a good chunk of it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The author is not able to explain macroeconomics in a way that makes any sense at all to me. It quite literally made me cry each time I started to read it. Luckily I passed my economics class, so I never have to torture myself with this book again.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adam R

    The first 3/4s of the book were simple enough, easy to get through. The last quarter of the book got really dense, but I think the drag of a semester added to that. Overall it is a good basic look at macroeconomics.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Dixit

    top class!!!anyone can easily learn economic theory by this.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    LOL read it in summer in 1 week...For course book for uni, it was not a bad read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This sets a standard for textbook enjoyment and readability. Bravo, Mankiw!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee

    My first introduction to Greg Mankiw. He has a great blog too.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    I had access to an online version through Aplia and I read that too. The writing style is excellent and the layouts are nice, but I would have liked more explanation of the formulas.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hafiza

    very good book. I'll read it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Al Capwned

    It's a good university textbook but there are flaws and Mankiw's personal political beliefs are evident, making this book feel one-sided at times.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Machala Machala

    Better than the "Principles of Economics".

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