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So B. It

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Now a major motion picture starring Alfre Woodard, Jessica Collins, John Heard, Jacinda Barrett, Cloris Leachman, and Talitha Bateman—in theaters October 2017! From acclaimed author Sarah Weeks comes a touching coming-of-age story about a young girl who goes on a cross-country journey to discover the truth about her parents, which the New York Times called "a remarkable nov Now a major motion picture starring Alfre Woodard, Jessica Collins, John Heard, Jacinda Barrett, Cloris Leachman, and Talitha Bateman—in theaters October 2017! From acclaimed author Sarah Weeks comes a touching coming-of-age story about a young girl who goes on a cross-country journey to discover the truth about her parents, which the New York Times called "a remarkable novel." Perfect for fans of Rebecca Stead's When You Reach Me and Ali Benjamin's The Thing About Jellyfish. She doesn't know when her birthday is or who her father is. In fact, everything about Heidi and her mentally disabled mother's past is a mystery. When a strange word in her mother's vocabulary begins to haunt her, Heidi sets out on a cross-country journey in search of the secrets of her past. Far away from home, pieces of her puzzling history come together. But it isn't until she learns to accept not knowing that Heidi truly arrives.


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Now a major motion picture starring Alfre Woodard, Jessica Collins, John Heard, Jacinda Barrett, Cloris Leachman, and Talitha Bateman—in theaters October 2017! From acclaimed author Sarah Weeks comes a touching coming-of-age story about a young girl who goes on a cross-country journey to discover the truth about her parents, which the New York Times called "a remarkable nov Now a major motion picture starring Alfre Woodard, Jessica Collins, John Heard, Jacinda Barrett, Cloris Leachman, and Talitha Bateman—in theaters October 2017! From acclaimed author Sarah Weeks comes a touching coming-of-age story about a young girl who goes on a cross-country journey to discover the truth about her parents, which the New York Times called "a remarkable novel." Perfect for fans of Rebecca Stead's When You Reach Me and Ali Benjamin's The Thing About Jellyfish. She doesn't know when her birthday is or who her father is. In fact, everything about Heidi and her mentally disabled mother's past is a mystery. When a strange word in her mother's vocabulary begins to haunt her, Heidi sets out on a cross-country journey in search of the secrets of her past. Far away from home, pieces of her puzzling history come together. But it isn't until she learns to accept not knowing that Heidi truly arrives.

30 review for So B. It

  1. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    This isn't sophisticated high-brow literature, but it is touching and honest, and it got me right in the feels, at least as far as the main storyline goes. Everything else, though, I had some issues with. Just about every review of this book contains a book-report-like summary, so I'm going to skip that and just talk about my thoughts. I couldn't imagine growing up the way that Heidi did, with a mother who could barely communicate, and definitely not care for herself, and her only other caregiver This isn't sophisticated high-brow literature, but it is touching and honest, and it got me right in the feels, at least as far as the main storyline goes. Everything else, though, I had some issues with. Just about every review of this book contains a book-report-like summary, so I'm going to skip that and just talk about my thoughts. I couldn't imagine growing up the way that Heidi did, with a mother who could barely communicate, and definitely not care for herself, and her only other caregiver being an agoraphobic woman. That's such a small life. I don't mean small as in petty, I just literally mean small. Her experience is limited to two small apartments for almost her entire life until shortly before going on her quest. It makes me sad, thinking of all the things that she should have experienced and couldn't - zoos, school, playmates, parks, etc. But I guess you can't miss what you never had. Which is one of the main themes of this book, actually. Heidi doesn't miss the fact that she never had a father, because she'd never realized that she should have had one. Or a grandmother. These things are not in her understanding until an outside experience brings them up... and then she wonders, and can't let them go. She needs to know who she is and where she came from. She does find answers, though they are not what she (or I) expected... but for everything that she gained, she lost something else. I did find this book easy to read and I was caught up in the story - it's a touching coming of age story, and a story about how love isn't really definable by the words we use. But otherwise, I can't help but have a lot of logistical issues with this book. - How did Heidi and her mama arrive at their apartment in the beginning, when Bernadette finds them? If (view spoiler)[Grandma (hide spoiler)] was taking care of them after they arrived in Reno, it had to be less than a week, and as we have seen, it takes countless rounds of repetition for Mama to learn anything, so I doubt she'd have known how to get back. So after (view spoiler)[Grandma's death (hide spoiler)] , how did Mama and baby get back to their apartment? Did someone take her? How would they know where to take her? And what kind of person would take a severely mentally disabled person and a newborn and drop them off alone somewhere? - How does Heidi enroll in school? She has no birth certificate, no social security number, no I-Exist records at all. She's likely never been to a doctor (unless one made house-calls) and almost certainly isn't up on her immunizations. Maybe they don't check for those things in Jr. High, assuming that one would have had all that taken care of in kindergarten or so. But then she has no school records either. - How does her guardianship work? Is she just flying under the radar of the system? I could see that working when she didn't leave her apartment... but now she's going to school and that involves a whole mess of legalities regarding guardianship, and it is even further complicated by the fact that her unofficial guardian can't leave her house. If Heidi happened to have the bad luck to be picked up by a truant officer, she'd be screwed. - Are the bills still being paid for her? How is that possible? How can she stay in the apartment? There are no adults residing there (technically, Bernie lives next door), and there has to be SOME paper trail SOMEWHERE indicating this. I mean, certificates had to be filed, and transportation arranged, and services rendered. This stuff doesn't just disappear. Some court clerk somewhere is going to start asking questions, and then the nice cozy little arrangement they have will be shattered. This book is categorized many times as "realistic fiction", but I disagree. This book wants you to believe that there's a kind of happy ever after here - that things may be different, and knowledge has been gained which changes everything, but mostly it's the same day to day. That it's just that easy. You want it, you go after it, and you get it. No, sorry - that's not realistic. A can of worms has been opened, and it's not resealable. In real life, there'd be a social worker knocking on the door already, and the next 8 years of her life would be institutional chaos, unless she was taken in by the person who never wanted to know her in the first place, or legally adopted - but there's another mess... Round and round it goes. This is the kind of book that falls apart if one actually thinks about the situation depicted. We're supposed to just accept it and focus on the quest and the themes and the emotional content, and not worry about the rest. I can't do that. I can admit that the story presented was touching, and I could identify with Heidi wanting to know about her past and being determined to find out about it... but I can't ignore all the other things that bureaucracy would dig its spindly little fingers into.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Selena

    So B. It is a hearting warming novel about a young girl named Heidi who wants to know more about her life, where she came from, and who she really is. She lives with her mother who is mentally disabled and only knows 23 words; she also lives with her neighbor Bernadette, who took Heidi and her mother in. Heidi sets off to an adventure to Liberty, New York where she will hopefully find herself, and her mama, some answers. When she arrives she gets a lot of answers, like what soof meant. Unfortuna So B. It is a hearting warming novel about a young girl named Heidi who wants to know more about her life, where she came from, and who she really is. She lives with her mother who is mentally disabled and only knows 23 words; she also lives with her neighbor Bernadette, who took Heidi and her mother in. Heidi sets off to an adventure to Liberty, New York where she will hopefully find herself, and her mama, some answers. When she arrives she gets a lot of answers, like what soof meant. Unfortunately she gets some very dreadful news. I learned that you shouldn't give up on something you really want to know because once you get the answer everything seems to make sense, and if my review left you with some questions about the book, then I strongly suggest you read the book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Merica

    I loved this book! It was beautifully written and the story drew me right in. Great pieces of wisdom were woven throughout and the book has a very satisfying ending, though not the one I expected. Everyone should read this one, and it would make a great read aloud.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Twelve-year-old Heidi, homeschooled by her unofficial guardian and neighbor Bernadette, has a mentally disabled mother and only one friend her age. But she doesn’t seem to have the types of problems I would imagine someone in her situation to have. Heidi is obsessed with discovering the mystery of her past. How did she and her child-like mother arrive at Bernadette’s door in an apartment building in Reno, Nevada when Heidi was just one week old? Heidi’s mother, who calls herself “Sobeit,” and wh Twelve-year-old Heidi, homeschooled by her unofficial guardian and neighbor Bernadette, has a mentally disabled mother and only one friend her age. But she doesn’t seem to have the types of problems I would imagine someone in her situation to have. Heidi is obsessed with discovering the mystery of her past. How did she and her child-like mother arrive at Bernadette’s door in an apartment building in Reno, Nevada when Heidi was just one week old? Heidi’s mother, who calls herself “Sobeit,” and whose entire vocabulary is made up of 23 words, doesn’t have any answers. Heidi’s only clue to her mother’s (and her own) past is one mysterious word her mother often repeats: “soof.” When Heidi finds an old roll of film in the back of a closet, she gets a big clue that takes her—alone—on a cross-country journey to find who or what is “soof.” This book is about identity, asking questions, and living both with and without the answers. Intelligently and sensitively written, at times poetic, this book was a great read. I was drawn to the mystery aspect and couldn’t put it down.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    So B It is a delightful story about 12 year old Heidi who is in search of her identity. She lives with her mother who has a mental disability and knows exactly 23 words. Together with their neighbor Bernadette, they live in Reno and get by through Heidi's luck with winning at video games and Bernie's disability check. One of the words that Heidi's mother knows is "soof" and there lies the driving factor to Heidi's travels to find her identity and what the word 'soof' means. Bernie has named Mama So B It is a delightful story about 12 year old Heidi who is in search of her identity. She lives with her mother who has a mental disability and knows exactly 23 words. Together with their neighbor Bernadette, they live in Reno and get by through Heidi's luck with winning at video games and Bernie's disability check. One of the words that Heidi's mother knows is "soof" and there lies the driving factor to Heidi's travels to find her identity and what the word 'soof' means. Bernie has named Mama So B. It because she feels that everyone deserves to have a middle name. The story centers around Heidi's unraveling of the mystery surrounding her mother and her travels to New York to discover the truth. It is about coming of age, identity, family and mental disabilities. It is a great read for middle grade students. I enjoyed this book and couldn't put it down once I started reading it. I heart Heidi.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    If you've ever read a book that haunted you long after the last page ended, then you understand the difficulty in writing a review that expresses the sheer beauty of an incredible tale. Attempting will be feeble, but here goes: There is security for 12 year old Heidi. Bernadette, a loving neighbor, provides help and guidance in taking care of her severely mentally challenged mother. Limited in the ability to express words and thoughts, Heidi's mother repeats one word over and over. Suffering from a If you've ever read a book that haunted you long after the last page ended, then you understand the difficulty in writing a review that expresses the sheer beauty of an incredible tale. Attempting will be feeble, but here goes: There is security for 12 year old Heidi. Bernadette, a loving neighbor, provides help and guidance in taking care of her severely mentally challenged mother. Limited in the ability to express words and thoughts, Heidi's mother repeats one word over and over. Suffering from agoraphobia, Bernadette cannot leave the apartment and thus Heidi's world is a small, safe cocoon of love. Whereas Heidi's mother has few words in her grasp, Bernadette is a voracious reader and avidly searches words and their meaning. Found by Bernadette when Heidi was an infant, she is well cared for and home schooled by Bernadette. Unlike her mother, Heidi is highly intelligent and thirsts for knowledge. That thirst includes the need to drink from the well of understanding about how her mother arrived in Reno, Nevada at the doorstep of Bernadette. Knowing they didn't simply drop from the sky, when Heidi finds a box of photos in the back of a closet, one of which indicates a sign of an institution in New York, she stubbornly pursues a journey to find the answer to puzzle pieces that seem disjointed. Bravely taking a bus from Reno to New York City, meeting a cast of characters along the way, Heidi's journey nets unexpected results. This is a lyrical, poignant, touching and heart warming book! The writing is wonderful and the emotions expressed and accurately portrayed brought tears and a longing to finish the book, while paradoxically not wanting it to end. This is what great writing should be. Going out on a limb, I'll wager that you won't be disappointed in reading this ASAP.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eden Schanzenbach

    I liked this book. It wasn't my favorite, but I enjoyed it. It was a good story about a young girl's life. She had to go through many tough adventures that I don't think a 12 year old girl should have to go through. The book was written by Sarah Weeks. The girl's name was Heidi. She had a Mama who was disabled. Heidi said that her mom had a "bum brain." Her mom can't take care of herself, so she has a neighbor, Bernadette, who watches over them. She is kind of like a guardian to Heidi. Bernadet I liked this book. It wasn't my favorite, but I enjoyed it. It was a good story about a young girl's life. She had to go through many tough adventures that I don't think a 12 year old girl should have to go through. The book was written by Sarah Weeks. The girl's name was Heidi. She had a Mama who was disabled. Heidi said that her mom had a "bum brain." Her mom can't take care of herself, so she has a neighbor, Bernadette, who watches over them. She is kind of like a guardian to Heidi. Bernadette says, "Its as if they fell right out of the sky." Heidi doesn't know where she was born or what her mom's real name is. Her mom says her name is So B. It, but they all know that isn't true. What kind of mom names her kid So B. It? Mama always says the word soof, and nobody knows why she does it or what it is. One day, Heidi decides she can't take it anymore. She needs to find out who she is and why her mama always say soof. She desperatly needs to know. Bernadette can't go outside because she has a disorder that if she does step a foot outside she will faint. Heidi finds a photo album and relizes that it is her mom in the past! They are from Liberty, New York. Heidi has never heard of that place, but knows it's a real place. Heidi calls the place that the photographs were taken at and finds out it is a home for the mentally disabled. She desides she needs to go there, now!! Heidi finally convinces Bernadette to let her go, by herself, all the way to Liberty, New York. Heidi takes the long journey and you will never belive what she finds! This is my favorite part of the book because I love the tension in the air when she arives. I am saying in my mind, "Will she find the truth? Will she find nothing?" It kept me reading and I loved it! Heidi figures out that her mom lived at the mentally disabled home and that is where Heidi was born. Her dad's name is Ethan and he has the same condition as her mom. Turns out that soof wasn't something, it was somebody!! Soof was her mom's nickname. Her dad gave it to her. Her mom's actual name was Sophie, but she was given the nickname, Soof. Heidi stays with some really nive people that work at the home. She stays with them for a few days and realizes they are really nice people. They offer to let her stay there and go to school. Heidi doesn't want to go to school there, she wants to go home. One day she gets a phone call from Bernadette and she says that she needs to get home, NOW! Heidi says no, she will be home tomorrow, she is in the middle of finding out the truth. When Heidi gets home, she gets another call. Her mom went in her sleep. She went when she was sleeping, she thinks its maybe from horrible heaadaches, over and over. Heidi can't believe that her mom died. She is stunned. When she gets home she goes to school and trys to get over it, but can't quite seem to. She gets better and realizes she is lucky she has Bernadette and that she found out about her mom's past. Most of all, she is happy she knows what Soof means.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hillary Mantone

    I liked this book. It wasn't my favorite, but it was still good. It was written by Sarah Weeks. This book was about a girl named Heidi and her Mama who is disabled. Heidi is about 12 because they don't know when she was born. They live with their neighbor Bernedette. Bernedette is also Heidi's gaurdian. Bernedette says "It was as if they had fallen from the sky." Heidi really wants to know who she is. She doesn't know where she was born or what her last name is. She also doenst know any other f I liked this book. It wasn't my favorite, but it was still good. It was written by Sarah Weeks. This book was about a girl named Heidi and her Mama who is disabled. Heidi is about 12 because they don't know when she was born. They live with their neighbor Bernedette. Bernedette is also Heidi's gaurdian. Bernedette says "It was as if they had fallen from the sky." Heidi really wants to know who she is. She doesn't know where she was born or what her last name is. She also doenst know any other family members besides Mama and Bernedette. Bernedette has a fear of leaving the house. So Heidi is home schooled. She also has to get the groceries and the things they need. Mama says a word that know one knows. Soof. Heidi wants to know what it means so bad! She gets very frustrated with Mama. One day Heidi finds a camera in the back of a droor. She developes the film and looks at the pictures. They are pictures of her mom in a place called Liberty. It looks like a home for the handicapped. Her mom and some other people,who are yet to be discovered, are at a Christmas party. She thinks she sees her Grandma. So Heidi goes out on an adventure to Liberty. Bernedette and Mama can't come because of Bernedettes fear and Mama's disability. So Heidi goes alone. She takes a 3 day bus trip to Liberty. When she gets to Liberty she goes straight to the place where Mama stayed in the pictures. The boss won't give her answers because he thinks she wants money from him. So Heidi stays with a employee who is very kind. They make her dinner and clean her up. The next day she goes back to Liberty and gets a phone call from Bernedette. She says Mama died. She went in her sleep. Heidi is very upset and wished she had never left. Heidi finds out everything she needs to know. She found out what her mom's real name is. Sophia not So B. It. She also finds out who her grandma, grandpa, and father is. Her dad is a disabled man like Mama. His name is Ethan. Also she find out that soof is the name Ethan gave Mama because he couldn't say Sophia. Heidi knows everything, but wishes Mama was still here. Heidi goes back home for the funeral. At the funeral the put stuff in Mama's casket like her tea cup and her favorite snacks. Heidi also writes something special for the funeral about Mama. Heidi is very sad and depressed. It takes a lot of time for her to feel better. I think the book was very well written. It was interesting and it made you think what would happen next. I like the characters and the whole message. Pay attention to the important things in life like family. I liked the whole consept of it. It made you think, what if you had someone disabled in your family. I really liked this book. I would recommend it to anyone!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paula Vince

    As a homeschooling mother, I was intrigued by the sound of this YA novel and all the positive reviews. 12-year-old Heidi has a very irregular family unit. Her mentally-disabled mother knows only a total of 23 words, and she and Heidi are both cared for by a loving neighbour, Bernadette, who has such severe agorophobia that just to step into the passage of their apartment building makes her collapse. Heidi longs to know her own biological background and wishes some of her mother's words would drop As a homeschooling mother, I was intrigued by the sound of this YA novel and all the positive reviews. 12-year-old Heidi has a very irregular family unit. Her mentally-disabled mother knows only a total of 23 words, and she and Heidi are both cared for by a loving neighbour, Bernadette, who has such severe agorophobia that just to step into the passage of their apartment building makes her collapse. Heidi longs to know her own biological background and wishes some of her mother's words would drop a few hints. Other than straightforward ones such as 'blue' and 'tea', there is one, 'soof' which puzzles and frustrates her. One day a camera is discovered in a crevice of their apartment revealing some photos taken at a home for the mentally disabled in New York. Heidi is sure it holds the key to her past and sets off alone to discover the mysteries. The section where she's on the road, meeting strangers aboard the bus takes up such a huge chunk of the book, I felt as if we were traveling with the brakes on. I began to feel stretched beyond suspense to impatience. The story had been geared toward discovering the solution to a possibly intriguing mystery, yet we had to get bogged down with random strangers' small talk for what seemed an indefinite pause. Then, when Heidi finally makes it to the Home, we get what the long interlude was for. It was necessary to flesh out the book, because the longed-for solution turns out to be too pat and easily discovered. Rather than being an "A-ha" moment with appropriate twists and concealments, the story of her past turns out to be nothing more than an awkward 'Ooops' incident that was badly handled by those in charge. The many plot-holes bothered me too. Heidi's tendency to experience good luck seemed heavy-handed and stretched beyond belief, becoming a convenient plot tool. And surely her grandmother would have left more clues to her own identity than one old camera before she died. It is completely unbelievable that she didn't. Finally when all was revealed, I doubt we'd expect such an extreme attitude from her grandfather, who after all, directed a facility for the mentally disabled. These aspects were niggling. So sorry, I disagree with those who think this book should be up there with the classics. I'm wondering whether many of the high ratings were because of weirdness and originality. It was weird and original alright, but lacked other essential aspects of a good story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This review contains spoilers. This was our book club pick this month. Its a children's book that won an award It's a really short read about a 12 year old girl who's mother is very mentally disabled, and they both live next door to a woman who is agoraphobic who more or less takes care of them. The only thing Heidi knows about her mother is that she calls herself So B It, she knows only 23 words and she says the word soof. This leads her on a quest to find the truth about her mother and herself This review contains spoilers. This was our book club pick this month. Its a children's book that won an award It's a really short read about a 12 year old girl who's mother is very mentally disabled, and they both live next door to a woman who is agoraphobic who more or less takes care of them. The only thing Heidi knows about her mother is that she calls herself So B It, she knows only 23 words and she says the word soof. This leads her on a quest to find the truth about her mother and herself. There were situations in this book that really rubbed me the wrong way regarding Heidi's well being that I won't give away here but her final outcome annoyed me to no end. All in all this is a book about family and knowing who you are and being part of something. It looks like I'm very much in the minority with this one. A pretty good story but just ok for me

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    So B. It was an excellent and powerful book that could be compared to What's Eating Gilbert Grape or The Big Way Out. It features a woman with childlike innocence and her daughter's struggle to deal with everything going on around her. It was brilliantly written, with memorable characters and an original plot.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    It doesn't happen often, but my rating for this book is purely on an emotional level. In spite of the many plot holes and the ginormous leaps over reality, I was completely pulled into this story. It is a middle grade book with a 12 year old girl named Heidi as the MC. She is living a unique life that consists of a mentally handicapped mother, a neighbor with severe limitations herself and a secret that needs to be discovered. I've never read anything quite like this. I liked the twists, even as It doesn't happen often, but my rating for this book is purely on an emotional level. In spite of the many plot holes and the ginormous leaps over reality, I was completely pulled into this story. It is a middle grade book with a 12 year old girl named Heidi as the MC. She is living a unique life that consists of a mentally handicapped mother, a neighbor with severe limitations herself and a secret that needs to be discovered. I've never read anything quite like this. I liked the twists, even as improbable they were. Very creative.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin O.

    For my summer reading I read So B. It by Sarah Weeks and I really liked the story. The message of the story is that even though you may be little and you have a tough life, doesn’t mean you can’t do great things. I found the book easy to read because I never wanted to put the book down. I have 3 reasons for why I really like the story. It is inspirational, I like the writing style, and I can relate to the main character. So B. It is very inspirational and the ending really surprised me. The mai For my summer reading I read So B. It by Sarah Weeks and I really liked the story. The message of the story is that even though you may be little and you have a tough life, doesn’t mean you can’t do great things. I found the book easy to read because I never wanted to put the book down. I have 3 reasons for why I really like the story. It is inspirational, I like the writing style, and I can relate to the main character. So B. It is very inspirational and the ending really surprised me. The main character in the story, Heidi, is a young girl who wants to find out more about her family. So she sets off to New York all by herself to discover her past. One quote I found was “I smiled. Turns out my luck hadn’t deserted me after all. I stood there with that big jar of jelly beans in my arms, thinking just because you can’t feel something doesn’t mean its not there.” I like this quote because she’s lost and all alone in New York, but she finds happiness in a jar of jelly beans. It’s the little things that count. I found another quote that’s inspirational and it also has to do with the ending. It is, “I looked outside the window and caught sight of a girl standing in the rain, her long tangled wet hair framing a narrow, serious face. For a split second I wondered what that girl was and what she was doing out there all alone, and then our mouths fell open at the same time as I realize I was looking at myself reflected in the window glass. She was me, Heidi it.” This quote is one of my favorite passages in the book because at first I didn’t know who it was until she reveals it is herself. Another reason for why I really liked the story is the author’s writing style is descriptive and she painted a picture in my mind. One quote that I think is descriptive is, “And I walked across the room past all that was missing, thorough the door, and into the light that shone like a sweet wide smile over all that was actually there. When I read this passage I can clearly see a picture in my mind which I really like. Another quote that I find descriptive is, “I was worried, but I was sure that Bernie was even more worried than me. I knew she was at home in Reno with mama, but for the first time ever, Bernie didn’t know where I was. Fly under the radar, she had said to me all those times, but now I was out there without any radar to fly under. I like this quote because it paints a picture in my mind also and I can feel how she’s feeling. Since I can feel how Heidi is feeling, I can relate to her which leads to my third reason. One passage that I can relate to her in the story is, “I knew I should tell her that I was fine, and that I made it to Liberty in one piece, but the moment I heard her voice, I feel apart. The knot that had begun to form way back in Cheyenne when the lines had first gone down, and had turned knuckle-white hard after I’d discovered my money had been stolen, began to uncurl, and as it loosened, everything I had been holding back to the surface. I can relate to her because I too have felt like everything was going wrong and not being able to hold my feelings in. This story not only has a good message, but it also has surprising twists to make it a great book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    I wish I could remember how I stumbled across this title. I'm glad I did. One of the things I love about YA fiction is that the books don't mess around. They go straight to the important things; how can someone possibly love me? who am I? how can I survive this trauma? They draw us in, wrap us up in the world of the protagonist, allow us to suffer the poignancy which is life, and then leave us facing the rest of life, usually feeling a bit bruised or tender. Without being overly dramatic, this bo I wish I could remember how I stumbled across this title. I'm glad I did. One of the things I love about YA fiction is that the books don't mess around. They go straight to the important things; how can someone possibly love me? who am I? how can I survive this trauma? They draw us in, wrap us up in the world of the protagonist, allow us to suffer the poignancy which is life, and then leave us facing the rest of life, usually feeling a bit bruised or tender. Without being overly dramatic, this book draws us in to some very prickly questions, and the heartbreaking answers. Recommended for young middle-schoolers.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Catherine ♡

    I remember reading this in middle school and having it be one of those books that actually really stuck with me. I just watched the movie and really liked it so I highly recommend!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Georgie J

    “Another flash of lighting spilt the sky, followed by a boom of thunder so loud, it rattled the windows behind me. Rain coming down hard and fast at an angle, and I had to jump over several large puddles to get to the tiny little storefront two doors down with a faded cardboard sign in the window I hadn’t noticed before. ABC cab. This detailed quote is from the amazing book So B. It by Sarah Weeks. I would rate this book a 5 out of 5 stars and I would definitely recommend this book to a friend b “Another flash of lighting spilt the sky, followed by a boom of thunder so loud, it rattled the windows behind me. Rain coming down hard and fast at an angle, and I had to jump over several large puddles to get to the tiny little storefront two doors down with a faded cardboard sign in the window I hadn’t noticed before. ABC cab. This detailed quote is from the amazing book So B. It by Sarah Weeks. I would rate this book a 5 out of 5 stars and I would definitely recommend this book to a friend because it’s very well described and a big mystery unravels at the end. My first reason I would recommend this book is because of its strong meaning. A direct quote I found is “’Here we are’ said the driver, stopping at the bottom of the long dirt driveway. ‘You’re sure it’s still open?’ ‘I’m sure,’ I said. ‘See? There are lights on up there.’ ‘Oh yeah, I see. Well, I brought a fare up here once years ago, and I think I remember there’s no good place to turn around up top, so since it ain’t raining no more, you mind walking up?” I think this quote demonstrates a strong meaning because Heidi the girl wanted to go even though the cab driver said the old hotel was closed. This book ends with a giant mystery that unfolds. The amazing mystery is the answer to who is Soof! A quote that helps unravel the mystery is “’Who are you?’ the woman asked. Elliot answered for me. ‘Soof,’ he said talking hold of my hand and looking over at her with the same wide smile he’d given me before. To figure out who is Soof and how Elliot knows Heidi you should definitely read the book So B. It!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Arminzerella

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Heidi doesn't remember how she and her mother, So B. It, came to live in Reno. As their neighbor, Bernadette, puts it, they just seemed to "fall out of the sky." Out of them all, Heidi is by far the most normal. Heidi's mother is severely mentally disabled, and Bernadette is agoraphobic and hasn't left her house in years. Heidi's mother has a vocabulary of 23 words - but there's only one word out of those 23 that interests Heidi: soof. She has no idea what it means and she becomes obsessed with Heidi doesn't remember how she and her mother, So B. It, came to live in Reno. As their neighbor, Bernadette, puts it, they just seemed to "fall out of the sky." Out of them all, Heidi is by far the most normal. Heidi's mother is severely mentally disabled, and Bernadette is agoraphobic and hasn't left her house in years. Heidi's mother has a vocabulary of 23 words - but there's only one word out of those 23 that interests Heidi: soof. She has no idea what it means and she becomes obsessed with finding out. Her journey takes her far from home to Liberty, NY, where she learns that some things just can't be known. What a strange and beautiful story this was. Has anyone written about a mentally disabled parent before for this audience (kids)? There's humor and simple wisdom to be found here, as well as spirited determination, and the solving of a mystery. Bittersweet in the end, Heidi discovers that the most important thing is not always finding the answer. Excerpt: "When she first explained it to me, I thought she said she had angora phobia. I looked it up in M.B.F. (Man's Best Friend), which is what we called the big Webster's dictionary we kept on the coffee table in the living room. It said a phobia was a fear and angora was a long-haired animal, usually a goat or a rabbit. I wasn't sure why, but when you put them together, according to Bernadette, it meant you were afraid to leave your house." (p. 7)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    A student checked this book out from the library for me to read because it was one of her favorite books in elementary school. It was absolutely charming and a little bit magical.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This book just makes you want to cry at the end! This is my second time reading it and I still felt like I was going to cry! It is just an amazing book!!!!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Strawberry Fields

    So there are things that I liked and things I didn't like about this book. The relationship between Heidi, her mom, and Bernadette is wonderful. It is a sweet story and the love and devotion that binds these three women are admirable. The characters are entities unto themselves but create something lovely and wonderful when they are together. Now, here we go. The streak of luck? Hmmmmm... All that time spent on the stories of the people Heidi met on the bus and the journey? The secondary character So there are things that I liked and things I didn't like about this book. The relationship between Heidi, her mom, and Bernadette is wonderful. It is a sweet story and the love and devotion that binds these three women are admirable. The characters are entities unto themselves but create something lovely and wonderful when they are together. Now, here we go. The streak of luck? Hmmmmm... All that time spent on the stories of the people Heidi met on the bus and the journey? The secondary characters had absolutely no purpose except to move the plot forward, a pet peeve of mine in children's literature when authors build a world around the main character where no one has any purpose except to serve the story. But, Heidi is a clearly drawn character who learns a lot about herself as she travels by bus across the country. She's an insightful, intelligent child, who seems like she'd make an amiable traveling companion. In her arrival, the answers she sought are wrapped up in a silly, trite way. And yet, I never got the answers I was looking for, as to how it could be that her mother and grandmother could leave absolutely NO CLUES but a few photos as to their identities? Not one piece of mail? ID? Old letters or family memorabilia? Nothing??? There was too much for me that wasn't believable at all. It had potential, but fizzled about halfway through to the end. I was disappointed.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Noriko

    4 or 4.5 out of five stars. This is a well-crafted middle grade coming-of-age story. It's bittersweet, yet beautiful. More thoughts at https://bookfiendsite.wordpress.com/2...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kelly W.

    I would recommend this fantastic, fabulous, five-star book to readers of all ages! I enjoyed how the book had a ton of detail, it reminded you of the main conflict frequently, and it had an amazing main character, Heidi. I loved this book, and I think you will, too! My first reason for recommending this fabulous book is because it had a ton of detail, which made me feel like I was in the novel. One of the times that I felt like I was in the story with Heidi was on page 159, when she described a I would recommend this fantastic, fabulous, five-star book to readers of all ages! I enjoyed how the book had a ton of detail, it reminded you of the main conflict frequently, and it had an amazing main character, Heidi. I loved this book, and I think you will, too! My first reason for recommending this fabulous book is because it had a ton of detail, which made me feel like I was in the novel. One of the times that I felt like I was in the story with Heidi was on page 159, when she described a home, “I passed a large kitchen on my left with big metal pots hanging from a rack over a long counter, and on the right a bathroom with white-and-black checkered floor tiles. Then came a small room set up like an office, with a phone and a type-writer on the desk.” When I read this, I felt like I was walking down the hallway with Heidi. Another time that I felt like I was in the story was on page 53, when Heidi described a picture, “There was a dressed-up Santa Claus with a white cotton beard and a crooked tree covered with paper chains and glitter pinecones that looked homemade.” Even though Heidi was only describing a picture, I still felt like I was at the Christmas party she was describing. I could see the tree, the Santa Claus, and people having a great time! A final reason when I felt like I was in the book with Heidi was on page 185, when she described a friend's house, “Roy and Ruby lived in a white house with yellow shutters and window boxes all across the front. There was a screened-in porch on the side and a white rope hammock slung between two trees in the yard.” In my mind, I pictured the house very clearly, as if I had lived in it forever. Overall, I felt like I was in most of the scenes with Heidi! I loved feeling like I was in the book with Heidi, and it was even better when I felt like there was one main conflict I was always reminded of in the novel. Heidi wanted to know the answer to the question ‘What is soof?’ That question, which was the conflict, was also the key to finding out about Heidi’s past. Her mom says soof all the time, but she is disabled so she cannot tell Heidi what it means. On page 40, I was reminded of the main goal, when Heidi wondered, “‘What is soof?’ The words grew louder in my head, and as I watched, the letters expanded and blurred together...the question became so vast that I could imagine it stretching to the moon and back again all by itself.” Those sentences clearly showed that the question is important to Heidi. The question is vast. Another time when I was reminded of the conflict was on page 98, when Heidi decided: “I was going to Liberty to chase down a four letter word-s-o-o-f.” In this passage, it was clear to me that Heidi wanted that goal, and nothing was going to stop her from achieving it. A final time in the novel when it stayed on topic was on page 158, when Heidi remembered, “As I started slowly up the steep driveway, a sudden gust of wind blew through and caught in the shaggy boughs of an old hemlock tree. Soof, they whispered softly as they swayed overhead...reminding me one more time why I had come.” That was important because Heidi was finally going to find out the truth that she had gone on the journey for. This novel made me feel like I was in the book with Heidi, yearning for the truth. Not only did Heidi stay with her goal throughout the whole book, she also was brave, determined, and loved her family. Heidi was brave on page 98, when she decided to go on a journey to find out what soof is, “I was really going to do this. I was going to New York by myself.” That is very brave, since she was going from Reno, Nevada to Liberty, New York by herself, on a bus. She was going to be with strangers, and she was only twelve! A time when Heidi was determined was on pages 78 and 79, when she decided, “I was going to Liberty...We both had our minds made up in opposite directions about me going to Liberty, and I didn’t see any point in discussing it with her anymore.” Even though Heidi’s friend and guardian Bernadette did not want Heidi to go to New York, Heidi was determined and had to find out the truth. She was not going to take no for an answer, even if it meant disobeying someone she loved. Sometimes Heidi had disagreements with her family, but she still loved them more than anything. One time she showed that she loved her family was on page 95, when the novel reads, “‘I love you, Mama,’ I said, and kissed her.” Heidi obviously loves her mom, and the reason she is going on this trip is to find out the truth about her and her mom. She wants to know what soof is, since it might help Heidi and her mom find out their history. I think that Heidi is a great person, and her mom and Bernadette should be proud of her. As you can see, I loved the novel So B. It by Sarah Weeks. It made me feel like I experienced everything Heidi did, it stayed on topic, and it portrayed a fantastic and amazing character, Heidi. I would completely rate this book five out of five stars. I will always remember So B. It, and I will admire Heidi for a long time.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kaethe Douglas

    Natasha read this as part of her 40-genre reading challenge at school. She was really enjoying it, then she was crying at the end. but she really wanted me to read it. I started pretty much the moment she finished. This is the story of a 12 year old girl named Heidi living in an apartment in Reno with her mentally disabled mother and a helpful neighbor with agoraphobia. Heidi finds some clues to her own background which she pursues in order to find out whether she has more family. (view spoiler)[L Natasha read this as part of her 40-genre reading challenge at school. She was really enjoying it, then she was crying at the end. but she really wanted me to read it. I started pretty much the moment she finished. This is the story of a 12 year old girl named Heidi living in an apartment in Reno with her mentally disabled mother and a helpful neighbor with agoraphobia. Heidi finds some clues to her own background which she pursues in order to find out whether she has more family. (view spoiler)[Little things bugged me as I was reading it, until the end, when really big things started to get to me. The setup is absurdly contrived. A mentally disabled woman with no known connections, living in an apartment without paying rent or utilities, without income even, except what the daughter can make out of slot machines, but fortunately there's a benevelent neighbor who suffers from horrific agoraphobia and can't leave her apartment, but who discovers an interior connecting door between the two apartments and can therefor raise this child and homeschool her without ever having to step outside her apartment door. There's that. Then there's the impairment that Heidi's mother, So B. It suffers. We don't know what it is. There are no legal records, there's no medical visit or diagnosis in Heidi's life, no medical care for her, even though she suffers from increasingly painful and frequent headaches. We know that she only speaks 23 words and is incapable of looking after herself, although she does learn how to fix a cup of tea. We don't ever get a glimpse inside her mind, because she can't really speak and no other effort to communicate is attempted. There's the neighbor, Bernadette. As near as we can tell, Bernadette found So B. It in the hallway with Heidi when the latter was a week old and has been taking care of them both full time ever since. Some time before, Bernadette had been out with her father for a birthday dinner when he died of a heart attack. She's never gone out of her apartment since, but although she's not well off, her father left her enough money to support the three of them. And, also, Bernadette's apartment has a whole lot of stuff in it, sufficient stuff to keep Hedi and her mother clothed until So B. It can be trusted to take the child out shopping. And then Heidi finds a camera with a roll of film still undeveloped in it, which happens to show a picture of some kind of home with the name and location clearly spelled out. So Heidi is able to figure out that her mother was in the home while she was pregnant (she looked kind of fat in the snapshots) And from there, it gets even worse. Heidi makes enough on the slot machine (she always wins on the slots exactly as much as she needs for any purpose) and in this case she buys a bus ticket to NY, where the home is. Sure, she could win enough to buy a plane ticket just as easily, but the author needs the trip to be slow. She gets there, knows that her mother had been there, and then she ends up going home with the sherriff and his nice wife who have had three miscarriages and would love to be parents, and are therefor good strangers for her to stay with, with a nice bedroom all ready. Multiple truly pointless delays ready and Heidi finally gets the secret of her mother's story (well, some of it) but not before the escalating headaches kill So B. It. That's right: her mother has to die to teach her an important lesson about not trying to find stuff out. Or something. Turns out her mother's dead, her grandmother is dead, her father suffers from some similar overwhelming brain problem that makes him almost entirely catatonic, but not quite, but her father's father is normal. And now Heidi has lost her luck (no more winning on the slots) but the nice sheriff and his wife who wanted a baby and were happy to take in Heidi manage to have a baby after all. And now that the plot doesn't require keeping her mother hidden from helpful authorities who might try to help her in some way, Heidi can go to school. (hide spoiler)] Yeah, I wept like anything, mostly at the sheer pointlessness. I expect I'll be bitter a long time. (view spoiler)[ What's really bothering me is that many readers are praising the book for being so accepting and so on. But Heidi doesn't have to be any kind of "accepting" because her mother doesn't have any recognizable symptoms, she looks normal, she's always sitting in the other room coloring, not actually interacting with Heidi or Bernadette, she never requires any sort of treatment or therapy, she is, for the most part an amiable void until she dies, still pretty and young, of the mysterious headaches. The only "acceptance" is that Heidi and Bernadette don't ever seek out any sort of medical care for her, not even when the headaches are so bad that Bernadette thinks Heidi should come home. Is So B. It's suffering not worth more attention than some tylenol and a washcloth? Daughter's copy. (hide spoiler)]

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    VOYA: 4Q4P So B. It Sarah Weeks Pre-Reading/Anticipatory Thoughts: The cover looks appealing. I’m not really sure what this is supposed to be about, be it looks like it would be about some sort of hip-style alternate spelling, which suggests an urban background. This does not work with the picture of a girl flying a kite on the cover, however. So really, just by looking at the book I’m not sure what to expect. During Reading: The story is written in a straightforward prose that moves quickly along t VOYA: 4Q4P So B. It Sarah Weeks Pre-Reading/Anticipatory Thoughts: The cover looks appealing. I’m not really sure what this is supposed to be about, be it looks like it would be about some sort of hip-style alternate spelling, which suggests an urban background. This does not work with the picture of a girl flying a kite on the cover, however. So really, just by looking at the book I’m not sure what to expect. During Reading: The story is written in a straightforward prose that moves quickly along the story line and doesn’t get too caught up on description. The pages tend to go pretty quickly. I like the unusual characteristics of a girl who is brought up by someone who is afraid to go outside and a mother who is mentally disabled. It reminds me a little bit of the movie “I am Sam” and the sort of terror I feel when I realize that something as needy as a baby could be in the hands of someone who does not fully understand how to do what the child needs them to do. After Reading: The ending is moving, and the quest to discover the word “soof” combined with the poignant realization not only of the word’s source, but more importantly, of what her mother meant by it, makes the book hit home. This is a story about discovery and loss, about how a quest to understand where you came from can lead you to places you never thought you would visit. Heidi learns a lot about herself on her ride to Liberty, New York, but those lessons come at a high premium: it is only when she finally understands how she came to live in Reno and the details of her birth and family that she can step outside of the protective cocoon that Bernadette has built around her and see the world. Ideas for Future Teaching: The story is compelling and an easy read, so it should be accessible to students. Often pupils, especially those in the middle grades, feel like there is a disconnect between themselves and their parents, so the physiological space between Heidi and her mother might reflect emotional distance in their real lives. This is a very interesting way to bring diversity into the classroom and give students a perspective about what it means to be handicapped. Also, throughout the story, we learn that handicaps can manifest themselves in different ways, whether it be the agoraphobia of Bernadette or the hopelessness of Ruby and Roy. This might prompt interesting discussion in the classroom about the different levels and meanings of disability.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Moreno

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Is anyone in your family mentally disabled? Have you ever wanted to find out about your past? This book is realistic fiction, I know this because the events that happen in this book can really happen to anyone. (Even the unfortunate ones.) I really liked this book because it tells you about Heidi, Bernie, and Heidi's mama. In this book, it tells you that for thirteen years, Heidi and Heidi's momma have been taken care of by their neighbor Bernie. Heidi's momma is mentally disabled and can only sa Is anyone in your family mentally disabled? Have you ever wanted to find out about your past? This book is realistic fiction, I know this because the events that happen in this book can really happen to anyone. (Even the unfortunate ones.) I really liked this book because it tells you about Heidi, Bernie, and Heidi's mama. In this book, it tells you that for thirteen years, Heidi and Heidi's momma have been taken care of by their neighbor Bernie. Heidi's momma is mentally disabled and can only say twenty three words. But one day, Heidi's momma says a word that changes her forever, "Soof." This book is person vs. self. I know this because Heidi tries to find out who her and her momma really are. When Heidi finds some old photos of what looks to be her mother, she looks at the background and then sees where her momma was. This leads Heidi to New York, Liberty. A major event that changed the character is when Heidi's momma died. This changed the main character Heidi because, she loved and cared about her a lot and didn't want her to die. Especially while she was away in New York, Liberty. Also Heidi feels that it's her fault because she wasn't there back home with her momma to say goodbye. First person point of view affects this story greatly because you get to really bond with the main character Heidi, and get to feel how she feels, and get to know what she thinks. I think that's a key point especially in this book because, like for example when her momma dies. You as the reader get to really feel how she feels, and how sad she is about the whole incident. In conclusion, I would definitely rate this book a 5 star, because I really liked this book. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes heart warming stories or to anybody that likes to cry while reading a book. I usually never cry when reading sad books, but this book made me cry when the whole incident with momma happened. After reading this book I have learned to never take anyone that you love for granted because when you least expect it they could be gone forever.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    So B. It by Sarah Weeks is a novel about a young girl named Heidi determined to find out about her past. Her mother was born with a mentally disabled brain, and isn't able to work or care for 12-year old Heidi, and she does not know of her father. Her neighbor, Bernadette, is the only one who can care for her, but she can't work due to her illness where she cannot go outside. They only way for them to get by is using Heidi's lucky streak and winning enough money from slot machines. They seeme So B. It by Sarah Weeks is a novel about a young girl named Heidi determined to find out about her past. Her mother was born with a mentally disabled brain, and isn't able to work or care for 12-year old Heidi, and she does not know of her father. Her neighbor, Bernadette, is the only one who can care for her, but she can't work due to her illness where she cannot go outside. They only way for them to get by is using Heidi's lucky streak and winning enough money from slot machines. They seemed to enjoy life, but Heidi is curious about a word that her mother says that she does not know. She is dying to know what this means, but her mother can't tell her what it is. Heidi has a feeling that this word is related to her past and who she is. This leads her on a journey far from home to figure out who she is. She meets a variety of colorful people, and she experiences truths in the real world that she never knew. This experience makes her braver and more understanding of people in the world, and she also discovers new feelings she had never truly felt before. Sarah Weeks's story was immaculate, and I really enjoyed it. So B. It was a short novel full of mysteries and surprises. It was a book told in first person, and the author expressed Heidi's feelings very well throughout the story. Readers were able to get to know Heidi and her emotions towards each character, and you could experience every dire feeling she felt whether she was sad or ecstatic. Readers who enjoy realistic stories with a twist should read this novel. Love and loss are things in this story that many people could relate to. The book was great, but I feel the ending felt rushed and I wished there had been more of an epilogue. Overall, So B. It by Sarah Weeks is a charming story that I think many readers will enjoy.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hayden Kremer

    I thought that this book was somewhat realistic and somewhat relate-able. I gave this book five stars because I thought that this book was very interesting throughout the entire book. Because I was interested throughout the entire thing, I thought that this book was an easy read. I thought that this book was easy to read for many reasons. One reason was that I was very interested in this topic. This book was about a little girl and her autistic mother who lived with their neighbor. Throughout the I thought that this book was somewhat realistic and somewhat relate-able. I gave this book five stars because I thought that this book was very interesting throughout the entire book. Because I was interested throughout the entire thing, I thought that this book was an easy read. I thought that this book was easy to read for many reasons. One reason was that I was very interested in this topic. This book was about a little girl and her autistic mother who lived with their neighbor. Throughout the story the girl wants to find who she really is. I thought that this book was very interesting because the topic was somewhat connectable. This book was somewhat relate-able because I think that everyone at some point in their life wants to know who they are and where they belong. I also thought that this book was very easy to read because the characters in the book always explain what they are doing. The story may also indirectly show how it is relevant it is to the story. I don't think that this book has anything that it could change to make it better. I think this is true because every sentence in the book is there for a reason. Also, everything in the book happens for a reason. I like this because there are a lot of books that have things happen but no reason for it. I think that this is a book that everyone needs to read because you get a theme out of the book. The theme that I got out of this book is that everyone should try to find who they are. I would recommend this book to readers because it is an easy read and there is something to learn from the book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    *Listened to audio version of this text This novel is about a girl named Heidi who wants to find out more about her life. She lives with her mother who is mentally disabled, she only knows 23 words, and has a neighbor named Bernadette whose house is connected to theirs. Heidi has never known who her father is, as Bernadette found Heidi's mother alone with her when she was a baby. 12 years later, they are still living together, and Bernadette continues to teach Heidi's mother simple new things suc *Listened to audio version of this text This novel is about a girl named Heidi who wants to find out more about her life. She lives with her mother who is mentally disabled, she only knows 23 words, and has a neighbor named Bernadette whose house is connected to theirs. Heidi has never known who her father is, as Bernadette found Heidi's mother alone with her when she was a baby. 12 years later, they are still living together, and Bernadette continues to teach Heidi's mother simple new things such as how to open a can. Bernadette has agoraphobia, so she home schools Heidi who has never gone to school or had much interaction with kids her age. One day Heidi finds an old camera which furthers her curiosity about the people in the photos and her background, along with her wonder about her mother's word "soof." She sets off on a journey, by herself, to find the answers to these questions. This book has many great teaching lessons for students. The theme of identity is woven throughout this book. Many students can relate to wanting to know more about some aspect of their life. This is also a great book to talk about special needs and differences within families. The story keeps you guessing what will happen next and has a great ending that is not expected.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stetson

    The genre of So B. It is realistic fiction by Sarah Weeks, I have gave it a five-star rating. The main characters of So B. It are Heidi, the main character, Bernadette, Mama, Thurman, Roy, Ruby, Georgia, and Elliot. The two main settings are Reno, Nevada and Liberty, New York. In Reno, Heidi is usually in her apartment or out gambling at a slot machine, and in Liberty she is either at Hilltop or Roy and Ruby's house. The main plot is a girl, Heidi, with a bum brain Mama who can't fully speak. Wh The genre of So B. It is realistic fiction by Sarah Weeks, I have gave it a five-star rating. The main characters of So B. It are Heidi, the main character, Bernadette, Mama, Thurman, Roy, Ruby, Georgia, and Elliot. The two main settings are Reno, Nevada and Liberty, New York. In Reno, Heidi is usually in her apartment or out gambling at a slot machine, and in Liberty she is either at Hilltop or Roy and Ruby's house. The main plot is a girl, Heidi, with a bum brain Mama who can't fully speak. When a word only Mama says starts to get to her, she goes on a journey to find out about her past. I really liked So B. It! I liked it because there were no suspenseful parts that killed me, yet I wanted to read on anyway. I think I relate to Heidi in luck, because I am lucky. My favorite part was when Heidi's past began to unravel, answering questions I had at the beginning. I truly did not have a least favorite part, but I didn't like how slow the book could get. I wish this book had a sequel/prequel. I recommend this book to all readers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Brunton

    The book So B. It by Sarah Weeks was a realistic fiction novel. When a 12 year old girl named Heidi doesn't know about her past because her mom is mentally disabled. She goes on a journey to figure out about her past, but especially the word soof that mama only knows. Will Heidi figure out about her past, or especially the word soof? Read this book to find out. I really liked this book. I liked this book because it keeps on leading me to read more and more about this book. I also would of never The book So B. It by Sarah Weeks was a realistic fiction novel. When a 12 year old girl named Heidi doesn't know about her past because her mom is mentally disabled. She goes on a journey to figure out about her past, but especially the word soof that mama only knows. Will Heidi figure out about her past, or especially the word soof? Read this book to find out. I really liked this book. I liked this book because it keeps on leading me to read more and more about this book. I also would of never suspected the ending. I would probably relate most to Heidi because we are age same age and I would probably do the exact same thing that she did. Heidi and I are also the same because we both have a little luck in us. My favorite part in the book is when Heidi finally gets to Liberty. I wished it explained a little more in the ending of the book and I recommend this book to basically anybody.

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