Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Autobiography of a Yogi (Kannada)

Availability: Ready to download

In 1996, Yoga International hailed Paramahansa Yogananda as "the father of the yoga in the west." In 1999, his acclaimed autobiography was selected one of the 100 best spiritual books of the 20th century. Since it was first published, the spiritual classic has introduced millions of readers to the science and philosophy of yoga meditation. With engaging candour, eloquence, In 1996, Yoga International hailed Paramahansa Yogananda as "the father of the yoga in the west." In 1999, his acclaimed autobiography was selected one of the 100 best spiritual books of the 20th century. Since it was first published, the spiritual classic has introduced millions of readers to the science and philosophy of yoga meditation. With engaging candour, eloquence, and wit, Paramahansa Yogananda narrates the inspiring chronicle of his life - the experiences of his remarkable childhood, encounters with many saints and sages during his youthful search throughout India for an illumined teacher, ten years of training in the ashram of his God-realized Guru, and of the many years that he lived and taught as spiritual preceptor to truth- seekers all over the world. Also recorded are his meetings with Ramana Maharshi, Ananda Moyi Ma, Master Mahasaya (the saintly disciple of Ramkrishna Paramahansa), Mahatma Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore, and Jagdish Chandra Bose. Considered a modern spiritual classic, the book has been translated into thirty-three languages and is widely used as a text and reference work in colleges and universitiesThousands of readers have declared Autobiography of a Yogi the most fascinating reading of a lifetime. Autobiography of a Yogi is at once a beautifully written account of an exceptional life and a profound introduction to the ancient science of Yoga and its time-honored tradition of meditation. The author clearly explains the subtle but definite laws behind both ordinary events of everyday life and the extraordinary events commonly termed miracles. His absorbing life story thus becomes the background for a penetrating and unforgettable look at the ultimate mysteries of human existence. This complete and unabridged edition included the chapter "the Years 1940-1951" written by Sri Sri Paramahansa Yogananda during the last years of his life.


Compare
Ads Banner

In 1996, Yoga International hailed Paramahansa Yogananda as "the father of the yoga in the west." In 1999, his acclaimed autobiography was selected one of the 100 best spiritual books of the 20th century. Since it was first published, the spiritual classic has introduced millions of readers to the science and philosophy of yoga meditation. With engaging candour, eloquence, In 1996, Yoga International hailed Paramahansa Yogananda as "the father of the yoga in the west." In 1999, his acclaimed autobiography was selected one of the 100 best spiritual books of the 20th century. Since it was first published, the spiritual classic has introduced millions of readers to the science and philosophy of yoga meditation. With engaging candour, eloquence, and wit, Paramahansa Yogananda narrates the inspiring chronicle of his life - the experiences of his remarkable childhood, encounters with many saints and sages during his youthful search throughout India for an illumined teacher, ten years of training in the ashram of his God-realized Guru, and of the many years that he lived and taught as spiritual preceptor to truth- seekers all over the world. Also recorded are his meetings with Ramana Maharshi, Ananda Moyi Ma, Master Mahasaya (the saintly disciple of Ramkrishna Paramahansa), Mahatma Gandhi, Rabindranath Tagore, and Jagdish Chandra Bose. Considered a modern spiritual classic, the book has been translated into thirty-three languages and is widely used as a text and reference work in colleges and universitiesThousands of readers have declared Autobiography of a Yogi the most fascinating reading of a lifetime. Autobiography of a Yogi is at once a beautifully written account of an exceptional life and a profound introduction to the ancient science of Yoga and its time-honored tradition of meditation. The author clearly explains the subtle but definite laws behind both ordinary events of everyday life and the extraordinary events commonly termed miracles. His absorbing life story thus becomes the background for a penetrating and unforgettable look at the ultimate mysteries of human existence. This complete and unabridged edition included the chapter "the Years 1940-1951" written by Sri Sri Paramahansa Yogananda during the last years of his life.

30 review for Autobiography of a Yogi (Kannada)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alok Mishra

    Pretext: There are some self-satisfied people in the reviews section who thought it better to belittle this book. You crazy ones, do you even know what an autobiography means? It means sharing one's experiences, life-lessons, episodes and whatever you lived. Why are people craving for this one to be a book on Yoga, spirituality and then crying like wolves when they find it full of wonders and surprises. How can you experience what the author experienced? Are you close enough to give yourself up Pretext: There are some self-satisfied people in the reviews section who thought it better to belittle this book. You crazy ones, do you even know what an autobiography means? It means sharing one's experiences, life-lessons, episodes and whatever you lived. Why are people craving for this one to be a book on Yoga, spirituality and then crying like wolves when they find it full of wonders and surprises. How can you experience what the author experienced? Are you close enough to give yourself up to a world which is away of the confusions and connections that we have made today? This book is a journey of Swami Paramhansa Yogananda Ji's life and his experiences. He writes about his beginnings, his Gurus, the wonders he saw and the wonders he experienced. Already transformed the lives of many, this book simply inspires one to begin to open for wonders in life - the wonders of joy. If you remain in your shell and not allow any miracle to happen, you will always be self-satisfied and in pain of your being. Life has become horrendous if we don't look for an out. At least reading this one will transport you to other dimensions for some time. Post Script: I will only reply to sane comments.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shitikanth Kashyap

    After painfully wading through fifty odd pages of what I consider to be lies or, at best, delusions of a (typical Bengali :P) megalomaniac, I decided to put this book down. I don't know what else I was expecting from a book of this genre. It was a mistake to pick it up in the first place. I absolutely fail to understand how learned, intelligent people can like this book so much. People apparating in and out of thin air! Someone willing himself out of photographs! Are you fucking kidding me! Am I After painfully wading through fifty odd pages of what I consider to be lies or, at best, delusions of a (typical Bengali :P) megalomaniac, I decided to put this book down. I don't know what else I was expecting from a book of this genre. It was a mistake to pick it up in the first place. I absolutely fail to understand how learned, intelligent people can like this book so much. People apparating in and out of thin air! Someone willing himself out of photographs! Are you fucking kidding me! Am I supposed to take these things on face value? Does Mukunda Ghosh mean us to take these miracles literally at all? If so, shouldn't I be seeking wisdom from someone less delusional? If not, are these stories supposed to have some hidden lessons? (I am yet to decipher any) Is the world as it is not beautiful and spiritually rich enough for him? Even if we leave the miracles out of the discussion for a moment, which is pretty difficult considering that they appear in the book at the rate of at least one per page, what IS the message that is hidden in this treasure of a book? Before you berate me for being close-minded, I do understand that there is a wonderful world outside of science. I appreciate beauty and art and wonder. I would even appreciate spirituality, but I have to hear about it from a person who can be honest about it to himself and to me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Hanry

    This has become my favorite book and since reading it, I have been reading and fully immersed in other books by Yogananda. Everyone would benefit by reading this book with an open mind, no matter what religious or spiritual beliefs you have, or even if you have no belief at all. Everything is possible! I bought this book at special price from here: https://www.amazon.com/Autobiography-...

  4. 4 out of 5

    P.J. Mazumdar

    This is not Yoga!! The first prerequisite for Yoga is to have Vidya, or an intellectual base arrived at by reasoning, though in the final culmination Vidya is left behind. Yoga is an intelligent search for the truth. It doesnt depend on fanciful fables and claims. And Yogananda really does stretch our credulity!! It starts with him remembering himself as a fetus when he knew all languages and finally selected the one he was hearing as his mother tongue and his first memories right after he was bor This is not Yoga!! The first prerequisite for Yoga is to have Vidya, or an intellectual base arrived at by reasoning, though in the final culmination Vidya is left behind. Yoga is an intelligent search for the truth. It doesnt depend on fanciful fables and claims. And Yogananda really does stretch our credulity!! It starts with him remembering himself as a fetus when he knew all languages and finally selected the one he was hearing as his mother tongue and his first memories right after he was born. The claims keep getting more and more astonishing, beginning with minor miracles like controlling his kite as a child, to fantastical claims like Yogis who never eat, become invisible, fly through the air and do just about anything that Superman does, and much more! There's a photograph of Yogananda standing alone with a caption, "Yogananda standing with his master, who did not care to be photographed, so he made himself invisible." It requires a very strong gullibility to accept this. If anyone wants to become invisible or fly, they should go, not to a Yoga teacher, but to David Copperfield. I am amazed that people in the West still seem to like this book. Many reviewers write about how they have learned about a 'different culture' and a 'different way of thinking' from this book, as if in India we are quite used to seeing our Yogis flying through the air and so on. I must make it clear that I am not belittling the book in entirety, it has a childlike purity which makes it a compelling read. Yogananda's transparent sincerity, ability to laugh at himself and his genuine love for god and his thirst for spirituality is all too apparent, and his account of his spiritual quest is often touching and revelatory. This is what gives the book its charm and power. Some of the passages deserve to be counted among the most illuminating accounts of mystical experience ever. But all too often, his eagerness to discover god and people on the spiritual path strays into descriptions of fantastical and unbelievable anecdotes. It would be quite natural for anyone who first comes into contact with Yoga through this book to develop a strong cynicism about Hinduism and its practises, including Yoga. But this is not Yoga at all. To learn about Yoga, I would recommend reading Swami Vivekananda and Ramkrishna Paramahansa, these were great teachers who also achieved relevatory experiences through Yoga but certainly never made such incredible claims. Yoga is not all about magic and fable that this book makes it out to be. I am sorry if this review offends anyone who has found this book inspiring. I can understand people being inspired by Yogananda's profound love of God which is so transparent in this book, and which did not fail to move me, but I would like to make my own stand for reason in following the path of Yoga.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rajat Ubhaykar

    Written with supreme confidence, there is an exceptional clarity of thought that runs throughout this book which will appeal to a man who's kept his mind open to possibilities beyond the realm of the usual. Anyway, the text of the book is peppered with miracles that will sound bizarre and will blow your mind wide open. There is also a chapter which describes 'life' after death (the progression of the soul)in vivid detail. All this will be difficult to digest for the man of science, but Paramahan Written with supreme confidence, there is an exceptional clarity of thought that runs throughout this book which will appeal to a man who's kept his mind open to possibilities beyond the realm of the usual. Anyway, the text of the book is peppered with miracles that will sound bizarre and will blow your mind wide open. There is also a chapter which describes 'life' after death (the progression of the soul)in vivid detail. All this will be difficult to digest for the man of science, but Paramahansa Yogananda is self-assuredly convincing and consistent. He woos the scientific man by defining the subtle laws at work behind the extraordinary events we term as miracles couched in scientific terms such as the theory of relativity. It is a wonderful beginner's guide to Indian philosophy, not to deride the complexities of issues addressed in the book, but in the sense that it gently and lovingly guides the reader along the 'path', giving ample time for introspection, an essential prerequisite for true understanding. Mainly written to 'sell' Eastern mysticism to the West without placing them on unfamiliar ground (he spent a solid chunk of his life in California), his ultimate goal is to point out how the religions of the world are talking about the same goddamn thing. He does this by coming up with Vedic interpretations of the Bible and drawing pretty convincing analogies with the Upanishadas and other major Hindu philosophical texts. The book is certainly worth reading for a peek into world-views that aren't strictly scientific. And for those who don't take his theories to heart like I did, it can alternatively be read as an extremely imaginative and engrossing work of fiction. As for me, it left me deeply disturbed and yet strangely at peace. Life-altering read. Check.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melani

    Of all the books by and about spiritual leaders that I have read, this is the one I come back to again and again. Paramhansa Yogananda does not come from ego or judgment when he writes about his spiritual experience. He is not above feeling emotions such as grief and joy, nor does he believe that emotions are something to be surmounted or tamed. This is the only "saint" I have ever been able to digest and trust.

  7. 5 out of 5

    James Morcan

    This is another of my favorite books and one that greatly influenced my life as well. I think the Yogis (and Yoginis!) of India hold a lot of secrets for humanity...ancient knowledge if you will...So I loved reading this particular book and learning some powerful insights... As a footnote, this was Steve Jobs' favorite book and the only book he ever downloaded to his iPad...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vivek

    The idiom 'Never Judge a Book By its Cover' aptly suits this book whose cover gives it a notion of being a purely religious text. Sri Yoganandaje takes his readers on a journey, which is full of witty instances, true accounts, insightful fables, and priceless wisdom. Though the book predominantly focusses on the timeless concept of spiritual evolution of a man, it surprisingly refers to numerous proven scientific concepts linked with spirituality. From eminent scientist J C Bose's theory of elec The idiom 'Never Judge a Book By its Cover' aptly suits this book whose cover gives it a notion of being a purely religious text. Sri Yoganandaje takes his readers on a journey, which is full of witty instances, true accounts, insightful fables, and priceless wisdom. Though the book predominantly focusses on the timeless concept of spiritual evolution of a man, it surprisingly refers to numerous proven scientific concepts linked with spirituality. From eminent scientist J C Bose's theory of electromagnetic radiation to the world of metaphysics, light waves, and atoms, Sri Yoganandaje gradually takes his readers to the cusp of science and spirituality. With Stephen Hawking's, the late British scientist, last published paper on the 'Origin of Universe' concluding that the cosmos is actually a projection emanating from a light source, Sri Yoganandaje's same words in one of the chapters are self-satisfying that what scientists are discovering today has been revealed to ancient sages centuries before. In nutshell, it is a book to go for if you are ready to open yourself to a world that is infinite and beyond one's comprehension. Even for the non-believers or the ones obsessed with finding a reason for everything, 'Autobiography of a Yogi' is compelling enough to verify the science-spiritual linkage discussed on several occasions in the book. Read more at https://wp.me/p6rxcY-1R

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike S

    If you were brought up Christian but had a lot of problems with the way the church, priests, pope etc. acted, or if you had a lot of frustration with the numerous holes and contradictions in the Bible, as I did, this book will be a breath of fresh air. Yogananda has several books where he talks about what Christ says and meant as portrayed in the Bible, where unfortunately he is often misquoted or poorly translated, if the quotes aren't outright fabrications. This is a great introduction to an a If you were brought up Christian but had a lot of problems with the way the church, priests, pope etc. acted, or if you had a lot of frustration with the numerous holes and contradictions in the Bible, as I did, this book will be a breath of fresh air. Yogananda has several books where he talks about what Christ says and meant as portrayed in the Bible, where unfortunately he is often misquoted or poorly translated, if the quotes aren't outright fabrications. This is a great introduction to an amazing man who can help you understand your own religion and spiritual experiences. ...I'm reading the book for the second time and this is by far the best spiritual book I've ever read. Yogananda is completely honest, clear and direct, and he met so many incredible people it's mind-blowing. India has an incredibly rich spiritual tradition. Also I learned that Hinduism is at it's heart monotheistic. I can't say enough good things about this book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sara Alaee

    Autobiography of a Yogi is the autobiography of a spiritual leader, Paramahansa Yogananda, one of the most well-known Indian yogi-swamis of all times. The book begins with his childhood, in a Bengali family, to his various encounters with the famous spiritual masters of the time (his own guru being one of them), to finally becoming a monk, establishing Yoga centers throughout the world, and introducing Kriya Yoga teachings to the west for the first time. Kriya Yoga is an ancient Yoga system whic Autobiography of a Yogi is the autobiography of a spiritual leader, Paramahansa Yogananda, one of the most well-known Indian yogi-swamis of all times. The book begins with his childhood, in a Bengali family, to his various encounters with the famous spiritual masters of the time (his own guru being one of them), to finally becoming a monk, establishing Yoga centers throughout the world, and introducing Kriya Yoga teachings to the west for the first time. Kriya Yoga is an ancient Yoga system which “Krishna gave millenniums ago to Arjuna; and was later known to Patanjali, and to Christ, St. John, St. Paul, and other disciples” and was later revived for use in modern times. I liked this book for some personal reasons. However, if you don't believe in mysticism and magic, chances are you won't like this book that much. It’s a recommended read for anyone who’s interested in Indian philosophy, especially Yoga meditation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    What a crazy book! I’ve read lots of yoga books. The type I usually pick are about the various forms of yoga that are taught in North America these days. A couple of them deal with the spiritual side of yoga as well as the physical. Most of these books are great sources of information and thought. This biography? I’m not so sure, even though it has a huge fan following. The closest word I can come up with to describe this autobiography is fantasy. Yogananda was a yogi in India who was divinely inspi What a crazy book! I’ve read lots of yoga books. The type I usually pick are about the various forms of yoga that are taught in North America these days. A couple of them deal with the spiritual side of yoga as well as the physical. Most of these books are great sources of information and thought. This biography? I’m not so sure, even though it has a huge fan following. The closest word I can come up with to describe this autobiography is fantasy. Yogananda was a yogi in India who was divinely inspired to come to the States. He started his “Self-Realization Fellowship” in California, which supposedly teaches all the secret “Kriyas” that transformed Yogananda’s life. That much is clearly factual (although the divinely inspired bit might be an exaggeration). The rest of the biography? Lots and lots of miracles. Photos of invisible people. People who can split themselves into two or more and be at two places at the same time. Women who never eat. Ever. They absorb the cosmic energies. A resurrected man returns from the astral plains and tells Yogananda about the many planes of existence for those beings who rise from life to life. And the list goes on. I read this book, bit by bit, and the cover of my edition is long worn off. I have to admit it. I enjoyed this book. It’s fun to venture into this dense forest of truths, part-truths, fantasy and lies. I didn’t try to distinguish between these levels of truth and non-truth. Perhaps one of the most interesting aspect of Yogananda’s ideas is his interest in joining Christianity and yogi ideas. At the end of the book, he claims to have seen Christ, who spoke gentle and private words to him which he decides not to disclose... hmmm. Yogananda talks about Christ and Krishna in the same sentence, suggesting that all religions are really the same. If you want an unusual read full of miracles, go for this book. Supposedly countless people have been transformed by this book. I wasn’t but you might be!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    After reading this I feel cheated by my American public school upbringing. Why are we so sheltered from Eastern religions? There is so much more out there - so many more experiences of God than the very limited and narrow interpreation of God in this culture. This book is really an eye-opener - I highly recommend it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Reading "Autobiography of a Yogi" by Paramahansa Yogananda at the age of forty-two was one of the most exhilarating experiences of my life. From the beginning chapter, I felt like I had finally come home. This was the life I had always wished was possible but never dreamed it could be! After finishing it, I sent away to Self-Realization Fellowship, the organization Yogananda founded in 1920, for the three-and-a-half years’ worth of bi-monthly lessons on “right living” and follow Yogananda’s teac Reading "Autobiography of a Yogi" by Paramahansa Yogananda at the age of forty-two was one of the most exhilarating experiences of my life. From the beginning chapter, I felt like I had finally come home. This was the life I had always wished was possible but never dreamed it could be! After finishing it, I sent away to Self-Realization Fellowship, the organization Yogananda founded in 1920, for the three-and-a-half years’ worth of bi-monthly lessons on “right living” and follow Yogananda’s teachings today as part of my daily spiritual discipline. I’ve listened to the audiobook version, read by Ben Kingsley, three times now and it never fails to thrill me. Everything in this book resonates in harmony with who I am and who I wish to become. I was already teaching spiritual classes by the time I encountered this book and was amazed at how much deeper it took me in my knowledge and practice. Yogananda teaches that direct contact with God is possible through the application of scientific yoga principles. After practicing his techniques, which have been handed down for thousands of years by Indian saints, I have reached new heights of peace, happiness and alignment with what Yogananda’s guru, Swami Sri Yukteswar, refers to as “that supreme intelligence which governs everything.” May this wonderful book enrich your spiritual life as it has mine!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    I have seen this book for 40 years and wanted to read it, but somehow I never picked it up, even at the used book shops which often had dozens of copies displayed. Last year I finally bought a used copy and last month I began eagerly to read the life story of the man who brought Kriya Yoga to the attention of the Western world. Unfortunately, my eagerness did not last long enough to get me past the two hundred page mark. I'm not sure why. I usually enjoy stories about a person becoming who they a I have seen this book for 40 years and wanted to read it, but somehow I never picked it up, even at the used book shops which often had dozens of copies displayed. Last year I finally bought a used copy and last month I began eagerly to read the life story of the man who brought Kriya Yoga to the attention of the Western world. Unfortunately, my eagerness did not last long enough to get me past the two hundred page mark. I'm not sure why. I usually enjoy stories about a person becoming who they are meant to be, and this book certainly starts off with that in mind. Yogananda shares his life story and how rebellious he was as a teenager, wanting more than anything to become one with God. He ran away from home more than once: trying to get to the Himalayan mountains to become a hermit sage one year, visiting many known saints and gurus looking for the one who would become his guide. I could appreciate his efforts, but perhaps I am too independent-minded to relate properly to the guru/student philosophy and all it involves. I could never bow down to another person that way, and although I could acknowledge a guru's wisdom, I have thought for myself too long to turn my life over to anyone. But that is just my Western Self. I understand that in the Orient there is traditionally nothing wrong with the idea. Odd that I can read about the same concept in Zen Buddhism and it seems fine, but in this book I had a mental echo all the time saying 'no, that just would not do for me, I could never live like that'. This feeling became stronger after Yogananda met his guru Sri Yukteswar and began to spend time with him. The man seemed cruel and too fond of using his mental talents on other people just to create lessons for Yogananda. I may be completely missing the point, as the author says many people did when dealing with his guru. But I was more repelled than fascinated at this point and after struggling through a few more chapters I decided I would give up. I might come back to the book later, but that is a very large 'might'.

  15. 4 out of 5

    DROPPING OUT

    I know this is a "classic" of "spiritual literature, but I wonder how many people so caught up in it realized the times in which Yogananda lived and wrote. The "spirituality" he brought to America was merely a continuation of the sanitized and de-racinated version "Sanatana Dharma" (AKA "Hinduism") brought to America by Swami Vivekananda, that it bore very little resemblance to what happened (and still happens) in India, and that it was also a further development of Emersonian enchantment with t I know this is a "classic" of "spiritual literature, but I wonder how many people so caught up in it realized the times in which Yogananda lived and wrote. The "spirituality" he brought to America was merely a continuation of the sanitized and de-racinated version "Sanatana Dharma" (AKA "Hinduism") brought to America by Swami Vivekananda, that it bore very little resemblance to what happened (and still happens) in India, and that it was also a further development of Emersonian enchantment with the Bhagavad Gita. Moreover, if one reads the book closely, Yogananda's teacher, Yukteshwar, asked him to write a biography of his teacher, Lahari Mahasya. As great a master of Kriya Yoga and astrology Yukteshwar was acknowledged in his day and after, so much more so, his teacher Lahiri Mahasya. Instead, Yogananda wrote an autobiography filled with grand tales. Finally, Kriya Yoga is an ancient and authentic discipline that takes years to master, as its secrets are revealed slowly. I can only wonder at what Yogananda so easily imparted resembles the real thing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christine Rondeau

    This book as supposedly changed lives... I'm not sure that it did anything for me. I thought that it dragged on enormously and felt like a very large pamphlet.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathrina

    If I have ever been dragged to a book kicking and screaming, it was first The Holy Bible: King James Version, then Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, and finally, though I demonstrably handled it with more maturity, Autobiography of a Yogi. I do not rate this book five stars, but rather all the stars, from one to five, in that it is both a piece of genius and metaphysical dreck, all paradoxically at the same time. The mysteries of the human consciousness are both specifically unpacke If I have ever been dragged to a book kicking and screaming, it was first The Holy Bible: King James Version, then Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, and finally, though I demonstrably handled it with more maturity, Autobiography of a Yogi. I do not rate this book five stars, but rather all the stars, from one to five, in that it is both a piece of genius and metaphysical dreck, all paradoxically at the same time. The mysteries of the human consciousness are both specifically unpacked and hopelessly buried in one single narrative. Yoganandaji, through his visitation with the deceased Sri Yukteswar, explains the complexities of the causal, astral, and physical worlds, and the complicated hierarchical system of promotion that is apparently the fate of every living human being, and it is exhausting. I am happier in my agnostic ignorance. Somehow Sri Yukteswar got into a sweet internship with the Supreme Being, jumping out of the herd to assist in the astral greenroom for causal candidates. Without poking too much fun, I will accede that my cup is most likely not large enough to contain all the mind-stuff. I am empathetic with and also guardedly suspicious of the need to purchase lessons from SRF in order to learn the secrets of Kriya Yoga. It must be untainted, but must it also have a price? But I better get a handle on this soon -- I'm traveling to India this December, following the path of Yoganandaji's enlightenment with tour guides from the SRF. Not a path I chose, but a path that has been placed before me, and I would be a fool to turn it down. Ranchi, Calcutta (Kolkata), Varanasi, Puri -- seen with my own eyes. This book has served well as travelogue. It remains to be seen what other uses I will make of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...30-minutes wait to call the firemen...and

    Yogananda confided with Tagore and Gandhi and many other world great names. It's a beautiful auto-biography, recalling childhood,amazing stories of India, a troubled school-learning (the Humanities, and English...),and above all: the Master Teachings. Yogananda brought Kriya Yoga to the USA and wrote many books; some on parallels between Christianity and Yoga.One of the key points of the book: his love for his Master Yuketswar. A must-read book, especially in these days when Gandhi-inspired, soc Yogananda confided with Tagore and Gandhi and many other world great names. It's a beautiful auto-biography, recalling childhood,amazing stories of India, a troubled school-learning (the Humanities, and English...),and above all: the Master Teachings. Yogananda brought Kriya Yoga to the USA and wrote many books; some on parallels between Christianity and Yoga.One of the key points of the book: his love for his Master Yuketswar. A must-read book, especially in these days when Gandhi-inspired, social activist Anna Hazare draws millions in India against political corruption [review of 2011].

  19. 4 out of 5

    Norman Moore

    I'm going to go against the grain here and say that although I see Yogananda as an important figure, and someone who constantly strived, spritiually speaking - his mix of western occultism, Theosophy and New-Age-ism is just that. Quote fromt he autobiography: "..around the six spinal centers which correspond to the twelve astral signs of the zodiac, the symbolic Cosmic Man. One-half minute of revolution of energy around the sensitive spinal cord of man effects subtle progress in his evolution; I'm going to go against the grain here and say that although I see Yogananda as an important figure, and someone who constantly strived, spritiually speaking - his mix of western occultism, Theosophy and New-Age-ism is just that. Quote fromt he autobiography: "..around the six spinal centers which correspond to the twelve astral signs of the zodiac, the symbolic Cosmic Man. One-half minute of revolution of energy around the sensitive spinal cord of man effects subtle progress in his evolution; that half-minute of Kriya equals one year of natural spiritual unfoldment..." If he was here now I'd ask him not to pander to the wannabes in the west and stick with authentic Hindu teachings. Nobody with half an understanding of any form of yoga equates things like the zodiac with chakra use, it's really not authentic and about as painful to read as Anodea Judith's 'expert' opinion on chakras. Making far-fetched statements about the efficacy of Kriya isn't designed to give anyone credibility. Take it all with a pinch of salt... N

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzie Palmer

    More just a book 'Autobiography of a Yogi' transformed my heart and mind like an indelible spiritual experience... it certainly expanded my view of life forever! Here's what i wrote in my autobiography: 'My mind wondrously expanded during the process of reading Paramahansa Yogananda’s Autobiography of a Yogi. The life experiences of this profound being, together with so many other profound saintly beings, fulfilled a previously unquenchable yearning in my heart. From here, I felt vipassana medita More just a book 'Autobiography of a Yogi' transformed my heart and mind like an indelible spiritual experience... it certainly expanded my view of life forever! Here's what i wrote in my autobiography: 'My mind wondrously expanded during the process of reading Paramahansa Yogananda’s Autobiography of a Yogi. The life experiences of this profound being, together with so many other profound saintly beings, fulfilled a previously unquenchable yearning in my heart. From here, I felt vipassana meditation had been for the higher purpose of purifying my mind in preparation to receive such divine truths. I embraced this book as a gift from God! For here was a great Hindu yogi’s self-written account about his colourful life and associations with many of India’s God-realised masters. Always destined to become a yogi, Yogananda shares the miracles he experienced in his life as well as some of the sacred teachings he obtained on his road of awakening. Reading this was a dream come true for me. I absorbed Yogananda’s every line of his life story, adoring his writing style, magnificent expression, and grace… the treasure of his heart and soul! Yogananda was the first yogi ever to share the divinity of his experiences in such a way. And, through his sharing, my faith in God grew boundlessly stronger and my belief in healing my physical challenge became unquestionable! Because of Yogananda, I felt a sense of God intoxication for the first time. He presented God as most loving, sacred, and precious. Fear of God was not exhibited in the old Western way; instead, Hindu’s teach to guide one’s life in awe of our Maker — in love with… For the first time, my idea of God rocketed. He even interpreted Christianity beautifully — the Bible is completely different when explained with esoteric yet lucid, supernal wisdom, insight, and light — the reason why I sought to study it here in Oz.' More than highly-recommended, this book is a must read if spiritually inclined...

  21. 4 out of 5

    RK Kuppala

    Imagine a story or script, if you will, built around a scientific theory or some invention to cater to the tastes of Hollywood audience. All the grandeur, graphics etc., Some arrant trash gets passed for knowledge so convincingly. 'Autobiography of a Yogi' is exactly that, the only difference being the subject, it is the 'mystic world of hinduism' at it's best, written specifically for the scientifically superstitious Western junta! It is not the content that I have problems with. I do not think Imagine a story or script, if you will, built around a scientific theory or some invention to cater to the tastes of Hollywood audience. All the grandeur, graphics etc., Some arrant trash gets passed for knowledge so convincingly. 'Autobiography of a Yogi' is exactly that, the only difference being the subject, it is the 'mystic world of hinduism' at it's best, written specifically for the scientifically superstitious Western junta! It is not the content that I have problems with. I do not think that 'wonders', 'supernatural powers', bizarre incidents explained by the author are impossible in the real world. In fact, probably because I am Indian, I intuitively know that they are possible. But it is the style that I have problems with. Throughout the book, it looked as if the author was trying to 'sell' something in the name of yogic powers, mysticism etc., This book is not going to enlighten you, of course we can't outsource enlightenment to books, one has to attain it on his own - but, thins book makes you think that being a yogi is all about gaining some supernatural powers etc., which is not going to help you! For me, this book is like Dan Brown's novel!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jos-Madelaine Standing

    Fantastic!!! Listening to this e-book on Audible reminds me of every reason why I had decided to become a yoga teacher six years ago!! Must Read for those interested in eastern theology, with a desire to abandon dogmatic viewpoints on life, and finally those ready to jump into the great abyss of the unknown...resting within.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    I enjoyed reading this book. It is filled with insight and wisdom and a little bit of magic. I did not read this book in search of answers or direction. I already feel pretty centered in my life and I feel that I have a good relationship with the Divine (as Yogananda calls it). But Yogananda tells some beautiful stories about faith and being centered. It is beautiful to read about someone who devotes their entire life to God and meditation. It is also beautiful to read about the amazing experien I enjoyed reading this book. It is filled with insight and wisdom and a little bit of magic. I did not read this book in search of answers or direction. I already feel pretty centered in my life and I feel that I have a good relationship with the Divine (as Yogananda calls it). But Yogananda tells some beautiful stories about faith and being centered. It is beautiful to read about someone who devotes their entire life to God and meditation. It is also beautiful to read about the amazing experiences he has when he completely removes himself from the world. I have to say that I liked the first 2/3 of the book a lot better than the end when he comes to America. Also, I disagree with some of the methods of reaching one-ness with God. I don't think marriage and sex are as evil or as distracting as he says they are. I think that is some of that puritanical philosophy that must have snuck into Hinduism because it is not inherent in the culture or the religion. Also, the Judeo-Christian idea of self-less service is left out when you focus on intense mediation. Yogananda refers a lot to Christ's teachings, but I think there is a bit of a disconnect between Christianity and his philosophy of meditation. I think meditation and "self-realization" and the access you gain to divinity cannot be complete without the idea of self-less service like Christ taught. I don't fully practice either so I cannot go further philosophically, but it seems to me that Yoga and "self-realization" is a part, albeit an essential one, of accessing divinity. I thought there was a lot of other christ-like allegories as well like his master's taking on of his disciple's sins and physical suffering for them. I thought a lot of the mystical/magical/miracle stuff was interesting and cool. Not sure what percentage I believe, btu that's OK with me. I do think there is a lot to the universe and its laws that we do not understand and that can be manipulated if we could use more of our "energies". I am pretty open to it, but I am not going to go buy an astrology band. I have practiced yoga in the past though and know that there is a lot I need to learn about divinity and my body and the connection.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    This was probably the first book Michael Miley ever gave me, possibly the first book I ever read upon his recommendation. Many others have followed, Michael having influenced my reading more than anyone else. I had known of Michael in high school, known of him as a tough guy, not someone I'd willingly associate with. I met him shortly after graduation, him and his brother, Tom, in Hodges Park, between the Park Ridge, Illinois City Hall, The Community Church and Bob Rowe's Evening Pipe Shop. The This was probably the first book Michael Miley ever gave me, possibly the first book I ever read upon his recommendation. Many others have followed, Michael having influenced my reading more than anyone else. I had known of Michael in high school, known of him as a tough guy, not someone I'd willingly associate with. I met him shortly after graduation, him and his brother, Tom, in Hodges Park, between the Park Ridge, Illinois City Hall, The Community Church and Bob Rowe's Evening Pipe Shop. The person did not fit with the reputation. Raised in a broken working-class family, ostensibly Catholic, Michael had been going through some swift changes, questioning his previously unthought assumptions about religion, politics and philosophy. I'd been doing much the same. We hit it off, beginning a creative, often contentious, dialogue that continues to this day. My answer to questions about the nature of reality consisted of a barely mixed stew of Marxist and existentialist ideas. He was beginning to find some insight through the study of Eastern philosophies. An exchange of ideas, reading recommendations and books began. Thus Yogananda. I found Yogananda to be charmingly bizarre, his claims to paranormal experiences intellectually unbelievable. But his charm was such that I persisted, reading the whole thing. Some experience with psychedelics had opened my mind quite a lot to the possibilities of quite extraordinary experiences. Perhaps we just interpreted them differently. It didn't hurt that Yogananda had had some acquaintance with Gandhi, a great hero of mine. Generally, my appropriation of his story was positive, however guarded, just as my appropriation of Michael's own stories of himself were to become. From Yogananda my readings progressed to Sri Aurobindo, again at Michael's suggestion, a more intellectually satisfying thinker, but that's another story...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    My name is Maria, and I read this book the first time in English, even though I was not really good in speaking or understanding English. But somehow I knew I had to explore this book, knowing nothing about yogis or gurus or indian culture. So I had a glossary and the book at the same time, teaching myself the language while reading this awsome story and amazing information. ALL MY LIFE ì HAVE a thirst for knowledge, and wisdom for the love of life. This book is the only book you really need in My name is Maria, and I read this book the first time in English, even though I was not really good in speaking or understanding English. But somehow I knew I had to explore this book, knowing nothing about yogis or gurus or indian culture. So I had a glossary and the book at the same time, teaching myself the language while reading this awsome story and amazing information. ALL MY LIFE ì HAVE a thirst for knowledge, and wisdom for the love of life. This book is the only book you really need in your bookshelves, if you would have to choose between getting read of your home library, but was asked to just keep ONE single book, this is the book. I HAVE BEEN READING all kinds of FANTASTIC LITTERATUR AND BIOGRAPHIES, historic documents, alternative books, enlightened readings. Yogananda was and IS it. I felt it with such immensity how this book spoke to me, and knew I did not have to look any further. So time passed and I kept reading other books, but not once did I leave the decision of travelling to India, and come in touch with a master kriya Yogi. I had to wait for 12!years for an initiated master of this yoga-line. Need I say more? As well as Scientific, this book is also like a true fairytale, with immortal beings and stories that blows your heart and mind wideopen. The best gift you can ever give yourself, and others. Best wishes Maria OM NAMAH SHIVAYAH

  26. 5 out of 5

    jack

    so far this book is fucking fascinating. it's doubly fascinating to me because paramhansa's brother is bishnu gosh, bikram's guru. this book is super dense but filled with amazing stories of growing up in india being surrounded by mystics and saints who would perform miracles left and right. it's amazing to me that there could be a place where spirituality is so widely accepted and celebrated. it gives me hope that that aspect of humanity can begin to be a part of our lives in the west, where we so far this book is fucking fascinating. it's doubly fascinating to me because paramhansa's brother is bishnu gosh, bikram's guru. this book is super dense but filled with amazing stories of growing up in india being surrounded by mystics and saints who would perform miracles left and right. it's amazing to me that there could be a place where spirituality is so widely accepted and celebrated. it gives me hope that that aspect of humanity can begin to be a part of our lives in the west, where we have unfortunately replaced it with the damaging and hateful stand-in of organized religion. having finished this book finally i have this to say: sometimes you read a book at exactly the right time. if this is the right time for you this book will change your life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    This is a first hand account of an enlightened person on a specific spirtiual path. Yogananda came to the US in 1920 and stayed until his death in 1952 to spread the teachings of Kriya Yoga, which is a practical approach to spritiuality. It gives the goal and the practices that support living the spiritual life. I am biased since this is the spiritual lineage under which I study. I have it in my car so I can read during meals or when I am waiting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amit Mishra

    Tell me anything better than this and I will read that quick! This was an amazing book, in fact, the most amazing one I have ever read. How the life moves and how we lean things in life are perfectly reflected in this great autobiography. You need to read this one of Yogananda ji to understand his life even better.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lora Abrielle

    Yogananda is truly inspiring, and I am not a 'disciple.' I simply recognize truth when I feel it. He lived a profound life, as he chose to diligently focus on high aspects of being. In this book, he talks about this life as a projection in the following way: "One day I entered a cinema house to view a newsreel of the European battlefields. The First World War was still being waged in the West; the newsreel presented the carnage with such realism that I left the theater with a troubled heart. 'Lor Yogananda is truly inspiring, and I am not a 'disciple.' I simply recognize truth when I feel it. He lived a profound life, as he chose to diligently focus on high aspects of being. In this book, he talks about this life as a projection in the following way: "One day I entered a cinema house to view a newsreel of the European battlefields. The First World War was still being waged in the West; the newsreel presented the carnage with such realism that I left the theater with a troubled heart. 'Lord,' I prayed, 'why dost Thou permit such suffering?' "To my intense surprise, an instant answer came in the form of a vision of the actual European battlefields. The scenes, filled with the dead and dying, far surpassed in ferocity any representation of the newsreel. 'Look intently!' A gentle Voice spoke to my inner consciousness. 'You will see that these scenes now being enacted in France are nothing but a play of chiaroscuro. They are the cosmic motion picture, as real and as unreal as the theater newsreel you have just seen -- a play within a play.' "My heart was still not comforted. The Divine Voice went on: 'Creation is light and shadow both, else no picture is possible. The good and evil of maya must ever alternate in supremacy. If joy were ceaseless here in this world, would man ever desire another? Without suffering, he scarcely cares to recall that he has forsaken his eternal home. Pain is a prod to remembrance. The way of escape is through wisdom. The tragedy of death is unreal; those who shudder at it are like an ignorant actor who dies of fright on the stage when nothing more has been fired at him than a blank cartridge. My sons are children of the light; they will not sleep forever in delusion.' "Although I had read scriptural accounts of maya, they had not given me the deep insight that came with personal visions and with the accompanying words of consolation. One's values are profoundly changed when he is finally convinced that creation is only a vast motion picture; and that not in it, but beyond it, lies his own reality." I highly recommend this writing by Yogananda. He offers many examples of living a 'miraculous' life, both within his own experiences and others. I have quotes around 'miraculous,' as I understand that we are Consciousness Itself - there is no separation. And with that understanding, 'miracles' are simply manifestations of awareness and can be considered a normal part of life. Examples include human beings who live without food or water, and those who spontaneously heal or facilitate such healings. Yogananda made his conscious departure from the physical, while in front of a public audience, on March 7, 1952. He left an 'incorruptible' body, as several (if not many) 'saints' have done, meaning the body did not deteriorate. The book doesn't say how long this continued, but it matters not. There are various bodies on display around the world, of those who have achieved this state of incorruptibility - for hundreds of years (refer to Susan Shumsky's book "Ascension"). The best overview of this book may be on the back cover: "Named one of the 100 best spiritual books of the 20th century, Paramahansa Yogananda's remarkable life story takes you on an unforgettable exploration of the world of saints and yogis, science and miracles, death and resurrection. With soul-satisfying wisdom and wit, he illuminates the deepest secrets of life and the universe -- opening our hearts and minds to the joy, beauty and unlimited spiritual potentials that exist in the lives of every human being."

  30. 5 out of 5

    Naliniprasad

    Started reading this book four years back.It took me a long time to finish mainly due to the language style used.The narrative appeared dry and monotonous at the beginning.Kept on reading it when ever I saw this book mentioned in print or in movies.Read it at a stretch and finished it last week.It was gratifying. Paramahansa Yogananda gives us a first hand account of the practice of "kriyayoga" ,it's proponents and preachers.I was really taken aback when I started reading about the ancient yogi " Started reading this book four years back.It took me a long time to finish mainly due to the language style used.The narrative appeared dry and monotonous at the beginning.Kept on reading it when ever I saw this book mentioned in print or in movies.Read it at a stretch and finished it last week.It was gratifying. Paramahansa Yogananda gives us a first hand account of the practice of "kriyayoga" ,it's proponents and preachers.I was really taken aback when I started reading about the ancient yogi "babaji".I have been looking at his picture in many places without having a clue as to his identity.Finally this book gave me an answer.The book also gives us accounts of some christian yogis.It is because of gurus like Lahiri Mahasaya,Trailang baba,Shri Yukteshwar and Paramahansa yogananda that the ancient vedic science is still thriving on earth.Some of the incidents and people described in the book border on fantasy and unreality.After completely reading the book, it is easy to understand why it is so famous.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.