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L'Énéide: édition intégrale (Fiction Historique)

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Arrivé chez les Carthaginois, Enée relate son épopée à Didon reine des dits carthaginois : chute de Troie, fuite vers la Thrace, la Grèce, la Sicile... Là où L'Iliade pouvait assommer le lecteur par ses tournures répétitives et son austérité, là où L'Odyssée décevait de par sa fin longuette et statique, L'Énéide de Virgile enchaîne à grande vitesse les scènes mythiques. D'a Arrivé chez les Carthaginois, Enée relate son épopée à Didon reine des dits carthaginois : chute de Troie, fuite vers la Thrace, la Grèce, la Sicile... Là où L'Iliade pouvait assommer le lecteur par ses tournures répétitives et son austérité, là où L'Odyssée décevait de par sa fin longuette et statique, L'Énéide de Virgile enchaîne à grande vitesse les scènes mythiques. D'ailleurs les aventures d'Énée et de ses compagnons échappés de Troie paraîtront bien plus accessibles au lecteur d'aujourd'hui que l'Odyssée d'Ulysse ou le récit de l'Iliade. La narration se veut plus rythmée, les scènes plus variées (tragédies, duels, guerre, jeux, incartades politiques, naufrages...) et le style bien qu'antique reste relativement facile à lire. Traduit par André Bellesort. Format professionnel électronique © Ink Book édition.


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Arrivé chez les Carthaginois, Enée relate son épopée à Didon reine des dits carthaginois : chute de Troie, fuite vers la Thrace, la Grèce, la Sicile... Là où L'Iliade pouvait assommer le lecteur par ses tournures répétitives et son austérité, là où L'Odyssée décevait de par sa fin longuette et statique, L'Énéide de Virgile enchaîne à grande vitesse les scènes mythiques. D'a Arrivé chez les Carthaginois, Enée relate son épopée à Didon reine des dits carthaginois : chute de Troie, fuite vers la Thrace, la Grèce, la Sicile... Là où L'Iliade pouvait assommer le lecteur par ses tournures répétitives et son austérité, là où L'Odyssée décevait de par sa fin longuette et statique, L'Énéide de Virgile enchaîne à grande vitesse les scènes mythiques. D'ailleurs les aventures d'Énée et de ses compagnons échappés de Troie paraîtront bien plus accessibles au lecteur d'aujourd'hui que l'Odyssée d'Ulysse ou le récit de l'Iliade. La narration se veut plus rythmée, les scènes plus variées (tragédies, duels, guerre, jeux, incartades politiques, naufrages...) et le style bien qu'antique reste relativement facile à lire. Traduit par André Bellesort. Format professionnel électronique © Ink Book édition.

30 review for L'Énéide: édition intégrale (Fiction Historique)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Æneis = Aeneid, Virgil The Aeneid is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil between 29 and 19 BC, that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. The first six of the poem's twelve books tell the story of Aeneas's wanderings from Troy to Italy, and the poem's second half tells of the Trojans' ultimately victorious war upon the Latins, under whose name Aeneas and his Trojan followers are destined to be subsumed. عنوان: انه اید؛ اث Æneis = Aeneid, Virgil The Aeneid is a Latin epic poem, written by Virgil between 29 and 19 BC, that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who travelled to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. The first six of the poem's twelve books tell the story of Aeneas's wanderings from Troy to Italy, and the poem's second half tells of the Trojans' ultimately victorious war upon the Latins, under whose name Aeneas and his Trojan followers are destined to be subsumed. عنوان: انه اید؛ اثر: ویرژیل؛ برگردان: میرجلال الدین کزازی؛ مشخصات نشر: تهران، نشر مرکز، 1381، در 479 ص، شابکها: 9643057151؛ 9643051099؛ 9789643057152؛ چاپ دوم 1375، چاپ سوم 1383، چاپ ششم 1387؛ واژه نامه دارد، نمایه دارد؛ موضوع: شعر حماسی لاتینی (یونانی) ترجمه شده به فارسی؛ - سده 01 پیش از میلادی منظومه‌ ای حماسی، که «ویرژیل» شاعر روم باستان آن را در پایان سده ی نخست پیش از میلاد و به زبان لاتین سروده، «ویرژیل» راهنمای سفر دانته در دوزخ و برزخ کمدی الهی نیز هست. سرودهای شبانی، و سرودهای روستایی را نیز ایشان سروده است داستان «انه اید» همان پیآمدهای نبرد «تروا»، پس از تازش «یونانیان» است. «ویرژیل» در «انه اید»؛ داستان «انه» را میسراید؛ و آنچه را که او، پس از رهایی از مرگ در «تروا»، در سفرهای پرماجرایش، برای رسیدن به «لاتیوم»، سرزمینی که به او نوید داده شده، میآزماید، و از سر میگذراند. سرگذشت «انه» یا «انه اید» ویرژیل، در غرب، سومین داستان بزرگ پهلوانی ست، پس از «ایلیاد و اودیسه»ی «هومر» یونانی. انه اید در ادبیات کلاسیک رومی (رمی) همان جایگاهی را دارد، که ایلیاد و ادیسه در ادبیات کلاسیک یونان دارد، آن را میتوان دنباله ای بر ایلیاد هومر نیز شمرد، ویرژیل، انه اید را از آنجا آغاز میکند، که هومر، ایلیاد را با ویرانی و سوختن تروا به پایان میبرد. انه اید همان حماسه ی ملی رومی ها نیز هست. «انه» بزرگزاده ای تروایی ست، که تبار مادریش به خدایان میرسید، و پس از تباهی تروا، او سفری پرماجرا را بر پهنه ی دریاها آغاز میکند، به کارتاژ، و سپس به ایتالیا میرود، مردمان لاتین را به پیروزی میرساند، و فرمانروای مردمی میشود که شایستگی ترواییان را، با توانستنهای لاتینیان در هم آمیخته اند. رومیان «انه» را نیای رومولوس، بنیادگذار شهر رم میشناسند، و میشناختند. ویرژیل از آن داستان کهن، حماسه ای پرشور ساخت، که در روزگار امپراتوری، پشتوانه ای تاریخی و اسطوره ای برای رمیان شد. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    “What god can help me tell so dread a story? Who could describe that carnage in a song - “ Well, the answer of course is Virgil, a poet of the era of Augustus’ Rome. Why does he write it? Many literary critics have condemned the Aeneid for being state propaganda. Of course it is. Openly, proudly so! Many others have condemned it for connecting strongly to other epic poems of the Ancient world, most notably of course Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Of course it does. Openly, proudly so! The Aeneid is a “What god can help me tell so dread a story? Who could describe that carnage in a song - “ Well, the answer of course is Virgil, a poet of the era of Augustus’ Rome. Why does he write it? Many literary critics have condemned the Aeneid for being state propaganda. Of course it is. Openly, proudly so! Many others have condemned it for connecting strongly to other epic poems of the Ancient world, most notably of course Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey. Of course it does. Openly, proudly so! The Aeneid is a perfect example of a change of imperial power and education from one dynasty or area in the world to another, a “translatio imperii et studii”. Whenever empires rise, and are in need of legitimacy, they make sure to incorporate literature, art and other cultural achievements of suppressed or defeated powers, thus creating a fictitious historical connection that justifies their claims to greatness and world dominance. The Greek culture has been widely exploited to establish a tradition of unbroken rule and lawful power in Europe, and the Aeneid is an early example of fiction supporting the dynastic claims of a whole people. Constructed as a sequel to the Iliad, and thus taking place at the same time as the Odyssey, it tells the story of Trojan refugee Aeneas and his family, who are on a quest to find a new home for themselves after surviving the destruction of Troy by the Greeks. After many adventures, mirroring Ulysses’ problematic navigation in the tricky waters of the Mediterranean, they land in the country where “fate” tells them to found a new empire based on Aeneas’ descendants. Here they turn from refugees to usurpers of power and fight a bloody war to finally declare themselves victors over the native peoples in the area which will become known as Rome, or Italy. So far, so good. Translatio imperii, check! Translatio studii? Roman culture is in many ways a direct copy and paste of earlier Greek achievements, and their Olympus is mostly identical, just renamed. But there are peculiarities within the Aeneid that give it a specific flavour and make it enjoyable to read. For example, Aeneas’ visit to the Underworld is hilarious, and he meets both past and future celebrities of his tribe. The modern reader may wonder how life in the Underworld works out practically, with Creusa, Dido, and eventually also Lavinia all joined together in their love for Aeneas? Is polygamy acceptable in the Underworld, if it is only practised as serial monogamy on earth? But those are amusing, theological reflections that the heroes do not dwell on. Much more interesting are the godly powers that support or oppose Aeneas’ cause, with Venus, his mother, being his most ardent advocate in Olympus, and with Juno being his most hateful enemy. A combination that puts Jupiter in a pickle, of course. Aeneas manages to have weapons of mass destruction delivered by the joint effort of Venus and Vulcan, and it is of peculiar interest to archaeologists that his shield carries the future of Rome written down for him: a prophetic text! Or a wonderfully amusing way to establish legitimacy through translatio historiae? Rewriting history when needed for political purposes is not an invention of Orwell’s 1984. Dante later added his own journey to the Underworld under the guidance of experienced traveller Virgil - translatio studii - as illustrated in The Divine Comedy, and beautifully painted by Delacroix, in another simultaneous leap forwards and backwards in history, creating connections between times and characters: What made me read the ancient text, and stick it out until the end, despite being frustrated at times when the war turned into repetitive, graphically described slaughter, involving heads cut open so that brains are split in half, and any other imaginable mutilation of human bodies, over page after page? There is the interesting question of heroic ideal, alive and terrifyingly deadly still in World War I and II, of “Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori”, the famous line from Virgil’s contemporary Horace’s Odes. One young man in the Aeneid puts it quite bluntly: if I win, I will bring home lots of booty, and if I fall, I will be an immortal hero. Either way, my father will be proud. There are the relationships between men and women, and the role of women in general. Camilla, the warrior virgin modelled on Amazons Hippolyta or Penthesilea, the mighty Carthaginian queen Dido, who has a strong mind of her own, and Lavinia, the booty for the winner in the war, are all different representatives of ancient women’s roles and status in society. For the modern reader, the goddesses in the Olympian council are more amusing types, playing the political advocates of the causes they support, fearlessly, adamantly, and in eternal frustration over the slow pace of the action, and over the cacophony of a polytheistic assembly, all with equal right to speak and lobby - and to which they add incessantly. Quite like international committees nowadays, weighing different claims, needs and justice against each other! General verdict: if you love mythology, historical processes as mirrored in fiction, graphic war scenes, unhappy love, and stormy seas, as well as the neverending story of human fight for power and legitimacy, then the Aeneid is highly recommended. I enjoyed it all, and will close with a bow to Dido, my favourite ancient, tragic heroine so far! She did not really get a chance, representing Carthage. Her suicide was a necessary construction to symbolise the wars to come: Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam, said Cato, and Dido was just one of many to suffer from Roman power play. A mighty queen, nonetheless!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Fergus

    THEY CAN CONQUER WHO BELIEVE THEY CAN - THEY CAN, BECAUSE THEY THINK THEY CAN! Now, isn’t that a nifty quick analysis of how faith works? That’s Virgil talking! Faith in oneself... or Faith in a Higher Being? Let’s take a closer look... Virgil left off writing this masterpiece a mere twenty years before the Star appeared over ancient Bethlehem. And, of course, the Aeneid gave the worldly Romans hope for a brighter future at the same time, when their history was beginning its slow decline into moral c THEY CAN CONQUER WHO BELIEVE THEY CAN - THEY CAN, BECAUSE THEY THINK THEY CAN! Now, isn’t that a nifty quick analysis of how faith works? That’s Virgil talking! Faith in oneself... or Faith in a Higher Being? Let’s take a closer look... Virgil left off writing this masterpiece a mere twenty years before the Star appeared over ancient Bethlehem. And, of course, the Aeneid gave the worldly Romans hope for a brighter future at the same time, when their history was beginning its slow decline into moral chaos. It inspired them to believe that a semi-divine Trojan named Aeneas had given them ideals worth dying for! With not much respect due to Troy’s ancient conquerors - the Greeks. Coincidence? Sure, it was political propaganda commissioned by Augustus, through Virgil’s noble mentor Maecenas. But don’t forget that many of the same Roman readers of this runaway bestseller were fathers of the first Italian Christian converts. The domino effect was about to play its hand. Early Christian apologists, looking for grist for their mills, would soon see in Virgil’s groundbreaking ideas about a blissful afterlife in the Elysian Fields - for ordinary good people, as well as Homer’s heroes - an announcement of the Lord’s freely-offered salvation. Did I say Homer? That’s another thing... Approximately concurrent with all of this was the disastrous destruction by fire of Alexandria’s priceless library - the last detailed link with the pre-Roman Greek world. So, now, books like this one were suddenly a prime source for imaginative myth-making. It is hard to imagine such inspired living as the Knights of the Round Table, or early books of such high-mindedness as Piers Plowman or Sir Gawain and the Green Knight existing without the nobility of the Aeneid. Or even the late medieval romances... The Greeks - so sybaritic in their literature and such a springboard in their stories for the imagination - had little or no influence on our serious Medieval European ancestors. The very dearth of Hellenic playfulness gave our ancestors their dour mindset. So, the popular faith and imagination of the Middle Ages derived largely from books like this! Even Aeneas’ triumphant victory over Turnus was seen by clerics as a divine allegory of the victory over evil. And who’s to say they were so WRONG, though? But, with that, Church censorship was also beginning, and Roman freedoms were eventually to be curtailed. But freedom has radically different restrictions as Age progresses to Age, and while we postmodernists seem to have fewer, we in fact have migrated to much less privacy. Every age has its manner of obviating anarchy. And to the Church, MORAL Anarchy was the most perilous type of chaos. And for the future of European civilization It seems in hindsight to make sense. It’s like your parents weeding out any bad influences on you as you grew up - can THAT be such a bad thing? Most good parents do it - or used to. Sure, there’ll be some Major adjustments for the kids later on, but if they have an active intelligence, they’ll catch up in plenty of time. By the time of the Renaissance Europeans were more than ready to delight in the rediscovered Hellenic classics. Similarly, could the seed of a great religion of love and compassion have taken root without the concurrent sowing of the nobility that the Aeneid has in men’s minds? Could Christianity have spread like wildfire throughout the fallen Empire... without it? Sure, I know I’m REACHING a bit to make my point. But whatever your own views, the Aeneid is the great Medieval Desert Island Book - one of the only great ancient imaginative yarns the serious, and violent, early Middle Ages really had. A true oasis for the souls of those who were lost in all that scattered debris - after the Fall of the Colossus that was the Roman Empire.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    There are plenty of reviews here telling you why you should or shouldn't read book X. This review of Virgil's "Aeneid," the largely-completed first century BC nationalist epic poem that recounts the Trojan War and Aeneas's role in the eventual founding of Rome, will tell you instead why you should read a copy of "Aeneid" from a university library. Simply put: student annotations. Nearly every book in a university catalog has been checked out at one time or another by a student reading it as prim There are plenty of reviews here telling you why you should or shouldn't read book X. This review of Virgil's "Aeneid," the largely-completed first century BC nationalist epic poem that recounts the Trojan War and Aeneas's role in the eventual founding of Rome, will tell you instead why you should read a copy of "Aeneid" from a university library. Simply put: student annotations. Nearly every book in a university catalog has been checked out at one time or another by a student reading it as primary or supplemental material for class. Thus, many books have important passages underlined, major themes listed at the beginnings of chapters, and clarifications written in the margins. The copy of "Aeneid" that I read not only contained thematic annotations from one student, but also a number of unintentionally funny comments from another. This made reading the epic poem, the sort of which spends five pages describing Aeneas's shield, much more entertaining than it might have otherwise been. For example, beside a section in which the longevity and glory of the Roman Empire was prophesied, the befuddled student wrote, "But Rome fell- did Virgil know this?" Ah yes, Virgil the time-traveling super-poet who cleverly peppered his verse with chronologically ironic statements. The same annotator observed that Dido's downfall is that she's "too nice" (apparently, feuding goddesses had nothing to do with it) and produced a mind-boggling series of rhetorical queries that demonstrate the importance of using context when deciphering pronouns in poetry (hint: the closest noun isn't always the antecedent). Sadly, the annotator only made it about a third of the way through the poem before either realizing that he/she could glean the crucial bits from lecture/Wikipedia or dropping the class. As a result, I was forced to pencil in similar comments in order to make it through the rest of the poem. The moral of this story is that though you may get the occasional bonehead marking up your book, reading a book that others have commented on previously gives an undeniable sense of camraderie. As in any interaction with strangers, you may be happily surprised, disappointed, or surprised into laughter. I highly recommend the experience to all.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 3 out of 5 stars to The Aeneid, a classic work written in 17 BC by Virgil. In The Aeneid, Virgil creates two vastly different archetypal heroes named Turnus and Aeneas. Aeneas is a Trojan prince who has hopes of finding a new Troy in the land of Latium, but he runs into an angered Turnus, a Rutulian prince that does not welcome Aeneas. Both men are equally strong, equally determined, and have equal and rightful claim to the land. However, Virgil creates this distinct difference a Book Review 3 out of 5 stars to The Aeneid, a classic work written in 17 BC by Virgil. In The Aeneid, Virgil creates two vastly different archetypal heroes named Turnus and Aeneas. Aeneas is a Trojan prince who has hopes of finding a new Troy in the land of Latium, but he runs into an angered Turnus, a Rutulian prince that does not welcome Aeneas. Both men are equally strong, equally determined, and have equal and rightful claim to the land. However, Virgil creates this distinct difference and hatred between the men that leads to the profound greatness of Rome. Turnus is a Rutulian prince who is planning on marrying Lavinia, the princess of Latium. He is courageous when he defends his people in the war against the Trojans (Book IX and X), brilliant in his plans to attack the Trojan camp (p.207), yet motivated to win for purely personal goals. Turnus sacrifices public welfare and the good of the state just to defeat Aeneas and win the battle and Lavinia. Aeneas is also a prince who is planning on marrying Lavinia. He is caring when he looks back for his late wife Creusa (p.57), respectful and loving when his father dies (p.80), and driven when he continues his journey to find a new Troy (p.103). However, unlike Turnus, Aeneas is truly unselfish in his reasons for wanting Latium. Aeneas wants to settle the land for his people and their families, to find a new Troy. Aeneas does not want the land to be selfish. Both Turnus and Aeneas have determination behind them, physical and mental strength behind them, yet most of all the gods behind them. With the help of Juno, Turnus fights till the end avoiding several near deaths such as Pallas’ arrow and his jump into the Tiber River fully armored. Similar to Turnus, Aeneas’ mother helps Aeneas by giving him protection with the creation of the shield (p.198), and when she heals Aeneas’ wound with the special potion (p. 302). Turnus and Aeneas up until this point have no differences. They are identical in their strengths, weaknesses, and support. However, the one major difference between them is that Aeneas has destiny behind him. He is fated to take care of his Trojan people, find a new Troy, marry Lavinia, and bear descendants to establish the great city of Rome. Aeneas has no choice but to win the war and Lavinia’s hand in marriage. Turnus must lose and somehow suffer; He cannot escape his fate. Virgil makes use of the difference between the two heroes using antagonism, hatred and most of all the superiority of Aeneas to show the greatness of Rome. At the time The Aeneid was written Augustus Caesar was in power and the Pax Romana was beginning. Rome was in a state of absolute reign and greatness. Virgil makes use of the character Aeneas to show the greatness of his friend Octavian or Augustus Caesar. He uses the difference between the two heroes to show that by destiny via Aeneas (an ancestor of Octavian Caesar) Rome will lead the world in philosophy, art, and intelligence, etc. Turnus is good, but Aeneas is better and so is the new emperor Caesar. With Octavian Caesar in control, Rome will become even greater than it is. Virgil accomplishes his goal of glorifying Rome and its leader Augustus Caesar. Virgil creates a strong similarity between Turnus and Aeneas, however the major characteristic of these two heroes is that Aeneas is destined to win and Turnus to lose. This difference greatly surpasses the likeness between the two men and leads to the exaltation and glorification of Rome. If Augustus Caesar is anywhere similar to Aeneas, which he is as Virgil points out, he will lead Rome to the tops. And that is just what happens! About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    "I sing of warfare and a man at war. From the sea-coast of Troy in early days He came to Italy by destiny, To our Lavinian western shore, A fugitive, this captain, buffeted Cruelly on land as on the sea By blows from powers of the air - behind them Baleful Juno in her sleepless rage. And cruel losses were his lot in war, Till he could found a city and bring home His gods to Latium, land of the Latin race, The Alban lords, and the high walls of Rome. Tell me the cause now, O Muse, how galled In her divine pri "I sing of warfare and a man at war. From the sea-coast of Troy in early days He came to Italy by destiny, To our Lavinian western shore, A fugitive, this captain, buffeted Cruelly on land as on the sea By blows from powers of the air - behind them Baleful Juno in her sleepless rage. And cruel losses were his lot in war, Till he could found a city and bring home His gods to Latium, land of the Latin race, The Alban lords, and the high walls of Rome. Tell me the cause now, O Muse, how galled In her divine pride, and how sore at heart From her old wound, the queen of gods compelled him- A man apart, devoted to his mission- To undergo so many perilous days And enter on so many trials." Years after finally reading The Illiad and The Odyssey (one of my high school classes went over the important bits of The Odyssey, but that was pretty much the beginning and end of my classical education), I got around to reading the Roman side of the story, at last. Is it blasphemy to say that I like Virgil's version more? Granted, Odysseus is probably a more compelling character, since he's at least morally complex in comparison to Aeneas's bland nobility and piety, but I kind of preferred reading the adventures of a guy who manages to be a hero without also having to be a self-centered, cheating dickbag. Even though I prefer the Greeks to the Romans overall, I'm Team Aeneas on this one, because man, Odysseus sucks. (I have this whole theory that everything that happens in the Odyssey is actually one huge lie concocted by Odysseus to explain why he didn't come home for ten years after the Trojan War) As in Homer's epics, some of the best parts of this book are the battle descriptions, which are exciting, detailed, and appropriately gory. There's also a lengthy description of the armor that the gods give one of the characters, and even though that sounds boring, it's actually beautiful. And I liked the supporting characters a lot more than I liked Homer's, especially Queen Dido and Camilla the warrior girl. Also Aeneas travels to the Underworld, which is always a fun time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    some funny reviews as to my opinions on this 1) this is filled with purple prose and instalove, complete with a hot sexy bad boy for the main character 2) hello my name is Aeneas Dark'ness Dementia Raven Way. I have long ebony black hair and some people say I look like Aphrodite (AN: if u don’t know who she is get da hell out of here!) I was sailing through the ever-mindful anger of the savage Juno. It was raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of gods stared at me. I put some funny reviews as to my opinions on this 1) this is filled with purple prose and instalove, complete with a hot sexy bad boy for the main character 2) hello my name is Aeneas Dark'ness Dementia Raven Way. I have long ebony black hair and some people say I look like Aphrodite (AN: if u don’t know who she is get da hell out of here!) I was sailing through the ever-mindful anger of the savage Juno. It was raining so there was no sun, which I was very happy about. A lot of gods stared at me. I put up my middle finger at them. 3) this doesn't really deserve one star but my latin class definitely does

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    Read as part of my A Levels. Thoroughly enjoyed the first half of The Aeneid (mainly because its the half influenced by The Odyssey and so more mythological and fantastical) less enthralled by the second half (more influenced by The Iliad - with war and politics.) Will go back for a reread at some point I imagine.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Oh, Aeneid, it isn't you... it's me! I tried to like you, Aeneid, I really did. And we had some good times, didn't we? But I have to admit that I think I was still a bit hung up on Iliad, and I was trying to make you something you aren't. That isn't fair to you, and it isn't fair to me. You've got such nice language in you. Such poetry! I'm sure that someone will come along soon who can appreciate you for what you are. You deserve it. Really. You're a wonderful story; you're just not for me. I fina Oh, Aeneid, it isn't you... it's me! I tried to like you, Aeneid, I really did. And we had some good times, didn't we? But I have to admit that I think I was still a bit hung up on Iliad, and I was trying to make you something you aren't. That isn't fair to you, and it isn't fair to me. You've got such nice language in you. Such poetry! I'm sure that someone will come along soon who can appreciate you for what you are. You deserve it. Really. You're a wonderful story; you're just not for me. I finally had to accept it when you kept going on and on about those STUPID BOAT RACES. Oh! I'm sorry! I'm sorry! No, really, that wasn't fair of me. No, no, you should absolutely enjoy your boat races. No, they're great, and I'm sure that they're interesting to a lot of people, and they're part of what makes you you -- which is great -- but I just can't get interested. My mind kept wandering. Oh, of course I realize you've got other interests. I realize that you were just finishing up with the boat races when I said this, but it isn't just that. I'd been thinking about this for awhile. And I think I should spend my time with a book that I enjoy more. And you'll find a reader who's interested in you. I really wish you all the best, and I'm sorry I had to stop reading you so early.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    I’ve been meaning to read the Aeneid for years. The Armorial Bearings of the City of Melbourne have the motto: Vires Acquirit Eundo which is taken from book four of the Aeneid. It translates as, “It gathers strength as it goes”. Melbourne’s first judge gave the young town the motto – but I’ve often wondered if those he gave it to had any idea that the reference is to sexual rumours spreading about Dido and Aeneas. Rumour being the swiftest of the Gods. Anyway, there is a pop star who is called Di I’ve been meaning to read the Aeneid for years. The Armorial Bearings of the City of Melbourne have the motto: Vires Acquirit Eundo which is taken from book four of the Aeneid. It translates as, “It gathers strength as it goes”. Melbourne’s first judge gave the young town the motto – but I’ve often wondered if those he gave it to had any idea that the reference is to sexual rumours spreading about Dido and Aeneas. Rumour being the swiftest of the Gods. Anyway, there is a pop star who is called Dido too, which is an odd name to call a child, I’d have thought. Given Dido’s fate in this book – to commit suicide as Aeneas leaves her to fulfil his destiny and found Rome – it seems an even stranger name to call a child. I had no idea that Aeneas was from Troy. That Helen one has a lot to answer for – but then, what would the Iliad, Odyssey and Aeneid be without her? And while we are on troublesome women – what’s that Juno like? But then, if you are going to marry your brother, well… The religion in this book is utterly remarkable. I quite like it, as it does more or less accord with my experience of the world. One of the problems Christianity faces is the problem of evil – how can an all powerful, all loving God allow such terrible things to happen? But the ancients had no such worries – basically the Gods are all total nutcases and totally dysfunctional. They don’t just engage in incest, but every vice imaginable and they all basically hate each other. So they go out of their way to make life a misery for each other and, in the process, make life a complete misery for people. I mean, imagine that not only the destruction of Troy, but also of Carthage (two of the major cities of the ancient world) can be more or less explained as resulting from a guy called Paris judging a beauty contest. This is religion for the third millennium. This is religion for a generation raised on Big Brother and American Idol. And when Virgil wants to be violent, we are talking squelchingly so. You know the sort of thing – thrice the two edged sword hacked into his flesh until huge welts… Yes, boy’s own adventure stuff, possibly even with capital letters. Lots of blood, quite a bit of mashed brains and the words ‘up to the hilt’ used at least twice that I can remember without checking. All the same there are moments of aching humanity and a perceptiveness that catches the breath. The scene in hell with Dido is very moving, the stuff with the king of Arcadia and Pallas is heart wrenching. A constant theme throughout is how your greatest victory can become your greatest defeat – as Turnus proves at the end. I really loved this, I loved the extended metaphors (some that went to the very edge of being over extended – like a rubber band that suddenly snaps and slaps the extender on the hand when all he wanted to do was shoot the band at a friend across the room, or knock down some paper targets now forever just out of reach). There is one – which I’ve forgotten what it was seeking to illuminate now – where a lion is being baited and has a spear stuck into it and the spear is broken off flush with its wound. I think all this was basically to say how loudly some guy was roaring – you know, as loud as a lion, wasn’t quite enough. But the metaphors really are quite something. You’d never get away with building metaphors like that today. I don’t know if it is as good as the Odyssey, but like the Odyssey it starts as a Classical Road movie and ends up one of those Epic Theatre battles that used to be on telly after the wrestling on Sunday mornings when I was growing up. You have to say one thing for these Mediterranean types , they sure know how to put on a good fight. The thing that is hardest to understand is that the Romans gave up all this to become Christians – hard to imagine.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Edward

    Introduction Map --The Aeneid Translator's Postscript Genealogy: The Royal Houses of Greece and Troy Suggestions for Further Reading Variants from the Oxford Classical Text Notes on the Translation Pronouncing Glossary

  12. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    History records that Virgil wrote his epic poem The Aeneid to fulfill two purposes. One is to restore the faith among Romans of the "Greatness of the Rome" at a time such faith was hard tried. The second reason is to legitimize the Caesar line to the Roman throne. To achieve this end, Virgil picks up a Trojan hero by the name of Aeneas, who is known as a mythical legend having been a character of Homer's epic poem the Iliad , and who becomes the founding father of future Roman rulers. Having History records that Virgil wrote his epic poem The Aeneid to fulfill two purposes. One is to restore the faith among Romans of the "Greatness of the Rome" at a time such faith was hard tried. The second reason is to legitimize the Caesar line to the Roman throne. To achieve this end, Virgil picks up a Trojan hero by the name of Aeneas, who is known as a mythical legend having been a character of Homer's epic poem the Iliad , and who becomes the founding father of future Roman rulers. Having drawn his character from Homer, Virgil also draws his influence from Homer. The Aeneid in all sense is a structural mixture of the Iliad and the Odyssey. Out of the twelve books, first six tells the story of Aeneas's wanderings and many obstacles he faces in his voyage to Italy thus imitating the pattern of the Odyssey . The next six books holds the story of warfare; the war between the Trojans and the Rutulians for the throne of Italy and the royal bride. This part imitates Homer's the Iliad. The reading experience of the Aeneid is mixed; while I enjoyed some books, some were tedious. But I did enjoy the dramatic effect which was abundantly poured in to the whole tale. And comparatively, I enjoyed the Aeneid more than the Iliad . The reason I'm sure to have driven from the fact that adventure and war being artfully mixed in the Aeneid , while the Iliad is so centered on warfare. Irrespective of the reasons behind writing the Aeneid , modern literary readers’ interest in this epic poem is directed on its story of the Trojan fate in the aftermath of the Trojan War. In a literary sense, Virgil had done Trojans justice by rescuing them from humiliation and restoring their dignity. For the sympathizers of Troy and Trojans, Virgil has furnished a good antidote.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    The Romans took over from the Greeks as the dominant Mediterranean power after Alexander of Macedon died in 323 BCE, and then turned into an empire when Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BCE, which is a nice way to say that he staged a military coup and installed himself as dictator. It ran along merrily for 800 years until around 500 AD, when it was finally overrun by a series of people with awesome names like Visigoths and Attila the Hun. Rome was actually founded even earlier than that, though The Romans took over from the Greeks as the dominant Mediterranean power after Alexander of Macedon died in 323 BCE, and then turned into an empire when Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BCE, which is a nice way to say that he staged a military coup and installed himself as dictator. It ran along merrily for 800 years until around 500 AD, when it was finally overrun by a series of people with awesome names like Visigoths and Attila the Hun. Rome was actually founded even earlier than that, though, in the 700s BCE, by Aeneas, who was a Trojan - from the Trojan War, so we’re working (as usual) off Homer. Like Odysseus, Aeneas had a long and incompetent journey from Troy. I made this myself! Click for bigger He wasn’t going home, though, he was trying to find a prophesied new one. Because Odysseus showed up in a horse and burned his old one. (That famous Trojan Horse story is mostly told in the Aeneid, only briefly referred to in the Odyssey.) That founding story, which is made up, is what's told in the greatest Roman epic, Virgil's Aeneid, written around 20 BCE. It’s pretty good. The story of the Carthaginian queen Dido is a high point: she falls in love with him; they sleep together and then he’s like never mind, I gotta go found Rome, prompting her to commit suicide by stabbing while burning, and beginning a feud with Carthage that will come to fruition when Hannibal barely fails to defeat Rome around 200 BCE, and then Rome completely destroys Carthage and you can’t even find ruins anymore, really, which is a bummer. Dido killing herself - by Cayot, 1711, this is in the Louvre TS Eliot calls The Aeneid "our classic, the classic of all Europe." It's a minor work for our generation - we're way more familiar with Homer - but it's been consistently read since it was written, unlike Homer (who lost favor for a while in the Middle Ages). It's an imperialist work, basically, written to canonize Rome as a great civilization and specifically exploring what it means to be a superpower. Virgil wasn't comfortable with it himself; he never finished it, and (according to the myth) asked that it be burned after his death, which lesson Kafka might have paid attention to: if you want something burned right, you'd best do it yourself. Translations I read the Fagles translation, which was as usual excellent. In case you don't know, Fagles is the Pevear & Volokhonsky of antiquity: he's done well-regarded translations of just about every work written BCE, which means you can just go with him if you don't have any better ideas but you should maybe watch out that you don't end up absorbing the entire canon through him, which would be weird. Mandelbaum also has a translation; I haven't read it but his work is dependable. Your other options are the conservative Fitzgerald or the very liberal Lombardo. Here's an excellent but very lengthy piece that (starting about halfway down) talks at length about different translations and comes out for Fagles.

  14. 4 out of 5

    jillian

    Once upon a 2050ish years ago, there was a Roman chap named Vergil who wrote poetry. And holy crappuccino, could he write poetry. Anyway, his chum Caesar Augustus says to him, "Verg, old pal, old bean! Write me some jolly old propaganda linking us Romans, inferiority complex-afflicted as we are, to the Greeks so we can get on with conquering the world and quit feeling so much like a master race of insecure teenagers, there's an absolutely spiffing chap. Oh, and feel free to completely copycat Ho Once upon a 2050ish years ago, there was a Roman chap named Vergil who wrote poetry. And holy crappuccino, could he write poetry. Anyway, his chum Caesar Augustus says to him, "Verg, old pal, old bean! Write me some jolly old propaganda linking us Romans, inferiority complex-afflicted as we are, to the Greeks so we can get on with conquering the world and quit feeling so much like a master race of insecure teenagers, there's an absolutely spiffing chap. Oh, and feel free to completely copycat Homer as much as you like." So good old Virg does, of course, because he was cool like that. Eventually, he has 10,000 or so lines of beautiful (in all seriousness here, Vergil was a gifted poet, to the point of nearly making me enjoy some of this book and giving it a 2 star rating feels almost unforgivably shallow and harsh of me. No hard feelings, poor Vergil, my poor sweet Vergil), moderately hard to follow and unbelievably tedious dactylic hexameter filled with mind-bogglingly idiotic characters and Homer ripoffs. Unfortunately, because of poor old Verg's untimely demise (probably a fishsauce gone wrong, or a toothache maybe... a toothache caused by a fishsauce gone wrong isn't completely implausible and oh boy, what a way to go), it never gets properly finished. But before he pops off down the easy road to Avernus, he requests that the Aeneid, that shining highlight of his career, be destroyed. Augustus, however, either wasn't in a terribly compliant mood that day, or he was just really hurting from the lack of quality Homer fanfiction available at the time (this was in the dark days before fanfiction dot net and AO3, so the only real place for this kind of stuff was graffiti on a forum wall and there's only so much you can do with that). Whatever it was, he apparently didn't feel like honouring poor old Verg's dying wish. I'm not going to say I wish he had just up and tossed it into Mt. Vesuvius or something else roughly that dramatic. That would be a horrid thing to say. Especially since this book contains such excellent quotes as “If I cannot move heaven, I will raise hell” and “...[the Cyclops] munched, the warm joints quivering 'twixt his teeth.” Not to mention that this lovely piece of Homer fanfic & Roman propaganda is practically a pillar of Western literature and the glorious civilization of Academia, and the dons of Oxbridge will be howling for my blood. (Picture it—a few dozen old guys in big black robes chasing me off the intellectual lawns of the internet and calling for my death... what a mental image! It shall sustain me till 2022.) But to be perfectly honest (and I'm not just saying this because I think it would be really cool and validating if I provoked the overlords of Academia to send a hitman after me), I wish he had tossed it into Mt. Vesuvius.

  15. 5 out of 5

    João Fernandes

    "Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta movebo!" If I cannot sway the heavens, I will wake the powers of hell" (Before I actually start reviewing The Aeneid, I'd like to thank Mr. Bernard Knox not only for his very helpful introductions in the Penguin Deluxe Editions of the three big classic epics, but for sharing his heartfelt story as an U.S. Army captain and his encounter with the Sortes Virgilianae of The Aeneid in the last weeks of World War II in Italy.) Imperator Caesar Divi Filius The Aenei "Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta movebo!" If I cannot sway the heavens, I will wake the powers of hell" (Before I actually start reviewing The Aeneid, I'd like to thank Mr. Bernard Knox not only for his very helpful introductions in the Penguin Deluxe Editions of the three big classic epics, but for sharing his heartfelt story as an U.S. Army captain and his encounter with the Sortes Virgilianae of The Aeneid in the last weeks of World War II in Italy.) Imperator Caesar Divi Filius The Aeneid, written by the Italian poet Virgil in the 1st century BC, is the first, and perhaps the only, truly successful fan fiction ever written. It follows the story of Aeneas, a Dardanian prince, offspring of Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite/Venus, and his wanderings to find Italy and plant the seeds that would one day spring into the greatest empire of the ancient world. He carries his father and son out of the burning wreckage of Troy, and tries to find a new home for the homeless surviving sons of Troy. This book has one of the most interesting and luckiest stories a book can have. In one thing Virgil was brilliant at, and that was at feeling the temperature of the crowd. The Roman Republic has fallen, Gaius Julius Caesar has seen to that. His adopted son, Octavian, has just secured what many think will be a dynasty that will rule the world. What better time to sing of the legitimacy of Roman supremacy? On them I set no limits, space or time I have granted them power, empire without end. - Jupiter on Aeneas' sons. Most rulers, in particular in earlier History, have had to deal with the awful task of legitimacy. Kings and emperors rule not because of force (well, it is definitely because of force, but that's not what we want the people to think), but because it is their divine right. When one power falls and another rises, was it due to the will of the gods or to the greed of man against the gods' champion? (For more on this question, read Richard II). As such, a new rule, a new dynasty, will always have to justify if and how their rule is divine will and not an abomination against the gods. What better time for Augustus, the head of the Gens Julia, to recall his adopted father's claim on divinity? He has added "Divi Filius" to his name, "son of a god", because Julius Caesar had already been deified, and both men claim descent from Aeneas, and therefore from Venus. Virgil not only sings of Aeneas and Venus in order to greaten their descendant, Augustus, he sings directly of Augustus as if the entirety of the Trojan escapades had been simply to put him on Earth. I can see the young emperor puffing up at every mention of how the gods want the Trojan/Italian hybrid race to rule the world, and that Vulcan himself carved the Battle of Actium into Aeneas' shield, the son of a goddess carrying his descendant's most glorious victory. Truly wonderful propaganda. Here is Caesar and all the line of Iulus soon to venture under the sky's great arch. Here is the man, he's here! Time and again you've heard his coming promised - Caesar Augustus! Son of a god, he will bring back the Age of Gold (...) expand his empire past the Garamants and the Indians to a land beyond the stars, beyond the wheel of the year, the course of the sun itself (...)" - Anchises' ghost to Aeneas, as they see Caesar Augustus in the Underworld Homer's Successor, Paris' Successor I get it, Virgil, I really do. The Iliad's epic battles are adrenaline injections to the reader, and Odysseus' misadventures in the The Odyssey have that Classical tragedy "everything going down hill" charisma to them. Trying to do both at the same time is daring, and you did a wonderful job, except you tried to do so much it feels too little. The battles between the Italians and the Trojan exiles sound *vaguely* like the Trojan War, only in a smaller, slightly less exciting scale. Aeneas' attempts to focus on his destiny and destination, his shaking off the lusts and perils thrown at him along the way... it felt like an Odysseus searching for a Penelope he never knew, a destiny that he carries because he has to, not one driven by his own free will and determination. Dido is Aeneas' Circe and Calypso, diluted down to a mortal spurned woman. She is by far the character I felt the most for: she is a widow, robbed of her love and her homeland, trying to rebuild her life in Carthage, and then some guy shows up yelling "look at me, I saw Polyphemus, my mother is a goddess, I am a Trojan hero, did I mention my mother is Venus, the goddess of beauty - by the way, I don't take after my father!" Dido has her memory of her former husband wiped out by Venus (I don't really the profit for her party, but okay) and is compelled to end up with Aeneas in some cave shagging, which to some constitutes marriage, but not to the State of Carthage. Dido's tragic end is entirely Venus and Aeneas' fault, who took to a grieving widow knowing that his destiny was elsewhere, and then is surprised to find her in Hades after her attention-seeking suicide - a curse and a prophecy of the coming of Hannibal, Rome's scourge. "And you, my Tyrians, harry with hatred all his line, his race to come (...) No love between our peoples, ever, no pacts of peace! Come rising up from my bones, you avenger still unknown" Of Gods and Men: Part III If you read my reviews of The Iliad and The Odyssey, you may have seen me obsessively analysing the God/Man relationships in Homer's epics, because it is the facet of his work I find the most fascinating. Virgil's gods are a bit too complacent. Homer's Hera and Virgil's Juno are the best kept persona, her intensity and obsession are all still there, but the rest of the gods just can't be bothered. Venus is always saving her son, as she does against Diomedes in The Iliad, but only halfway through the book does she remember "oh maybe I should have helped your Trojans during the fall of Troy instead of making you run away like a coward". Jupiter doesn't do a single relevant thing in the entire book except saying "no more meddling", which is thoroughly disobeyed by both parties. Vulcan's role is to do the exact same thing he did in The Iliad as Hephaestus - to forge a shield for the protagonist. It felt like the conflict of the gods among themselves, to be expected in basically any decision they ever make, polytheistic gods being unilateral by definition, was lacking. Artemis/Diana, supporter of Troy during the war, simply switches sides to the warrior princess Camilla; Ares/Mars just can't be bothered; Athena is either asleep or too busy trying to bring Odysseus a GPS on some goddamn world's end. The entire conflict of the forces of nature we see in The Iliad seems diluted in the wars in Italy... The King and the Usurper I feel like I've been focusing on the negatives of The Aeneid, and I want to make clear that I loved this book. Those four stars up there are actually a 4.5, which is not only a 5 because I, in my own aspirations for this epic, I found some of them lacking. This does not mean it isn't one of the most powerful pieces of literature that have survived from ancient times, and a recommended read. It felt more lyrical than Homer, and it had some truly great writing (Fagles' translation is as great as ever). The entirety of this work is set and bound in finding Aeneas in Italy, to claim a new home for his Trojans, to build a second Troy, to honour the memory of the fallen in the East. The best part of this epic is Aeneas' moral ambiguity. He's like a second Odysseus or Achilles, in that his actions are driven by his knowledge of his fate - which is repeated a little too often throughout the book - and since he is guided by the gods and the will of the universe, he does not have to think about the other side to his actions. He has to conquer Hesperia. He has to found Troy II. He is duty bound to fight the Italians - which, in all fairness, he avoids at all costs - because the gods say so. But the truth is that Aeneas and his Trojans are invaders. They arrive in peace, and they try to form ties of friendship with the natives, but they still have as a plan to settle as an independent city, a city commanded by the heavens to conquer, plunder and force its culture down the world's throat. Alba Longa, and its great daughter, Rome, might have been built in peace, but in their national consciousness the command was always war. In this view, Aeneas is the rightful ruler of Latium, and his descendants the rightful rulers of all. But from a Latin point of view, Aeneas is a refugee that has arrived on their land, somehow contrived to get the hand of a princess and a kingdom, a city that - unbeknownst to them - has war in its mind. Turnus, the antagonist, is nothing more than a man spurned by a king, robbed of his bride by a foreigner, and he tries to fight for what he believes is just. To the very last, when his sister Juturna fakes a signal from Jupiter to inspire the Italians to think they will win, Turnus believes he is on the side of justice. He calls himself "a second Achilles" , and the entire war for a woman is very Homeric - Lavinia is the new Helen, Aeneas is his brother-in-law Paris, and Turnus is more Menelaus than Achilles. So what we see, really, is a miniature Trojan War. And like the genuine deal, we can be rooting for one side or another: we can sing of just Achaeans and spurred Menelaus, Turnus and his attempts at defending his rights and the freedom of his people - or we can root for fallen Troy and the romance of Paris and Helen, for Aeneas' destined love and rule of Italy. Personally, I couldn't relate to Aeneas' cause as much as I'd like, even though Virgil throws in a forced "the people ache for Aeneas" justification for his conquering. In Carthage, Aeneas didn't need to war. He could rule besides Dido, and from her bones, instead of the horrible wars between her city and his, would rise an empire as powerful as Rome. Yet he is too stuck in the past, in the future he sees only the past reflected, a second Troy, a second War. If the Fates had left me free to live my life, to arrange my own affairs of my own free will, Troy is the city, first of all, that I'd safeguard, Troy and all that's left of my people whom I cherish. - Aeneas to Dido. But Fate, a tale three deities wrote, history that not even the gods are willing to confront or try to change, has decided blood and iron would build this empire, blood and iron would rule it. Gods are not gods if they themselves are ruled, and men are not men if they cannot try and build their own fate, like Turnus did. do the gods light this fire in our hearts, or does each man's mad desire become his god? - Nisus The justice and law of the Roman Empire, that vicious civilisation, which by force brought great advancements to the Mediterranean world, has never been more accurately depicted than in Aeneas' actions: veni, "vidi", vici

  16. 4 out of 5

    Parthiban Sekar

    The reason that I picked up this Latin epic book (Yes, what I read did not seem to be a poem, at least to me, but just a splendid translation) is the countless inter-textual references to this mythology book in the books I previously read. And I was not even half-satisfied to find none of them in this translation, in that sense. But, coming to this translation: "Can there be so much anger in the hearts of the heavenly gods?" The above line just summarizes the whole story of prophetic wanderings an The reason that I picked up this Latin epic book (Yes, what I read did not seem to be a poem, at least to me, but just a splendid translation) is the countless inter-textual references to this mythology book in the books I previously read. And I was not even half-satisfied to find none of them in this translation, in that sense. But, coming to this translation: "Can there be so much anger in the hearts of the heavenly gods?" The above line just summarizes the whole story of prophetic wanderings and wars of Aeneas, a Trojan who was forced to leave his own land Troy with his arms, men, father, and son, and a sign from the above. The divine interventions he encounters are always mixed blessings. While his mother Venus comes to aid during his hard times, the mother of gods, Juno always contrives some disastrous plan against him, reasons for which I am quite uncertain. "Women are unstable creatures, always changing!", says Mercury who comes in rescue of Aeneas from that nuptial trap of Dido. As Aeneas sets sailing, hardships, rough weather, and unfortunate deaths that befall him are countless, inexorable, and irrevocable. All credits to the relentless efforts of Juno and the oversight of the god of gods. When the rumor does her part to bring unforeseen troubles to the ill-fated and embittered Aeneas and his son Ascanius from faraway lands and distant enemies, the god of war, Mars feels a pinching responsibility for his divine position and breaks all hell loose in the name of war on the poor mortals who try to endure all difficulties hoping on the divine destiny. The wars, wanderings, and wraths seem to continue: Treaties are broken, wars are waged, lands are ransacked, ships are wrecked, fathers are broken, mothers are heart-wrenched, sons are killed, daughters are sullied and animals are slaughtered. Are the gods satisfied? What I like much about the book are the vivid narrations of misery of fathers who sent their sons to war, and mothers whose sons went to war without telling them. What I don't like about the book are the countless sacrifices, mostly oxen or sheep or swine or sometimes even opponent soldiers or anything with head or something in hundreds or more. The only times when there were no hints of sacrifices were when they coughed or farted. Oh, forgive me, it is just my level of understanding on sacrifices or anything of that sort is very low. So, if you want to know what happens to the guy who gets the sword from Orlando Bloom i.e. Paris from the TROY movie at the end, you might want to check this out. Well, hey! there is HOMER, too!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    The Aeneid is an epic tale of the journey of Aeneas, survivor of Troy's fall, and his journey to found the Roman peoples. The story is one you should read yourself and like the Greek Illiad and Oddessy (from which Virgil borrows heavily-as any Roman writer would have done at the time- 19 BCE). It is a story full of gods and goddesses, war, lust and anger. One of the great classic stories. It is one everyone should take a moment and read at least once. I highly recommend reading it in the origina The Aeneid is an epic tale of the journey of Aeneas, survivor of Troy's fall, and his journey to found the Roman peoples. The story is one you should read yourself and like the Greek Illiad and Oddessy (from which Virgil borrows heavily-as any Roman writer would have done at the time- 19 BCE). It is a story full of gods and goddesses, war, lust and anger. One of the great classic stories. It is one everyone should take a moment and read at least once. I highly recommend reading it in the original Latin as the phrases translate better than in modern translations..case in point is the elegance of the original Latin in the phrase "..tantaene animis caelestibus irae?" ("Can such great anger dwell in heavenly breasts?"). I shall leave all the ins and outs of the story for English majors and Classics scholars to dissect. My thing is history and the historical background for Virgil is quite interesting. Virgil was a friend of Maecenas, a close advisor to Octavian Caesar. Octavian, not yet Augustus, had decided after the period of civil conflicts of the past several decades to aim for peace throughout the Empire. Octavian tightened laws on Roman morality and one of the ways he did this was to co-opt the writers and poets of the day. Virgil's Aeneas is the perfect ROman. He is a devoted son, great warrior and faithful to the gods. Take a close look at the basic character of Aeneas (patriotism, filial devotion, parental love, conformity to the will of heaven, and a scrupulousness in carrying out the honors due the gods)- they are precisely the same virtues Caesar was preaching. That is why Aeneas is the epitome of the Roman ideal. He never loses his self-control, never blasphemes, is never unjust, deceitful or careless in the performance of any of his obligations. There is no flaw in his character; he is never guilty of sin and although a great warrior, he prefers peace. Not to mention throughout the story the gods and other peoples often remark on the future potential for the peoples of the Tiber river-a clear nod to stroking the egos of the Romans about their own creation myths. It is a truly magnificent work -not just as a work of storytelling, but in the subtle influence it spread throughout the Empire. Like Homer's great work- this one is Virgil's magnum opus (taking over a decade to write) and should be read by all well rounded people everywhere.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ivana Books Are Magic

    When I think of Aeneid, I think of one Summer not too long and one bright fifteen-year-old I taught it to. By that time, I've read Aeneid a number of times and I had a very high opinion about it yet it was that experience of teaching it to somebody that made me see it in a whole new light. I felt like I was reading it for the first time, but still I could remember all those parts that originally moved me the most and it was interesting to observe my emotional reactions to it anew. For clearly, i When I think of Aeneid, I think of one Summer not too long and one bright fifteen-year-old I taught it to. By that time, I've read Aeneid a number of times and I had a very high opinion about it yet it was that experience of teaching it to somebody that made me see it in a whole new light. I felt like I was reading it for the first time, but still I could remember all those parts that originally moved me the most and it was interesting to observe my emotional reactions to it anew. For clearly, it was a work that was capable of moving me deeply. Tutoring can be quite challenging, as it often happens that those who search for a tutor are the ones who are having the most problems grasping the subject matter. Interesting thing about literature is that those students who refuse to read it are often the those who are best capable to understand it. Any brows raised yet? Who are writers after all? Aren’t they those who choose to search for additional meanings and interpretations of this world? Those who are not satisfied with it? Those who are ready to rebel? Don’t give me that ‘Ceaser -ordered -this -book -to- praise- the- Romans -so- the- writer- must - have- been -a -sell out’ thing. I couldn’t care less and I think it is irrelevant. A book is either a success or is it not. This hasn’t nothing to do with the fact whether it was commissioned or not. It has got to do with the person who wrote it, if the author is an artist determined to create art, then the book usually ends up being art. If you ask me, the fact that it is supposed to be written to praise ancient Romans is not important at all and it doesn’t take or add anything to/from Aeneid. Don’t use it as an excuse for giving up on reading it. If you don’t like it because it didn’t move you that’s fine, but I think this epic deserves a fair change. I believe it deserves to be read with an open mind and heart. It sometimes happens with classics that we forget to really read them. We read about them and by the time we get to reading them, we’re so engrossed with all that background information that we forget the fundamental joy of reading and that is reading for love of reading. What matters is that it is amazing epic poem written by a talented writer. In other words, it is the writer that matters. Speaking of writers, I imagine a lot of them were rebellious teens. Those straight A student will read the book, cover to cover and learn the basic historical facts about it, but will they be moved? Will they cry when Aeneid leaves a woman who loves him to fulfil what he sees as his duty? Will they offer new interpretations? Those that are really new and fresh, not a sum of something critically acclaimed literature professors shared most recently? Perhaps it is an appropriate irony that it often happens that intelligent but rebellious students avoid reading assignments, just because they find it hard to connect to the subject matter. Because they are put off by the fact that it is a classic. That is really understandable, because when one is fifteen, Aeneid may seem boring. That is why a good teacher must be prepared to invest a bit more time to get their students into reading it. Let’s take Aeneid, for example. Yes, we could talk about all kind of literary interpretations, about its background, about its historical context but wouldn’t it be nice to talk about it like readers? Like people who were genuinely moved by it? I must have read Aeneid at least twice that Summer. Surprisingly, trying hard to concrete on every important aspect of it didn’t take anything away from the joy of reading it. That is the marvellous thing about literature. It really doesn’t matter how long ago it was written, great literature always makes us feel a certain way. Time is the greatest distance between two places, said Tennessee Williams and while that is certainly the case when it comes to our daily lives and human relationship, such rules do not apply to literature. You know you won’t be less of an intellectual if you admit that you were actually moved by a literary classic. If you don’t open emotionally (and not just intellectually) to some piece of writing, you’re bound to miss out. I’m not going to say that every single verse in Aeneid left me in awe. The poetry is certainly beautiful, but the narrative, the characters and the overall story might feel a bit alien to a modern reader. Nevertheless, if one is willing to just forget about all that and READ it, I’m sure that one will find that the praise Aeneid has enjoyed is well deserved. Sure, there are events in it that aren’t terribly interesting and parts that were an obvious praise of ‘you-know-who’ and so on… That all being said, it is a book I enjoyed reading. It is a book I’ve read numerous times and that is the most honest of recommendations. Don’t take my word for it, go on and read it yourself, if you already haven’t. If you have, consider rereading it. Aren’t you curious why it is such a brilliant piece of writing? Why it inspired so many writers? Why it has been considered one of the most important works of European literature? Don’t be afraid to take up this one, find a good translation and enjoy. And if you happen to be able to read in original ( for there are people who can read in Latin), lucky you.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Ok but this was so much better than the Iliad or the Odyssey... Aeneas is the only main hero from an epic I didn't despise with every fiber of my being (except Hector I adored Hector)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan Weaver

    A gifted poet's account of playing Mario Brothers to level 7. Expect a lot of "then Aeneas was told he needed to fetch a golden bough. But he could only obtain the bough if he completed such-and-such. So he did. Then he went to the underground world and gave the bough to the boatman, and the boatman therefore let him cross the river..." but with lyric flourish. It's maybe not Mario, but some side-scrolling platformer, definitely. If I understand correctly, Virgil wrote it by order of Caesar August A gifted poet's account of playing Mario Brothers to level 7. Expect a lot of "then Aeneas was told he needed to fetch a golden bough. But he could only obtain the bough if he completed such-and-such. So he did. Then he went to the underground world and gave the bough to the boatman, and the boatman therefore let him cross the river..." but with lyric flourish. It's maybe not Mario, but some side-scrolling platformer, definitely. If I understand correctly, Virgil wrote it by order of Caesar Augustus to a.) connect him, CA, to the line of the founder of Rome thus giving him special first citizen status if not divine right to rule b.) connect the Romans to the Greeks, toward whom they had an inferiority complex and c.) justify imposing Roman culture on barbarian cultures as imposing order. Virgil never finished it. Before he died he ordered the incomplete manuscript to be destroyed. This book shouldn't even exist!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shya̋m

    Sometime you may recall today with pleasure. (1.203) __________ And end is set for everyone, For life is brief and cannot be recovered. (10.467-468) I don’t fear death. To me, the gods are nothing. (10.880) He dreamed about immortal fame . . . (10.548) __________ After deciding on Peter Green's recent translations of Homer, I decided on something equally direct for a second reading of the Aeneid to try to get more enjoyment than my very forgettable first reading of Dryden's rendering. To me, Virgil's ep Sometime you may recall today with pleasure. (1.203) __________ And end is set for everyone, For life is brief and cannot be recovered. (10.467-468) I don’t fear death. To me, the gods are nothing. (10.880) He dreamed about immortal fame . . . (10.548) __________ After deciding on Peter Green's recent translations of Homer, I decided on something equally direct for a second reading of the Aeneid to try to get more enjoyment than my very forgettable first reading of Dryden's rendering. To me, Virgil's epic lacks a certain poetic quality that Homer has, which is likely due to Greek versus Latin; but the story, also, lacks a resonance that Homer's two epics possess; the first two books of Aeneas' descriptions of the fate of Troy I thought very good, but the allure weakened from there. The translator writes in the preface: I am in awe of scholars who can expertly debate Vergil’s political pose and attitude; I find him difficult just to read. In part, I blame the half-finished state of his epic: only twelve out of the projected twenty-four books exist, and many are two- or three-word fragments. Some full lines were obviously misplaced, either by Vergil or by a scribe struggling with the text. We have a reliable report that Vergil was unhappy with the draft, and I am grouchily convinced that this was not only on aesthetic grounds but also on those of clarity. After all, Vergil did ask for his epic to be burned on his death . . . nevertheless, there remain some good poetic imagery and turns of phrase, and no doubt the poem, as it is, is better in the original Latin. __________ . . . more than words. (1.136) From them I will not limit time or space. Their rule will have no end. (1.278-279) Her rosy neck now shone. Her hair’s ambrosia breathed a holy fragrance. Her belt fell loose, her robe now swept her feet. Like a true god she walked. (1.402-405) Graceful long hair, the blushing glow of youth. (1.590) Don’t trust the horse, my people. (2.48) Even when they bring gifts, I fear the Greeks. (2.49) Sinon’s false oaths and trickery convinced us. The tears that he contrived did what Achilles And Diomedes and ten years of war And a thousand ships could not: they brought us down. (2.195-198) Out of her rosy mouth there came these words . . . (2.593) Truly, I saw the whole of Troy collapsing In flames . . . (2.624-625) . . . rose up, conquered by the truth. (2.699) Like weightless wind and dreams that flit away. (2.794) I just want time . . . (4.433) Rome Will rule the world and raise her heart to heaven. (6.781-782) Caesar, and all of Iulus’ offspring, destined To make their way to heaven’s splendid heights. (6.789-790) Revered with awe from old times . . . (7.172) Through endless blue sea to Italian shores. (7.198) The azure Tiber, favourite stream of heaven. (8.64) Dissolved in wine . . . (9.189) Dawn rose from the saffron bed . . . (9.459) Split oak and fragrant cedar. (11.137) My fate forbids me joy in life. (11.180) Any risk that I have to take is worth it. (11.437) He wore exotic red and splendid purple. . . . (11.772) Apollo heard. Part of the prayer he granted; The rest he scattered to the fluttering breeze. (11.794-795) His spirit filled with unrelenting flame. (12.3) Is death so terrible? (12.646)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    I have always loved this poem. This is argueabely the best poem ever written. This poem was composed by Virgil a poet from 29 BCE. I enjoyed this translation very much. I recommend this book to all. Enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joy

    Disclaimer: I rushed/skimmed through this for a Greek Mythology course. It was interesting to read an epic that centered around Roman history and mythology rather than Greek. Will probably reread at some point. Recommended for lovers of classics and mythology. 3.25

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    I'm not sure if this is the translation I read back when I did Classics at GCSE and A Level. It seems familiar, but of course, the story would be and two different close translations might still be similar. Anyway, with my course on Tragic Love in the Trojan War, I've had the urge to reread The Aeneid all term. I can't imagine the loss to the world that it would have been if Vergil's wishes had been carried out when it came to the burning of the manuscript. Parts of The Aeneid are just beautiful I'm not sure if this is the translation I read back when I did Classics at GCSE and A Level. It seems familiar, but of course, the story would be and two different close translations might still be similar. Anyway, with my course on Tragic Love in the Trojan War, I've had the urge to reread The Aeneid all term. I can't imagine the loss to the world that it would have been if Vergil's wishes had been carried out when it came to the burning of the manuscript. Parts of The Aeneid are just beautiful -- Homer's work has its own vitality and its own robust beauty, but not the polish of Vergil's work. There's a lot of gorgeous metaphors and similes here, things that work just right, and moments of tenderness that you wouldn't expect in the middle of what is admittedly a rather gory epic. Aeneas' attempts to embrace his dead (and therefore ghostly) wife and father are just, oh, and the little touches of humanity we get from a lot of the characters -- Amata pleading with Turnus to stay safe, Lavinia blushing, Dido falling so hopelessly in love... It's an incredibly rich text and there's so much to enjoy about it. I should read a good poetic translation at some point -- I think I own one -- but in the meantime even the prose translation, which I imagine was far from an ideal way to translate Vergil's intentions, is lovely.

  25. 4 out of 5

    poncho

    The Aeneid continues the story of what happened after the Greeks had taken Troy; it tells the story of Aeneas, a Trojan hero who had lost all hope after witnessing his city and his king devastated by what we know as The Trojan Horse, very well crafted by Ulysses and his people — which reminds me of this part in The Odyssey in which a nymph (I think) tells Ulysses how skilful he is when it comes to deceiving; it tells the story of an exile who after a divine promise of a new nation regains his st The Aeneid continues the story of what happened after the Greeks had taken Troy; it tells the story of Aeneas, a Trojan hero who had lost all hope after witnessing his city and his king devastated by what we know as The Trojan Horse, very well crafted by Ulysses and his people — which reminds me of this part in The Odyssey in which a nymph (I think) tells Ulysses how skilful he is when it comes to deceiving; it tells the story of an exile who after a divine promise of a new nation regains his strength, takes his family with him and goes after wherever the gods may guide him. At this point it's pretty much as if Homer had written the epic, but then new characters are introduced, characters that might be as influential as any former, such as Dido, queen of Carthage, who aids the wandering Trojans in their misfortune. "Not ignorant of ill I learn to aid distress." But then she falls in love with Aeneas and he falls in love with her — but actually, I think he just liked her because he thought Carthage was the land promised by the gods, for the one who really was in love was her, to the point that she commits suicide (in a very poetical way, I must say), after the Trojan hero flees from the queen's land when he's advised to hurry and find Italy, where he must found a new nation. This is told in Book IV, one of my favourites (the other being Book VI and XII), and the only thing I didn't like about it is that it is really short: it sings so briefly how all this romance happens, though it's always like this in the whole poem, for one minute Iulus is just a little kid who can barely catch up on his father's steps while fleeing from Troy, and then he's an all fighting adolescent in the last war. But I think the few lines Virgil wrote concerning Dido and Aeneas are beautiful enough to captivate the reader making clear that quality means more than quantity; and then one understands why it took the author so long to publish his work and why he was very hard to please when it came to what shall be brought not only to Augustus but to the entire world. O relics once dear, while God and Fate allowed, take my spirit, and release me from my woes! My life is done and I have finished the course that Fortune gave; and now in majesty my shade shall pass beneath the earth. Like I already said, Book VI was also one of my favourites and it is considered the center of the poem, not only mathematically (the poem consists of twelve books), but also because I'd say it has been one of the most influential in the history of literature. The book tells Aeneas descent into the Avernus ushered by the Cumaean Sybil all the way to the Elysian Fields where the soul of his father rests; and while they travel along the underworld, the Sybil tells Aeneas how that world is constituted judging by each soul's deeds. Does this sound familiar? Say for example a book in which an exile is guided through the underworld in search of his beloved? Bingo! It's The Divine Comedy. Reading this definitely blew my mind because I could see why Dante chose Virgil as his guide in his well-known masterpiece; but also because I realised much of the greco-latin myths I knew have the weight they have because of Virgil's creation, like The Trojan Horse, or even the underworld itself and those who rule there. The Aeneid really made me connect some dots, like a very particular part when Aeneas is trying to convince his father to flee with him, but the latter tells him he's too old already and death might suit him better. But then something happens: Anchises receives a divine sign that tells him that it's time to overcome his sorrows and accompany his son into a new start. It's something that is amazingly similar to the Pentecost versicles in The Bible. Take a look: "From above the head of Iulus a light tongue of flame was seen to shed a gleam and, harmless in its touch, lick his soft locks and pasture round his temples. […] with sudden crash there was thunder on the left and a star shot from heaven, gliding through the darkness, and drawing a fiery trail amid a flood of light […] At this, indeed, my father was overcome and, rising to his feet, salutes the gods, and worships the holy star." — Virgil. The Aeneid. "And suddenly there came a sound from heaven as of a rushing mighty wind, and it filled all the house where they were sitting. And there appeared unto them cloven tongues like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them. And they were all filled with the Holy Ghost, and began to speak with other tongues, as the Spirit gave them utterance." — Acts 2:2-4 (KJV) Strange yet fantastic, isn't it? Somehow I feel that Virgil's work was the guideline for a whole new era, not only in the Western Canon (in which Homer is also included), but also in Christianity. We can read how Aeneas surrendered his fate to Divinity after he had lost everything but a little bit of hope, which is one of the things that Christians would preach about later on. I don't mean to say though that Aeneas is the establisher of this doctrine, but it's something great to reflect upon when one thinks about the origins of Christianity and its merging points with earlier cultures. There's also the fact that Aeneas was welcomed with war in the land where he was supposed to build a new empire (augured in Vulcan's shield), and there's a vesicle in Luke 4:24 that says "And he said, Verily I say unto you, No prophet is accepted in his own country." Generally speaking, reading such a work of art has been a very… cultivating experience, and it is definitely a must-read. Just ignore what people say about this being a fanfic. It's not. Or maybe technically it is, but personally, when I think of one of those things I think of vampires' stories written by teenagers; while this is a masterpiece written by a very meticulous poet who would later influence many magnificent writers such as Milton. I also disagree with some of the things I've read about Virgil plagiarising Homer's work. C'mon! Of course he had to mention the latter's characters and even try to keep his style as accurate as possible since he was writing a tribute for the Roman roots along with Homer's epics, for whom the author of The Aeneid was very respectful. Each author had their own personal print (while Homer's cyclops were more terrifying, Virgil described them with a compassionate pinch as lonely sorrowful creatures because of what Ulysses did to one of them). Besides, Virgil made his own contribution to greco-roman culture and mythology, and to literature as a whole — and I don't see fanfics achieving this, do you? There is a great difference between plagiarism and influence.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Zenki the Hermit

    RECOMMENDED TO: ☐ History junkies ☐ Fans of fan fiction ☐ People who've read Dante's Inferno ☐ People who'd like to witness Virgil rip off The Iliad and Odyssey ☐ Mortals who want to see the Greek/Roman gods being their typical, meddling selves ☐ Masochists who want to read this book rather than watch a YouTube summary

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    When in high school I read the Iliad and Odyssey. After completing them I had to run down Virgil's Aeneid. If you've ever read these books the word pictures of this epic story (Greek myth and then Roman) will I believe be somewhat burned into your mind. I doubt you'll ever have clearer ones. Though written centuries ago the epic tales of mythological gods, goddesses, and heroes will stay with you. For me also the "shift" from Greek characters to Roman (especially in the case of the mythological When in high school I read the Iliad and Odyssey. After completing them I had to run down Virgil's Aeneid. If you've ever read these books the word pictures of this epic story (Greek myth and then Roman) will I believe be somewhat burned into your mind. I doubt you'll ever have clearer ones. Though written centuries ago the epic tales of mythological gods, goddesses, and heroes will stay with you. For me also the "shift" from Greek characters to Roman (especially in the case of the mythological deities) was extremely, what(?) interesting(?). That might be the word. the way Homer sees Aphrodite and Virgil sees Venus are, different. Maybe complimentary would be an applicable word, though it seems to me that they had at times radically different views of them. Where I went away from Homer picturing Aphrodite, Ares and their allies in a more negative light, Virgil seemed to see that particular party in a more sympathetic light. As one view of the "heroic" mythical past this is an enjoyable and (dare I say it?) worthwhile read. Also I must admit, I always enjoyed fanciful type literature (and stories). As a kid it was harder to find stories of swords, daring do magic and mayhem than it is now and mythology served quite well. Like a lot of people (including Tolkien and Lewis) I preferred Norse mythology, but Greek and Roman would do in a pinch. So, think about it, erudition and high adventure all in one book, what's not to like? It's a win/win.

  28. 5 out of 5

    J. Sebastian

    Mandelbaum’s translation is beautiful. After the fall of Troy, Aeneas and his Trojans strive through tremendous pain and hardship to find their way home. Destiny and fate are always in view behind the suffering and the endless journey, and a beauty that is rich and deep emerges everywhere. It is the blending of destiny with heroic epic poetry that gives meaning and beauty to life, no matter how hard it can become. Though Aeneas wanders through many lands, the great women of the book emerge as la Mandelbaum’s translation is beautiful. After the fall of Troy, Aeneas and his Trojans strive through tremendous pain and hardship to find their way home. Destiny and fate are always in view behind the suffering and the endless journey, and a beauty that is rich and deep emerges everywhere. It is the blending of destiny with heroic epic poetry that gives meaning and beauty to life, no matter how hard it can become. Though Aeneas wanders through many lands, the great women of the book emerge as landmarks on his journey home. This begins with the loss of his wife Creusa, whom Aeneas loses when they are escaping the Greeks and the burning ruin of Troy; he turns, much like Orpheus when Eurydike is following him out of the underworld, and discovers that she is gone. Rushing back to find her Aeneas encounters Creusa's ghost; it is too late, but she tells him that another wife awaits him in Italy, and Creusa submits to fate. There follows the tragedy of Dido, who falls in love with Aeneas when he is shipwrecked in Carthage. He (in submission to the ordained fates) abandons her cruelly, and continues on his journey. Halfway through the book Aeneas will descend into the underworld following the Sybil, priestess of Apollo (as Theseus entered the Labyrinth with the help of Ariadne’s thread). In the second half of the book the great heroine is Camilla, whose tragic death (like that of Dido) can move deep currents of pity in the reader. Foreshadowed from the very beginning of the poem, Lavinia, the promised bride awaits for him at the end of his journies; she is betrothed to another, and this will cause another war before the foundations of Rome can be laid. Some examples of the happy success of Mandelbaum’s English translation: near the end of Book I, the scene is set thus for a great story, just before Dido asks Aeneas to tell the tale of his trials and wanderings: And at the first pause in the feast the tables are cleared away. They fetch enormous bowls and crown the wine with wreaths. The uproar grows; it swells through all the palace; voices roll across the ample halls; the lamps are kindled–– they hang from ceilings rich with golden panels–– and flaming torches overcome the night. And then the queen called for a golden cup, massive with jewels, that Belus once had used, Belus and all the Tyrian line; she filled that golden cup with wine. The hall fell still. (I. 1008 - 1018) Late in the poem, the young hero Pallas exhorts his men, who are being routed, thus: “Where are you running, comrades? By your valor and by the name of your own King Evander, by victories you have won and by my hope that now would match my father’s fame, you cannot trust to your feet. The sword must hack a passage through Latin ranks. And where their mass is thickest, there, there is where your noble homeland asks that you and your chief, Pallas, find a path. There are no gods against us: mortals, we are driven back by mortal enemies; we have as many hands and lives as they. Just see, the waters hem us in with their great sea wall; there is no retreat by land. Then shall we seek the deep or Troy’s new camp?” This said, he charged against the crowding Latins. (X. 510 - 524) He saves the battle here, but it costs him everything. Perhaps the most amazing scene, full of wonder, is when Aeneas begins to weep, beholding the relief sculpture that decorates Juno’s temple in Carthage; this depicts scenes from the Trojan war in which he took part; he sees himself therein, his friends, his former king, his famous enemies. Here in this strange new land, Troy gone, he weeps, feeding "his soul on what is nothing but a picture” (I. 659), discovering that there is nowhere that the story of Troy is not known. But there are so many rich, deep, meaningful, and wonderful passages that to tell them all is to rewrite the whole Aeneid. I will look forward to reading it again and again; it gets better every time.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sylvain Reynard

    Don't be fooled by cheap imitations. This is the real Virgil and his lyrical account of the events that transpired after the fall of Troy. (Beware of Greeks bearing gifts) Read this work and discover why Virgil was the poet laureate of Italy, only to be replaced by Dante. And read it, too, to discover why Beatrice asked Virgil to guide her Beloved through the treacherous Inferno ...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris

    Having just read this Masterpiece of Western Civilization, even in a translation in very questionable modern Greek of the '50s, made me realize that I should be using the word "Epic" in describing other books less frequently. This is the first and only Epic I have ever read in my miserable life.

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