Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Books of Magic, Volume 7: Death After Death

Availability: Ready to download

Since learning that he would become a wizard of infinite power, young Tim Hunter has been cursed with a life of loss and death. Tired of the misery that has become his adolescence, the fourteen year-old mage releases all of his magic unto the universe. But as a war between Heaven and Hell erupts over the newly released power, Tim learns that his impulsive action may lead t Since learning that he would become a wizard of infinite power, young Tim Hunter has been cursed with a life of loss and death. Tired of the misery that has become his adolescence, the fourteen year-old mage releases all of his magic unto the universe. But as a war between Heaven and Hell erupts over the newly released power, Tim learns that his impulsive action may lead to the end of all Creation. Now the completely powerless sorcerer must find a way to outmaneuver and manipulate an assortment of angels, demons, and deities in order to regain his magic or watch as all of existence ceases to be.


Compare
Ads Banner

Since learning that he would become a wizard of infinite power, young Tim Hunter has been cursed with a life of loss and death. Tired of the misery that has become his adolescence, the fourteen year-old mage releases all of his magic unto the universe. But as a war between Heaven and Hell erupts over the newly released power, Tim learns that his impulsive action may lead t Since learning that he would become a wizard of infinite power, young Tim Hunter has been cursed with a life of loss and death. Tired of the misery that has become his adolescence, the fourteen year-old mage releases all of his magic unto the universe. But as a war between Heaven and Hell erupts over the newly released power, Tim learns that his impulsive action may lead to the end of all Creation. Now the completely powerless sorcerer must find a way to outmaneuver and manipulate an assortment of angels, demons, and deities in order to regain his magic or watch as all of existence ceases to be.

30 review for The Books of Magic, Volume 7: Death After Death

  1. 4 out of 5

    C.

    And finally we come to the last book in the Books of Magic trade paperback series, book 7: “Death After Death”. When the book opens (issue #42 of the series), Tim is trying to decide what to do with his life. Living in San Fransisco with Zatanna, he feels directionless. Magic is doing him no good when all it seems to do is push those who matter most to him further away. Molly has left him and gone home to England. His father is getting married to Holly, the woman he met on the way home from the h And finally we come to the last book in the Books of Magic trade paperback series, book 7: “Death After Death”. When the book opens (issue #42 of the series), Tim is trying to decide what to do with his life. Living in San Fransisco with Zatanna, he feels directionless. Magic is doing him no good when all it seems to do is push those who matter most to him further away. Molly has left him and gone home to England. His father is getting married to Holly, the woman he met on the way home from the hospital after being burned by Martyn way back when. For Tim it just doesn’t seem like anyone needs him anymore. Then he runs into the angel Araquel and together they try to get Timothy back home to England where something very big is about to go down, something like the apocalypse. It seems the angels in Heaven are trying very hard to turn Earth into another Heaven, but the Devil has other ideas and he uses Tim’s father as his weapon, turning him into a huge ravenous beast that tears through town killing angels left and right. Tim and Araquel have to figure out a way to stop the angels from destroying the world, but do it without killing them. For everything that’s come before in this series, “Death After Death” is by far the most exciting and grandest scaled story yet. The sight of the angels, by the dozens, flying about London while Tim and his allies are rushing here and there trying to stop the massacre all had a great cinematic quality to it and the story literally flew by in no time at all. Tim must learn to deal with and fix this problem on his own, though, because earlier in the story during he and Araquel’s journey home, Tim gave up his magic, coming to understand that the magic didn’t belong to him in the first place, but to the world, and all he’d done was use it to get what he wanted. So he let it go, and the boy who returns to London is now just a regular, powerless boy, yet he’s still caught up in these amazing situations and simply wants no part of it. He just wants to be a 14-year-old boy whose biggest concerns are school and acne. But that’s not Tim Hunter’s lot in life, as he learns, and when it comes down to it, Tim realizes he is up to the challenge. Writer John Ney Rieber said from the beginning that he wanted the story of Tim Hunter to be about a boy, and his problems would be those of any adolescent. I’ve always thought he’s done a great job during this series of expressing that hope as well as he can, given the situations in which Tim finds himself, and “Death After Death” is no exception. The character has always felt a little too intelligent for my tastes, as a 14-year-old character, but his inner struggles and the simple things he wants in life all ring very true. This book marks the end of Rieber’s run on the series and I say if you’re gonna end a book after 4 years, what better way than this? With the end of this book, it truly feels as if Rieber has said everything he had to on the subject of Tim Hunter. The art this time is provided not just by Peter Gross (no Snejbjerg this time), but also by Jill Thomspon, Richard Case and Temujin. Thompson’s is the only name I was already familiar with while the other two merely finished Gross’s layout work. Aside from Tim’s changing hair style and length, I didn’t notice anything out of the ordinary or particularly bad in the art. Layout were pretty easy to follow, but there were a few times I read some word balloons out of order. It’s hard to believe I’ve just spent over a week reading 50 straight issues of THE BOOKS OF MAGIC, a series that was, I admit, one of my least favorite among the Vertigo titles when I first discovered them over a decade and a half ago. But I think reading them like this, collected, where you don’t have to read them 24 pages month by month, this is definitely the way to do it. The story makes so much more sense when you don’t have 30 days between installments, especially when the story is as insane and surreal as this one got at times. These collected books have made me re-evaluate my opinion of Tim Hunter and his saga, and this final volume even moreso. I don’t know if I want to read the last 1/3 of the series, since it was done under a different writer and I’m afraid some of what made these stories so good might be missing. Then again, the Gross issues might be even better. Who’s to say? For what it’s worth, this is a very good series to get hold of if you can find it. I might even recommend BUYING it if you see the trades available somewhere. Given how old they are, you probably won’t, but I got mine from the library, which had the entire run. Either way, however you can get it, if you see it available, I strongly recommend it. Good stuff.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    I really wish Vertigo would publish the rest of the issues as trade paperbacks...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Baska

    I give the series 3.5 stars, rounded to 4. It could've been better, I feel like certain parts could've been expanded upon - the storyline kind of jumps around a bit, certain plots I don't see the importance and the point of, but not bad.

  4. 5 out of 5

    M.i.

    What I liked most about this book, is the portrayal of Tim as an actual boy who is struggling with trying to find himself in a world where he is much more than he thinks he is. The way it ends was a surprise, though a welcome one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Meh. This series petered out towards the end. I liked the series quite a bit up until The Girl in the Box.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ian Forsyth

    I was disappointed by the whole arc of the story. It didn't have enough cohesion.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Donopolis

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jsounart

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sherwin

  10. 5 out of 5

    Measie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joy Derision

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  14. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ove

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joshe

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo

  18. 4 out of 5

    Niilo Mäkelä

  19. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  20. 5 out of 5

    George

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chip

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amit

  23. 4 out of 5

    Macguire Tablac

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christina Haley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eefa

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jon Robertson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gina Donahue

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra J.W.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adeline Paduraru

  30. 4 out of 5

    CGlee

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.