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Una discesa nel Maelström (eBook Supereconomici)

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Edgard Allan Poe, scrittore statunitense, viene considerato uno dei rappresentanti più importanti del genere gotico, sebbene la sua vita e le sue opere siano posteriori rispetto al periodo del romanzo gotico vero e proprio. Del movimento neogotico riprende molte suggestioni, svincolandosi però dalle ambientazioni tipiche e più stereotipate, e sviluppandone con grande origin Edgard Allan Poe, scrittore statunitense, viene considerato uno dei rappresentanti più importanti del genere gotico, sebbene la sua vita e le sue opere siano posteriori rispetto al periodo del romanzo gotico vero e proprio. Del movimento neogotico riprende molte suggestioni, svincolandosi però dalle ambientazioni tipiche e più stereotipate, e sviluppandone con grande originalità più gli aspetti psicologici, indagando fra le ossessioni e gli incubi personali. Scrittore di grande inventiva, ha anticipato generi letterari quali il racconto poliziesco e la fantascienza.


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Edgard Allan Poe, scrittore statunitense, viene considerato uno dei rappresentanti più importanti del genere gotico, sebbene la sua vita e le sue opere siano posteriori rispetto al periodo del romanzo gotico vero e proprio. Del movimento neogotico riprende molte suggestioni, svincolandosi però dalle ambientazioni tipiche e più stereotipate, e sviluppandone con grande origin Edgard Allan Poe, scrittore statunitense, viene considerato uno dei rappresentanti più importanti del genere gotico, sebbene la sua vita e le sue opere siano posteriori rispetto al periodo del romanzo gotico vero e proprio. Del movimento neogotico riprende molte suggestioni, svincolandosi però dalle ambientazioni tipiche e più stereotipate, e sviluppandone con grande originalità più gli aspetti psicologici, indagando fra le ossessioni e gli incubi personali. Scrittore di grande inventiva, ha anticipato generi letterari quali il racconto poliziesco e la fantascienza.

30 review for Una discesa nel Maelström (eBook Supereconomici)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    A fascinating tale of a man's near-death experience in a giant maelstrom or whirlpool at sea. A man on a ship is being sucked slowly toward a massive whirling pool of water. The bottom equals death and there's no way out. So how does he respond? At first, he gives himself over to his fate. He knows he's doomed. But in a way this is liberating. He "became possessed with the keenest curiosity" about the whirlpool and "positively felt a wish to explore its depths, even at the sacrifice I was going A fascinating tale of a man's near-death experience in a giant maelstrom or whirlpool at sea. A man on a ship is being sucked slowly toward a massive whirling pool of water. The bottom equals death and there's no way out. So how does he respond? At first, he gives himself over to his fate. He knows he's doomed. But in a way this is liberating. He "became possessed with the keenest curiosity" about the whirlpool and "positively felt a wish to explore its depths, even at the sacrifice I was going to make." His principal grief? Not his own impending death but rather "that I should never be able to tell my old companions on shore about the mysteries I should see." But once he slides into the whirlpool itself and begins whirling round and round its sides, getting ever lower to the bottom (and death), his reaction changes. Like in The Pit and the Pendulum, he begins to try to measure his predicament, seeing all "the numerous things that floated in our company" and seeking "amusement in speculating upon the relative velocities of their several descents toward the foam below." He then makes an observation that cylinders seem to descend most slowly, so he lashes himself to a water barrel and dives overboard to save himself. But he's not just a rational scientist here. What's striking, throughout, is his appreciation not only of the terror of the maelstrom but of it's sublime beauty. The sides of the funnel are "perfectly smooth" and "might have been mistaken for ebony, but for the bewildering rapidity with which they spun around, and for the gleaming and ghastly radiance they shot forth, as the rays of the full moon...." And when the rays of the moon do reach the bottom he sees a thick mist "over which there hung a magnificent rainbow...." So he's drawn to this place much like Poe's narrators elsewhere are drawn to death: there's a fascination and even a beauty amid the horror that Poe is always keenly attuned to and that serves to elevate many of his tales.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    A supposedly old man tells his story of getting into the whirlpool of the Moskoe-stroem while on a fishing trip with his brothers. The description is absolutely brilliant. You really see and hear the fellows drawn into the eye of the storm and you feel the rage of the elements. This certainly is the best depiction of a natural phenomenon I read. Absolutely recommended! Brilliant story!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    'A Descent Into the Maelstrom' tells the story of a brave fisherman and his brother who take the risk of fishing near a gigantic maelstrom in the Norwegian sea, taking home considerably more fish than their fellow fishermen who remain on safer fishing grounds. One night, a terrible storm plunges their ship right into the mouth of the vortex, meaning certain death for the brothers. The narrator speaks of overcoming his fear of certain death upon seeing the center of the maelstrom and beholding its 'A Descent Into the Maelstrom' tells the story of a brave fisherman and his brother who take the risk of fishing near a gigantic maelstrom in the Norwegian sea, taking home considerably more fish than their fellow fishermen who remain on safer fishing grounds. One night, a terrible storm plunges their ship right into the mouth of the vortex, meaning certain death for the brothers. The narrator speaks of overcoming his fear of certain death upon seeing the center of the maelstrom and beholding its beauty and inconceivability - seeing it as proof of God's power. Waiting for their boat to shatter on the bottom of the abyss, the narrator catches a glimmer of hope, while his boat and his shell-shocked brother are spiraling downwards to meet their doom. The narrator lives to tell the tale - even though he has become an old man during those terrible hours, despite being in the in the prime of his years when the descent into the maelstrom happened. A beautiful and terrifying short story and one of my personal favorites by E.A. Poe! 5 stars!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Zapata

    When I am reading and a book title is mentioned, I like to check and see if it is a real book. Then if it sounds interesting, I record the title and plan on reading it One Of These Days. Which is how I came across A Descent Into The Maelstrom. In Arthur Clarke's story Maelstrom II (from his collection The Wind from the Sun: Stories of the Space Age) the astronaut main character remembers reading the Poe story. I became curious so here we are. I had not read Poe since school days and had never rea When I am reading and a book title is mentioned, I like to check and see if it is a real book. Then if it sounds interesting, I record the title and plan on reading it One Of These Days. Which is how I came across A Descent Into The Maelstrom. In Arthur Clarke's story Maelstrom II (from his collection The Wind from the Sun: Stories of the Space Age) the astronaut main character remembers reading the Poe story. I became curious so here we are. I had not read Poe since school days and had never read this particular story. Maybe I have fixed memories of Poe, but this story did not seem like any of the ones I had to read in school. Two nameless men are up on a high mountain in Norway, looking out over the precipice at the sea far below. There are a few islands scattered around, and then the reason for the climb up the mountain begins to appear. Between two islands a giant whirlpool regularly forms. It is a mile wide during the full force of its power, and from our vantage point we can see down into the whirling depths of the thing. Excuse me while I back away from the edge, I am feeling a bit dizzy. Now the story within the story begins. It is told by the white-haired man, and relates his experience with the whirlpool. Obviously he survived, since he is the one telling the tale, but how did he manage to live through what was a terrible experience? Well, observation is the key to everything in life, and there is no better example of it than in this story. I cannot say more. I remember Poe's work being ridiculously frightening to my overactive young imagination. I suppose if I had read this one years ago I would have reacted differently, but I simply could not get too carried away here. We already know the man survived; and there is a lot of scientific explaining going on when you would expect more sheer terror. The story feels more like a newspaper article rather than a gripping mysterious thriller. But I do still feel a bit dizzy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I have yet to read another writer with the ability to take all my senses into a story and make me live it. Poe is a wonder and an amazement to me. He describes a whirlpool a mile wide, a descent, and an escape. This stressed me out, scared me. Wow. What great skill!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Connie G

    The Maelstrom is a vortex of water off the coast of Norway that whirls and drags objects to the rocky bottom of the sea. When a fishing boat encounters a hurricane it gets thrown off course into the area of the Maelstrom. Poe's short story is exciting and suspenseful as the fisherman tries to save himself from certain death from this violent force of nature.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa J.

    This is why I'm afraid of traveling by sea. Thank you very much for reminding me, Poe. P.S.: Poe should still be alive writing more stories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    Another twisted Poe tale.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jowayria Rahal

    I woke up this morning eager to do nothing but to celebrate the birthday of a man who loved with a love that was more than love. Everything was in its place but my own mind as it tried hard to wander the streets of Boston in its desperate attempt to figure out a way to celebrate this man's literary genius. It was until today's afternoon that I found out that I do not only own a copy of Poe's most tales, but that I also already have started reading one of his less appreciated not-so-short-stories I woke up this morning eager to do nothing but to celebrate the birthday of a man who loved with a love that was more than love. Everything was in its place but my own mind as it tried hard to wander the streets of Boston in its desperate attempt to figure out a way to celebrate this man's literary genius. It was until today's afternoon that I found out that I do not only own a copy of Poe's most tales, but that I also already have started reading one of his less appreciated not-so-short-stories. Of course, all I could think of then is to finish reading A Descent into the Maelstrom, which I have started reading almost two weeks ago. Although Poe's choice of a frame structure may seem unreasonable and quite confusing, this doesn't make of the story any less understandable nor relishable. A Descent into the Maelstrom is a character's account of how he escaped death and how filled with terror and horror he was during that experience. For that, he is but an admirable figure for his genius combination of wit, intelligence and bravery. It is the story of q man who rode his ship towards his certain death. Accepting his fate as inevitable, he then reasons that if all of his life is sure to crumble before his very eyes, he can at least look forward to discovering the "undiscovered country " to be the first traveler who'd irrupt its bourn. It is in the very moment when he encountered death that he realized that for knowledge, even the encounter of death is manageable. This is one of those stories that make you think about a lot of things ranging from death to forbidden knowledge. So, you just go for a walk hoping that things will become much clearer when you get back home but-in fact- they don't. Does life become more definite and decipherable as we keep on living?

  10. 4 out of 5

    K. Anna Kraft

    I have arranged my thoughts into a haiku: "Merciless whirling. One's wits, one's greatest asset, Battling terror."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jose

    Tianming's Fairy Tales from Death's End bought me here. In this proto science fiction story, Poe's Narrator recalls his miraculous escape from a whirlpool(Moskstraumen), with chilling accounts of terror and helplessness against natural forces. But instead of succumbing to the morbidness, narrator tries to make sense of the danger he is in, with reason, hence the sci fi / math fi categorization. Readers do have the usual incentive and freedom to consider this as a horror story in conventional sens Tianming's Fairy Tales from Death's End bought me here. In this proto science fiction story, Poe's Narrator recalls his miraculous escape from a whirlpool(Moskstraumen), with chilling accounts of terror and helplessness against natural forces. But instead of succumbing to the morbidness, narrator tries to make sense of the danger he is in, with reason, hence the sci fi / math fi categorization. Readers do have the usual incentive and freedom to consider this as a horror story in conventional sense, or to question the reliability of narration, with its prevailing story inside a story structure. Poe even star notes an Archimedian work (obviously fake), as his reference for floating body dynamics in fluid vortex. Still, I somehow kept expecting weird supernatural or unknown horror from Nordland, till the last word, like in Algernon's Willows of Danube.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    It's been several years since I read this but I remember it felt flat: Poe simply tells a story and makes no effort to up the terror or to create tension. Perhaps that was his experimental way to create an unusual type of "horror" story. I'd say this is for Poe's fans only.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    The story is told by an Old Norwegian fisherman to a tourist at the top of a very tall mountain. The story of how he was caught during a storm in a maelstrom three years earlier with his brothers and how he survived. The old man recounts his ordeal that in less than a single day changed his hairs from a jetty black to white, weakened his limbs, and t unstrung his nerves. On a fishing trip with his brothers a storm arose fuelled by the most powerful and wicked hurricane that ever erupted from hea The story is told by an Old Norwegian fisherman to a tourist at the top of a very tall mountain. The story of how he was caught during a storm in a maelstrom three years earlier with his brothers and how he survived. The old man recounts his ordeal that in less than a single day changed his hairs from a jetty black to white, weakened his limbs, and t unstrung his nerves. On a fishing trip with his brothers a storm arose fuelled by the most powerful and wicked hurricane that ever erupted from heaven caused their ship to be swept into an almighty vortex. It is another of Poe’s stories that surprised me. I had thought all of his tales where dark gloomy affairs however this short story had none of the supernatural spooky atmosphere, rather a dark and powerful one set down by nature herself. A story within a story which is a literary technique that I have always enjoyed. It gives the reader the feeling that they are themselves on top of that mountain listening as the old man narrates his tale. I was absorbed by this tale, drawn in with every page just as the maelstrom did the old fisherman, and like him I witnessed the horrors and wonders of this tale with a stupefied awe that I never expected from such a short story!

  14. 4 out of 5

    M. Ashraf

    This was another great short story by Poe, with very good details, I imagined myself being there in the middle of the storm hanging to the ring bolt, riding the tides, feelings the ups and the downs of every wave, jumping into the barrel to save myself and holding tight, pray to survive my fate.It was great!! I also liked the scientific note about Archimedes about the floating principle of different bodies, it was very good, and made it a bit realistic for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cynda

    Description great. I live on the coast and am familiar with various hurricanes and other storms on the Texas Gulf Coast. So this story is credible to me. Yet it is difficult to follow. Poe used unusually obtuse here with his arcane language. Unnecessary. He could have used a more familiar landscape of the American Atlantic Coast. The arcane language makes story difficult to have full or even half appreciation of. Therefore 1 star.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The title describes what this sci-fi story is about, and the awe-inspiring nature that Poe creates makes it gripping throughout. The use of scientific logic toward the end brings up many interesting issues about the relationship between man, God and nature. The story's plausibility is a hallmark of Poe's strength as a writer.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Harry Doble

    A study in both the Sublime and how to write about motion. Possibly the most Lovecraftian of Poe's short stories, except without the monsters and cosmic horror.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    I usually love Poe's short stories but I didn't like this one. It was great in some parts but in others, I felt lost. However, it's a little bit creepy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alvaro Rojas

    The science made it for me. It was a really smart move from the seaman.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cláudia

    “To the right and left, as far as the eye could reach, there lay outstretched, like ramparts of the world, lines of horridly black and beetling cliff, whose character of gloom was but the more forcibly illustrated by the surf which reared high up against its white and ghastly crest, howling and shrieking forever.”

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    It's pretty cool to read Edgar Allan Poe's early works. He had a great story-telling technique.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    ...the six hours of deadly terror which I then endured have broken me up body and soul. When I first read about the Maelstrom, I found it intriguing, but nothing special. Since then, I've found myself continually thinking about it. I don't know what Poe was thinking when he wrote it. Perhaps he was just writing an interesting story, or perhaps he was exploring something deeper. "A Descent into the Maelstrom" is about a man who experiences horror at sea. He and his brothers are fishing when they a ...the six hours of deadly terror which I then endured have broken me up body and soul. When I first read about the Maelstrom, I found it intriguing, but nothing special. Since then, I've found myself continually thinking about it. I don't know what Poe was thinking when he wrote it. Perhaps he was just writing an interesting story, or perhaps he was exploring something deeper. "A Descent into the Maelstrom" is about a man who experiences horror at sea. He and his brothers are fishing when they are caught in a terrible storm. The storm drags them to a giant whirlpool. The story is lengthy and details the horror the narrator feels watching his life swirl away. How terrifying to watch your life disappear before your eyes? For me personally, I was thinking about life in general. You go about your life living each moment and next thing you know your caught in a giant whirlpool. (Figuratively speaking, of course.) There were two people in the whirlpool. One chose to fight against everything going on. The other throws himself into the turns and adjusts. Can you guess which one survived? I think this is a story I will be returning to again.

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Doyle

    Essentially this is one man telling his terrifying story of being on a ship when a hurricane comes along and pushes the ship towards a whirlpool and how he became the lone survivor of the shipwreck. The horror in this story is all courtesy of Mother Nature. The author's description of being in the midst of the ocean was vivid, I could feel the terror. Interestingly, salvation is found by observing the natural phenomena around him and determining what would give him a greater chance of surviving Essentially this is one man telling his terrifying story of being on a ship when a hurricane comes along and pushes the ship towards a whirlpool and how he became the lone survivor of the shipwreck. The horror in this story is all courtesy of Mother Nature. The author's description of being in the midst of the ocean was vivid, I could feel the terror. Interestingly, salvation is found by observing the natural phenomena around him and determining what would give him a greater chance of surviving the maelstrom.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Hatch

    My least favorite Poe I've read so far. It didn't grip me at all, but I'm not one for deep sea/big storm tales. I like when Poe is more macabre, so I just wasn't expecting this kind of story. It is actually probably 3 stars because it was still enjoyable, but it's been a long time since I've given a book under a 3, and this is probably the closest to deserving it haha.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Keith Bell

    My favourite Poe story. Great adventure story with vivid descriptions and use of resources to (Isaac Newton, etc) to ensure accuracy of the story. Incorporates science very well. Some sources have even listed this as a Science Fiction story. Not truly a Sci-Fi story but clever use of science.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    3.5 Stars

  27. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Meh.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I read this short story for an AP Literature class of mine. My group and I had to present it to the class and give a brief summary, describe the use of figurative language, use an example of literary criticism, etc. I found that there wasn't much literary criticism for the story to begin with. That may have had to do with the fact that the story itself didn't reach much popularity compared to Poe's other works. Despite the lack of popularity, I expected the story itself to be very interesting. P I read this short story for an AP Literature class of mine. My group and I had to present it to the class and give a brief summary, describe the use of figurative language, use an example of literary criticism, etc. I found that there wasn't much literary criticism for the story to begin with. That may have had to do with the fact that the story itself didn't reach much popularity compared to Poe's other works. Despite the lack of popularity, I expected the story itself to be very interesting. Poe's works as a whole are incredibly fascinating to me. However upon reading this I didn't feel as much fascination as I had hoped. Perhaps because in a literal sense it was a story about a potentially unreliable elderly man telling a story of a whirlpool that almost killed him. But after taking a step back and looking over the story once again produced a change of opinion. The use of imagery and personification were beautiful and frightening. It made me feel as though the Maelstrom itself was a living breathing destruction machine; a strong yet mesmerizing god. Poe's writing was beautiful just as expected. As I wrote this review I originally wanted to give A Descent into the Maelstrom a 2 out of 5 stars. I was genuinely bored with the story until I was able to research and really appreciate the story for what it was, and I can say that I was utterly impressed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shall I Download A Black Hole And Offer It To You

    a slight departure from what one would expect from Poe, but still quite well done... brought to mind the band Nurse With Wound, as they have a record titled "Lofoten Deadhead"... plenty imagery here: dark and forbidding seas, starkly weathered landscapes, scattered driftwood, animal carcasses, seawrack... did Poe attempt to make the maelstrom a semi-sentient being, sated by the death of his brother? hmmm... still, the writing has all of Poe's pacing and run-on sentences and atmosphere of dread a a slight departure from what one would expect from Poe, but still quite well done... brought to mind the band Nurse With Wound, as they have a record titled "Lofoten Deadhead"... plenty imagery here: dark and forbidding seas, starkly weathered landscapes, scattered driftwood, animal carcasses, seawrack... did Poe attempt to make the maelstrom a semi-sentient being, sated by the death of his brother? hmmm... still, the writing has all of Poe's pacing and run-on sentences and atmosphere of dread and uncertainty... believe it or not, one could say after finishing...

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Meditationseed

    Is hope a positive feeling in us, or would it be based just on a desire that brings suffering? And how does hope develop? Through memory and observation? Or by belief in the supernatural or a consequence not so obvious to our senses and thoughts? The stage of these reflections is a tale about the sea and its temperament. Unstable, radically powerful, and though it is in some measure predictable, it snatches away and holds far more mysteries than our consciousness reveals, at least for a while ...

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