Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

A Caribbean Mystery

Availability: Ready to download

There is no rest or relaxation for Miss Marple. Miss Jane Marple, Agatha Christie's most appealing sleuth, returns in this classic baffler of a vacation-turned-deadly.


Compare
Ads Banner

There is no rest or relaxation for Miss Marple. Miss Jane Marple, Agatha Christie's most appealing sleuth, returns in this classic baffler of a vacation-turned-deadly.

30 review for A Caribbean Mystery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brina

    Since I was a kid reading Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys, I have read mysteries in between other books as a palette cleanser. Rather than go into a reading slump, I read a fast paced crime or detective story to clear my head. There is no detective writer I enjoy more than the Queen of Crime herself, Dame Agatha Christie. I joined the Goodreads group reading the detectives when I found out that they would be reading one Miss Marple case a month for a year. Although I had been a fan of Hercule Poiro Since I was a kid reading Nancy Drew or the Hardy Boys, I have read mysteries in between other books as a palette cleanser. Rather than go into a reading slump, I read a fast paced crime or detective story to clear my head. There is no detective writer I enjoy more than the Queen of Crime herself, Dame Agatha Christie. I joined the Goodreads group reading the detectives when I found out that they would be reading one Miss Marple case a month for a year. Although I had been a fan of Hercule Poirot first, I jumped at the opportunity to read more books by Christie. A Caribbean Mystery, Miss Marple's tenth case, is the upcoming group selection. An older Miss Marple has been gifted a Caribbean vacation to the island of St Honore by her wealthy nephew Raymond West. With her getting on in years, he desires that she spend at least part of the winter away from the dreary climate of St Mary Mead. One who is more than willing to try new things even as she ages, Miss Marple agrees to spend time at a beach front hotel. Appearing as a feeble old lady with a knack for knitting, Miss Marple is the delight of the hotel guests. Yet, her mind is anything but flighty, and, just as it seems to do in St Mary Mead, murder cases fall into Miss Marple's lap. Colonel Palgrave is also vacationing on St Honore. Regaling the other guests with his tales of safari and the spoils of war, he is the life of the island, even if his stories are on the boring side. While telling Miss Marple the story about meeting a murderer in the eye, Colonel Palgrave literally believes he has seen a criminal from a previous experience. Sure enough, the next day he turns up murdered, followed closely by a local hotel worker named Victoria. Guests start to panic and some flee, leaving Miss Marple to sharpen her detecting skills. As in the cases in St Mary Mead, the police appear less than competent. It is up to Miss Marple to unravel the clues to this case, along with the help of fellow guest Mr Rafiel. Together, the two octogenarians come up with motives and alibis for all the hotel guests and workers before another murder occurs on hotel grounds. All this takes place while Miss Marple is supposed to be on vacation, yet, as she has confided in at least one person in each case that I have read, murder seems to find her. As in the case at St Mary Mead, Miss Marple lets the case take place in front of her only to come up with a simple solution at the end. While Hercule Poirot is still my favorite of Agatha Christie's detectives, Miss Marple is starting to grow on me. Whereas Poirot entreaties people to employ their little grey cells and usually knows whodunit it at the beginning, Miss Marple uses deductive reasoning to systematically come up with the criminal and motive by the case's close. Miss Marple's cases take less brain power and are perfect for my palette cleansers. I always enjoy reading Agatha Christie's mysteries, and A Caribbean Mystery was no exception. I look forward to the next time that I sit down with one of her cases, and rate this easy reading mystery 3.5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Henry Avila

    Jane Marple is very grateful to her loving nephew Raymond West, a popular novelist and rich man, who paid for his aunt's vacation (she recently recovered from an illness ) . The tropics on an island in the Caribbean Sea, doesn't sound like a place Miss Marple would feel comfortable in, she is from rainy, cold, with just a little bit of snow, the quiet St. Mary Mead England. An out of the way village , where nothing ever happens, that is what everyone believes ... Warm weather a beautiful golden Jane Marple is very grateful to her loving nephew Raymond West, a popular novelist and rich man, who paid for his aunt's vacation (she recently recovered from an illness ) . The tropics on an island in the Caribbean Sea, doesn't sound like a place Miss Marple would feel comfortable in, she is from rainy, cold, with just a little bit of snow, the quiet St. Mary Mead England. An out of the way village , where nothing ever happens, that is what everyone believes ... Warm weather a beautiful golden beach , blue skies and still even more prettier sea, clear, as if nobody ever swam in it. Just the perfect locale to regain one's health. Nevertheless how can an elderly spinster , enjoy the atmosphere? Young, happy , wealthy couples running around the Golden Palm Hotel that name alone says it all , but after a week in the sun the old woman , begins to start thinking not a bad place the West Indies, glad she came if only something exciting would occur. Miss Marple gets her wish maybe too much so. The cast of characters: Two well to do couples amateur botanists, scurry about the islands to find exotic flowers and plants, taking pictures writing articles for the National Geographic magazine , they need something to do! Col. Edward Hillingdon retired, a rather reserved gentleman, wife the charming Evelyn and Gregory Dyson, fun loving guy , his gorgeous naughty mate Lucky a strange name for a woman, rumors of shenanigans between the foursome, but gossip can't be believed. Now Major Palgrave another old retired British army officer likes to tell stories, ancient boring tales to the hotel guests, such as hunting tigers in India or was it elephants in Africa? That nobody wants to hear, one in particular involving a murder. The polite Miss Marple pretends to listen, almost falling asleep, it will be his last one for the major. Next day he is found dead in bed, by Victoria the native maid, poor Miss Marple, everywhere she goes someone dies, not a surprise to Dr. Graham an island physician, he had high blood pressure medicine, in his room but the ever suspicious Jane is not so sure. The doctor then receives information that troubles him. The worried young newlyweds who bought the hotel , Tim and Molly Kendal know deaths in paradise is bad for business. After a quick funeral everything is back to normal, nobody can resist the deep blue sea besides, the deceased wasn't too liked ... Mr Rafiel pushing eternity, but richer than anyone Miss Marple has met helps her when another murder happens. Mrs.Kendal starts to act weirdly, mental illness? The police request gently of the hotel guests, not to leave the island of St.Honore they insist. The question this novel asks is , can paradise exist ever on Earth while people are still walking on its surface?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    A Caribbean Mystery (Miss Marple, #10), original publication year 1964 Characters: Miss Jane Marple, Mr. Rafiel Abstract: Miss Jane Marple, at the insistence of her nephew, relaxes at a resort in the Caribbean. The sea is sublime and the weather is fine in this quiet paradise so far away from quiet St. Mary Mead, until the apparently natural death of fellow guest Major Palgrave. Miss Marple is disturbed because the previous evening he was in good health, and almost showed her "a snapshot of a murd A Caribbean Mystery (Miss Marple, #10), original publication year 1964 Characters: Miss Jane Marple, Mr. Rafiel Abstract: Miss Jane Marple, at the insistence of her nephew, relaxes at a resort in the Caribbean. The sea is sublime and the weather is fine in this quiet paradise so far away from quiet St. Mary Mead, until the apparently natural death of fellow guest Major Palgrave. Miss Marple is disturbed because the previous evening he was in good health, and almost showed her "a snapshot of a murderer". Convinced that the major's death was not at all natural, she begins to ask difficult questions, and another victim dies. عنوانها: معمای کارائیب، قتل در کارائیب؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دوازدهم ماه دسامبر سال 1997 میلادی عنوان: معمای کارائیب، نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: نگین ازدجینی، نشر: تهران، نشر روایت؛ سال: 1373، تعداد صفحات: 298، شابک: 9789643637071؛ عنوان دیگر: قتل در کارائیب؛ چاپ دیگر: تهران، ثالث، 1393؛ شابک: 9789643809201؛ عنوان: معمای کارائیب، ترجمه: مجتبی عبدالله‌ نژاد، نشر: تهران، هرمس، سال: 1389، تعداد صفحات: 252، شابک: 9789643637071 ؛ چاپ دیگر: 1393، در 238 ص؛ شابک: 9789643637071؛ از مجموعه داستان‌های بانو آگاتا کریستی، و از سری خانم مارپل، کتاب دهم است؛ که نخستین بار در روز شانزدهم نوامبر سال 1964 میلادی در بریتانیای کبیر توسط انتشارات کولینز کرایم کلوب و در سال 1965 میلادی توسط انتشارات داد، مید اند کمپانی، در آمریکا به چاپ رسیده است. ا. شربیانی

  4. 5 out of 5

    carol.

    One's time period can be such a bother, don't you think? Or, in some cases, very inspiring. I, for instance, never thought I'd see the time when a Cheeto could become president. I mean, president of the Frito-Lay Corporation, sure. But an elected position? A victory for processed foods! Out with the vegetable gardens, in with the snack machines! Wait, not that kind of orange finger food? Oh. Oh, well... nevermind. Back to what I was saying about inspiration. I mean, hey--I'm in my forties. I act One's time period can be such a bother, don't you think? Or, in some cases, very inspiring. I, for instance, never thought I'd see the time when a Cheeto could become president. I mean, president of the Frito-Lay Corporation, sure. But an elected position? A victory for processed foods! Out with the vegetable gardens, in with the snack machines! Wait, not that kind of orange finger food? Oh. Oh, well... nevermind. Back to what I was saying about inspiration. I mean, hey--I'm in my forties. I actually had a grandmother who referred to black Americans as 'coloreds.' Think about the sea of societal change iin this time period, from the court case upholding desegregating schools in 1954 (way to go, independent Justice Branch!) to an actual African-American President of the U.S. in 2008. That's pretty amazing. Sometimes I think I'm in the right epoch, and other times I don't. I mean, processed snack foods--gross. Take Agatha Christie's A Caribbean Mystery, for instance. If only we could have left a bunch of her era's prejudices and populist ideas out of the book, it'd be much more tolerable. Did we need to have the social commentary on the marriage and procreative habits of the islanders? Not necessary to the plot in the least, and yet it gets mentioned a number of times, at least four or five, I should think. Along with the weird psychoanalysis of women in general. Thank goodness we're modern enough at this point to have a discussion about sex versus love, as well as treat adultery as not that shocking. Skip those retro bits and you have a delightful mystery in a beautiful setting, although one can't help wish--just a little bit, says Miss Marple--for some actual English weather (not me, though. I can totally not wish for English weather). Dear Raymond has sent Miss Marble on an island vacation, to rest her rheumatism and test her skills. Not long after Major is telling her a story about a murderer, he himself it found dead. Mon dieu! Wait, wrong character. But Miss Marple is too genteel to use exclamatory phrases. It's a gentle kind of narrative at first, where Miss Marple looks back on life, human nature, the challenges of aging, and picks apart the relationships of the other guests at the resort. Surprising to me were the short bits that included a third-person perspective of another couple of characters. It was obvious Christie was using it to build suspense and as a red herring, but I was a bit surprised to note such a cheap trick. Ah well. It really was a fun little story, with some interesting twists and a multiple body count to keep the reader in a state of fear. The resort proved to be a typical Christie setting of the isolated manor house/guests, leading to a limited pool of suspects. This one, I remembered reading before, so I can't say whether it surprised. But I enjoyed it and polished it off quickly.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This mystery sees Miss Marple relocated from her usual setting, of villages and vicarages, and deposited on a Caribbean holiday by nephew Raymond. The preceding winter had seen Miss Marple suffering from pneumonia and, with sunshine advised to aid her recovery, she is treated to a stay at the Golden Palm Hotel in St Honore, Trinidad. The hotel has been taking over by a young couple, Molly and Tim Kendal, who are keen to keep returning guests happy and ‘make a go’ of it. Among the guests are the This mystery sees Miss Marple relocated from her usual setting, of villages and vicarages, and deposited on a Caribbean holiday by nephew Raymond. The preceding winter had seen Miss Marple suffering from pneumonia and, with sunshine advised to aid her recovery, she is treated to a stay at the Golden Palm Hotel in St Honore, Trinidad. The hotel has been taking over by a young couple, Molly and Tim Kendal, who are keen to keep returning guests happy and ‘make a go’ of it. Among the guests are the wealthy Mr Rafiel, attended by assistant Esther Waters and valet/masseur Arthur Jackson, Canon Prescott and his sister, Dr Graham, Major Palgrave and two married couples – Colonel Edward Hillingdon and wife, Evelyn, and Greg and Lucky Dyson. Major Palgrave is the type of elderly man who loves to tell stories about his past and Miss Marple is listening to him one day when he tells her about a murderer and, shortly afterwards, he is found dead… Truth be told, Miss Marple has been finding her Caribbean holiday slightly monotonous, even without Major Palgrave’s interminable tales. When there are more odd happenings on the island, Miss Marple teams up with Mr Rafiel to investigate. This is an enjoyable mystery, although it is not one of Christie’s best plots and Miss Marple suffers from a lack of her usual sounding boards and cast of village characters. If you enjoy this, Mr Rafiel is mentioned in a further mystery, “Nemesis.”

  6. 4 out of 5

    Simona Bartolotta

    “She had one weapon and one weapon only, and that was conversation.” It fell rather flat in comparison to other Christie's works, but 1) you can't really blame Miss Marple for not being Hercule Poirot and 2) you can't really blame anyone for not being Hercule Poirot. They try, they do, but it's not their fault if they fail. The same goes for the characters/suspects. I don't know, it's as if Miss Marple makes everything duller, and Poirot everything shinier. I can't help feeling this difference an “She had one weapon and one weapon only, and that was conversation.” It fell rather flat in comparison to other Christie's works, but 1) you can't really blame Miss Marple for not being Hercule Poirot and 2) you can't really blame anyone for not being Hercule Poirot. They try, they do, but it's not their fault if they fail. The same goes for the characters/suspects. I don't know, it's as if Miss Marple makes everything duller, and Poirot everything shinier. I can't help feeling this difference and it's not my fault either. But Mr. Rafiel was everything. A couple of decades younger, and I'd have wanted him to propose to Miss Marple. Scratch that, I wanted him to propose and that's it. Their banter was cute and fun, and definitely unexpected. “If you knew what you looked like that night with that fluffy pink wool all round your head, standing there and saying you were Nemesis! I'll never forget it!”

  7. 4 out of 5

    Moonlight Reader

    I read this one for the "overseas travel" square because it gets Miss Marple out of St. Mary's Mead on a long vacation to the sunny climes of the West Indies. As is often the case with Christie, the reader must, rather uncomfortably, wade through some casual racism/colonialism/sexism to enjoy the mystery. I don't think that this is one of Christie's best, though. Her mysteries often rely strongly on coincidence, but this one takes the use of coincidence to a whole new level of ridiculously unbeli I read this one for the "overseas travel" square because it gets Miss Marple out of St. Mary's Mead on a long vacation to the sunny climes of the West Indies. As is often the case with Christie, the reader must, rather uncomfortably, wade through some casual racism/colonialism/sexism to enjoy the mystery. I don't think that this is one of Christie's best, though. Her mysteries often rely strongly on coincidence, but this one takes the use of coincidence to a whole new level of ridiculously unbelievable. I did enjoy the introduction to Mr. Rafiel, and would've liked to hear more about him. He made a nice counterpoint to Miss Marple.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    Another excellent Miss Marple book, and although I have seen the Joan Hickson TV adaptation, I cannot remember ever having read the book. I really enjoyed it and liked the introduction of Mr Rafiel, who I know we will see later. I'm really enjoying this whole challenge and we still have a good few to go.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

    Love Agatha! Miss Marple, yay! Since she's not at home, she has to work harder to be taken seriously. This time, for once, I thought I had the murderer figured out. Nope, wrong again. Reread... Just got one question; how did she get rich nephews who buy her Caribbean vacations? (Jealous me)😎

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lotte

    A lovely mystery that started slow and then took some surprising twists and turns near the end.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    Again, a fantastic literary sleight of hand where the clues are paraded before one's eyes - yet that one crucial piece of misdirection fools one till the end.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    "If anybody had been there to observe the gentle-looking elderly lady who stood meditatively on the loggia outside her bungalow, they would have thought she had nothing more on her mind than deliberation on how to arrange her time that day. But that gentle old lady was deliberating quite other matters. She was in a militant mood." Miss Jane Marple is visiting the Golden Palm resort on the St Honore Island of the Caribbean. Being concerned for her health, her nephew Raymond paid for his aunt to spe "If anybody had been there to observe the gentle-looking elderly lady who stood meditatively on the loggia outside her bungalow, they would have thought she had nothing more on her mind than deliberation on how to arrange her time that day. But that gentle old lady was deliberating quite other matters. She was in a militant mood." Miss Jane Marple is visiting the Golden Palm resort on the St Honore Island of the Caribbean. Being concerned for her health, her nephew Raymond paid for his aunt to spend some time in the sun. While Miss Marple's rheumatism is improving, she finds her stay, while perfectly lovely rather dull. During a conversation with Major Palgrave, another one of the guests, he mentions that he knows of a set murders and has a picture of the culprit and would Miss Marple want to see it. Before she can answer, the major catches sight of someone and puts the picture away. The next day he is dead. Eager to discover the culprit, Miss Marple is on the case. After reading some books with heavier subject matters, this book was just the breath of fresh air I needed. Miss Marple is getting older but her deduction skills are not diminishing. The resort is a relaxing place but nothing much happens. Miss Marple misses the happenings of St Mary Mead. To fill her time she talks to the rest of the guests. Major Palgrave is a man with plenty of stories but one sticks out in particular, the one of the murders. When the major is about to show the picture of the culprit, he puts it away. When found dead the next day, Miss Marple knows there had to be something to his story. This was a multi-layered narrative with plenty of red herrings and a cast of memorable characters (Jason Rafiel standsout a bit more for me). Miss Marple is absolutely fabulous and I simply can not picture her knitting on the beach. Originally published in 1964, ths installment of the series is fun and entertaining but also a clever whodunit. I am getting close to finishing this series and that makes me quite sad. Until then, though, I will enjoy the adventures of this great lady.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    “It's all very well to talk like that,” said Mr. Rafiel. “We, you say? What do you think I can do about it? I can't even walk without help. How can you and I set about preventing a murder? You're about a hundred and I'm a broken-up old crock.” Humour is probably not something people associate with Agatha Christie but she did have plenty of it, and used it usually when portraying silly and arrogant people. A Caribbean Mystery sees our lovely Ms Marple in the West Indies, where nothing seems to ha “It's all very well to talk like that,” said Mr. Rafiel. “We, you say? What do you think I can do about it? I can't even walk without help. How can you and I set about preventing a murder? You're about a hundred and I'm a broken-up old crock.” Humour is probably not something people associate with Agatha Christie but she did have plenty of it, and used it usually when portraying silly and arrogant people. A Caribbean Mystery sees our lovely Ms Marple in the West Indies, where nothing seems to happen when compared to St Mary's Mead, until of course there is a murder, and everyone is a potential suspect. Many red herrings take us on a variety of paths, but this time a clue is given near the beginning, which will allow some readers to actually find out who is the murderer by the end. That is if you don't let yourself be lead all over the place by our manipulative author. I guess that Robert Thorogood, creator of Death In Paradise tv series and novels, had this book in mind :O)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I was sick this week, so it was a good job I was given a pack of Miss Marples for Christmas. They made for the perfect sick books. None of them were amazing, they were late Miss Marple, but they all had a mystery my addled fog brain couldn’t get and I continue to love Miss Marple as a symbol of women who are overlooked and underrated on the basis of appearance, age and stereotypes. I do have to mention that this particular one has some racist remarks made by a few characters about the black resi I was sick this week, so it was a good job I was given a pack of Miss Marples for Christmas. They made for the perfect sick books. None of them were amazing, they were late Miss Marple, but they all had a mystery my addled fog brain couldn’t get and I continue to love Miss Marple as a symbol of women who are overlooked and underrated on the basis of appearance, age and stereotypes. I do have to mention that this particular one has some racist remarks made by a few characters about the black residents of the island this takes place on, which jolted me out of the narrative each time it happened, especially since it was repeated past the point of “here is this character saying an awful thing so you know they are bad”, into some direct author descriptions and comments made by characters we’re not supposed to hate. Time and place, of course, but a blot on an otherwise perfectly acceptable mystery in 2017.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Verena

    My first encounter with Agatha Christie and I was pleasantly surprised. It was a quick easy read and the mystery kept me guessing until the final reveal. Will pick up another of her books soon, perfect size and length to fit in my handbag anywhere :)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Beckham

    I rather suspect that Agatha Christie – aged in her mid-seventies – took a holiday at the Colony Club, Barbados – and from the anonymity of her deckchair secretly wrote the plot for A Caribbean Mystery (1964), through the watchful eyes of her alter ego, Miss Marple. It’s not the strongest of her novels – and perhaps lacks the depth and texture of her classics, which are set in more familiar surroundings and society. But nonetheless – it tricks you with all her customary guile. I must remember – w I rather suspect that Agatha Christie – aged in her mid-seventies – took a holiday at the Colony Club, Barbados – and from the anonymity of her deckchair secretly wrote the plot for A Caribbean Mystery (1964), through the watchful eyes of her alter ego, Miss Marple. It’s not the strongest of her novels – and perhaps lacks the depth and texture of her classics, which are set in more familiar surroundings and society. But nonetheless – it tricks you with all her customary guile. I must remember – when she mentions the Major’s glass eye, she does it for a reason! Miss Marple, despite her advancing years – is present throughout – and plays a surprisingly active role. There is a hilarious scene early on, when she tells unashamedly a pack of white lies in order to loosen the tongues of her unsuspecting victims. The plot itself is probably a tad one-dimensional, and requires some suspension of disbelief as it reaches its climax, but there’s no arguing with the logic – just kicking yourself that you couldn’t fathom it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    Book 9 in the Miss Marple Challenge. Old Major Palgrave liked to regale others with stories of his past―his time in Kenya, India, experience with a tiger, and one which he knew of through an acquaintance, of a murderer. His listeners unfortunately didn’t find his tales quite so interesting as he did himself and one listener in particular, a fellow guest at a hotel in the Caribbean was lost in her own thoughts while hearing what the Major said only in fits and snatches. And when he was about to s Book 9 in the Miss Marple Challenge. Old Major Palgrave liked to regale others with stories of his past―his time in Kenya, India, experience with a tiger, and one which he knew of through an acquaintance, of a murderer. His listeners unfortunately didn’t find his tales quite so interesting as he did himself and one listener in particular, a fellow guest at a hotel in the Caribbean was lost in her own thoughts while hearing what the Major said only in fits and snatches. And when he was about to show her a picture of the murderer, something stopped him from doing so. But when the Major ends up dead the very next morning, this particular listener, Miss Marple who is in the West Indies where her nephew Raymond West has sent her for a vacation has to try to remember all she heard. For although his death appears natural, Miss Marple isn’t quite satisfied. Her suspicions are soon proved right when another body is found. But what had the Major’s story been about? And who made him stop midway? Miss Marple has to try and remember as much as she can of what the Major told her while looking into fellow guests at the hotel. What makes this case particularly difficult for her is that she is so far from home, and from the people who usually take her opinion seriously, Sir Henry Clithering and Inspector Craddock among them. But she does find help in old Mr Rafiel, a rather crotchety but wealthy gentlemen staying in one of the bungalows at the hotel. He doesn’t have much of an opinion of old ladies but once he begins to really converse with Miss Marple, and realises she has brains, his attitude changes and he jumps in to help solve the mystery. This was one I’d read before and remembered the solution to pretty well but there were a few elements that I had forgotten. It doesn’t have as many plot twists or red-herrings as some of AC’s others (though there are the complexities and twists of human relationships). The confusion she tries to create about whether the murderer is a man or woman doesn’t really work, because while Miss Marple may not have heard all of the Major’s story, the reader has (read it, that is). (It has a few non-PC bits as well.) The puzzle, though, isn’t a very easy one to solve. Part of the main storyline reminded me a little of an old Hollywood film―I won’t say which or it will spoil the plot. This wasn’t among my favourite Miss Marple books but I did quite enjoy reading it. Three and a half stars.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mara

    For some reason, I assumed I wouldn't like this one as much the twentieth go around, but... yeah. Really enjoyed it all over again! Because this was one of the first audio books I ever had, I've revisited this dozens of times over the years. There's something about the final reveal in this one that feels especially satisfying to me, though I find that some of the book lags a bit

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bert

    Lovely murder mystery, old people rule.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kim Kaso

    And another Agatha Christie done for my quest to read (& reread) all of her books. I saw the Mystery! production within the last year or two. This one was a little "fish out of water" for Miss M, sent on a Caribbean vacation by her nephew. It took her a bit to get her feet under her, she had so many strangers to sort out among her fellow guests and the owners and staff of the hotel. No supporting cast from her beloved St. Mary's Mead, no one who knows she has a razor sharp mind when it comes And another Agatha Christie done for my quest to read (& reread) all of her books. I saw the Mystery! production within the last year or two. This one was a little "fish out of water" for Miss M, sent on a Caribbean vacation by her nephew. It took her a bit to get her feet under her, she had so many strangers to sort out among her fellow guests and the owners and staff of the hotel. No supporting cast from her beloved St. Mary's Mead, no one who knows she has a razor sharp mind when it comes to murder and the darkness that lurks beneath the good manners. A solid 4.5 stars for me, very enjoyable. A heroine for all of us who knit and quietly observe the world and are underestimated.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carina

    loving Agathas sweet, bloody crimes a lot! if you think you know who did it - there will be someone you did not even consider being the killer. She fools me every time!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anneta

    A miss Marple mystery in the Caribbean.A short book with an interesting story that did not impress me very much,however i generally enjoyed it,only it felt a bit rushed.Maybe it's the translation.I read it in greek and it felt like some parts of the book were shortened,not sure about that last one but i got this feeling while reading.Three stars from me!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    WOW I ACTUALLY PREDICTED THE ENDING. for like the first time ever, I guessed the murderer correctly in an Agatha Christie novel. :D :D also, I love Miss Marple so much, xD.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    A Carribean Mystery is one of the Miss Marple mysteries. Although Agatha Christie herself preferred Miss Marple to Poirot, I, like many of her readers, prefer Monsieur Poirot. Why? I have no idea. I certainly started reading his mysteries first, and I think it's also because he amuses me more than Miss Marple. But then again, I've only read, what, two books involving her. Basically, the plot involves Miss Marple coming across as suspicious death, which starts to escalate. After reading this book A Carribean Mystery is one of the Miss Marple mysteries. Although Agatha Christie herself preferred Miss Marple to Poirot, I, like many of her readers, prefer Monsieur Poirot. Why? I have no idea. I certainly started reading his mysteries first, and I think it's also because he amuses me more than Miss Marple. But then again, I've only read, what, two books involving her. Basically, the plot involves Miss Marple coming across as suspicious death, which starts to escalate. After reading this book, I'm actually really interested in reading the other books involving her. Miss Marple is on smart lady. Her weapon of choice is her conversational talents and that is something she has in spades. While there aren't any direct interrogations, the winding, conversational style is charming. Well, there isn't much to say about this book. It's fairly short and a really quick read. And of course, being written by Agatha Christie, classifies as a cozy. But in an ironical fashion, the book also talks about the very things a cozy is supposed to avoid. Miss Marple muses on how the she is expected to be ignorant about things, because her nephew considers her old. But she remembers show even in small villages, the underside of life can be seen, and some are things that even the most modern authors haven't written about (or thought off). And it's ironic how she, as a first-rate detective, is considered to be doubly sheltered because she is a. a woman and b. from the older class. It seems that Christie was having a little subtle laugh at the societal norms of her time. And here are two quotes to sum up what I've been saying: "Though really rural life was far from idyllic. People like Raymond were so ignorant. In the course of her duties at the country parish, Jane Marple had acquired quite a comprehensive knowledge of the facts of rural life. She had no urge to talk about them, far less to write about them - but she knew them. Plenty of sex, natural and unnatural. Rape, incest, perversion of all kinds. (Some kinds, indeed, that even the clever young men from Oxford who wrote books didn't seem to have heard about." " 'I don't really feel that I've got sufficient experience to judge. I'm afraid I've led a rather sheltered life'. 'And so you should, dear lady, so you should,' cried Major Palgrave gallantly." (First published at http://www.allsortsofbooks.blogspot.com/...)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eli Easton

    Read for the Lifetime Reading Challenge (1964). I've always been a fan of Agatha Christie, but it's been at least fifteen years since I read one of her novels. I always forget just how much I enjoy them. I adore her writing style. She has very efficient, compact prose that nevertheless packs a dry, witty wallop. I listened to the audio of this book from narrator Emilia Fox, who is brilliant. She does voices for all the characters and really brings the story to life. I could listen to a dozen more Read for the Lifetime Reading Challenge (1964). I've always been a fan of Agatha Christie, but it's been at least fifteen years since I read one of her novels. I always forget just how much I enjoy them. I adore her writing style. She has very efficient, compact prose that nevertheless packs a dry, witty wallop. I listened to the audio of this book from narrator Emilia Fox, who is brilliant. She does voices for all the characters and really brings the story to life. I could listen to a dozen more Agatha Christie's read by her. This isn't AC's finest mystery plot line, but it's a great read nonetheless. Miss Jane Marple has traveled to the West Indies on vacation thanks to her generous nephew. Of course, she gets involved with a murder. There's a wonderful vintage feeling about the story, with well off English people spending months on holiday, canons, business tycoons, bird watchers and naturalists, the lower class secretaries and masseurs and the West Indies natives, which viewed from an imperialist England uber non-PC perspective. As for the mystery, there are red herrings galore among the group of suspects on the island. Reading an Agatha Christie to me isn't so much about the mystery as it is being immersed in that classic British world and enjoying her fine prose and fantastic characterizations. She'll always be 5 star to me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anneta

    A miss Marple mystery in the Caribbean.A short book with an interesting story that did not impress me very much,however i generally enjoyed it,only it felt a bit rushed.Maybe it's the translation.I read it in greek and it felt like some parts of the book were shortened,not sure about that last one but i got this feeling while reading.Three stars from me!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    A typical Agatha Christie mystery - a light, fun read but definitely following a very familiar formula. The fun is in guessing which of the characters is not who they seem to be because that will be your murderer. And the author likes to lead you astray with 'red herrings'! Miss Marple is always a delightful detective and I always enjoy the means she uses to get her own way.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    3.5* for this audiobook edition...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Maya's bookshelves

    This is my first Agatha Christie book I read. And I really don't know how to feel. Like it was good and enjoyable but i was not very impressed by it. I pretty much grew up watching Agatha Christie's movie/tv show adaptations so i had some high expectations but for some reason I was not satisfied. But I would definitelly give her books another chance!

  30. 5 out of 5

    twice_baked✌️

    Aw, this was an amazing book. I love it so so much. My favorite Miss Marple is Bertram's Hotel, but I think this one might be better - or at least tied, I can't decide. Whew, kay. Stuff in bold is the only stuff you have to have to read to get anything out of this review so if you want to go fast and just skim, only read the stuff in bold. PROS about this book. - Miss Marple isn't irritating like she is in other ones. She's less fluttery and doesn't constantly put down her talents and pretend she Aw, this was an amazing book. I love it so so much. My favorite Miss Marple is Bertram's Hotel, but I think this one might be better - or at least tied, I can't decide. Whew, kay. Stuff in bold is the only stuff you have to have to read to get anything out of this review so if you want to go fast and just skim, only read the stuff in bold. PROS about this book. - Miss Marple isn't irritating like she is in other ones. She's less fluttery and doesn't constantly put down her talents and pretend she knows nothing. She actually goes and DOES stuff - and tries to track down the murderer. - I loved almost all of the characters. Almost. I loved Mr. Rafiel, I loved Miss Prescott, I loved Jackson, I loved Evelyn Hillingdon, I loved Molly Kendal, I loved Tim Kendal, I loved Dr. Graham... - The married couples in this book actually acted like married couples (other than the Dysons). The Kendals actually seemed like what a couple in love would act like, they just really loved each other and you could tell - they would tease and laugh and they would show concern for one another and comfort one another. They wouldn't be over-the-top with their love, they were just a calm and steady couple and I really liked how normal they seemed. - I loved Mr. Rafiel and how straight and to-the-point he was. He didn't mince words and I appreciated that. A lot of times he voiced what I was thinking - when Miss Marple says "and I might be wrong but..." he points out, "but you don't think you are, do you?" which is nice because so many times I roll my eyes for that reason. Miss Marple says ohh I'm probably not that smart and I'm like oh come on how many murders have you solved by down? Don't give me this crap about your abilities. And Mr. Rafiel was funny - and he's willing to do something to stop a murderer, I loved how whole-heartedly he jumped into tracking someone down and figuring it out. - It was creepy at times, like all Agatha Christies. She's a pro at writing creepily, with lots of dashes and periods and italics. - I was honestly so confused along with them when they were trying to figure it out and it was a good confused. It's like when you have a puzzle and you think you got some of the answers wrong so you try to figure it out and in the end you realize what's wrong and can put everything together and it's so satisfying in the end - that's what this was like. It was super confusing and then in the end it was like "oh right, wow that is so cool". It was so much fun reading because things kept happening that would complicate it and you would be like dude they could totally be the murderer! and you're convinced that it is. And then something else happens and you're like wait man THEY are the murderers!? and then something happens and you're like AHA THAT ONE is the murderer! and so on. And I love that - things kept happening that would jumble everything up. - I love how as soon as Miss Marple saw the light, she jumped into action, it was so much fun watching her do her thing like because she was on it and for an old lady she has a lot of get up and go. - I liked all the action. There was 0 interrogations because Miss Marple aint about that detective life. - I liked that it happened on a resort, that's a relaxing and aesthetic place to read about lol. - I appreciated that even though the murders happened there, the Kendals didn't roll over and die and that even at the end of the book after a lot of traumatic things have happened, that they're still there, running it, even though they risked their lives because the murderer was going around trying to kill. A lot of books (or, Agatha Christies) something happens at a resort or hotel or house and the people who own it end up moving away and selling the place and it's sad because it's like guys it wasn't even like you were the murderer or like you almost got killed. But in this story Molly almost does and she still sticks around and I love how much backbone they have as a couple. - I love how much backbone Molly has, too, btw. - I love Jackson and how willing he is to work to find the murderer and also I love that he was trying to figure out on his own accord who the murderer was, even though he wasn't getting paid for that, that he was still going around trying to track down who it was so that no more people died. I loved that he noticed, and was a really good observer, and realized what was going on and realized what was fishy about this thing or that thing. It made me appreciate him even more when he was so smooth about explaining everything - like, he didn't give away that he was trying to find out what was going on, but he did tell Miss Marple something (when she caught him) that helped her solve the mystery and that helped him solve what was going on (eg, he noticed the way someone was acting and thought it looked like maybe another person was trying to poison them, so he went to find out and it like holla man 🙌🙌). Though honestly not too sure if at the end of the book he actually knew what was going on or if he just had an idea and it never got around to taking root. - I really really liked Miss Prescott being willing to talk about what was going on even if Canon Prescott wasn't willing to. Miss Prescott just had a really good personality for a parson's sister. Agatha Christie normally makes them dowdy and frumpy and not much help, and way too dried up and old-maidish and spinster-like, but thankfully that is not Miss Prescott. She wants to talk about the murder just as much as the next guy - and is willing to weed out who it could be. - It was so so nice how action-packed it was, or have I already mentioned that, idk I'm too lazy to go back and find out. - I loved how the ending really is sad which doesn't happen with v many Agatha Christies though I just read one like this (They Do It With Mirrors) and I love when she makes the ending sad. It makes me sad and she does a good job. And I also love the epilogue to this book - how everyone has more or less gotten what they deserved and that everybody's more or less happy with their life...that things are on the up and up (cuz you can't get much worse than murder amiright). Actually I went to track down which Agatha Christie I thought was sad, and as I was reading the review I gave for They Do It With Mirrors, I realized it was almost identical to this book (well, that you could use that review as a review for this book). - PLOT TWISTERRS MAN BABY WHOO GET THOSE PLOT TWISTERS ON. I just love plot twisters and ofc it's not an Agatha Christie murder mystery without one (or five). - The murderer's backstory/history was really interesting. Like, the story behind the story. The beginning of how it all came about - the prequel, I guess it would be. The prequel of the person's crime history was interesting. That doesn't make sense - basically, the way s/he murders is interesting, k? - I don't know what to call this, but I think I'll stick with: the reason for why he was murdered was interesting - see, after he tells this rambling story about seeing a murderer once, he looks up and sees who he thinks is the murderer and realizes crap so he starts talking about something else and that's where it all starts because the next morning he's found dead and people assume he was old so duh but Miss Marple aint so shur bou dat. < idk I just felt like doing that. CONS about this book. - I kind of guessed the murderer. Which was sad. But I didn't totally, I just thought what s/he did was a little bit odd in their position, and I was like hmm...but it was a chapter before the reader found out for sure who it was so though it wasn't a huge surprise, it was a little bit of a surprise since it had only just occurred to me. - CRAAAAAP I liked the murderer AGAIN man! I always do that to myself and it's not fair to the readers to actually appreciate/like the murderer! I like those where you appreciate that s/he picked the one s/he picked, but this wasn't really like that, you didn't totally know the murdered person, you just knew they were kind of a bore to be around. So it wasn't like I appreciated what the murderer had done, it was just that I liked the character and how they acted and it was sad that they were guilty. (but I actually kind of like liking the murderer so don't let that turn you off - this book is 100% worth the read.) - It never totally resolved the question about a character who was kind of a snoop - like, they were looking through someone's papers and it never totally explained why. Like, the person said it was probably because they wanted to see if that person was going to leave them anything in their will, but it never says for sure that that's why. And by the end of the book, you really appreciate the person so ig that means they were just curious but still, it was a little bit odd. I didn't really mind, though. books where I (unintentionally) like the murderer. Man in the Brown Suit Murder of Roger Ackroyd Endless Night Mystery of the Blue Train Pocketful of Rye Murder on the Orient Express A Caribbean Mystery

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.