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Girls on the Verge

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A powerful, timely coming-of-age story about a young woman from Texas who goes on a road trip with two friends to get an abortion, from award-winning author Sharon Biggs Waller. Camille couldn't be having a better summer. But on the very night she learns she got into a prestigious theater program, she also finds out she’s pregnant. She definitely can’t tell her parents. And A powerful, timely coming-of-age story about a young woman from Texas who goes on a road trip with two friends to get an abortion, from award-winning author Sharon Biggs Waller. Camille couldn't be having a better summer. But on the very night she learns she got into a prestigious theater program, she also finds out she’s pregnant. She definitely can’t tell her parents. And her best friend, Bea, doesn’t agree with the decision Camille has made. Camille is forced to try to solve her problem alone . . . and the system is very much working against her. At her most vulnerable, Camille reaches out to Annabelle Ponsonby, a girl she only barely knows from the theater. Happily, Annabelle agrees to drive her wherever she needs to go. And in a last-minute change of heart, Bea decides to come with. Girls on the Verge is an incredibly timely novel about a woman’s right to choose. Sharon Biggs Waller brings to life a narrative that has to continue to fight for its right to be told, and honored.


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A powerful, timely coming-of-age story about a young woman from Texas who goes on a road trip with two friends to get an abortion, from award-winning author Sharon Biggs Waller. Camille couldn't be having a better summer. But on the very night she learns she got into a prestigious theater program, she also finds out she’s pregnant. She definitely can’t tell her parents. And A powerful, timely coming-of-age story about a young woman from Texas who goes on a road trip with two friends to get an abortion, from award-winning author Sharon Biggs Waller. Camille couldn't be having a better summer. But on the very night she learns she got into a prestigious theater program, she also finds out she’s pregnant. She definitely can’t tell her parents. And her best friend, Bea, doesn’t agree with the decision Camille has made. Camille is forced to try to solve her problem alone . . . and the system is very much working against her. At her most vulnerable, Camille reaches out to Annabelle Ponsonby, a girl she only barely knows from the theater. Happily, Annabelle agrees to drive her wherever she needs to go. And in a last-minute change of heart, Bea decides to come with. Girls on the Verge is an incredibly timely novel about a woman’s right to choose. Sharon Biggs Waller brings to life a narrative that has to continue to fight for its right to be told, and honored.

30 review for Girls on the Verge

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    This book was absolutely incredible. I hardcore cried while reading this one because it opened my eyes up so much more to the struggles women face every day to have control over their own bodies. It may only be February but I predict that this book will end up in my top 5 of the year because it hit me SO hard. What a devastatingly important book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    I look like I've been through a battle and lived to talk about it. Out of all of the important sociopolitical topics covered in YA over the last few years, one thing I have constantly wished to see more portrayals of in literature is pro-choice discussions about women doing what needs to be done to retain control of their own bodies. In the last few months, there has been so much going on here in the US regarding reproductive rights that Girls on the Verge is exactly what we needed to see burst I look like I've been through a battle and lived to talk about it. Out of all of the important sociopolitical topics covered in YA over the last few years, one thing I have constantly wished to see more portrayals of in literature is pro-choice discussions about women doing what needs to be done to retain control of their own bodies. In the last few months, there has been so much going on here in the US regarding reproductive rights that Girls on the Verge is exactly what we needed to see burst onto the scene, and it couldn't have come at a better time. Girls on the Verge has so many fantastic points fit into this powerful little story, such as: • The discussion revolving around the fact that birth control isn't flawless and the "just use protection!" argument isn't always enough • The overarching theme of girls supporting girls and learning how to look past their own biases to take care of each other (because supporting a woman's right to choose doesn't have to mean you'd make the same choice yourself) • The delightfully well-crafted references to current political goings-on (I died a little of joy every time Wendy Davis was mentioned!) On top of all of that, though, it's just such a fun story to read. Sure, it tackles very heavy and tough topics, and it definitely made me emotional a few times (mostly just enraged by the ridiculous state of our society right now), but I also laughed so hard at so many of the exchanges between Camille, Bea, and Annabelle. These girls are hilarious and feel so real and genuine; even in little ways, they just feel human, like the way one of them always piped up with "I'll Google it!" when they were curious about the tiniest little thing — that's a very 'me' thing and I loved it. Their friendships are so delightful and lovable and I honestly, truly cherished every single page of Girls on the Verge and hope that it gets the attention it deserves. ♥ P.S. Can I just say this would make an AMAZING teen film adaptation? Get on it, Netflix! All quotes come from an advance copy and may not match the final release. Thank you so much to Henry Holt and Co. for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lola

    4.5 stars. It’s not easy to take a controversial topic, like abortion in this case, and create a not only meaningful but also engaging, refreshing and satisfying story that highlights this subject and makes you think critically about it. Yet the author succeeded. Whenever I pick up a book with a heavy theme, I brace myself and oftentimes expect to cry so I choose a ‘‘right moment’’ to read it. But the beautiful truth here is that every moment is the right one for GIRLS ON THE VERGE. It’s ugly in 4.5 stars. It’s not easy to take a controversial topic, like abortion in this case, and create a not only meaningful but also engaging, refreshing and satisfying story that highlights this subject and makes you think critically about it. Yet the author succeeded. Whenever I pick up a book with a heavy theme, I brace myself and oftentimes expect to cry so I choose a ‘‘right moment’’ to read it. But the beautiful truth here is that every moment is the right one for GIRLS ON THE VERGE. It’s ugly in the sense that women should have complete control over their own bodies and anyone who says otherwise has no respect for the female gender. Texas certainly has no respect for women if it doesn’t offer Camille a real choice between keeping her baby and having an abortion. She has to travel far in order to have a semblance of a choice and the road is harsh, full of obstacles and people who would rather make the choice for her. Luckily, she has two friends to support her be on her side whatever happens. There are many flashbacks that help understand how Camille ended up making the decision to terminate her pregnancy by leaving her theatre program with someone she never thought she would grow close to and her very religious best friend who initially pushed her toward having a baby. It’s a truly remarkably-told tale. It’s short because the author does not bother with unnecessary description or scenes and she clearly carefully planned the storyline because it works and it’s hard to put down. In a perfect world, everyone would be reading this book and thinking more about the right to choose for a woman. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  4. 4 out of 5

    preoccupiedbybooks

    An important, timely and well written story about a woman's right to choose IMPORTANT NOTE: I AM EXTREMELY PRO-CHOICE AND MY REVIEW REFLECTS THIS. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE THEN PLEASE STOP READING, AND DO NOT COMMENT. Camille, a teenager living in Texas found out that she was pregnant on the same night that she found out that she had got into an amazing theatre programme. She couldn't tell her parents, her best friend reacted badly to the news, so she had to try to face it all alone. Everything, and ev An important, timely and well written story about a woman's right to choose IMPORTANT NOTE: I AM EXTREMELY PRO-CHOICE AND MY REVIEW REFLECTS THIS. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE THEN PLEASE STOP READING, AND DO NOT COMMENT. Camille, a teenager living in Texas found out that she was pregnant on the same night that she found out that she had got into an amazing theatre programme. She couldn't tell her parents, her best friend reacted badly to the news, so she had to try to face it all alone. Everything, and everyone was against her. Camille then, at her most vulnerable reached out to Annabelle, a girl she barely knew to help her get an abortion. At the last moment, her best friend Bea changed her mind and decided to go with them on the roadtrip. I loved this audiobook! It was really engaging from the word go. I could tell that it was based on actual facts, and Sharon Biggs Waller explained it all in the author's note at the end. She also listed organisations and their contact details to help you if you are in a similar situation to Camille. The characters were so authentic and real. I loved Camille and so wanted to reach out and help her! I loved the friendships that were formed and cemented with Annabelle and Bea during the road trip. Despite the heavy and sensitive topic, the book was fun, and had girls supporting each other despite their differences! Yess! 🙌The girls were so funny and adorable, I just wanted to protect them all! I applaud Sharon Biggs Waller for nailing such an important issue, whilst still creating such a great story! 👍 👍 👍 However, I hated the judgement that Camille faced. The revolting attitudes. It made me so angry, disgusted and sad! Now I'm not American. I live in the UK. We have a wide range of contraceptives available from multiple places here. They are free through the NHS! I do like how Girls on the Verge discussed that birth control is not 100% effective, but the truth is, if contraceptives are freely available, then there is less unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections. In the book, Camille had to order condoms online. The pregnancy tests were locked up, needing the pharmacist's permission to buy! That's crazy! I remember seeing condoms locked up in glass cases when I visited the USA and thought WTAF?!! That's going to be off-putting to so many people! The reason that this book attracted my attention, is because of all the law changes currently happening to do with women's body and sexual health in the USA. Yes it has even made it onto our news over here! In the UK abortion is legal everywhere except in NI. The abortion act in 1967 made it possible to legally have an abortion up to 23 weeks and 6 days into a pregnancy, and only beyond that for medical reasons. In the UK 1 in 3 women have an abortion in their lifetime. In the USA 1 in 4 women will have one by age 45. Making it illegal will not change that, It will just drive women to desperate measures, and put them in dangerous situations like Camille. In this country, you can get an abortion in 3 different ways. You can contact an abortion provider directly, get a referral through you doctor, or go to a family planning/contraception/sexual health clinic. The whole process will not take more than 2 weeks from your initial appointment up until your abortion. That is why I found this book so shocking! The things that Camille had to go through to get to the point of driving to the border for an abortion were appalling! I hate to think of anyone going through any of that, let alone a young girl. Imagine if that were your daughter, niece, sister, granddaughter or friend? The current US laws on abortion seem to moving and changing so quickly. This book was based on Texas in 2014, but since then Alabama has introduced ridiculous laws so obviously made by men, who do not understand pregnancy! Bottom line, is that a woman should be able to decide what she does with her body, and I cannot believe we are still having this conversation in 2019! Why are women still having to march for the rights to their own bodies in the 21st century?!! I understand that people have their own so called pro-life opinions on this matter, but do they have to shove it down other people's throats? The people who stand outside planned parenthood are deplorable. As if women who are going there aren't going through enough. Abortion isn't a decision that people make lightly, and no one knows what other people have been or are going through! Frankly it's no one else's business! In Girls on the Verge Camille was spoken to, and treated so badly. She was harshly judged, slut shamed and had no rights. The protesters, fake clinics, and the people in positions of power giving incorrect facts about pregnancy and abortion made me sick. It truly made me angry and so so very sad for her. Nevertheless, this book was empowering, full of hope and had a wonderful ending, and I'm so glad I read it! Camille was such a strong and determined young lady!Young people should definitely read this. In fact everyone should. We need to be talking more about sex, birth control, abortion, and shouldn't be shaming people. "Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always." (Brad Meltzer)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie Zantopoulos

    4.5 stars This book is too timely, sickly timely, for all that is happening in the United States as I sit down to write this review. More people making decisions for women and their bodies, telling that what is and isn't acceptable, and shaming those who are sexually active before they deem is "appropriate". In Girls on the Verge Camille is pregnant and knows, without any doubt in her mind, that she does not want the baby. No, she doesn't want to give it up for adoption, no she does not want to 4.5 stars This book is too timely, sickly timely, for all that is happening in the United States as I sit down to write this review. More people making decisions for women and their bodies, telling that what is and isn't acceptable, and shaming those who are sexually active before they deem is "appropriate". In Girls on the Verge Camille is pregnant and knows, without any doubt in her mind, that she does not want the baby. No, she doesn't want to give it up for adoption, no she does not want to hear the heartbeat, she wants an abortion. Camille lives in Texas and while abortion law and the control over women's bodies change constantly (honestly, I'm fighting pure hot anger right now) this book was written with the most up to date laws as possible at the time of writing. We follow Camille as she tries and struggles to do something as simple as buying a pregnancy test, her rebelious new friend Annabelle who won't let Camille go through this alone. Then there's Beatrice (whom I have a bit of a teeth grinding issue with) who is hyper religious and is struggling to be a friend to Camille when she's willfully "killing a baby". The whole religious girl can't support or understand a friend who doesn't want to be a teen mom trope...I'm not a fan. But, I understand it's Texas and that's a whole other world of religious devotion that my north east self just doesn't have to deal with. This book is maddening, heartbreaking, and just downright eye opening. LIving in Pennsylvania I don't have to deal with crap like that and there's a difference between knowing others do and reading the step by step trauma that girls in Texas (and states like it) go through. There isn't much more to say about this book, I'm not going to spoil the storyline for you, just know it's a raw look at the struggles, trauma, and heartache that women all over the world face just to have control of their own lives and bodies. It's hard to read at time, it pisses you right the hell off, and it also showcases the strength and resolve of girls, women, families, and friends. It's beautiful and it's important. I hope you'll read it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Madalyn (Novel Ink)

    4.5 stars. WOW; this is such a necessary book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jane (It'sJaneLindsey)

    4.5 stars. I’m so glad this book exists.

  8. 5 out of 5

    K.

    Trigger warnings: abortion, restrictive access to abortion, misogyny, car accident, slut shaming, pro-life bullshit, sanctimonious religious bullshit. 4.5 stars. This book was amazing and heartbreaking. This book was also rage-inducing. Basically, it's the story of a teenage girl living in Texas who's gotten pregnant and wants to get an abortion. Texas being Texas, that access is incredibly restricted and she's forced to go on a roadtrip to try and sort things out. This is, I think, a very impor Trigger warnings: abortion, restrictive access to abortion, misogyny, car accident, slut shaming, pro-life bullshit, sanctimonious religious bullshit. 4.5 stars. This book was amazing and heartbreaking. This book was also rage-inducing. Basically, it's the story of a teenage girl living in Texas who's gotten pregnant and wants to get an abortion. Texas being Texas, that access is incredibly restricted and she's forced to go on a roadtrip to try and sort things out. This is, I think, a very important book for showing how restricting reproductive rights (at one point, she can't even buy a pregnancy test because the male pharmacist gets all "As a Christian and a father, I'd be horrified if anyone sold my daughter a pregnancy test so I won't sell you one") doesn't actually stop abortion and instead just drives women to more and more desperate ends. The author is very frank about the difference that abortion has made in her own life, and I love that she included that at the end of the novel. My one small gripe is that it's a VERY short book and I wish it was 50-100 pages longer than it is so that the story didn't feel so rushed at times. In short: this book made me want to stab things but it was also amazing. Do with that information what you will.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    5 stars. So so powerful. I don't know if I can say that I enjoyed reading this? YES it was well written and YES I had a lot of fun with these characters, but this book made me so angry. Angry that society tells teenage girls that they aren't mature enough to make a decision about their own bodies or any woman in general, angry that men believe they can treat women the way that they did in this book and almost caused these girls to be injured, and angry that these young women had to drive hundreds 5 stars. So so powerful. I don't know if I can say that I enjoyed reading this? YES it was well written and YES I had a lot of fun with these characters, but this book made me so angry. Angry that society tells teenage girls that they aren't mature enough to make a decision about their own bodies or any woman in general, angry that men believe they can treat women the way that they did in this book and almost caused these girls to be injured, and angry that these young women had to drive hundreds of miles so that our main character could get an abortion. This book had me incredibly upset but not just because it's sad what they had to go through - but because i'm so frustrated that society refuses to give women the rights to their bodies. This book is sad, but it's also hopeful. Hopeful in the way that it makes me believe that reproductive rights will be full given back in the future, but there's no guarantee. GIRLS ON THE VERGE will definitely end up as a favorite of 2019 and something that I will reread at least once in the near future. This is a novel you aren't going to want to miss. TW: abortion

  10. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Laurey

    I finished this book yesterday but it was too topical with the Alabama abortion law. Anyhow, I want to give this book to everyone, especially if you are a young person, in the US, and especially a young women in Texas. Girls on the Verge is the story of 3 girls who go on a road trip to try and get their friend Camille an abortion because she is 17 and lives in Texas. Taking place in 2014 after Wendy Davis's famous 14 hour filibuster on the Texas State Senate floor. I've lived in Texas for the pa I finished this book yesterday but it was too topical with the Alabama abortion law. Anyhow, I want to give this book to everyone, especially if you are a young person, in the US, and especially a young women in Texas. Girls on the Verge is the story of 3 girls who go on a road trip to try and get their friend Camille an abortion because she is 17 and lives in Texas. Taking place in 2014 after Wendy Davis's famous 14 hour filibuster on the Texas State Senate floor. I've lived in Texas for the past 25+ years and accurate medicine based sex education is not provided. Camille was supposed to go to drama camp this summer, but after her first sexual encounter with an equally inexperienced boy she becomes pregnant. Camille and her friends set off for Mexico and during their road trip there are many obstacles in their way due to the misogyny and backwards mindset of the people she has sought out for help and counsel. Texas was a scary place in 2014, and even more so when it comes to a woman's right to choose. This book also provided practical information I think especially young women in the southwest should hear. Did you know that if you are 17 you can get an abortion in New Mexico without your parents knowing? Now you do!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Luupi "The Reading Queen"

    I need this book like now! *-*

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight . Wow wow wow this is an important book. As more women's rights are taken away across the U.S., Girls on the Verge shines a glaring spotlight on all the hypocrisy and injustice that accompanies each of these decisions.  And you might be thinking "hey, isn't this supposed to be a book review and not a political rant?", but you'd be wrong. Because it's inherently both. Books have a plethora You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight . Wow wow wow this is an important book. As more women's rights are taken away across the U.S., Girls on the Verge shines a glaring spotlight on all the hypocrisy and injustice that accompanies each of these decisions.  And you might be thinking "hey, isn't this supposed to be a book review and not a political rant?", but you'd be wrong. Because it's inherently both. Books have a plethora of purposes: To entertain, to shock, to elicit any number of feelings. But one of the purposes can, and should be, to make a social statement. Sharon Biggs Waller does that here, in a way that still makes for an appealing reading experience. The book is chock full of information that women in general but absolutely young women should know about their rights. It discusses such horrors as "crisis centers", which are in the business of trying to prey on scared young women in order to push their conservative Christian agenda. It talks about  the amount of people who will try to shove themselves into a woman's personal reproductive decision making. The vast differences in state laws are a big feature of the book, as are the variations in law when it comes to the time period in which a woman is allowed to seek an abortion, the methods she may use, and whether she needs consent. Which is obviously utter bullshit, because exactly zero of the people making said decisions are a woman and/or her physician. Girls on the Verge tackles this incredibly important topic, but it's also at its core a tremendously heartfelt story about female friendship and growing up. Camille doesn't always see eye to eye with her best friend since forever, Bea. Bea is staunchly religious and is appalled when she learns of Camille's decision. That is when Annabelle steps up to the plate to basically be the most awesome friend in the history of friendship. She's willing to help Camille at, quite literally, any cost. I don't want to go too in depth because this is a story you must read for yourself, and this is spoiler territory. But I promise that Annabelle is complete friend goals. Bea of course starts to come around a bit, and joins them on their journey. But make no mistake, she's going to have to grow a lot as a person if she deserves Camille's friendship. And to be clear, this isn't a bash on religion at all. It's a bash on using conservatism disguised as religion to judge other people. Which is kind of the antithesis of actual religion anyway, right? There's a slight romantic element, but to me it seemed like its purpose was not a focus on romance, but more a focus on how life doesn't end when you're faced with a really difficult hurdle. That you still deserve and can find love in all its forms. Also, if there's anything I love more in a book than roadtrips, it's a road trip to Mexico with three women who are journeying to find themselves. Bottom Line: You need to read this book, appreciate its strong feminist message, then you need to make everyone you know read it. And then, you know, get out there and help change the world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    dani

    i've always been pro-choice and i always will be. reading stories about women making that difficult choice, i really cannot help but admire them. you have to be brave and strong because it's not an easy decision, it's something that will change you forever. i truly loved that she had great friends along the way, support it's needed all the time and even more in these situations. for me, it fills me reading stories like this and i'll finish the review by saying sensitive and controversial topics nee i've always been pro-choice and i always will be. reading stories about women making that difficult choice, i really cannot help but admire them. you have to be brave and strong because it's not an easy decision, it's something that will change you forever. i truly loved that she had great friends along the way, support it's needed all the time and even more in these situations. for me, it fills me reading stories like this and i'll finish the review by saying sensitive and controversial topics need to be read about, heard about, written and spoken about!!! let's make it "normal" because that's what it is!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Menna♡

    This book is brilliant, it is a beautiful combination between fun and necessary. It had moments that made me grin and moments that made me angry beyond belief. this book talks about the fact that women should have the right to choose what to do with their bodies. I think it handles that topic splendidly. It shows the struggles and the horrible things women go through daily to be able to do something or because they made a choice that some people don't agree with. The harassment they endure outside This book is brilliant, it is a beautiful combination between fun and necessary. It had moments that made me grin and moments that made me angry beyond belief. this book talks about the fact that women should have the right to choose what to do with their bodies. I think it handles that topic splendidly. It shows the struggles and the horrible things women go through daily to be able to do something or because they made a choice that some people don't agree with. The harassment they endure outside of abortion clinics and always having people trying to shove their opinion in their faces. One of the things i absolutely loved about this is the friendships, the relationship between these girls is so wholesome and amazing. It shows different opinions on the subject and that no matter how different you're opinion might be, you respect the other's choice, no matter how different it is from the one you would've made. The only thing i didn't love about this book, is how sometimes it feels like the author is trying to give us some info by having one of the girls say the facts or google the thing. She sometimes shows us the thing instead of just have someone tell it and to be honest i preferred this method much more. My overall thoughts is that i think everyone should read it. 4.5⭐

  15. 4 out of 5

    thi

    4.5/5 - 🗣 I am and always will be pro-choice - 🗣🗣 Criminalizing abortions won’t prevent them from happening it just facilitates unsafe abortions - The story takes place in Texas, a known conservative state and Camille faces a lot of opposition to her choice - The frustration was real when health care professions, law practitioners, STRANGERS, frequently pushed their bias onto her - Damn separation of church and state man I’m 🤦🏻♀🤦🏻♀🤦🏻♀🤦🏻♀ - there’s some obvious discussions about abortion overall as 4.5/5 - 🗣 I am and always will be pro-choice - 🗣🗣 Criminalizing abortions won’t prevent them from happening it just facilitates unsafe abortions - The story takes place in Texas, a known conservative state and Camille faces a lot of opposition to her choice - The frustration was real when health care professions, law practitioners, STRANGERS, frequently pushed their bias onto her - Damn separation of church and state man I’m 🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️🤦🏻‍♀️ - there’s some obvious discussions about abortion overall as well as observations on sex education and sex MIS-education - As the author notes; shame is often used as a tactic to control women’s reproductive rights and that isn’t fair - I’d say my only problem was a weird turn near the end of the book before being on track again - A glimpse of what most likely many people go though concerning abortion, It’s poignant, it’s relevant ... too relevant

  16. 4 out of 5

    Max Baker

    Thank You Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review This is an important book. I won't deny it, because to do so would be a gross and frankly irresponsible thing to do. Girls on the Verge points out a lot of terrible things the US have done in regards to women's health and abortion. The main character Camille has to go through multiple hoops just to get a straight answer out of someone and it's just awful. Like you seriously want to punch the concept of the st Thank You Netgalley for providing me a free review copy in exchange for an honest review This is an important book. I won't deny it, because to do so would be a gross and frankly irresponsible thing to do. Girls on the Verge points out a lot of terrible things the US have done in regards to women's health and abortion. The main character Camille has to go through multiple hoops just to get a straight answer out of someone and it's just awful. Like you seriously want to punch the concept of the state of Texas for what they put this girl and the thousands of others in her position through. This will make you angry, it will make you think, and it will most likely inspire some action in you that you need to take before it gets better. I just think it was a boring book. Girls on the Verge feels very much like a book written in response to a subject that has a lot of controversy surrounding it. And in my experience, they make great responses by humanizing and exploring what someone must go through, but they don't make for a compelling story. Camille is less of a main character and more of an every girl for someone to see through. See the inequality, the judgement, the shame. And make no mistake, it works but it doesn't help with the story or the character. Camille's defining trait is she wants to be an actor. Annabelle's is that she sort of a rebel. And Bea is that she's religious and Camille's best friend. Of all three characters, Bea is the only one who gets the most development, trying to understand Camille's decision to have an abortion and her own religious upbringing. I liked how Bea isn't villainized for her religion and that it plays a strong part in her character rather then a stand-in villain for the religious pro-life people. However, I do think that Bea is the most extraneous character between the three. In my opinion, I think this should have been a road trip with only Camille and Annabelle, because they didn't know each other. Annabelle drives Camille wherever she needs to go, but they're virtually strangers at the start of the book and I don't feel like they grew that close on a personal level. It seemed like Camille cared so much for Annabelle because of what she was doing for her rather then out of genuine friendship. Having the two of them in the car for long periods of time would have allowed for some chemistry to develop between them as well as a friendship. But because Bea was there, Camille was split between her best friend and Annabelle which prevented the two from connecting. However, I do believe that a Camille and Bea story would also work, with Bea going with her best friend despite her religion because she cares so much for Camille and not because she was jealous of Annabelle. As it stands I don't think the main trio was bad in any way, but I would have preferred if they could have had more time to interact and grow with one another. This is an important book, and one I think should be read by nearly everyone in the US, but I'm hard pressed to call it an enjoyable story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Latanya (Crafty Scribbles)

    When I selected this book to read, I had no idea how Sharon Biggs Waller would approach this tale. Would she use objectivity? Or, would she sneak some teachings that hurt readers? Suffice to say, she chose the former with gusto. In Girls on the Verge, Waller creates a story of a girl's personal decision in the form of a road trip along with two girlfriends with varied mindsets. Set in Texas, Camille faces abortion restrictions, including false information and misogynistic and paternalistic attit When I selected this book to read, I had no idea how Sharon Biggs Waller would approach this tale. Would she use objectivity? Or, would she sneak some teachings that hurt readers? Suffice to say, she chose the former with gusto. In Girls on the Verge, Waller creates a story of a girl's personal decision in the form of a road trip along with two girlfriends with varied mindsets. Set in Texas, Camille faces abortion restrictions, including false information and misogynistic and paternalistic attitudes by men and women supporting said men. However... I mentioned that, in the form of a road trip, Camille's personal decision brings forth a coming of age that's timely, necessary, and honest. Pros 1. Honesty and Objectivity. Weller shares her experience and you can tell as the prose comes from a knowledgeable and nonjudgmental place. What's involved mentally, emotionally, and physically in making such a personal decision finds excellent space. The theme is making a personal decision that fits for the person, and wow, do we need more books like this one. 2. Both Sides Are Represented Through Annabelle and Bea, Camille's Friends via Pro-Choice and Pro-Life arguments). While the book's heavily pro-choice (Yay!), thankfully, the latter's reasonable and respectful. 3. The ending's subtle and sublime. 4. Quick pacing. 5. Short chapters. 6. High tension. Given the subject, it's expected. But, there's high tension as it's a road trip tale and well, things happen. 7. Friendship Matters. Annabelle's amazing. Bea's learning. Regardless of how they feel, they hold Camille upright through this difficult time, thick and thin. 8. Realistic Setting. There's no magic. Tropes do not show to save the day. Obstacles and hurdles display the topic's difficulty, especially in red states. 9. A Likable Main Character. Camille's a teenager who's relatable. There's no Buffy-speak. She does not act like an adult, but a young woman on the verge of a big decision with a need for help and support. 10. Read the Author's Note. Enough said. Cons Honestly, I could not find a single con personally. Read and see for yourself. 4/5 Well-researched. Honest. Objective. Fair.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Brown

    Every gift is a blessing girl. Nice job Sharon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christie

    Loved these girls 💕 Touching story written with care, facts and sensitivity.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jaye Berry

    Okay I don't think I can actually write a review that slaps as hard as this book. Girls on the Verge is about a teenage girl named Camille who finds out she's pregnant right after she gets into a prestigious theater program. She can't tell her parents and her ultra-religious best friend Bea doesn't agree with her choices. Camille is forced to deal with the situation herself but the system and her state are set out against her. At her lowest point, Camille finds help from Annabelle- a girl she bar Okay I don't think I can actually write a review that slaps as hard as this book. Girls on the Verge is about a teenage girl named Camille who finds out she's pregnant right after she gets into a prestigious theater program. She can't tell her parents and her ultra-religious best friend Bea doesn't agree with her choices. Camille is forced to deal with the situation herself but the system and her state are set out against her. At her lowest point, Camille finds help from Annabelle- a girl she barely knows from theater. Annabelle is happy to take Camille wherever she needs to go to have an abortion, and with a last minute change of heart, Bea ends up coming along on the road trip. This book is so so important right now (and annoyingly anytime because the problem of men thinking they should control women's bodies and choices apparently will never go away). It's honestly just insane to me how we're in 2019 and we're still debating this. In the US, recently more and more bills have been introduced or passed in various states that exist solely to restrict or ban abortions. I'm not going to go off but the author's note in this book really says it better than I ever could. All of the obstacles Camille has to go through in this book are so heartbreaking, and reading it made me so angry and sad. I don't know if the state of Texas is as much of a hellscape as this book showed me but I sure hope it's getting better over there. I love it when I end up reading a book that gets tagged as feminist but actually is. This book is all about a girl's choice for her own body and life, and also about strong friendship and girls supporting girls. Honestly the friendship and the road trip itself almost made me 5 star this book because I just loved it so much. Camille and Bea's friendship is complicated and they both barely know Annabelle but it turns into such a great trio and their adventures through Texas and around were fun. (I mean not ALL fun because the entire point is for Camille to have an abortion and everyone has baggage but you know.) This book isn't even 250 pages but it packs such a punch, highly recommend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    Girls on the Verge is a book that begs to be read. In today's anti-choice climate where women's bodily rights are being slashed left and right, this timely tale gives reader a taste of the hoops many women have to jump through to simply take control over their own bodies. My heart broke for pregnant teen Camille as her hopes were dashed over and over again, as man after entitled man made decisions for her about her own body and future - and shaming her constantly through this process. My heart b Girls on the Verge is a book that begs to be read. In today's anti-choice climate where women's bodily rights are being slashed left and right, this timely tale gives reader a taste of the hoops many women have to jump through to simply take control over their own bodies. My heart broke for pregnant teen Camille as her hopes were dashed over and over again, as man after entitled man made decisions for her about her own body and future - and shaming her constantly through this process. My heart breaks for all women who have to go through experiences similar to this, for those who have to go through any kind of abortion experience, and for those who aren't allowed to go through such an experience because of laws barring her from doing so. It's a scary time for women in our world right now, and this book is just one that helps to demonstrate why.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Lynne

    I thought for a while that I was gonna give this book 4.5 stars, only knocking down a half star because I didn’t like Bea or Annabelle for various reasons, but in the end I decided that I loved this book to much to not give it a 5! Such a raw and important story about a young woman and the hurdles she goes through just to try and have control over her own body. So emotional and devastating and angering at times...hilarious and fun and sweet at other times. Absolutely loved it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Unicorn

    This was such a moving, heartbreaking and educational experience. There are just so many things that I do not know about contraception and abortions and just female anatomy despite being a woman which is crazy. This book has helped me learn and taught me how to learn about these things. It is absurd that a woman has to travel to get an abortion but that is the way it is unfortunately. At times I got so angry I wanted to punch every old man making laws about our bodies. This is a must read for 20 This was such a moving, heartbreaking and educational experience. There are just so many things that I do not know about contraception and abortions and just female anatomy despite being a woman which is crazy. This book has helped me learn and taught me how to learn about these things. It is absurd that a woman has to travel to get an abortion but that is the way it is unfortunately. At times I got so angry I wanted to punch every old man making laws about our bodies. This is a must read for 2019 it is so amazing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    shew this was a very hard read. especially while thinking about all the "heartbeat" bills up for a vote in multiple states (with no exceptions for rape or incest) including in the great state i live in - tennessee. it's so unbelievably heartbreaking that this is something women and young girls go through every day. i did feel it was a little heavy handed at times but honestly, i'm ok with that. after all it is targeted towards a younger audience than me, and i think it's important to really impre shew this was a very hard read. especially while thinking about all the "heartbeat" bills up for a vote in multiple states (with no exceptions for rape or incest) including in the great state i live in - tennessee. it's so unbelievably heartbreaking that this is something women and young girls go through every day. i did feel it was a little heavy handed at times but honestly, i'm ok with that. after all it is targeted towards a younger audience than me, and i think it's important to really impress upon the younger generation how important this is. but honestly people of all ages should read this. it's a very heavy read, and i teared up several times but there are also moments of levity and road trip antics which i always appreciate (ya girl loves a road trip book!). **I received an eARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.**

  25. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Frank information is the greatest strength of this road trip / coming-of-age story. I kept asking myself, why didn't I know this? How can this be medical care for women in the United States today? The way that I got this ARC months ahead of the release date speaks volumes about potential impact. It was dropped off at the library by a young woman (heading off to college) who wanted to make sure it was included among the titles our teen volunteers are considering in their role as a YALSA Teens' To Frank information is the greatest strength of this road trip / coming-of-age story. I kept asking myself, why didn't I know this? How can this be medical care for women in the United States today? The way that I got this ARC months ahead of the release date speaks volumes about potential impact. It was dropped off at the library by a young woman (heading off to college) who wanted to make sure it was included among the titles our teen volunteers are considering in their role as a YALSA Teens' Top Ten Book group. I know she is a big fan of the author. She could have kept this for herself. Instead, she chose to share it - to spread the word - to sound the alarm. A brave call-to-action about women's reproductive rights that is already being shared reader-to-reader. Highly recommended.

  26. 5 out of 5

    maya

    i’m crying in a library right now it’s just fucking unfair what a girl has to do to have control over her own body it’s fucking bullshit

  27. 5 out of 5

    Giulia

    "It isn’t fair that you have to miss out on your future because of one mistake you made in the past. I am so sick of old white dudes telling us what we can and can’t do with our bodies." TW: slut-shaming, abortion Actual rating: 3.5 ⭐ What a charming, important and informative read. Do not let the average rating fool you (that is totally my fault as I was expecting something different – I don't even know why, I myself am confused...by myself.) I thoroughly appreciated the message and the educationa "It isn’t fair that you have to miss out on your future because of one mistake you made in the past. I am so sick of old white dudes telling us what we can and can’t do with our bodies." TW: slut-shaming, abortion Actual rating: 3.5 ⭐️ What a charming, important and informative read. Do not let the average rating fool you (that is totally my fault as I was expecting something different – I don't even know why, I myself am confused...by myself.) I thoroughly appreciated the message and the educational aspect present in Girls on the Verge. The three girls were lovely and lively. I gotta admit that I felt a particular connection to Annabelle because I, too, am a hoe for coffee and I cannot function without it. Also, I was a fan of Bea’s character arc and her development. The main character - Camille - was charming but also a little bit vanilla, if I have to be honest. The plot itself was captivating and fast-paced. This was an easy and fast read, and I truly appreciated the sex Ed aspect present in this book. And the unflinching honesty about a topic that is more often than not glossed over. It was a frank and informative coming-of-age story with the always deeply cherished touch of road trip-ness. During the drive, they face problems, misogyny, sexism but also kindness of strangers. And, on top of all this, it was also positively feminist read. Camille, Bea and Annabelle had to listen to the never wanted and definitely never needed opinions of white men – who just wanted to control the girls’ bodies and lives – and how they had to fight for their rights. Really likes the feminist undertones and comments. As Rachel would say: Can I get an AMEN! I really liked how at the beginning of the book there were notes on the abortion laws in Texas, as a non US citizen I did not know about all this and thus I think it is vital to have a book that depicts how hard it can be to find a safe, legal abortion in the USA so that everybody (even people outside of America) has the chance to fully understand. I’m glad I’ve read Girls on the Verge. As I’ve mentioned ad nauseam this was a very educational, progressive, honest and unflinching book, but it also had a touching and important friendship. If I have to be honest, I thought that sometimes it was a bit too heavy handed and a bit preachy, but the message was there, and it was important to share and address. I also particularly liked how the prejudices and judgments were not only one way. Whit that I mean that the girls have to face not only judgments and preconceptions from the outside world but also among themselves. Annabelle and Bea had a few arguments about the latter’s faith and beliefs; same thing happened between Bea and Camille. It was refreshing to see them challenging each other and discuss important topics and not just simply pretend that everything was alright. They called each other out and fought and because of that they felt real and human. But now, lemme address the things that did not convince me that much. Because, in the end, this is still a three stars read. For as much as the message was important, I thought the plot as a whole was a bit overly dramatic, underdeveloped and rushed. To be more precise, I thought this book was going to span during a longer period of time. Or at the very least, this is what the synopsis made me believe. I thought Bea and Camille had a serious fall out, I thought they stopped talking to each other and that they had a huge fight some years past. Instead, yes, they had a fight but it happened something like three days prior the road trip. I thought it was more of a piecing together the relationship kind of sub-plot between the two of them, and I couldn’t help but being disappointed. And that is mainly because I LOVE stories about giving second chances to a friend and rebuilding a friendship by clearing things up. But this was not the case because there was nothing to piece together since nothing got really ugly to begin with. They had an argument about abortion (Bea against, Camille pro) but that was it. It was an important argument, don’t get me wrong, but Camille’s reaction was also very much overly dramatic and a bit childish, in my opinion. Another thing that was overly dramatic was the family issues mentioned in this book (if we can call them that, tbh). It is hinted that both Camille and Bea have a pretty tough environment at home. Bea’s is explained: her parents want her to be the perfect daughter and she feels the pressure. But Camille’s was really underdeveloped. It is hinted that, basically, her family does not love her but…I’d say that that’s a lie. When interactions were shown, they were pretty normal and not problematic, in my opinion. So I truly did not understand from where Camille was coming. That useless drama really bothered me and I couldn’t shake it off. It was also suggested that Annabelle did not really have the perfect family life but it was not developed at all, and that let me down a bit. Also because Annabelle’s character remained a mystery and practically nothing about her persona was unveiled. Which was a pity. Since all these aspects weren’t really specified to begin with, the story in general felt rushed (specifically towards the end, where everything was wrapped up way too quickly) and under-developed. I guess I was expecting a bit more instead it truly was “only” a book about a road trip to go and get an abortion. Nothing more but definitely nothing less. And I say that because I truly believe that Camille’s story is an important one to share and scream from the rooftops. It underlined the fight to find a way to give and obtain the right to decide what happens to one’s own body and one’s life. Camille’s story to educate today’s teens on sex Ed and abortion and to encourage empathy for those who do decide to have an abortion is an important one to share and I am truly, deeply glad I’ve read it. I simply think that my expectations were just a tad bit too high. My fault really, not the book's. I’d highly recommend this as Girls on the Verge truly is a good one, guys. Do pick this up! "Your girlfriends are the most important people you’’ll ever have in your life. You keep hold of them."

  28. 4 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    GIRLS ON THE VERGE made me sad and mad, sad that girls and woman have to jump through hoops to get the healthcare they need, because others, mostly older men, use restrictive legislation to control females. In the afterward, Sharon Biggs Waller talks about how access to reproductive healthcare, including abortion was easier legally, in the number of clinics and in fewer zealots protesting outside clinics. Camille would not have had to go to a judge, to decide whether at seventeen she was old eno GIRLS ON THE VERGE made me sad and mad, sad that girls and woman have to jump through hoops to get the healthcare they need, because others, mostly older men, use restrictive legislation to control females. In the afterward, Sharon Biggs Waller talks about how access to reproductive healthcare, including abortion was easier legally, in the number of clinics and in fewer zealots protesting outside clinics. Camille would not have had to go to a judge, to decide whether at seventeen she was old enough to choose whether to be pregnant. She would have not had to drive to a clinic on the other side of the state, only to be forced to see an ultrasound and wait another week. She would not have needed to purchase abortion pills a a flea market or in Mexico. She would not have had to go to a neighboring state. If men, instead of women got pregnant, clinics would be more plentiful than Starbucks, pills pills would be in gumball machines and government would pay for the service. I loved the sex positivity aspect of GIRLS ON THE VERGE and that even the repressed Beatrice grew beyond her religious education that focused on shame. Every woman needs an Annabelle and to be an Annabelle for those in need. She was such a great character and example of sisterhood. GIRLS ON THE VERGE shouldn’t be such a necessary book in 2019 and should be read not just out of necessity, but because it’s a good story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brianna - Coffee Books and Bullet Journals

    3.5 stars Okay, I'm going to get a lot of slack for this, but I don't feel like this was the best way to tell this story... I am not going to deny the fact that this is an important story to tell. It absolutely is. The political climate is absolutely a topic that we need to talk about and I'm so glad it's being discussed in YA books. This book was quick paced and I finished it in one day. It was engaging from start to finish. Let's talk about where this book fell short. - The character developme 3.5 stars Okay, I'm going to get a lot of slack for this, but I don't feel like this was the best way to tell this story... I am not going to deny the fact that this is an important story to tell. It absolutely is. The political climate is absolutely a topic that we need to talk about and I'm so glad it's being discussed in YA books. This book was quick paced and I finished it in one day. It was engaging from start to finish. Let's talk about where this book fell short. - The character development of the three girls. Annabelle had the most character development of the three, and even hers was lackluster. Bea had literally no growth throughout the story. This was a by product of it only being 220 pages. - No consequences of doing things "on their own". If Camille would have had abusive parents, I might have bought that she didn't want to tell them. But she had a good and positive relationship with them, and there were no consequences of doing things herself. There were multiple roadblocks to her getting an abortion including crossing the border and getting illegal black market drugs from Mexico. These drugs are highly dangerous and there was no discussion of the dangers. She was encouraged by an adult to go on this trip and take these drugs. My sister is 16. I would be devastated if she did these things without any adult intervention. Because of that, I won't be recommending this book to her. - The gross overgeneralization of the anti-choice people. I get that the author was trying to make a point. And I get that there are definitely people that are that far to the right on this topic. But not everyone is. There are people that are middle of the road, and people that are pro life, but aren't so in your face. Especially in a large city such as Houston. I'm giving this 3.5 stars because it is still a topic of conversation that needs to be discussed in literature, especially YA. I don't want to discourage more of these books on this topic. But I don't believe that it was the best way to go about it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kelley

    WOW! What a powerful read, and in one sitting, no less! I gave this 5 stars plus some exclamation points!!! And it hits so close to home. I was 20, in college, thinking it would never happen to me. But it did, and I didn't want to put aside my future, dreams, and life at that time and move back to an abusive home life. (At that time, I wasn't sure I'd ever want children.) Camille struggled with so many of the same thoughts, feelings, and experiences I had at that time. Like her, nothing was going WOW! What a powerful read, and in one sitting, no less! I gave this 5 stars plus some exclamation points!!! And it hits so close to home. I was 20, in college, thinking it would never happen to me. But it did, and I didn't want to put aside my future, dreams, and life at that time and move back to an abusive home life. (At that time, I wasn't sure I'd ever want children.) Camille struggled with so many of the same thoughts, feelings, and experiences I had at that time. Like her, nothing was going to change my mind. Not even the Crisis Clinic, which by the way, was a spot-on depiction and really brought back memories. This is an important and timely read also, as women's rights are being stripped away in many states. I loved Annabelle! Every woman needs a friend like Annabelle--someone who'll kick the patriarchy in the nuts! And I'm glad Bea was along, to show "the other side" and to be able to walk a mile in Camille's shoes with her. If only everyone had that opportunity. If only...... I can't remember the name of the speaker, but I heard a woman on NPR say limiting abortion rights is an under-the-radar kind of racism. This fact, given at the end of the book, speaks to that, for who are more poverty-stricken in our country than women of color: Despite restrictive laws, as of 2017, one in four women in the US will seek an abortion by age 45. Fifty-six percent of women who seek abortions have a child already. Thirty-four percent are 20-24; 12 percent are teens age 15-19. Seventy-five percent of women seeking abortions are poor. The possible overturning of Roe v. Wade would mean the end to legal abortions in the US. Women would still have abortions, but they would have to seek illegal and unsafe abortions. We need to make our voices heard!!! P.S.: A few years later, I did become a mother, and my beautiful daughter is now 27.

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