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The Complete Poems (Poetry Library)

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With an Introduction and Notes by David Ellis, University of Kent at Canterbury. Lawrence's reputation as a novelist has often meant that his achievements in poetry have failed to receive the recognition they deserve. This edition brings together, in a form he himself sanctioned, his Collected Poems of 1928, the unexpurgated version of Pansies, and Nettles, adding to these vo With an Introduction and Notes by David Ellis, University of Kent at Canterbury. Lawrence's reputation as a novelist has often meant that his achievements in poetry have failed to receive the recognition they deserve. This edition brings together, in a form he himself sanctioned, his Collected Poems of 1928, the unexpurgated version of Pansies, and Nettles, adding to these volumes the contents of the two notebooks in which he was still writing poetry when he died in 1930. It therefore allows the reader to trace the development of Lawrence as a poet and appreciate the remarkable originality and distinctiveness of his achievement. Not all the poems reprinted here are masterpieces but there is more than enough quality to confirm Lawrence's status as one of the greatest English writers of the twentieth century.


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With an Introduction and Notes by David Ellis, University of Kent at Canterbury. Lawrence's reputation as a novelist has often meant that his achievements in poetry have failed to receive the recognition they deserve. This edition brings together, in a form he himself sanctioned, his Collected Poems of 1928, the unexpurgated version of Pansies, and Nettles, adding to these vo With an Introduction and Notes by David Ellis, University of Kent at Canterbury. Lawrence's reputation as a novelist has often meant that his achievements in poetry have failed to receive the recognition they deserve. This edition brings together, in a form he himself sanctioned, his Collected Poems of 1928, the unexpurgated version of Pansies, and Nettles, adding to these volumes the contents of the two notebooks in which he was still writing poetry when he died in 1930. It therefore allows the reader to trace the development of Lawrence as a poet and appreciate the remarkable originality and distinctiveness of his achievement. Not all the poems reprinted here are masterpieces but there is more than enough quality to confirm Lawrence's status as one of the greatest English writers of the twentieth century.

30 review for The Complete Poems (Poetry Library)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Shannon

    My favorite poem from my favorite poet: "Self Pity I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself." -D. H. Lawrence, 1929

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alok Mishra

    Reading the works by Lawrence in prose is certainly a pleasure well-extracted. However, once you read the poems written by him, you come to know him closely, better and in vivid perspectives of his personality. Reading poems by Lawrence taught me that he was close to the truth - the truth that everything is there either eternal or ephemeral in totality. Nothing is aloof. This might be my personal interpretation but I am sure many readers might have come close to it as well. This collection is co Reading the works by Lawrence in prose is certainly a pleasure well-extracted. However, once you read the poems written by him, you come to know him closely, better and in vivid perspectives of his personality. Reading poems by Lawrence taught me that he was close to the truth - the truth that everything is there either eternal or ephemeral in totality. Nothing is aloof. This might be my personal interpretation but I am sure many readers might have come close to it as well. This collection is complete.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    What is it about Lawrence and sex? Even the tortoises are having intercourse in this collection of poetry. And let me just say, Lawrence, the bunny poem, dude, really? That aside, or maybe because of it, many of the poems in the collection are good. Even if Lawrence had never written any of his novels, many of these poems might have earned a place in literature as well. He covers more than sex, but politics and the hope and contradiction that is America. There is much abo What is it about Lawrence and sex? Even the tortoises are having intercourse in this collection of poetry. And let me just say, Lawrence, the bunny poem, dude, really? That aside, or maybe because of it, many of the poems in the collection are good. Even if Lawrence had never written any of his novels, many of these poems might have earned a place in literature as well. He covers more than sex, but politics and the hope and contradiction that is America. There is much about gender roles and relationships here as well. He mediates on a mountain lion he saw killed and carried by someone, and the mediation turns into which is worth more – humankind or the power and beauty of the cat. If you have ever had a dog or cat that met a blue jay, you will love the poem of the same name. There is something more honest about these poems than about his novels, a nakedness that doesn’t quite appear in the long works. In some ways, though the poetry, Lawrence shows himself as a follower of Wordsworth, a descendent of all those romantics.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Patric

    The Great American Sage Don Jones introduced me to D,H. Lawrence poetry in 2000 and D.H. is one of the greatest gifts I have received in understanding the depth and breath of the sacred masculine's longing for wholeness in our world ~ true love, natural beauty and authenticity in interactions with others. This is a complete digest of D.H.'s poetic angst, insights and blessings in modernity that reveals a new wonderful landscape of wholeness in humanity and horizons in the human heart for all of The Great American Sage Don Jones introduced me to D,H. Lawrence poetry in 2000 and D.H. is one of the greatest gifts I have received in understanding the depth and breath of the sacred masculine's longing for wholeness in our world ~ true love, natural beauty and authenticity in interactions with others. This is a complete digest of D.H.'s poetic angst, insights and blessings in modernity that reveals a new wonderful landscape of wholeness in humanity and horizons in the human heart for all of us to explore within. I keep this book on my classic top shelf and ready at hand everyday for inspiration.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Nearpass

    love 'One thing is certain, we've got to take hands off love. the moment i swear to love a woman all my life that very moment i begin to hate her. In the same way, if i swore to hate a woman all my life, I should instantly feel a pang of compunction Amounting almost to love.' D. H. Lawrence

  6. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Far better than his far more famous novels. Bitter and randy but often sensational, bringing flowers Reach me a gentian, give me a torch! Let me guide myself with the blue, forked torch of a flower down the darker and darker stairs, where blue is darkened on blueness down the way Persephone goes, just now, in first-frosted September to the sightless realm where darkness is married to dark and Persephone herself is but a voice, as a bride a gloom invisible/> Far better than his far more famous novels. Bitter and randy but often sensational, bringing flowers Reach me a gentian, give me a torch! Let me guide myself with the blue, forked torch of a flower down the darker and darker stairs, where blue is darkened on blueness down the way Persephone goes, just now, in first-frosted September to the sightless realm where darkness is married to dark and Persephone herself is but a voice, as a bride a gloom invisible enfolded in the deeper dark of the arms of Pluto as he ravishes her once again and pierces her once more with his passion of the utter dark among the splendour of black-blue torches, shedding fathomless darkness on the nuptials. There's about 6 duds for every one of those - as always, a Collected is never judged by its hit rate but by its best. His philosophy is rank nonsense ("Sexless people transmit nothing."; "The machine shall be abolished from the earth again; / it is a mistake that mankind has made;") - as always, this has no bearing on the poems. What do I care that he is the most unsound voice in the great unsound choir of English literature? See here, here, here, here, here. The dirt-cheap holly-green Wordsworth paperbacks are where I got my first education. (I think this is what older generations got via Dover Thrifts or Pelicans.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Bat I had to read some of D.H. Lawrence's poems for an English class my favorite one was Bat. Lawrence begins this poem by describing a beautiful scene of bats flying in the sunset in Florence Italy. He believes these bats to be swallows, but asks himself why are they flying so late. He begins to study the way they fly and how they look in the sky. When he realized that they are bats he changes, and begins to describe this animal with certain disgust, he calls them "creatures that hang the Bat I had to read some of D.H. Lawrence's poems for an English class my favorite one was Bat. Lawrence begins this poem by describing a beautiful scene of bats flying in the sunset in Florence Italy. He believes these bats to be swallows, but asks himself why are they flying so late. He begins to study the way they fly and how they look in the sky. When he realized that they are bats he changes, and begins to describe this animal with certain disgust, he calls them "creatures that hang themselves up like an old rag." It's as if bats represented something bad for him, darkness, perhaps something scary with a grin they have on their faces. He says "in China bats are a symbol of happiness," however not for him. The human race is funny that way, we can like something a first glance but when we realize what we are really looking at we change our minds and decide we no longer feel the same way. The scene of the bats reminds me of the national park in New Mexico where you can see the bats fly by the thousands on summer nights. Lawrence traveled a lot and New Mexico was one of the places he visited. His ashes are in New Mexico although he died in France. So a little theory that I have that I was not able to confirm in my research was that when he wrote this poem maybe he was in New Mexico but missed Italy, which is where the initial scene takes place. I liked this poem because the scene he describes is easy to visualize and I think bats are cute.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    "The Piano" is my absolute favorite poem. I treasure this collection and keep it on my nightstand.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I'm not entirely sure that every poem in here needed to be published, but it was a complete collection and read over the course of many, many months, worth the effort in my opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Darina Philogene

    Didn't read this in its entity because I'm not a fan of poetry but I read a good amount of these poems and I liked them. But there are too many for me to sit and read this from beginning to end.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aveugle Vogel

    "darker stairs"

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aidan

    all about marxism and erections. love it

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ata A

    D.H. Lawrence's poems are intensely expressive. My personal favorite of his poems in this large collection is the very last, "Phoenix". For those interested in Metaphysics - especially Sufism or even Buddhism - they will appreciate the words of the poem "dipped into oblivion" [fanaa' in sufic nomenclature]. Overall I adore the work! It also includes poems regarding politics, love, morality, religion, justice, etiquette and even subtle satire :) Here are some short selection D.H. Lawrence's poems are intensely expressive. My personal favorite of his poems in this large collection is the very last, "Phoenix". For those interested in Metaphysics - especially Sufism or even Buddhism - they will appreciate the words of the poem "dipped into oblivion" [fanaa' in sufic nomenclature]. Overall I adore the work! It also includes poems regarding politics, love, morality, religion, justice, etiquette and even subtle satire :) Here are some short selections: Souls to Save You tell me every man has a soul to save? I tell you, not one man in a thousand has even a soul to lose. The automat has no soul to lose so it can't have one to save. Change: Do you think it is easy to change? Ah, it is very hard to change and be different. It means passing through the waters of oblivion. Sleep: Sleep is the shadow of death, but not only that. Sleep is a hint of lovely oblivion. When I am gone, completely lapsed and gone and healed from all this ache of being.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    This is one I've picked up off and on over many years. My favorite is the little poem Self-Pity I never saw a wild thing sorry for itself. A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough without ever having felt sorry for itself. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Now, I could say that it is not a poem, but just a piece of observation which sticks in my memory. Which, I suppose, could be a definition of poetry after all.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    Reading this book was an epic experience in my life. I read it kind of slow. It's really like reading someone's journal. There's just a strange powerful energy to it. Most of the poems aren't great by themselves, but together they gain all these strange momentums, they start to take you over. Some of his short ones are his best.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ماهر Battuti

    Though Lawrence is mainly known as a novelist, he has written huge number of poems. His poetry is deep and digs into the consciousness of human nature and also mythical connections. Some of the poetry of Lawrence was translated unto Arabic, and I have rendered his poem "Ship of Death" into Arabic as far ago as 1964.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Klawitter

    Sorrow Why does the thin grey strand Floating up from the forgotten Cigarette between my fingers, Why does it trouble me? Ah, you will understand; When I carried my mother downstairs, A few times only, at the beginning Of her soft-foot malady, I should find, for a reprimand To my gaiety, a few long grey hairs On the breast of my coat; and one by one I watched them float up the dark chimney.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    I read some of his short stories and poems in highschool and thought they were dark and depressing with few redeeming qualities. I appreciate the attempt at defining the "human condition", but it just gets depressing and old after a while.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stella Wang

    Quick read since the poems are just so beautiful and straightforward! His words are so beautiful but also witty sometimes! The poems certainly make me think of the cruel reality yet appreciate certain things!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kinsey

    Awesome Poet!!!! Here is one of the poems I loved. It's short. Self-Pity I never saw a wild thing/ sorry for itself./ A small bird will drop frozen dead from a bough/ without ever having felt sorry for itself.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Markéta Kimi

    "And I think in this empty world there was room for me and a mountain lion. And I think in the world beyond, how easily we might spare a million or two humans And never miss them."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rabya

    there is a poem about a broken bird- i forgot the title quoted in g.i. jane movie by guy who plays aragon

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel Sigauke

    Lawrence at his best int terms giving an insight about life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Hodgson

    Look for selections instead. Lawrence had a lot of half formed repetitions, and junk. He was weak when working in rhyme, stronger outside of it. Pretty experimental.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julia Michell

    Adore The Snake!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    David

    Rotten politics - wonderful, searching lines.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Terry Mendez

    This is a poet that will never get old he was way ahead of his time

  28. 5 out of 5

    Trina

    Fanny Howe recommended this to me while I was in Russia. So far, I'm still in the rhyming doggerel early poems.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mikael

    why struggle thru lady chatterleys lover and missing the lame sodomy bit anyway its that lame when you can be a complete pansy and use this as yr pillow

  30. 5 out of 5

    Darby Hudson

    ah wow. this is what inspired bukowski. a directness. plain language. nihilism. a bit of oscar wildian reverse wisdom. what a find.

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