Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Brave New World: A Novel/Brave New World Revisited

Availability: Ready to download

The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future--of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future--of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Aldous Huxley's most enduring masterpiece. The non-fiction work Brave New World Revisited, published in 1958, is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including the threats to humanity, such as over-population, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.


Compare
Ads Banner

The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future--of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing The astonishing novel Brave New World, originally published in 1932, presents Aldous Huxley's vision of the future--of a world utterly transformed. Through the most efficient scientific and psychological engineering, people are genetically designed to be passive and therefore consistently useful to the ruling class. This powerful work of speculative fiction sheds a blazing critical light on the present and is considered to be Aldous Huxley's most enduring masterpiece. The non-fiction work Brave New World Revisited, published in 1958, is a fascinating work in which Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy envisioned in Brave New World, including the threats to humanity, such as over-population, propaganda, and chemical persuasion.

30 review for Brave New World: A Novel/Brave New World Revisited

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rakhi Dalal

    1984 by Orwell was the first work of dystopian fiction that I laid my hands on. It left me so numb that I couldn't gather my thoughts on the experience of reading it. Then I read Brave New World by Huxley and then We by Zamyatin followed by the little story (The New Utopia) by Jerome. BNW inspired me to read We. That makes for a reverse order in terms of their time of publication.I am not sure why I felt drawn to these books in succession. May be these readings came in wake of the increasing unc 1984 by Orwell was the first work of dystopian fiction that I laid my hands on. It left me so numb that I couldn't gather my thoughts on the experience of reading it. Then I read Brave New World by Huxley and then We by Zamyatin followed by the little story (The New Utopia) by Jerome. BNW inspired me to read We. That makes for a reverse order in terms of their time of publication.I am not sure why I felt drawn to these books in succession. May be these readings came in wake of the increasing uncertainty towards the kind of future we are standing on the brink of. I don't know if the nations have become more hostile towards each other than they were ever, whether we the people have become more intolerant towards each other or whether it is because of the faster and consistent accessibility to the happenings around the world that it appears to be the case. May be I felt that these readings might help me understand the extent to which we humans can advance in order to maintain the supremacy of a selected few/ one in power so that some form of uniformity may be imposed in the name of forced ideals. What these readings really did was to lay bare the fragility of societal structure which can crumble and surrender to the whims of its "selected few/one". But it also made clear the neccessity to exercise our faculties rationally, to be aware of the dangers such advances may hold for the future of human civilization itself. P.S : Only thing which really didn't go down well with me about this book was the portrayal of the character of John (the Savage). He is born in a savage society, there is no mention of him being ever educated but he has read the complete works of Shakespeare and his discourse later on shows a kind of deep understanding and adherence to an idea of morality which is difficult to imagine owing to his savage upbringing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Prophetic. Well, Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) tried to predict what would happen probably during our time now up to the 26th century or 632 A.F. (Anno Ford with Year 0 being 1908 when Model T was introduced). He wrote this novel, Brave New World in 1931 and first published in 1932. Fifteen years after, in 1949 George Orwell did a similar thing when he published his social science fiction, 1984. Both Huxley and Orwell were like Nostradamus but without the dreams or visions. Huxley came from the famo Prophetic. Well, Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) tried to predict what would happen probably during our time now up to the 26th century or 632 A.F. (Anno Ford with Year 0 being 1908 when Model T was introduced). He wrote this novel, Brave New World in 1931 and first published in 1932. Fifteen years after, in 1949 George Orwell did a similar thing when he published his social science fiction, 1984. Both Huxley and Orwell were like Nostradamus but without the dreams or visions. Huxley came from the famous Huxley family with outstanding scientific, medical, artistic and literary talent. Orwell, on the other hand, was said to possess a keen intelligence and wit, a profound awareness of social injustice, an intense, revolutionary opposition to totalitarianism, a passion for clarity in language and a belief in democratic socialism. IMO, let's see what happened so far after almost 80 years. At least with some semblance: Huxley's prophesy: Babies are mass-produced in laboratories. Take note that Watson and Crick only discovered the DNA helix structure in 1953. So, this was a good guess by Huxley. Reality: Dolly, the cloned sheep (1996-2003). Huxley's prophesy: Soma, readily available all-around upper that make you feel better Reality: Ecstasy etc - although they are not readily available and expensive Huxley's prophesy: Overpopulation Reality: Correct! (But that should be easy) Huxley's prophesy: Free sex Reality: Marry your wife, get sex free! :) Huxley's prophesy: No religion, no God, no concept of the family, no mama, no papa Reality: 'think that this has not changed so much Seriously, this is a well-written dystopian novel and is now top of my list of favorite sci-fi novels relegating 1984 to second place. Reason: this came before that Orwell's book and this is written in a funny way that I think even children can appreciate. John the Savage, for example, seems like Tarzan the first time he sees the World State (aka The Brave New World) and also his eloquence and mastery of Shakespeare's verses is just so funny. Why Shakespeare? Because Huxley and The Bard were both British? Well, I should have added that. In a way, Huxley also indirectly prophesized that children of the 21st century would still study Shakespeare in school. Huxley and Shakespeare are both genius anyway. So let their books live forever. Thanks to my reading buddies: Bea, Angus and Tintin for reading this book with me. Whoever thought of suggesting this book for us to read should have some potential to be a future genius too. Excellent choice for a book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    I somehow managed to live to age 60 before reading a book most people read in high school. The title is so etched in our culture, I had little curiosity - and now I've discovered just how brilliant this 1932 novel is. While the specifics of Huxley's Brave New World may not yet be here, or not in the form he envisioned, the picture he paints is frightening. As he says in the introduction: "There is, of course, no reason why the new totalitarianisms should resemble the old...A really efficient tot I somehow managed to live to age 60 before reading a book most people read in high school. The title is so etched in our culture, I had little curiosity - and now I've discovered just how brilliant this 1932 novel is. While the specifics of Huxley's Brave New World may not yet be here, or not in the form he envisioned, the picture he paints is frightening. As he says in the introduction: "There is, of course, no reason why the new totalitarianisms should resemble the old...A really efficient totalitarian state would be one in which the all-powerful executive of political bosses and their army of managers control a population of slaves who do not have to be coerced, because they love their servitude." The first element of the brave new world is production-line bio-manufacturing of people - assembly line produced babies: "standard men and women in uniform batches", bio-engineered to fit a particular role in life. Henry Ford's production methods are so revered, the passage of time is measured by A.F. years, or years after the time of Ford. Then there is the embryonic, childhood and early adult conditioning, explained by a manager: "All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny." My "favourite" conditioning scene had a nurse training infants to dislike books and nature, by terrifying them whenever they approached or even looked at a book or flower. "We condition to masses to hate the country [i.e., non-urban living]", says one manager. The other means of control was mass addiction to the drug soma, readily distributed to all, more powerful than alcohol or heroin, and producing complete bliss. In one scene, a sub-species group was getting out of control, so police arrive and, rather than wielding batons, spray soma mist in the air. "Suddenly, from out of the Synthetic Music Box a Voice began to speak....The sound track roll was unwinding itself in Synthetic Anti-Riot Speech Number Two (Medium Strength). ..."My friends...what is the meaning of this? Why aren't you all being happy and good together?...at peace, at peace...Oh I do want you to be happy." Two minutes later, the riot was over. Most of the book is chilling, but for a modern reader, one of the funniest scenes is how Huxley envisioned an on-the-scene live radio broadcast by a reporter in the future: "...rapidly, with a series of ritual gestures, he uncoiled two wires connected to the portable battery buckled round his waist; plugged them simultaneously into the sides of his aluminum hat; touched a spring on the crown - and antennae shot up into the air; touched another spring on the peak of the brim - and like a jack-in-the-box, out jumped a microphone and hung there, quivering, six inches in front of his nose...". Cool! One of the managers summarized the brave new world this way: "The world's stable now. People are happy; they get what they want; and they never want what they can't get. They're well-off; they're safe; they're never ill; they're not afraid of death; they're blissfully ignorant of passion and old age; they're plagued with no mothers or fathers; they've got no wives, or children, or lovers to feel strong about; they're so conditioned that they practically can't help behaving as they ought to behave. And if anything should go wrong, there's soma." It's a neo-fascist's wet dream. In his follow-up booklet/essay Brave New World Revisited, written in 1958, Huxley compared Orwell's nightmare vision of 1984 with his vision of Brave New World, and describes the differences this way: "In 1984 the lust for power is satisfied by inflicting pain; in Brave New World, by inflicting a hardly less humiliating pleasure." I don't think modern day totalitarians have set aside Orwell's approach, but I do fear the most serious danger in the future is closer to what Huxley envisioned.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tristan

    “The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people. His servitude is strictly objective.” While its illustrious counterpart, Orwell’s 1984, has entered our cultural lexicon in more significant “The nature of psychological compulsion is such that those who act under constraint remain under the impression that they are acting on their own initiative. The victim of mind-manipulation does not know that he is a victim. To him the walls of his prison are invisible, and he believes himself to be free. That he is not free is apparent only to other people. His servitude is strictly objective.” While its illustrious counterpart, Orwell’s 1984, has entered our cultural lexicon in more significant ways – who doesn't know about Doublethink, Newspeak, Memory Hole, or The Ministry of Truth? - Huxley’s concocted fable of a scientifically authored future for mankind remains the most clinically, rationally approached - and thus more prescient - one. In a far off future, this vision, penned down in 1931, could very well prove to be correct, making the noble attempt of his former student Orwell seem almost crude and laughable in comparison. Indeed, in 2017 a Brave New World scenario is more near than we’d like to imagine. All the technical tools - even if still primitive - are available, all that need be added are the right circumstances and a powerful, unopposed group strong-willed enough to bring it into reality. Yet for all its prophetic potency, at the same time this is exactly where the issue lies with Brave New World: as a work of art, it doesn’t cleave to you. It’s a novel almost solely composed of ideas. And so, judged purely as a novel, it shows itself to be rather threadbare in its construction, offering up little more than a dry summation of what are admittedly intriguing concepts, but ultimately showing an acute deficiency in its ability to evoke any deep emotion. This, primarily, is the fault of its underdeveloped, two-dimensional characters, and a lacklustre, almost lazy plot that doesn’t necessarily invite further contemplation by the reader on the intricacies of what by all rights should be a richly textured world (or on its history for that matter). It's mind-bogglingly restricted, superficial, and (how ironic) sterile. One wouldn't be wrong in asserting this might have been Huxley’s exact intention, so as to make the future all the more devoid of humanity and thus frightening to us, but that shouldn't serve as an excuse for tedium. All good fiction does need to have these emotional anchors in place. Here, sadly, it falls short in that regard. A historically significant work to be sure, but aesthetically lacking. Brave New World Revisited (1958) however, Huxley’s later commentary on the viability of the future he envisioned, I found to be much more preferable. Dispensing with characterization or concern for plot, Huxley can engage at heart’s content in some intellectual freestyling: ruminating, extrapolating, pursuing various strands of thought, etc.. His comparision of the different techniques of mind manipulation (both of individuals and of crowds) employed by the authoritarian regimes of Nazi Germany and Soviet Russia were particularly insightful. I could have tolerated it being more lengthy than it is, actually. In essence, it is both a sobering account of how malleable, and indeed easily influenced, human beings in the main really are when put in the “right” conditions, and a manual on how to counteract the ambitions of those in possession of the vulgar will to power. A vigilant defense of freedom in all its forms, education and a deep awareness of our inherent corruptability and faults, Huxley argues, are still our best bulwarks against further encroachment by budding tyrants. In this case prophesy, for all intents and purposes, thankfully remains a mug’s game.

  5. 5 out of 5

    T4ncr3d1

    "Avete mangiato qualcosa che v'ha fatto male?" indagò Bernardo. Il Selvaggio fece cenno di sì. "Ho mangiato la civiltà." Non so perché abbia aspettato così tanto a leggere questo testo. E dire che è praticamente universalmente considerato il terzo legittimo membro di quel trittico distopico che include 1984 e Fahrenheit 451. Il mondo nuovo è esattamente il rovescio del capolavoro orwelliano, come rivendicato dallo stesso autore: lì il controllo forzato attraverso un sistema di punizioni, qui un con "Avete mangiato qualcosa che v'ha fatto male?" indagò Bernardo. Il Selvaggio fece cenno di sì. "Ho mangiato la civiltà." Non so perché abbia aspettato così tanto a leggere questo testo. E dire che è praticamente universalmente considerato il terzo legittimo membro di quel trittico distopico che include 1984 e Fahrenheit 451. Il mondo nuovo è esattamente il rovescio del capolavoro orwelliano, come rivendicato dallo stesso autore: lì il controllo forzato attraverso un sistema di punizioni, qui un controllo più morbido attraverso un sistema di premi. Alla gente viene dato esattamente ciò che vuole: e questo basta a mantenerla inerme e inerte, persino si riesce a disinnescare qualunque conflitto. Con l'aiuto di qualche trovata eugenetica (per niente buona, in realtà) e l'applicazione rigorosissima del condizionamento psicologico ed ipnagogico. In una società ormai mondiale, che ha annullato il gioco politico nell'apoteosi legittimata di una classe dirigente-casta; che è stata preventivamente indotta ad accettare una classificazione in caste di uomini superiori o inferiori, super intelligenti o malformati, ma tutti messi nelle condizioni di poter raggiungere la propria felicità (illusoria); che si riconosce unicamente nel rispetto dei suoi tre principi di Comunità, Identità, Stabilità; che ha sdoganato la libertà sessuale, rinunciando per sempre, tuttavia, alla genitorialità e all'istituzione familiare (al punto che il concetto stesso di genitore suscita orrore e ribrezzo!) - in questa società si consuma il dramma esistenziale di John, il Selvaggio, uno dei pochi esseri umani a vivere in una realtà ancestrale e ancora naturale, lasciata ai margini dalla totalizzante società di questo brave new world, che, una volta entrato in contatto con essa, rimane letteralmente intossicato dalla civiltà. Nello scontro tra il Selvaggio, figlio di genitori naturali, esponente di una umanità ancora naturale, e che ama declamare versi di Shakespeare, e la vasta gamma di personaggi che incontra, l'autore fa rivivere lo scontro tra la civiltà umana e la natura, tra l'era delle macchine e del progresso e l'età innocente, quella contrapposizione tra natura e società tanto cara a Rousseau. E se, da un lato, Huxley propende esplicitamente per l'esaltazione della sua utopia naturale (che, trent'anni più tardi, dipingerà nel suo ultimo romanzo, L'isola), d'altra parte la lotta non può che terminare a favore del più forte. Se pure la storia è costituita da ingredienti semplici, un intreccio minimo ed uno stile piuttosto pallido e insapore, il romanzo è ben sorretto da una grandissima visionarietà, da un elevato spirito critico e da un ricchissimo complesso di conoscenze nei campi più disparati, dalla genetica alla psicologia, dalla clonazione al condizionamento. Ai giorni nostri ormai si perde, eppure va sentito l'ardore della sua immaginazione, che negli anni Trenta riusciva a parlare di clonazione, procreazione artificiale e condizionamento in un modo che ancora oggi risulterebbe abbastanza inquietante. Fondamentale, dunque, la seconda parte del libro, Ritorno al mondo nuovo, un'appendice scritta decenni dopo che raccoglie tutte le considerazioni di Huxley, dalla politica alla psicologia. Se anche risultano ormai accettate le visioni da incubo del progresso tecnologico di Huxley, nondimeno restano amaramente attuali i problemi sollevati, il conflitto tra società ed individuo, il problema sociale delle droghe, l'illusione della felicità, il compromesso, soprattutto, tra realizzazione personale e progresso della società. E resta ancora, pesante come un macigno, l'interrogativo senza risposta: fino a quanto siamo disposti a rinunciare alla nostra libertà per perseguire la realizzazione di una felicità illusoria?

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carol Smith

    Brave New World A difficult book to rate. I thoroughly hated the journey. Random thoughts that popped into my head along the way included: - I’d like to go to Iceland. Right now. - I could really use a soma tablet. - Dystopia is so not my cup of tea The ideas communicated are both profound and profoundly disturbing, but the vehicle used to communicate them to the reader is simply excruciating. Lame, shallow characterizations along with a simplistic and simply boring plot = a lethal combination. In Brave New World A difficult book to rate. I thoroughly hated the journey. Random thoughts that popped into my head along the way included: - I’d like to go to Iceland. Right now. - I could really use a soma tablet. - Dystopia is so not my cup of tea The ideas communicated are both profound and profoundly disturbing, but the vehicle used to communicate them to the reader is simply excruciating. Lame, shallow characterizations along with a simplistic and simply boring plot = a lethal combination. In the excellent foreword (which I don’t recommend reading until the end), Christopher Hitchens suggests that the characters are two-dimensional for a reason – because the Society of BNW has snuffed out their emotional and intellectual depth. This may be so, but it makes for painful reading. Nabokov detested the “novel of ideas” for very good reason – they just aren’t much fun. And yet I thoroughly enjoyed the climactic conversation between the Savage and the World Controller. Here we get to hear Aldous – channeled via Mustapha Mond – brilliantly lay out his full dystopic vision. I just couldn’t bear the path taken to get me there. Brave New World Revisited The earlier chapters on population pressures, over-organization, and propaganda are quite prescient and interesting. I lost interest once he began delving into how the future state will brainwash and distract the individual, and I suspect he did as well. In the end notes, Huxley is quoted as saying, upon completing BNW Revisited, “I am sick and tired of this kind of writing." Finally, it must be said that Huxley was a futurist but was also inevitably a product of his time. His obsession with eugenics, his belief in the hereditary nature of intelligence, and his obvious anti-Semitism detract and distract from his core message. Still, I couldn’t have hated it all that much as I just added Island and Point Counter Point to my GoodReads queue…

  7. 4 out of 5

    Simona Bartolotta

    «How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world that has such people in't!» -W. Shakespeare, 'La tempesta' Nel mondo nuovo ogni singola persona è felice. Ogni singola persona è bella, intelligente, benestante. Be', per essere sinceri circa una metà della popolazione è stata sottoposta ad un arresto della crescita quand'era ancora allo stato embrionale o giù di lì, e adesso è qualcosa come una razza subumana sottomessa agli individui normali. Però fa niente, sono felici anche loro, e sapete perché? La «How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world that has such people in't!» -W. Shakespeare, 'La tempesta' Nel mondo nuovo ogni singola persona è felice. Ogni singola persona è bella, intelligente, benestante. Be', per essere sinceri circa una metà della popolazione è stata sottoposta ad un arresto della crescita quand'era ancora allo stato embrionale o giù di lì, e adesso è qualcosa come una razza subumana sottomessa agli individui normali. Però fa niente, sono felici anche loro, e sapete perché? La verità è che nel mondo nuovo l'individuo singolo non esiste. Esso vive solo ed esclusivamente in quanto membro della società (ognuno appartiene a tutti), ed in quanto membro della società deve essere uguale agli altri membri della società. Se nasci nel mondo nuovo, non hai scelta. Più correttamente, se nasci nel mondo nuovo non sai neppure cosa voglia dire, avere scelta. Da piccolissimo, inizieranno ad inculcarti in testa cosa dovrà piacerti e cosa dovrai odiare, quali saranno gli ideali che dovrai sostenere e i tabù che non oserai violare. Prima addirittura che tu sia nato, il che equivale a dire 'prima che tu sia uscito dalla provetta', Loro -quegli stessi Loro di cui tu un giorno sarai parte- decideranno l'impiego che dovrai avere ed il lavoro che dovrai fare. Ti verrà insegnato a non lasciarti andare alle passioni, dentro di te non nascerà mai nulla di spontaneo. E tu vivrai per tutta la vita così come prefissato, perché la società lo esige. La cosa agghiacciante è che non lo saprai mai. Morirai con la convinzione di aver vissuto una vita felice, ma in verità non hai mai amato, non ti sei disperato, non hai mai avuto fede in qualcosa e non hai mai conosciuto la libertà (libertà: che concetto sfuggente! Chi può dire che noi siamo liberi?). Ma l'uomo, come Huxley stesso dice nei suoi saggi raccolti col titolo Ritorno al mondo nuovo, non è come la formica, o l'ape; l'uomo è come il lupo o l'elefante, un animale di branco, sì, ma solo in certi frangenti. Vedremo infatti, verso la metà del romanzo, un uomo non condizionato, un Selvaggio, venire brutalmente introdotto in questo ambiente e venire sbranato dalla realtà che lo circonda. «Noi preferiamo fare le cose con ogni comodità.» «Ma io non ne voglio di comodità. Io voglio Dio, voglio la poesia, voglio il pericolo reale, voglio la libertà, voglio la bontà. Voglio il peccato.» «Insomma» disse Mustafà Mond «voi reclamate il diritto di essere infelice.» «Ebbene, sì» disse il Selvaggio in tono di sfida «io reclamo il diritto di essere infelice.» «Senza parlare del diritto di diventar vecchio e brutto e impotente; il diritto di avere la sifilide e il cancro; il diritto d'avere poco da mangiare; il diritto d'essere pidocchioso; il diritto di vivere nell'apprensione costante di ciò che potrà accadere domani; il diritto di prendere il tifo; il diritto di essere torturato da indicibile dolori d'ogni specie.» Ci fu un lungo silenzio. «Io li reclamo tutti» disse il Selvaggio finalmente.Di solito si pensa ai romanzi Il mondo nuovo, 1984 e Fahrenheit 451 come i membri di una trilogia, in quanto tutti e tre romanzi distopici. Con questo li ho letti tutti, e con questo mi sono resa davvero conto della forza della letteratura distopica. Una forza che racchiude la capacità di emozionare, interessare, e far funzionare il cervello di chi legge.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eℓℓis ♥

    Una felicità universalmente riconosciuta, ma artificiale è preferibile ad un'esistenza dove sentimenti e aspirazioni sono repressi, la libertà individuale è preclusa e il concetto di bellezza e di famiglia - affinché non venga meno la stabilità della popolazione - viene sacrificato assumendo una connotazione "obsoleta"? Questa la domanda che riecheggia per l'intero romanzo... Huxley ci scaraventa in una società distopica certamente più soft e meno brutale rispetto a quella orwelliana, ma comunqu Una felicità universalmente riconosciuta, ma artificiale è preferibile ad un'esistenza dove sentimenti e aspirazioni sono repressi, la libertà individuale è preclusa e il concetto di bellezza e di famiglia - affinché non venga meno la stabilità della popolazione - viene sacrificato assumendo una connotazione "obsoleta"? Questa la domanda che riecheggia per l'intero romanzo... Huxley ci scaraventa in una società distopica certamente più soft e meno brutale rispetto a quella orwelliana, ma comunque d'effetto poichè la quotidianità delle persone è scandita dalle nozioni con cui sono state plagiate durante la fase dell'ipnopedia e, alla minima difficoltà, obnubilate e intontite dagli effetti allucinogeni e antidepressivi del "soma". Eppure è il saggio critico "Ritorno al mondo nuovo" la vera perla, infatti, l'autore sviscera con minuzia le tematiche che ha trattato, ricollegandosi alle successive scoperte scientifiche e non che si sono verificate dalla pubblicazione del romanzo. Una monografia, questa, punteggiata da un cinismo e pessimismo di fondo, se si pensa che questo libro è datato 1931 è davvero stupefacente quanto sia stato lungimirante e visionario l'autore.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roberto

    Reclamiamo il diritto di essere infelici Chi si interessa di ingegneria ed automazione sa che di fronte ad un determinato problema il progettista ha l'abitudine mentale di analizzarlo, individuarne i dati e le variabili in gioco, fissare gli obiettivi e quindi procedere alla progettazione del sistema per ridimensionarlo, con metodo. Senza tenere conto di fattori etici o legati alla morale. E se tentassimo di risolvere i problemi del mondo attuale con la stessa logica, funzionerebbe? Obiettivo: eli Reclamiamo il diritto di essere infelici Chi si interessa di ingegneria ed automazione sa che di fronte ad un determinato problema il progettista ha l'abitudine mentale di analizzarlo, individuarne i dati e le variabili in gioco, fissare gli obiettivi e quindi procedere alla progettazione del sistema per ridimensionarlo, con metodo. Senza tenere conto di fattori etici o legati alla morale. E se tentassimo di risolvere i problemi del mondo attuale con la stessa logica, funzionerebbe? Obiettivo: eliminazione guerre. Soluzione: creare un governo mondiale che assicuri a tutti ordine ed pace, secondo il motto: "Comunità, Identità, Stabilità”. Obiettivo: miglioramento della specie. Soluzione: creare un ordine mondiale che regoli le nascite dei bambini in laboratorio per via extrauterina, cancellando gravidanze e parti. Manipolare geneticamente gli embrioni dividendo la società in classi, secondo le capacità intellettive e fisiche dell’individuo. "Tipificare" uomini e donne in infornate uniformi, ossia applicare i principi della produzione in massa alla biologia. Obiettivo: miglioramento della stabilità e della qualità della vita. Soluzione: controllare la popolazione con tecniche di indottrinamento e di condizionamento mentale durante il sonno, per convincere ciascuno della propria felicità e del proprio ruolo nella società, smorzando gli istinti egoistici e competitivi. Abolizione della famiglia tradizionale e del matrimonio. Incoraggiamento dei comportamenti sociali di tipo consumistico e dell'uso di droghe, che riducono lo stress; incoraggiare la sessualità per sviare qualunque impulso di ribellione e tensione nei confronti della società. Programmare la vita fino a sessant'anni senza decadimento, con successiva morte serena e senza traumi. Eliminare handicappati, omosessuali e vecchi dalla società. Obiettivo: stabilità economica. Soluzione: provocare disgusto per libri, fiori e per sport all'aria aperta che non necessitino di complicate attrezzature costose. Promuovere i consumi con slogan "Più sono i rammendi e minore è il benessere", "È meglio buttare via che aggiustare" etc. Funzionerebbe, certo. E anche bene, probabilmente. Ma questa ipotesi, che ci descrive benissimo Huxley ne "Il mondo nuovo" del 1931, ci appare invece come un inferno, perché va a minare l'unicità dell'uomo auspicandone la standardizzazione. In realtà noi amiamo le nostre imperfezioni, le nostre sensazioni, i nostri sentimenti, le nostre debolezze, la nostra libertà. E una vita senza queste cose sarebbe inutile e senza senso. "Io voglio Dio, voglio la poesia, voglio il pericolo reale, voglio la libertà, voglio la bontà. Voglio il peccato." "Insomma" disse Mustafà Mond "voi reclamate il diritto di essere infelice." Purtroppo non siamo così lontani dal modello ipotizzato da Huxley e credo dobbiamo fare un notevole sforzo per evitare che questo approccio scientifico possa essere applicato estensivamente al "nostro" mondo. Curioso cosa scriveva Huxley riguardo ai candidati politici: "Contano davvero solo due cose: la personalità del candidato e la maniera in cui la sanno proiettare gli esperti della pubblicità. Il candidato deve essere bello, in qualche modo, o virile o paterno. Deve saper intrattenere il pubblico senza annoiarlo. Il pubblico, avvezzo alla televisione e alla radio, vuole lasciarsi distrarre, e non ama che gli si chieda di concentrarsi, di compiere una lunga fatica intellettuale. Perciò i discorsi del candidato attore devono essere brevi e scattanti. I grandi problemi del momento debbono esser liquidati in cinque minuti al massimo. La natura dell'oratoria è tale che fra i politici e i chierici c'è sempre stata la tendenza a semplificare le questioni complicate. Dalla tribuna o dal pulpito anche al più coscienzioso degli oratori è difficile dire tutta la verità. I metodi che si usano oggi per vendere il candidato politico, come se fosse un deodorante, danno all'elettorato questa garanzia: egli non sentirà mai dire la verità, su niente." Inquietante, inquietante davvero...

  10. 4 out of 5

    John M

    What I like most about Brave New World is that it centers on the disease of human passivity as it's controlled by the higher-ups in society. With 1984 there is the possibility for consciousness of the inherent evil of the subversive intolerance of the government, and therefore the possibility for revolution. If only the people would realize their situation! If only the proles could unite against totalitarian tyranny! With Huxley's fable, however, this consciousness is completely undermined throu What I like most about Brave New World is that it centers on the disease of human passivity as it's controlled by the higher-ups in society. With 1984 there is the possibility for consciousness of the inherent evil of the subversive intolerance of the government, and therefore the possibility for revolution. If only the people would realize their situation! If only the proles could unite against totalitarian tyranny! With Huxley's fable, however, this consciousness is completely undermined through the fulfillment of the base drives of the majority. There is no reason to rebel, and society can change only through an impossible systematic negation of all the techniques espoused that clamor to fulfill these drives. Anyone who comes to realize the true state of affairs isn't filled with a Herculean wish to revamp it, but can only sigh to himself while secretly saying, "ah, that's just society getting what it wants," and make plans for voluntary exile. This is the cynicism of Huxley given literary flesh. He echoes the Dostoevskian lament through the Grand Inquisitor (alluded to in Brave New World Revisited) that human beings want to be taken care of and provided for, not free. Freedom is too hard, it takes work, and to be human is to take the easy way out. The grandeur of Huxley is that he wasn't just a novelist, as seems to be the case with creative writers for the last fifty years -- Walker Percy, Anthony Burgess, and a handful of others exempt. "Brave New World Revisited" attests to this fact, as well as other minor philosophical gems, like "The Perennial Philosophy", where he stretches to mysticism, and "The Doors of Perception", where he journals the psychedelic flavor of mescaline. His ruminations are perfectly commensurate with our state today -- where education is in decline, where neohedonism is the game, where it's all about money and fulfillment of drives over truth, etc. --, and the points that shine the most are on propaganda and, well, the distractability of human beings: "In regard to propaganda the early advocates of universal literacy and a free press envisaged only two possibilities: the propaganda might be true, or it might be false. They did not foresee what in fact has happened, above all in our Western capitalist democracies -- the development of a vast mass communications industry, concerned in the main neither with the true nor the false, but with the unreal, the more or less totally irrelevant. In a word, they failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." This is the basis of society in Brave New World, and scientific and technological advances (eugenics, hypnopaedia, classical conditioning) are a means to this end. Huxley saw, like Chomsky after him, that you don't need to bludgeon the population in order to coerce it to your preferences. Rather, you manipulate minds. Things are less messy this way.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jakk Makk

    Brave New World beat out 1984 as the tyranny of choice. Consider smartphone addiction, people love to be enslaved 2,ooo times a day and beg for the privilege. I don't believe most people make independent decisions anymore, they just act out their programming. The first step to overcoming brainwashing is to realize you've been brainwashed. Do you fail to one star your DNF's? To do so is to cheat the reading community of their time. Is it because you are lazy or because you want to be nice? If you Brave New World beat out 1984 as the tyranny of choice. Consider smartphone addiction, people love to be enslaved 2,ooo times a day and beg for the privilege. I don't believe most people make independent decisions anymore, they just act out their programming. The first step to overcoming brainwashing is to realize you've been brainwashed. Do you fail to one star your DNF's? To do so is to cheat the reading community of their time. Is it because you are lazy or because you want to be nice? If you are doing it in order to get more likes, are you certain that strategy is effective? Or is it because your handlers have taught you to never question authority? Is three question marks in a row bad style? If you can't embody this level of skepticism you may no longer have a choice in the matter. Why do people self-censor? Is it training or the path of least resistance? If you are still reading this I highly recommend Brave New World Revisited. It's a checklist of how we got to where we are now.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kirstin

    This one just didn't live up to the hype I had built up about it. I feel bad giving it 3 stars but I just didn't enjoy it that much. I'm sure I should have read it long ago.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Grazia

    Si supponga per assurdo che... ... in un futuro imprecisato si costituisca una società in cui: - sia deprecato avere rapporti monogami - l'uomo si riproduca attraverso la manipolazione genetica, e sempre per il tramite di essa si decida a priori la classe di appartenenza dell'essere così generato - non esistano i sentimenti, i legami, ma uno stato di tranquillità perenne indotto dalla soddisfazione degli istinti primari - si faccia uso legale di una droga, 'soma', per il cui tramite la tristezza o l Si supponga per assurdo che... ... in un futuro imprecisato si costituisca una società in cui: - sia deprecato avere rapporti monogami - l'uomo si riproduca attraverso la manipolazione genetica, e sempre per il tramite di essa si decida a priori la classe di appartenenza dell'essere così generato - non esistano i sentimenti, i legami, ma uno stato di tranquillità perenne indotto dalla soddisfazione degli istinti primari - si faccia uso legale di una droga, 'soma', per il cui tramite la tristezza o l'inquietudine non siano più stati d'animo contemplati - non si educhi, si condizioni. - il condizionamento sia non solo lecito, ma la modalità accettata e condivisa, ciò che consente alle persone di vivere con serenità in quanto "questo è il segreto della felicità e della virtù: amare ciò che si deve amare." - la solitudine sia abolita - la vecchiaia sia abolita - la morte avvenga tra l'indifferenza più totale in quanto nessuno è legato a nessuno - tutto profumi, anche nello scarico del water scenda acqua di colonia - il progresso scientifico venga indirizzato al controllo della società - la lettura dei classici sia abolita, anzi in realtà la lettura sia abolita - Dio sia soppiantato da un certo signor Ford, mente ideatrice del modello sociologico applicato Ehm... ma siam sicuri di ragionare così tanto per assurdo? "La gente è felice; ottiene ciò che vuole, e non vuole mai ciò che non può ottenere. Sta bene; è al sicuro; non è mai malata; non ha paura della morte; è serenamente ignorante della passione e della vecchiaia; non è ingombrata né da padri né da madri; non ha spose, figli o amanti che procurino loro emozioni violente; è condizionata in tal modo che praticamente non può fare a meno di condursi come si deve. E se per caso qualche cosa non va, c'è il "soma"... " Ed voilà. ...ecco la stabilità! Come dire... inquietante! E Se, in questo mondo agghiacciante, all'interno di una riserva, esistesse anche solo un uomo non condizionato e non condizionabile? E se quest'unico uomo non omologato reclamasse a gran voce: "Io voglio Dio, voglio la poesia, voglio il pericolo reale, voglio la libertà, voglio la bontà. Voglio il peccato"? Vien da chiedersi quanto distiamo da quel modello. Vien da rimanere stupefatti e ammirati da un visione così lungimirante e profetica. Questa favola, come la chiama Huxley, è stata scritta nel 1931. Ammazza se fa riflettere.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Giovanna

    4.5 Terrificante. Terrificante perché vicino. Perché dà da pensare. Perché la realtà de Il mondo nuovo è molto più simile alla nostra di quanto avrei mai pensato. 1984 fa paura, perché per chi lo legge ora parla di un passato più recente di quanto non ci piaccia pensare, ma Il mondo nuovo può farci paura perché parla di un presente. E lo stesso Huxley ci fa notare che al tempo della sua stesura Il mondo nuovo sembrava un futuro remoto, poco probabile mentre 1984 era la certezza. E invece eccoci q 4.5 Terrificante. Terrificante perché vicino. Perché dà da pensare. Perché la realtà de Il mondo nuovo è molto più simile alla nostra di quanto avrei mai pensato. 1984 fa paura, perché per chi lo legge ora parla di un passato più recente di quanto non ci piaccia pensare, ma Il mondo nuovo può farci paura perché parla di un presente. E lo stesso Huxley ci fa notare che al tempo della sua stesura Il mondo nuovo sembrava un futuro remoto, poco probabile mentre 1984 era la certezza. E invece eccoci qua. Gli abitanti de Il mondo nuovo non vengono controllati tramite il timore, il controllo esercitato con il pugno di ferro ma tramite il piacere. Illusi di vivere una vita perfetta, beata, immune da qualsiasi rischio. Omologati. Ignari. E noi? Non viviamo forse una realtà simile? Siamo storditi dalle novità, dal progresso inarrestabile, dalla convinzione di vivere in un mondo bellissimo, colorato, illuminato dalle luci dei riflettori. E alla fine convinti di vivere sempre al massimo non ci accorgiamo che ci manca proprio il tassello fondamentale del puzzle: la consapevolezza. Ci manca una visione chiara e nitida delle cose, perché vediamo ciò che vogliamo vedere, ciò che più ci interessa vedere. Noi siamo come il cavallo a cui un fantino mette i paraocchi per non farlo imbizzarrire: ciechi. Ma di peggio c'è che noi ci lasciamo accecare, quando avremmo una facoltà unica nel suo genere: il pensiero. Consigliato a chiunque sia in cerca di una lettura scorrevole ma impegnativa.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    I needed something to read on the plane from San Antonio so I picked this book up at an airport bookstore. It was a good choice because I have been interested in dystopian literature for some time. I found Brave New World both prescient and engaging. I thought Huxley did a good job not only describing his view of the future, but also supplying a decent plot and good character development. The interplay between the rebellious intellectual Bernard Marx, the beautiful and shallow, fully acclimated I needed something to read on the plane from San Antonio so I picked this book up at an airport bookstore. It was a good choice because I have been interested in dystopian literature for some time. I found Brave New World both prescient and engaging. I thought Huxley did a good job not only describing his view of the future, but also supplying a decent plot and good character development. The interplay between the rebellious intellectual Bernard Marx, the beautiful and shallow, fully acclimated Lenina Crowne, and the "Savage" John from New Mexico was interesting. I also appreciated the contrast between hyper-modern London and the Indian reservation in New Mexico, where old traditions persisted. Huxley described the setting in both places convincingly, although they represented opposite extremes of human behavior. I do see some signs that Huxley's depressing vision of the future has been realized. For example, the stratification of society according to cognitive skills is very evident today. One might even suggest that today's surveillance state and military-industrial complex leave little room for individuality. A powerful media is capable of transmitting government propaganda. Our popular culture is extremely low-brow and decadent. Perhaps it is difficult to have authentic, unmediated experiences and shape one's own destiny. Those who try to live off the grid in order to escape the confining norms and conventions of a post-industrial society may relate to Huxley's dystopian vision.

  16. 4 out of 5

    ✧ k a t i e ✧

    Yeah, I enjoyed this 10000000000x better than 1984. AND WHAT WAS THAT ENDING????

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mickdemaria

    Il mondo nuovo è insieme a 1984 e a Noi di Zamjatin uno dei grandi romanzi distopici del '900. Aldous Huxley è un grande intellettuale che proviene da una famiglia di intellettuali, accademico, filosofo, investigatore lisergico, musicologo, romanziere... Non c'è ambito del sapere che questo autore non abbia toccato. Mente curiosa e vivace ci consegna con quest'opera un grande romanzo e una seria riflessione sociologica in un'epoca in cui il concetto di distopia ancora non esisteva. Il romanzo ci Il mondo nuovo è insieme a 1984 e a Noi di Zamjatin uno dei grandi romanzi distopici del '900. Aldous Huxley è un grande intellettuale che proviene da una famiglia di intellettuali, accademico, filosofo, investigatore lisergico, musicologo, romanziere... Non c'è ambito del sapere che questo autore non abbia toccato. Mente curiosa e vivace ci consegna con quest'opera un grande romanzo e una seria riflessione sociologica in un'epoca in cui il concetto di distopia ancora non esisteva. Il romanzo ci trasporta in un Mondo Nuovo, per l'appunto. Un mondo fondato sulla stabilità sociale, sul controllo delle nascite e delle morti. Un mondo ordinato, classificato in rigide gerarchie predisposte dal "travaso" (la nascita è considerata pratica oscena ed obsoleta), un mondo nel quale ogni individuo è costruito in modo tale da essere soddisfatto di ciò che è, in cui il desiderio è visto come fonte di possibile instabilità sociale. Voglio ciò che sono quindi non devo combattere per avere di più. Grazie ad un'attenta programmazione e all'uso costante di droghe. Le leggi della forma romanzo impongono anche la presenza di "selvaggi" contenuti dentro riserve assolutamente separate, ovvero individui dediti ancora a pratiche antisociali come la riproduzione vivipara, la monogamia, il culto di dei. L'incontro tra le diverse culture porterà il lettore e i personaggi alla riflessione su un possibile modello sociale. Il romanzo è oggi più attuale che mai. La de-personalizzazione, la sovrappopolazione, il concetto di una società che concede ai propri membri tutti quegli svaghi che sono funzionali al mantenimento di un ordine... Sono aspetti assolutamente presenti nella nostra quotidianità, ma ancora non presenti nel tempo in cui il romanzo fu scritto. Questo ci dà la misura di quanto il pensiero di Huxley fosse a fuoco e lungimirante. Non entrerò nel merito della questione non avendo gli strumenti intellettuali necessari. Vorrei però, per un attimo, abbandonare l'impulso manicheo che ci fa etichettare subito come "sbagliato" un mondo come quello ideato da Huxley. Mi viene in mente una famosa citazione da "Il terzo uomo": In Italia, sotto i Borgia, per trent'anni hanno avuto guerre, terrore, assassini, massacri: e hanno prodotto Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci e il Rinascimento. In Svizzera, hanno avuto amore fraterno, cinquecento anni di pace e democrazia, e cos'hanno prodotto? Gli orologi a cucù. La grandezza dell'uomo (per come la pensiamo noi) è frutto del disequilibrio, della violenza, della sopraffazione. Questo è giusto? Siamo sicuri che sia il tipo di vita che desideriamo? Perché l'uomo deve essere necessariamente imprevedibile e creativo? Perché deve tendere ad un fine ultimo? Perché è l'essere eletto da dio? La violenza e la sopraffazione sono leggi di natura, strumenti per la sopravvivenza della specie. E se non fossero più necessari? Nel romanzo il vecchio soccombe, il nuovo sopravvive. Ma Huxley non ci da lezioni, non ci imbocca una verità predigerita. Si limita a fare un esperimento mentale. Ci offre un mondo nuovo, possibile (o probabile) e ci chiede di immaginarlo, di valutarlo, di prenderlo in considerazione, di metterci in discussione, mette sulla bilancia Shakespeare e Ford e ci lascia liberi di pesarli usando il nostro metro di giudizio. E in fin dei conti questo è tutto ciò che si può chiedere ad un'opera letteraria. Voto:8

  18. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    Yes, I read this a long time ago. No, I didn't remember anything. I came to the book thinking it was a mirror image of 1984, with the political violence and control. But Huxley is much more subtle, and ironic. The control evident in THIS Brave New World has been willingly given over...relationships, emotions, drive, ambition. Individualism...none of this matters, and no one cares. I had forgotten the tongue-in-cheek humor in the observations...until John Savage appears. Then the tone shifts and t Yes, I read this a long time ago. No, I didn't remember anything. I came to the book thinking it was a mirror image of 1984, with the political violence and control. But Huxley is much more subtle, and ironic. The control evident in THIS Brave New World has been willingly given over...relationships, emotions, drive, ambition. Individualism...none of this matters, and no one cares. I had forgotten the tongue-in-cheek humor in the observations...until John Savage appears. Then the tone shifts and the book moves to its conclusion. This book was published in 1932 -- 15 years before his student, Orwell, published his dystopia. Huxley's predictions of technology and the intent of technology are uncanny. The visit to the Indian Pueblo in New Mexico makes me wonder if he traveled...that area of the country is a favorite for us, and his portrayal of the village and the area were fascinating. John, and his unconscious references to Shakespeare, added that outsider view of the culture, and reminds us how alien it really is. "Oh, brave new world, that has such people in it." Indeed. Indeed. John's philosophical discussion with Mond (world?) lets us know Mond also can throw out Shakespearan lines at will...he understands the ridiculousness of the world he supports...and he supports it anyway. The essays Huxley wrote in 1958, revisiting his novel were so interesting. He seemed very defensive that his book never reached the heights that his student, Orwell reached. His letter to Orwell after the younger man sent him a copy of 1984 seems touchy... He revisted in his essays the issues he felt were important in his novel...overpopulation, over-organization, propaganda, the arts of selling, brainwashing, chemical persuasion, hypnopaedia (sleep learning), and education for freedom. He explains that his book is a blueprint for 'a new kind of nonviolent totalitarianism.' He believed, and I see evidence, that humans will participate willingly in the stripping of their rights and responsibilities. That's the tragedy of Brave New World...people have lost their responsibilities, their individuality, their ability and willingness to do right, to make decisions.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Briar Rose

    There are so many layers to Brave New World. One aspect that is often overlooked is its exploration of what it means to be human, and how far humanity can be stretched and altered before basic humanness disappears. I think this is why the book still resonates today -- even though the methods have changed, we are still using technology to play with the idea of humanness, whether it be computers, genetic engineering or something else. The book raises questions about the interplay of science and te There are so many layers to Brave New World. One aspect that is often overlooked is its exploration of what it means to be human, and how far humanity can be stretched and altered before basic humanness disappears. I think this is why the book still resonates today -- even though the methods have changed, we are still using technology to play with the idea of humanness, whether it be computers, genetic engineering or something else. The book raises questions about the interplay of science and technology with power and social engineering. Huxley both reveres and fears science, he welcomes its advances and comfort it brings, and fears the unintended consequences of its application, and science that has no reference to a system of ethics. Then there are the questions of sex and love and happiness and suffering and how a person can function both as an individual and a member of a society, and whether the two are even possible. The novel itself is only half a novel -- it is really more a place to hang ideas on, and all the characters function as authorial ciphers. The plot is superficial, a mere way to explore the world Huxley has created and all its strange and terrifying consequences. But it's still compelling, funny and bizarre to read; I still wanted to keep turning the pages. Brave New World Revisited is less interesting, but still fascinating as a piece of paleofuturism -- a forecast from the 1950s about what the world would look like today. It is interesting how much Huxley got right, and how much he got wrong. Many of the issues he was concerned with no longer trouble us, but others are just as relevant today as they were when he wrote it. I was unimpressed with the introduction in this edition, written by Christopher Hitchens. His ideas were confused, he was clearly pushing his own agenda rather than introducing us to the work, and ultimately I feel he just didn't understand Huxley or his novel. Disappointing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kane Bergstrom

    Tonight, I finished "Brave New World", a book published in 1932, by Aldous Huxley. Ironically I was wearing work boots and pants, and on the clock for a fortune five hundred company. A pawn, an epsilon if you may, in this world run on time, money, and class. His visions have come true in a sense, but just the fact that we can read such things proves different. But, it does give proof that maybe his new society had it right. If I had never read this book, or any book, or any free form of entertai Tonight, I finished "Brave New World", a book published in 1932, by Aldous Huxley. Ironically I was wearing work boots and pants, and on the clock for a fortune five hundred company. A pawn, an epsilon if you may, in this world run on time, money, and class. His visions have come true in a sense, but just the fact that we can read such things proves different. But, it does give proof that maybe his new society had it right. If I had never read this book, or any book, or any free form of entertainment, I wouldn't know any better than what's right in front of me. Oblivious happiness. So, maybe the secret is to care a bit less, and stop looking so deeply? Well, if you never know, and if you never dare to know, then what the fuck is the point? To just work your life away, have meaningless sex, watch oatmeal tasting movies, and not know any better? To just pop a pill and settle for the mundane. To not think differently ever. Huxley for me confirms beliefs in the way I was brought up and taught to think and believe. To never stop asking questions, to always search for more, and to not be afraid of failure, in fact, embrace it, and learn from it. Keep dreaming, and keep learning. I recommend this and "Island" for a bit of an escape of everyday life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alessandro

    Cos'è la libertà umana che qui si perde assieme all'individualità? Meglio è viver al proprio posto, in un mondo nuovo, secondo le proprie capacità individuali prestabilite al concepimento in provetta; in una civiltà calcolata che come una macchina ben oliata gira e rigira nell'ignoranza e accettazione individuale e nella perfetta organizzazione collettiva; oppure invece esser selvaggi e saper leggere e citare Shakespeare e provare emozioni disgustose e arretrate? Cos'è meglio e cosa inquieta di pi Cos'è la libertà umana che qui si perde assieme all'individualità? Meglio è viver al proprio posto, in un mondo nuovo, secondo le proprie capacità individuali prestabilite al concepimento in provetta; in una civiltà calcolata che come una macchina ben oliata gira e rigira nell'ignoranza e accettazione individuale e nella perfetta organizzazione collettiva; oppure invece esser selvaggi e saper leggere e citare Shakespeare e provare emozioni disgustose e arretrate? Cos'è meglio e cosa inquieta di più?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Atilio Frasson

    Tres estrellas para "Un mundo feliz" y cuatro para "Nueva visita a un mundo feliz"

  23. 5 out of 5

    FerroN

    “Tutti sono felici” nel Mondo Nuovo: due miliardi di automi inumani, prodotti e selezionati in laboratorio e condizionati con tecniche subliminali fin dalla nascita, sottoposti alla felice tirannia del benessere. Con l’ausilio di scienza e tecnologia, lo stato mondiale programma ciascuno di essi per un preciso compito da svolgere nella società e, tramite un corollario di divertimenti, distrazioni e droghe, riesce a far sì che nessuno possa prendere coscienza della propria assoluta mancanza di li “Tutti sono felici” nel Mondo Nuovo: due miliardi di automi inumani, prodotti e selezionati in laboratorio e condizionati con tecniche subliminali fin dalla nascita, sottoposti alla felice tirannia del benessere. Con l’ausilio di scienza e tecnologia, lo stato mondiale programma ciascuno di essi per un preciso compito da svolgere nella società e, tramite un corollario di divertimenti, distrazioni e droghe, riesce a far sì che nessuno possa prendere coscienza della propria assoluta mancanza di libertà. Huxley immagina per l’umanità un futuro antiutopico in cui un’élite ristrettissima controlla agevolmente l’intera popolazione mondiale; nessun ricorso alla forza, né violenze né punizioni sono necessarie per sottomettere e mantenere l’ordine in una massa perennemente condizionata e gratificata dalla possibilità di soddisfare qualsiasi desiderio materiale. Dopo i primi capitoli, nei quali viene illustrato l’inquietante Mondo Nuovo, la vicenda prende corpo. La trama però è piuttosto esile. Uno dei momenti più riusciti (e il più divertente) è il tentativo di seduzione effettuato da Lenina Crowne nei confronti di John (chiamato “il Selvaggio” perché proveniente da una delle riserve dove vengono segregati i soggetti “difettosi” e quelli nati ancora fuori controllo): è la collisione definitiva, senza speranze di comprensione, tra l’umanità perfetta uscita dalle provette e quella sporca, antica e “vivipara”. Il passaggio più forzato – e poco plausibile – è costituito dalla lunga dissertazione filosofica tra uno dei dieci governatori del mondo e John (cresciuto senza alcuna istruzione, “il Selvaggio” deve infatti tutta la sua preparazione scolastica alla sola lettura dell’opera completa di Shakespeare, libro trovato per caso nella Riserva messicana). Ritorno al Mondo Nuovo è una raccolta di saggi scritta ventisei anni dopo l’uscita di Il Mondo Nuovo. Prendendo spunto dai temi contenuti nel romanzo, l’autore analizza l’evoluzione della società avvenuta nel frattempo e quella che si prepara nel futuro. Sovrappopolazione, scarsità di riserve energetiche e alimentari come possibili cause di derive autoritarie; pubblicità e messaggi subliminali, metodi di propaganda politica importati da quella commerciale; medesime dinamiche di persuasione di massa utilizzate da regimi dittatoriali evoluti e da sistemi democratici, concentrazione dei poteri economici e finanziari e conseguente asservimento della politica, benessere in cambio della rinuncia alla libertà: sono gli argomenti che più preoccupavano Huxley nel 1958, tutte tematiche attuali ma cui i più influenti mezzi di comunicazione evitano accuratamente di accennare. “I maggiori trionfi della propaganda sono stati compiuti non facendo qualcosa, ma astenendosi dal farlo. Importante è la verità, ma ancor più importante, da un punto di vista pratico, è il silenzio sulla verità”. Aldous Huxley, 1958 * * * Nota: L’edizione Oscar Mondadori (ristampa 2014/2015) contiene anche l’inedita Prefazione all’edizione 1946 del Mondo Nuovo e il saggio conclusivo Il Mondo Nuovo e i suoi ritorni di Alessandro Maurini. La traduzione di Lorenzo Gigli di Il Mondo Nuovo, risalente al 1933, è stata riveduta e corretta da Paola Levante (sono stati eliminati soprattutto l’arcaico utilizzo del “voi” come forma di cortesia, l’abuso dell’elisione e la reiterazione dei pronomi personali), mentre la revisione della traduzione di Luciano Bianciardi di Ritorno al Mondo Nuovo è opera della figlia Luciana.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    O wonder! How many godly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in't. —William Shakespeare, The Tempest This was a reread for me (why did everyone who saw me with this book say, "Haven't you read that before?") and I suppose since everyone has read it, everyone knows the basic premise of Brave New World: About 600 years from now, after a devastating Nine Years War full of terror and anthrax bombs, a world government is put into place. Through gen O wonder! How many godly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in't. —William Shakespeare, The Tempest This was a reread for me (why did everyone who saw me with this book say, "Haven't you read that before?") and I suppose since everyone has read it, everyone knows the basic premise of Brave New World: About 600 years from now, after a devastating Nine Years War full of terror and anthrax bombs, a world government is put into place. Through genetic manipulation, the population is engineered to fulfill the tasks of their preordained castes, and through hypnopaedia, the population is conditioned to accept the imposed values of their society. As adults, people are discouraged from solitary pursuits, and as a result of their conditioning, spend leisure time devoted to consumerism, group sport, free sex (including mandatory orgies), 4-D movies called "feelies", and the consumption of soma -- a drug that brightens mood, aids sleep, or enables a mental holiday, depending on dosage. When a "savage" from a New Mexico Indian Reservation is introduced to the totalitarian society, both he and the people that he meets are innately repulsed by the other. Now, I reread Brave New World at this time because in Liberal Fascism, author Jonah Goldberg warned that this is the future that we're blindly marching towards. And as Goldberg also stated each time he invoked Aldous Huxley, many people read this book and wonder, "What would be so wrong with that?" The world's stable now. People are happy; they get what they want; and they never want what they can't get. They're well-off; they're safe; they're never ill; they're not afraid of death; they're blissfully ignorant of passion and old age; they're plagued with no mothers or fathers; they've got no wives, or children, or lovers to feel strong about; they're so conditioned that they practically can't help behaving as they ought to behave. And if anything should go wrong, there's soma. That doesn't actually sound so bad, but even Huxley himself makes it clear that his vision of the future here is a dystopia, not a utopia, and in Brave New World Revisited -- which he wrote in 1958 and which was included in the edition that I read -- he despaired that his vision was coming true even quicker than he foresaw and hoped to warn society against sleepwalking towards a future of conformity, loss of freedom, and the mindless pursuit of the trivial and degenerate. Huxley's warnings about imminent overpopulation (and, in particular, his predictions about the overbreeding of the wrong sorts of people) -- which is the lynchpin of his argument -- now seems quaintly outdated in the same way that Marx wasn't right about the imminent revolt of the working class, so it's tempting to dismiss all of his fears out of hand. For contrasting views about what modern writers think of the vision of Brave New World, here's a dissenting viewpoint from The New York Times in 2013 (but it is interesting to read in the comments section that most readers think that this article is off the mark) and an article from The New York Post in 2012 that thinks Huxley was a visionary. To me, putting Brave New World into context like this is far more interesting than simply reading the novel on its own, and insofar as Huxley was considered a great thinker of his time, I think that was his intent (and forgives the less than perfectly literary constructions of his book). Even if Huxley didn't impeccably envision the near future (although Jonah Goldberg and Kyle Smith of The Post might make compelling parallels), Brave New World certainly extrapolates a logical progression from what Huxley identified as the problems of his time, and if they have any resonance with modern readers, we would do well to sit up and take notice.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin B.

    What would happen if you were designed in a lab? If things like hair color, height, and IQ, were determined by a Greek letter? Brave New World is a book where people are born in test tubes. They are then decided to be in the Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, or Epsilon class. Then they decide all of your characteristics, based on what class you are in. As you group up, you are taught morals through the hypnopaedic process (sleep-teaching). One of these morals is to not like being alone. But, there is What would happen if you were designed in a lab? If things like hair color, height, and IQ, were determined by a Greek letter? Brave New World is a book where people are born in test tubes. They are then decided to be in the Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, or Epsilon class. Then they decide all of your characteristics, based on what class you are in. As you group up, you are taught morals through the hypnopaedic process (sleep-teaching). One of these morals is to not like being alone. But, there is a man named Bernard Marx who has different ideas. He prefers solitude to company. This makes him unique to the society, which threatens England’s moral structure. A theme from the book is “Having people have diverse thought processes is important.” Something that the author did great was portraying a possible future. Also, he did a great incorporation of complexity and simplicity. It was a very interesting style of writing to read. The book Brave New World is a classic for a few reasons. One reason is the quality of the writing. Another reason is the genius involved in the book. Finally, The book’s plot is very interesting and complex. Clearly, the book, Brave New World, is an amazing work of art.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    This was an OK book. First off I enjoyed the futuristic feel of the book even though it was written back in the Thirties. The idea of humans being mass produced is pretty wild. The thing that I didn't like about it was the dryness of the book. I did not see a plot buildup nor a very "high" climax in the plot. In some sections the book is really dense and I would have to use Sparknotes on it to try and decipher its meaning. In some other cases it was a good read that I could follow. I am the type This was an OK book. First off I enjoyed the futuristic feel of the book even though it was written back in the Thirties. The idea of humans being mass produced is pretty wild. The thing that I didn't like about it was the dryness of the book. I did not see a plot buildup nor a very "high" climax in the plot. In some sections the book is really dense and I would have to use Sparknotes on it to try and decipher its meaning. In some other cases it was a good read that I could follow. I am the type of person that if I feel like reading a book, I would want to just sit down and read it. I dont want to use my brain to try and get a small message out of it, but that's just me. The book has a lot of input on politics. I am not into politics so this book was sort of a bust for me. The characters in the book were probably more interesting than the actual book. You have a sex addict (Lenina), a socially awkward penquin (Bernard), a noob (John), and a hypocrite (The Dirsctor). I dont regret reading this book, but I wish that it was a little more entertaining and less prophetic.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Samantha wickedshizuku Tolleson

    A very disturbing read! I was very upset by this book on many levels, but was intrigued by the structure Huxley used. Every different line was a different plot following many chracters.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eustachio

    Avete tutto il diritto di additarmi per strada urlando «SCHIAPPA!» o «Non hai capito proprio niente!», ma uno dei tanti problemi che ho avuto con Il mondo nuovo in quanto distopia nella triade dei tanto amati 1984 e Fahrenheit 451 non è solo che questi due sono molto meglio, bensì che quella di Huxley secondo me più che una distopia è un'utopia. Ne Il mondo nuovo non c'è più il concetto di famiglia, la società è divisa in caste, le persone condizionate sin dalla nascita a essere felici nella prop Avete tutto il diritto di additarmi per strada urlando «SCHIAPPA!» o «Non hai capito proprio niente!», ma uno dei tanti problemi che ho avuto con Il mondo nuovo in quanto distopia nella triade dei tanto amati 1984 e Fahrenheit 451 non è solo che questi due sono molto meglio, bensì che quella di Huxley secondo me più che una distopia è un'utopia. Ne Il mondo nuovo non c'è più il concetto di famiglia, la società è divisa in caste, le persone condizionate sin dalla nascita a essere felici nella propria casta, non si invecchia, tutti appartengono a tutti (cioè si incentiva il sesso fine a se stesso e a non legarsi emotivamente con nessuno) e a fine giornata ti spetta una razione di droga. Datemi dello scemo, ma non mi sembra un mondo così orribile. Ok, l'individuo non esiste, non c'è libertà di pensiero, qualsiasi forma di vera arte è bandita, ma finché stai bene e sei (portato a pensare di essere) felice col tuo lavoro e di non desiderare nient'altro, alla fine stai bene e sei felice. Se poi hai la sfiga di sviluppare un pensiero personale cosa fanno, ti ammazzano? Macché: ti mandano in un'isola con persone come te, così coltivi la speranza di poter sovvertire il sistema, che più o meno vuol dire che, avendo uno scopo a lungo termine e qualcuno pronto ad appoggiarti, un modo per provare a essere felice lo trovi. La storia in sé è lenta e una volta spiegate le regole della nuova civiltà non c'è molto di che sorprendersi per lo sviluppo. Da questo punto di vista ho apprezzato di gran lunga Ritorno al mondo nuovo, una serie di saggi scritta da Huxley quasi trent'anni dopo su argomenti quali la sovrappopolazione e la propaganda, temi affrontati in modo semplicistico nel romanzo e che col senno di poi potrebbero rappresentare una minaccia seria per l'umanità. Tipo. No, non fraintendetemi, concordo che la Terra si sta facendo sempre più affollata e che la tv ci fa il lavaggio del cervello, ma le dittature e gli scenari apocalittici profetizzati da Huxley dopo sessant'anni sembrano un po' esagerati. Concedetemi di ritagliarmi un po' di spazio qui per lanciare mattoni contro la Mondadori (attenzione, seguiranno spoiler). La traduzione è terribile. Non è terribile perché è vecchia, è terribile perché nessuno s'è preso la briga di rivederla. Non mi importa più di tanto se mi trovo davanti "egli", "esso", "ella", "essa", "donde", "aperse", "lagrime" e "ad onta", ma vogliamo parlare dell'uso del voi al posto del lei, i nomi tradotti, i calchi e le citazioni shakespeariane non colte? Errori e traduzioni brutte brutte: La fanciulla si voltò di scatto. [...] «Enrico!» Il suo sorriso le scoperse in un lampo rosso una fila di denti di corallo. «Carina, carina» mormorò il Direttore [...] (cap. 1, pag. 17) «Noi condizioniamo le masse a odiare la campagna» concluse il Direttore. [...] «Vedo» disse lo studente [...] (cap. 2, pag. 22) «Marx» disse «potete far presente qualche vostra ragione perché io non metta subito in esecuzione la sentenza che è stata emessa contro di voi?» «Sì, lo posso» rispose Bernardo a voce altissima. (cap. 10, pag. 133) Sospirò. Bernardo, frattanto, aveva trovato che Miss Keate non era da buttar via. (cap 11, pag. 143) Bernardo cercò di spiegarglielo, poi mutò pensiero e propose d'andare a visitare qualche altra classe. (cap. 11, pag. 144) E poi ci sono tutte le citazioni non colte. Quando ci si trova di fronte a una citazione bisognerebbe attenersi a una traduzione unica e conosciuta, così che il lettore del testo d'arrivo possa riconoscerla come tale. E se della citazione ci sono più traduzioni, bisognerebbe semplicemente attenersi alla stessa traduzione ogni volta che la citazione si presenta. Logico, no? Il titolo originale è Brave New World, espressione che viene da La tempesta di Shakespeare. Per la precisione è una battuta di Miranda dal quinto atto, prima scena: O wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in't. Il Selvaggio, novello mostro di Frankenstein, ovvero essere "incivile" che impara a conoscere il mondo "civile" tramite alta letteratura, cita di continuo le opere di Shakespeare perché è l'unico libro che ha letto. In inglese: 1. "O wonder!" he was saying; and his eyes shone, his face was brightly flushed. "How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is!" [...] "O brave new world," he began, then-suddenly interrupted himself; [...] "O brave new world," he repeated. "O brave new world that has such people in it. Let's start at once." (cap. 8) 2. "O brave new world …" By some malice of his memory the Savage found himself repeating Miranda's words. "O brave new world that has such people in it." (cap. 11) 3. "How many goodly creatures are there here!" The singing words mocked him derisively. "How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world..." (cap. 15) Le frasi sono identiche. Il Selvaggio cita Shakespeare a memoria, è ovvio che le frasi siano le stesse. In italiano invece abbiamo: 1. «O meraviglia!» diceva; e i suoi occhi brillavano, il suo viso era tutto illuminato. «Quante soavi creature ci sono qui! Come l'umanità è bella!» [...] «O nuovo mondo ammirevole!» cominciò; [...] «O nuovo mondo ammirevole!» ripeté. «O nuovo mondo ammirevole che contieni simile gente! Partiamo subito.» (cap. 8, pagg. 123-124) 2. "O nuovo mondo mirabile..." Per qualche fantasia della sua memoria, il Selvaggio si provò a ripetere le parole di Miranda: «O nuovo mondo mirabile che contieni simile gente"[1]». [1] La tempesta di Shakespeare, atto V. (cap. 11, pag. 142) (No, le doppie virgolette dopo "gente" sono un refuso del libro, non mio). 3. "Quante belle creature ci sono qui." Le parole cantate lo derisero, schernitrici. "Come è bella l'umanità! O mirabile nuovo mondo..." (cap. 15, pag. 186) Per "O brave new world" abbiamo "nuovo mondo mirabile" (1), "nuovo mondo ammirevole" (2) e "mirabile nuovo mondo" (3), per "How many goodly creatures are there here!" abbiamo "Quante soavi creature ci sono qui!" (1) e "Quante belle creature ci sono qui!" (3), e per "How beauteous mankind is!" abbiamo "Come l'umanità è bella!" (1) e "Come è bella l'umanità!" (3). E solo in un caso la citazione è riconosciuta e segnata — nel secondo caso, poi, come a dire che nel primo e nel terzo caso nessuno si è accorto che il Selvaggio parlava della Miranda di Shakespeare e ripeteva sempre le stesse parole. La cosa spassosissima è che molte altre citazioni sono riconosciute e hanno note precise, ma non l'opera di Shakesperare che dà il nome al romanzo. Evidentemente se non è proprio palese, se la frase non sa troppo di inglese d'altri tempi o se non è tra virgolette, la citazione è impossibile da riconoscere. Esempio random: "E poi in questo sonno della morte, quali sogni?..." (cap. 18, pag. 227), che puzza lontano un miglio di Shakespeare, a cercarlo in originale è "For in that sleep of death, what dreams? …", dal famoso soliloquio di Amleto. A cercare la traduzione della Wikipedia italiana ("perché in quel sonno di morte quali sogni") abbiamo 9050 risultati, come a dire che è una traduzione riconoscibile anche senza una nota che spieghi il riferimento. A cercare la versione della traduzione di Huxley si trova solo la traduzione di Huxley, come a dire che se la sono inventati sul momento e che se la nota non c'è è perché il traduttore non ha riconosciuto la citazione. E niente, di Shakespeare ho letto solo La tempesta e le cose che ho notato le ho notate per sport. Se mi ci fossi messo di impegno o se fossi stato un fan di Shakespeare ai livelli del Selvaggio non oso immaginare cosa avrei trovato. Cara Mondadori, se sei in ascolto batti un colpo. Che senso ha rinnovare la grafica degli Oscar se poi nel 2013 devo mettere la stessa traduzione del 1933? Perché devo pagare 9,50 euro per un "classico moderno" che troverei con la stessa traduzione in una bancarella? La minaccia de Il mondo nuovo è la mancanza di libertà e la mancanza di libertà è che la traduzione e la pubblicazione di un classico sia ancora sotto il dominio di un unico editore. Non saremo liberi quando si risolverà il problema della sovrappopolazione, saremo liberi quando potremo leggere di Henry e Bernard, non di Enrico e Bernardo.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Etonomore

    I struggled with whether I wanted to give this book 4 stars or 5 stars for a solid couple of hours. I think if I were to rate Brave New World on its own, I would probably go with 4 stars. The story is incredibly ambitious and has a lot going for it, but I really think the early chapters drag. I find Bernard to be an almost intolerable character to spend time with, and its not until John is introduced that I really become invested in the world and the story. John is, quite clearly, a twisted sort I struggled with whether I wanted to give this book 4 stars or 5 stars for a solid couple of hours. I think if I were to rate Brave New World on its own, I would probably go with 4 stars. The story is incredibly ambitious and has a lot going for it, but I really think the early chapters drag. I find Bernard to be an almost intolerable character to spend time with, and its not until John is introduced that I really become invested in the world and the story. John is, quite clearly, a twisted sort of stand-in for the reader, and it is through his perspective that I think the themes Huxley is exploring really pop off the page. What really pushed me to give 5 stars here is the second half of this book, Brave New World Revisited. I can not stress enough how interesting and delightful it was to explore the mind of Huxley and his musings on the current state of the world in the '50s in regards to the totalitarian "utopia" he dreamed up back when Brave New World was originally published. If you have ever read Brave New World or if you ever plan on reading it I cannot stress enough how important I think it is to give Revisited a read through also, as it both enriches the experience of Brave New World as well as providing an incredibly engaging exploration of society and the problems we face.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Agathangelos

    Il romanzo, una fantasia avveniristica con un intreccio rudimentale, tenta di capire il trauma partendo dal principio del disincantamento del mondo, esasperandolo fino all'assurdo, ricavando l'idea della dignità umana dal riconoscimento della disumanità. Il motivo di partenza sembra essere la percezione della somiglianza di tutti i prodotti in serie, uomini o cose che siano. La metafora schopenahauriana dei prodotti di fabbrica della natura viene presa alla lettera. Greggi brulicanti di gemelli Il romanzo, una fantasia avveniristica con un intreccio rudimentale, tenta di capire il trauma partendo dal principio del disincantamento del mondo, esasperandolo fino all'assurdo, ricavando l'idea della dignità umana dal riconoscimento della disumanità. Il motivo di partenza sembra essere la percezione della somiglianza di tutti i prodotti in serie, uomini o cose che siano. La metafora schopenahauriana dei prodotti di fabbrica della natura viene presa alla lettera. Greggi brulicanti di gemelli vengono prepararati nella storta, un incubo di infiniti sosia come quello che invade la vita di veglia dell'ultima fase del capitalismo, dal sorriso standardizzato e dal garbo sfornato dello charme industry. L'esperienza della singolarità, dell'hic et nunc della esperienza spontanea, già insidiata da un pezzo, viene esautorata del tutto: gli uomini non sono più soltanto consumatori dei prodotti di serie sfornati dai trast, ma paiono essi stessi prodotti dalla strapotere di questi e privi di individuazione. Lo sguardo preso dal panico, di fronte al quale le osservazioni inassimilabili vengono a pietrificarsi in allegorie della catastrofe, spezza l'illusione dell'innocua quotidianeità. Di fronte ad esso il sorriso commerciale della modella diventa ciò che in effetti è: la smorfia della vittima. Il mondo nuovo è un campo di concentramento che si crede un paradiso non essendoci nulla da contrapporgli. Se, a seguire una teoria della psicologia delle masse di Freud, il panico è quella condizione nella quale crollano delle potenti identificazioni collettive e le energie instintuali liberate si convertono in subitanea angoscia, allora l'individuo colto dal panico sarà in grado di innervare ciò che di oscuro sta alla base dell'identificazione collettiva: la falsa coscienza dei singoli i quali, privi di una perspicua solidarietà, legati ciecamente a immagini del potere, si credono d'accordo con una Totalità che li soffoca con la sua ubiquità. Come lo stato universale del mondo nuovo non conosce differenze che non siano artificiosamente preservate fra i campi di golf e i laboratori di ricerche biologiche di Mombasa, di Londra, così l'americanismo che viene parodiato è il mondo stesso. Questo dovrebbe, secondo il motto di Berdiaev, assomogliare all'utopia che è divenuto possibile intravedere a partire dalla stadio attuale della tecnica. Se si completano i suoi tratti, esso diventa un inferno: le osservazioni sullo stadio attuale della civiltà vengono spinte dalla teleologia ad essa immanente fino all'evidenza diretta della sua atrocità. Invece delle tre parole d'ordine della rivoluzione francese si proclama: Community, Identity e Stability. Community definisce una condizione della società in cui ogni singolo è sottoposto incondizionatamente al funzionamento del tutto, sul senso del quale nel mondo nuovo non dovrebbe essere più lecito, e nemmeno possibile, porsi interrogativi. Identity significa la cancellazione delle differenze individuali, la standardizzazione spinta fino ai fondamenti biologici. Stability la fine di ogni dinamica sociale. La situazione astutamente equilibrata si ricava per estrapolazione da certi sintomi di un'eliminazione del gioco delle forze economiche nel tardo capitalismo: una perversione del Millennio. La panacea garantita della statistica sociale è il conditioning (dalla psicologia behavoristica: dove significa la provocazione di certi riflessi o comportamenti mediante modificazioni deliberate del mondo cirocstante, attraverso il controllo di condizioni), la quale è entrata nella lingua corrente americana per indicare ogni specie di controllo scientifico delle condizioni di vita: così air conditioning è il livellamento meccanico della temperatura in spazi chiusi. In Huxley conditioning significa la completa preformazione dell'uomo a opera dell'intervento sociale che va dalla riproduzione artificiale e dalla determinazione tecnica del conscio e dell'inconscio nello stadio infantile fino al death conditioning, un allenamento che scaccia dal fanciullo la paura della morte, mostrando al fanciullo dei morti e contemporaneamente nutrendolo di dolciumi sicché associ in avvenire le due cose. L'effetto finale del conditioning, cioè dell'integrazione e della pressione e della coercizione sociali in misura assai superiori a quella conosciuta con il protestantesimo: gli uomini si rassegnano ad amare ciò che debbono fare, senza neanche più sapere rassegnarsi. Così la loro felicità viene rafforzata soggettivamente e viene mantenuto l'ordine. Tutte le rappresentazioni di un'influenza puramente esteriore della società sul singolo, per il tramite di genti come la famiglia o la psicologia appaiono superate. Ciò che alla famiglia è accaduto già oggi, viene perpetrato ai suoi danni ancora una volta, dall'altro nel mondo nuovo. Come figli della società nel senso più letterale del termine gli uomini non si trovano in un rapporto dialettico ma coincidono con essa secondo sostanza. Esponenti volontari della Totalità collettiva nella quale è stata assorbita ogni antitesi, essi sono in senso non metaforico socialmente condizionati e non già adattati al sistema dominante solo in un secondo tempo, attraverso un loro sviluppo (continua)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.