Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Aeschylus, Promitheas Desmotis

Availability: Ready to download

O Titanas Promitheas denetai ston Kafkaso timorimenos ap' to Dia. O Iphaistos ton simponai, kathos to Kratos kai i Via ton karphonoun alipita. Sti sinekhia ton episkeptontai i Okeanides pou ton simponoun ki aftes. Erkhetai sti sinekhia o Okeanos simvoulevontas ipokhorisi kai kampsi tis adiallaxias. O Promitheas arnitai. Tritos episkeptis i Io (kori tou Inakhou) kiniyimeni O Titanas Promitheas denetai ston Kafkaso timorimenos ap' to Dia. O Iphaistos ton simponai, kathos to Kratos kai i Via ton karphonoun alipita. Sti sinekhia ton episkeptontai i Okeanides pou ton simponoun ki aftes. Erkhetai sti sinekhia o Okeanos simvoulevontas ipokhorisi kai kampsi tis adiallaxias. O Promitheas arnitai. Tritos episkeptis i Io (kori tou Inakhou) kiniyimeni ap' tin oryi tis Iras. Sti sizitisi o Promitheas promantevi apallayi tou idiou kai tis Ios ap' ta dina sto mellon. Aphini kai kapio iponooumeno sto khoro oti gnorizi mistiko yia tin katastrophi tou Dia. Ta loyia tou akougontai. Se ligo phtani o Ermis kai ton apili yia na tou apospasi to mistiko. Mataia epimeni. O Promitheas antisteketai akomi kai ston keravno tou Dia. Sto telos tou ergou vouliazi sta vathi mazi me to khoro, pou tou meni pistos.


Compare
Ads Banner

O Titanas Promitheas denetai ston Kafkaso timorimenos ap' to Dia. O Iphaistos ton simponai, kathos to Kratos kai i Via ton karphonoun alipita. Sti sinekhia ton episkeptontai i Okeanides pou ton simponoun ki aftes. Erkhetai sti sinekhia o Okeanos simvoulevontas ipokhorisi kai kampsi tis adiallaxias. O Promitheas arnitai. Tritos episkeptis i Io (kori tou Inakhou) kiniyimeni O Titanas Promitheas denetai ston Kafkaso timorimenos ap' to Dia. O Iphaistos ton simponai, kathos to Kratos kai i Via ton karphonoun alipita. Sti sinekhia ton episkeptontai i Okeanides pou ton simponoun ki aftes. Erkhetai sti sinekhia o Okeanos simvoulevontas ipokhorisi kai kampsi tis adiallaxias. O Promitheas arnitai. Tritos episkeptis i Io (kori tou Inakhou) kiniyimeni ap' tin oryi tis Iras. Sti sizitisi o Promitheas promantevi apallayi tou idiou kai tis Ios ap' ta dina sto mellon. Aphini kai kapio iponooumeno sto khoro oti gnorizi mistiko yia tin katastrophi tou Dia. Ta loyia tou akougontai. Se ligo phtani o Ermis kai ton apili yia na tou apospasi to mistiko. Mataia epimeni. O Promitheas antisteketai akomi kai ston keravno tou Dia. Sto telos tou ergou vouliazi sta vathi mazi me to khoro, pou tou meni pistos.

30 review for Aeschylus, Promitheas Desmotis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ana O

    “Your speech is pompous sounding, full of pride, as fits the lackey of the Gods. You are young and young your rule and you think the tower in which you live is free from sorrow: from it have I not seen two tyrants thrown? The third, who now is king, I shall yet live to see him fall, of all three most suddenly, most dishonored. Do you think I will crouch before your Gods, -so new-and tremble? I am far from that.” This is one of my favorite Greek tragedies, and I daresay one of my favorite plays “Your speech is pompous sounding, full of pride, as fits the lackey of the Gods. You are young and young your rule and you think the tower in which you live is free from sorrow: from it have I not seen two tyrants thrown? The third, who now is king, I shall yet live to see him fall, of all three most suddenly, most dishonored. Do you think I will crouch before your Gods, -so new-and tremble? I am far from that.” This is one of my favorite Greek tragedies, and I daresay one of my favorite plays in general as well. I'm sure you're all familiar with Prometheus. He was one of the mightiest Titans, creator of mankind. He was punished by Zeus and chained to a rock. Every day an eagle tore at his body and ate his liver, and every night the liver grew back. His crime? He gave the human race the gift of fire. Other characters- Io Hephaestus Hermes Oceanus Kratos Bia “Hear the sum of the whole matter in the compass of one brief word — every art possessed by man comes from Prometheus.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    Zeus is such a tyrant; he just wanted to keep all that power to himself. So when the noble hearted Prometheus gave a little bit of it to man, Zeus was rather angry; thus, he punishes Prometheus rather severely: he is chained to rock where an eagle eats his liver, only for it to grow back overnight for the next day’s feed. This is perpetually repeated. But what of Prometheus’s reasons. Why did he give man fire? He did it because he saw that man needed it. It wasn’t the simple reckless theft as Zeu Zeus is such a tyrant; he just wanted to keep all that power to himself. So when the noble hearted Prometheus gave a little bit of it to man, Zeus was rather angry; thus, he punishes Prometheus rather severely: he is chained to rock where an eagle eats his liver, only for it to grow back overnight for the next day’s feed. This is perpetually repeated. But what of Prometheus’s reasons. Why did he give man fire? He did it because he saw that man needed it. It wasn’t the simple reckless theft as Zeus would have it be: it was benevolence. Prometheus is a titan, a race of giants of incredible size that possess great strength; however, they have little intellect. Prometheus is the exception to the rule. He saw in man a smaller version of himself; he realised that salvation resided in improving one’s intellect, like his own did, so he gave them a tool in which they could use to develop. Does he sound like a bad guy? No. He doesn’t. His only crime was disobedience. His fate eternal torture: Prometheus is, naturally, quite annoyed at the entire situation. He has spent years in service to this new God; he helped him win his dominion. This is how he is repaved? He knows that Zeus will never relent, so he turns to prophecy to construe the tyrant’s fall. He speaks to the chorus and to various demi-gods to make his plans known. He is very much the victim in this play. He only ever wanted to help mankind, but in doing so he accidently threatened the position and authority of the Gods. Not a thing to be taken for granted by those in power. "Then beneath the earth those hidden blessings for man, bronze, iron, silver and gold—who can claim to have discovered before me? No one, I am sure, who wants to speak to the purpose. In one short sentence understand it all: every art of mankind comes from Prometheus. So the situation becomes morally complex. Although his actions were intended to be kind, he very much overstepped a boundary. Man has prospered with his gift, but it wasn’t Prometheus’s to give. Perhaps the Gods were withholding it for a reason beyond their own preservation. Man has developed medicine and trade form fire, but he has also developed war and conquest. He has become more productive, more dangerous. Zeus could simply have taken fire back from man, though he has a point to make in his actions. He wants Prometheus to see his “mistake” and live with the consequences. Isn’t Zeus just lovely? I love how Aeschylus has banded this situation together. He plays on the audience’s sympathy for his hero, but he also shows the danger he possesses. As ever, with Ancient Greek drama the morale dilemma is the driving force of the plot. I’d love to see this performed; it’s a true shame the rest of the trilogy didn’t survive, but that’s where we look to Percy Shelley’s interpretation of the second play Prometheus Unbound. And wonder at the power of the poet’s ability to take Aeschylus’s source material and make it so completely his own without destroying it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Προμηθεύς Δεσμώτης = Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus Prometheus Bound (Ancient Greek: Promētheus Desmōtēs) is an Ancient Greek tragedy. In antiquity, it was attributed to Aeschylus, but now is considered by some scholars to be the work of another hand, and perhaps one as late as c. 430 BC. Despite these doubts of authorship, the play's designation as Aeschylean has remained conventional. The tragedy is based on the myth of Prometheus, a Titan who defies the gods and gives fire to mankind, acts for wh Προμηθεύς Δεσμώτης = Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus Prometheus Bound (Ancient Greek: Promētheus Desmōtēs) is an Ancient Greek tragedy. In antiquity, it was attributed to Aeschylus, but now is considered by some scholars to be the work of another hand, and perhaps one as late as c. 430 BC. Despite these doubts of authorship, the play's designation as Aeschylean has remained conventional. The tragedy is based on the myth of Prometheus, a Titan who defies the gods and gives fire to mankind, acts for which he is subjected to perpetual punishment. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: سال 2008 میلادی عنوان: پرومته در زنجیر؛ نویسنده: آشیلوس؛ مترجم: شاهرخ مسکوب؛ تهران، نشر اندیشه، 1353، در 104 ص موضوع: نمایشنامه اساطیر یونانی سده پنجم پیش از میلاد این ترجمه بارها تجدید چاپ و آخرین بار انتشارات فرهنگ جاوید، در سال 1394 هجری خورشیدی، آنرا چاپ و منتشر کرده است. کتاب در حدود 430 سال پیش از میلاد، توسط: آشیلوس، نوشته شده است. تراژدی پرومته در زنجیر، یکی از سه داستانی است، که دو داستان دیگر آن «پرومته بند گسسته» و «پرومته آتش آور» از بین رفته اند. پرومته یکی از پهلوانانی بود، که به زئوس، در راه رسیدن به قدرت، یاری کرده بود. خدای خدایان با قدرت تازه ای که به دست آورده بود، ظالمانه تصمیم گرفت، که بشر را نابود کند، و نسل جدیدی خلق نماید، پرومته با تصمیم او مخالفت ورزید، و بشر را نجات داد و آنگاه هنرهای مفید را به انسان آموخت. زئوس، این کار پرومته را، نتوانست ببخشد. هنگامی که نمایش آغاز میشود، پرومته به یک نقطه ی بلند و صخره ی کوه آورده شده، و به یک تخته سنگ عظیم بسته شده است، ولی هنوز به تنبیهی که برایش در نظر گرفته اند، تن در نداده است. دسته ای از حوریان دریایی، از طریق هوا پرواز میکنند، و میآیند تا پرومته را تسلی دهند. پرومته، برای آنان میگوید که چگونه به زئوس کمک کرده بود، و میپرسد: دلیل تنبیهش چیست. او همچنین به حوریان دریایی میگوید که: بالاخره یک روز زئوس مجبور خواهد شد، از او کمک بگیرد. اما او راز رستگاری زئوس را فاش نخواهد کرد، مگر آنکه آزاد شود. سپس اقیانوس، پدر دختران دریایی، سوار بر عرابه ای که اسبهای بالدار، آنرا به حرکت درمیآورند، از راه میرسد. پرومته مغرورانه، به دلسوزیهای او، و نه به راهنماییها، و تدابیر وی، وقعی نمیگذارد. نفر بعدی که نزد پهلوان پشیمان نشده میآید: «یو»، یکی دیگر از قربانیان ظلم و خشونت زئوس است، که دختری باکره بود، و روزگاری در نزد زئوس قرب و منزلتی خاص داشت، ولی حالا به صورت ماده گاوی تغییر شکل داده، و بر اثر نیش خرمگسی آواره ی دنیا شده بود. پرومته پیش بینی میکند، که هنوز محنت و غم در انتظار آن دختر است، ولی سرانجام به شکل اول خود برمیگردد، و فرزندی از زئوس خواهد زائید، که یکی از اولادانش به صورت پهلوانی، برای نجات پرومته، از تخته سنگ بالا خواهد آمد. حالا حرفهای تمردآمیز، و رازهای پر از لافزنی پرومته، به گوش زئوس رسیده است، و او هرمس را، به نزد پرومته میفرستد، تا درباره حرفهای او تحقیق کند. این پیغام آور زئوس نیز، با حرفهای تحقیرآمیزی بازمیگردد. علیرغم تهدید زئوس، که عقابی را میفرستد، تا اعضای حیاتی او را بخورد، پرومته همچنان غیرقابل نفوذ باقی میماند. او تا به آخر، بدون ترس و بیم، در مقابل تهدیدهای زئوس، ایستادگی میکند، تا سرانجام صاعقه ی عظیمی، از طرف زئوس، تمام صخره و سنگهای اطراف او را نابود میکند. و... ا. شربیانی

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    "Don't rage and storm. You are intelligent: full well You know that punishment falls on unruly tongue." Prometheus knows that indeed, and suffers unspeakable injustice and pain for his unruly tongue and rebellious action. But that doesn't stop him from speaking up against the tyranny of Zeus, who is particularly harsh and unfair as he is new to power - not established enough yet to be able able to cope with free thinking, independence and criticism. Prometheus is punished for feeling for humankind "Don't rage and storm. You are intelligent: full well You know that punishment falls on unruly tongue." Prometheus knows that indeed, and suffers unspeakable injustice and pain for his unruly tongue and rebellious action. But that doesn't stop him from speaking up against the tyranny of Zeus, who is particularly harsh and unfair as he is new to power - not established enough yet to be able able to cope with free thinking, independence and criticism. Prometheus is punished for feeling for humankind and for giving them the tools to rise to a new level of civilisation. By giving them fire, he offers them what was considered the privilege of gods, and thus he breaks the hierarchical rules of the status quo. For that, he is chained to a mountain by Hephaistos, acting unwillingly on Zeus' orders. The political situation described two and a half millennia ago is strikingly human and timeless. Exchange Prometheus' name for any idealist rebel, and Zeus' wrath for that of any ruthless patriarch, and the drama will stay essentially the same. You will find the sexual exploitation of young vulnerable women exposed to men of power without empathy in any given era, and most later victims won't be given the whole Ionian Sea to be remembered by. You will find the advisers of Oceanus' type - recognising injustice but reluctant to risk their own privilege to speak up against the tyrant. And you will find the powerless Chorus of those lamenting fate without being able to change it. Machiavelli described Zeus in his Prince. And Milton created a version of Prometheus in his Satan. Wherever people are punished for speaking truth to power and standing up for the rights of weaker communities, you have Prometheus Bound re-enacted. And still today we hear powerful men yelling "Pride!" or "Shame!" whenever someone takes on the role of Prometheus to educate and support humanity and to make them independent of tyrannical rulers' whims. Prometheus is all of us who believe in and work for the development of civilised and just life. What makes him stand out is his will to act on behalf of others, and not just moan and complain about the injustice of his "bad boss". Timeless classic - to be reread regularly until the Promethean gift has reached each corner of the world.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pooja

    Prometheus: someone who thinks forward. Prometheus Bound is a play based on the Greek Mythology. Prometheus, a titan (immortal), a descendant of original gods, Gaia and Ouranos (Earth and Heaven), is being imprisoned, chained and punished to death by Zeus (Olympus God) for being kind to human beings, for making them capable and giving a head to think for themselves and nature, to give them a power to become equal to Gods. He stole fire from Olympus. He gave fire to men. He stopped men thinking of th Prometheus: someone who thinks forward. Prometheus Bound is a play based on the Greek Mythology. Prometheus, a titan (immortal), a descendant of original gods, Gaia and Ouranos (Earth and Heaven), is being imprisoned, chained and punished to death by Zeus (Olympus God) for being kind to human beings, for making them capable and giving a head to think for themselves and nature, to give them a power to become equal to Gods. He stole fire from Olympus. He gave fire to men. He stopped men thinking of their future deaths. Inside their hearts he put blind hope! With it men will soon master many arts. He did that for men, nothing but the creatures of a day. If ever in your life, you have had a little interest in Greek Mythology, have enjoyed an audacious and without modesty conversation between Gods or even if you have not, then this book is for you. I tried to persuade many of my friends to read this one short book, they again won't listen. They are not my friends anymore. Do not enroll yourself in that list. Do not become a person who refuses to encounter such art. If you come across a play as this and do not have a look at it, then THIS is a tragedy of all tragedies.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    ... By the immutable hugs steel chains, nails that Saviour of men at these high steep rocks. He stole from the splendor of Fire which creates all, your flower, and he gave it to mortals. Chastises him for having insulted the gods. He may learn to revere the tyranny of Zeus, and he is careful to be kind to men (...) it is the fruit of your love for men. Being a God, you do not fear the wrath of the gods. You made the Living too large donations. For that, on this gloomy rock standing without bendi ... By the immutable hugs steel chains, nails that Saviour of men at these high steep rocks. He stole from the splendor of Fire which creates all, your flower, and he gave it to mortals. Chastises him for having insulted the gods. He may learn to revere the tyranny of Zeus, and he is careful to be kind to men (...) it is the fruit of your love for men. Being a God, you do not fear the wrath of the gods. You made the Living too large donations. For that, on this gloomy rock standing without bending the knee, without sleep, you will consummate yourself into endless lamentations useless groans (...) the spirit of the Son of Kronos is impenetrable; his heart can not be touched.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Nomen-Mutatio

    I'm shocked to see that only one of my Goodreads friends has read this play. This is my favorite work of ancient Greek literature. The story has some pretty deep meaning. It's really the inverse of the Fall From Grace. Instead of the human desire for knowledge resulting in the perverse punishment of Original Sin as issued by that sadistic toddler running the show in the Old Testament, we find a tale of heroic sacrifice which results in the illuminating powers of reason and curiosity being bestow I'm shocked to see that only one of my Goodreads friends has read this play. This is my favorite work of ancient Greek literature. The story has some pretty deep meaning. It's really the inverse of the Fall From Grace. Instead of the human desire for knowledge resulting in the perverse punishment of Original Sin as issued by that sadistic toddler running the show in the Old Testament, we find a tale of heroic sacrifice which results in the illuminating powers of reason and curiosity being bestowed upon the minds of mortal, fallible human beings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Owlseyes inside Notre Dame, it's so strange a 15-hour blaze and...

    Bound to a rock, Prometheus claims for help and understanding; for how long?... imprisoned. He’s alone. Someone has locked his feet and hands. He implores the Divine Ether, the winds …mother Earth, the Sun: “look at the suffering imposed upon a god”. He gets an explanation from the Oceanides who inform him that the Olympus has new rulers; Zeus' laws are absolute; there’s no forgiveness for the deeds of Prometheus, who, once brought to humanity the divine fire: all arts' knowledge. Zeus, now is t Bound to a rock, Prometheus claims for help and understanding; for how long?... imprisoned. He’s alone. Someone has locked his feet and hands. He implores the Divine Ether, the winds …mother Earth, the Sun: “look at the suffering imposed upon a god”. He gets an explanation from the Oceanides who inform him that the Olympus has new rulers; Zeus' laws are absolute; there’s no forgiveness for the deeds of Prometheus, who, once brought to humanity the divine fire: all arts' knowledge. Zeus, now is the king. He wants to annihilate races. He distributes privileges; but nothing to mankind. Prometheus swears: “one day will come to ban him:… he’ll pay for this unjust deed”. The end for this tragic play places Prometheus being buried under rocks. Three thousand years later Shelley will resurrect him...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    This is probably the best and most classic telling of Prometheus, from his giving fire to man from the noblest of reasons to how horribly and seemingly unjustly that Zeus punishes him. All arts and tools come from Prometheus, after all, and he should always be considered the greatest of all friends of mankind even though he is a titan. However, he's also the one that pushed us to improve our intellect in the same way he did for himself, and in doing so, he brought harm upon himself. See a trend? This is probably the best and most classic telling of Prometheus, from his giving fire to man from the noblest of reasons to how horribly and seemingly unjustly that Zeus punishes him. All arts and tools come from Prometheus, after all, and he should always be considered the greatest of all friends of mankind even though he is a titan. However, he's also the one that pushed us to improve our intellect in the same way he did for himself, and in doing so, he brought harm upon himself. See a trend? We created war with the smelting of ore into weapons, after all. It's not all about cooking and keeping warm or creating medicine. Was Zeus right? Was it right to keep an immortal chained and have a bird eat his liver for all eternity? Or was this just the graphic depiction of what we will always do to ourselves? I wish I could read the other two parts of this play. I think that would be awesome. :) But alas. What we've got is still pretty raw and emotional and delightfully slanted. After all, we're meant to sympathize entirely with Prometheus throughout the play. It reminds me an awful lot of Paradise Lost. :) Good motivations and charismatic leaders leading to roads paved to hell. :)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Nothing happens! More than any other work of literature I've ever read, Prometheus Bound is the play where nothing happens. Even in Waiting for Godot, the characters at least move around a little. But poor Prometheus spends the entire play spiked to a rock. But it's terrific anyway. This is Karl Marx's favorite play, and you'll understand why. Prometheus is a proletariat hero: when he sides against the gods and with humanity, he's going with the Revolution. It's not just fire he gives them, eithe Nothing happens! More than any other work of literature I've ever read, Prometheus Bound is the play where nothing happens. Even in Waiting for Godot, the characters at least move around a little. But poor Prometheus spends the entire play spiked to a rock. But it's terrific anyway. This is Karl Marx's favorite play, and you'll understand why. Prometheus is a proletariat hero: when he sides against the gods and with humanity, he's going with the Revolution. It's not just fire he gives them, either; he throws in math, writing, medicine, and "blind hopes" to stop men from "foreseeing their death." Thanks? Prometheus is a great character himself: sarcastic, cynical, overflowing with self-pity: one of the most human characters in Greek drama. He spends most of the play boasting about what he's done for humans or whining about how much his punishment sucks. Hermes is right when he says, "You'd be unbearable if you were free." He gets this wonderful moment in the second half: Io shows up to commiserate. She's one of Zeus and Hera's many casualties: Zeus wanted to sleep with her, Hera was jealous, and she ended up getting turned into a cow driven from one end of the earth to another by a stinging gadfly. So she ambles in and they're like, man: that Zeus guy, huh? What a dick. It's a very cool interaction, the Titan and the cowified maiden recognizing each other as fellow sufferers. But this is one reason there's some debate over whether Aeschylus wrote Prometheus Bound at all: Zeus is a total dick here. A tyrant. There's not much ambiguity. Prometheus repeatedly prophesies his overthrow, too, which is weird because Greek audiences would have known perfectly well that he's lying. So why this assault on Zeus? Prometheus tells Hermes, contemptuously, "Let me assure you, I would not exchange / my own misfortune for your slavery" [to Zeus]. That's an intense thing to say, right? The issue of tyranny was important to the Greeks, who (as you may have heard) were trying this new thing they called "democracy" - see Sophocles' great Antigone for more - but it seems downright reckless to accuse Zeus of it. Over the past few decades, most scholars have tipped against Aeschylus' authorship: their idea is that this is a later play mistakenly attributed to Aeschylus. Only a later playwright would be this brash, is the idea. If you're only going to read one Aeschylus, it should be Anne Carson's translation of Agamemnon; after that you should read the other two plays in The Oresteia, either the Fagles or Hughes translations. But read this fourth! Whoever wrote it, they did a great job. For a play in which nothing happens, there's a lot going on. Translations Scully and Herington, which I read on Dec. 27 2012, is not very good. Functional at best, and beware: there are stupid modernizations here. Guess what they wrote? They wrote this: "Zeus is not / about to mellow". So much for them. Joel Agee has a new translation for NYRB Classics that I read on March 24 2015, and it's way better - so much better that I rewrote this entire review because now I like this play. Also I got to meet Agee last night and he's wicked nice.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pink

    Some books you read because you want to become absorbed in a great story. Or you want to look deeper at the meaning of life, considering your place in humanity. Then some books you pick up because they're short and fill a gap, or tick off a list of books to read. I'll leave you to consider which is the more rewarding way of doing things.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sue K H

    Loved this. In this play, Prometheus is the kind God who gives fire, language, mathematics, Agriculture, medicine and many other gifts to mankind. He values intellect and friendship and has the power of prophesy. Zeus is the kind of God who rules with brutality and has no true friends. Besides being brutal, he's paranoid and uncaring. Zeus aims his wrath a Prometheus because of the gifts he gave to humans. There is no real action in this play, it's all speeches about what happened or what will h Loved this. In this play, Prometheus is the kind God who gives fire, language, mathematics, Agriculture, medicine and many other gifts to mankind. He values intellect and friendship and has the power of prophesy. Zeus is the kind of God who rules with brutality and has no true friends. Besides being brutal, he's paranoid and uncaring. Zeus aims his wrath a Prometheus because of the gifts he gave to humans. There is no real action in this play, it's all speeches about what happened or what will happen in this battle between brutality and stagnation vs intelligence and progression. I thoroughly enjoyed the themes, and the language.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jelena

    Talking about stories everyone is familiar with, this is about as famous as it gets: Prometheus, a descendant of the old gods, gives humankind, a short-lived, savage and uncultivated race, the ultimate technological breakthrough – fire. For this transgression he is punished by Zeus. Along with fire, humanity receives a more than impressive grand total of skills and technology. I believe it to be of quite some significance here that Prometheus has no personal gain from this action other than the Talking about stories everyone is familiar with, this is about as famous as it gets: Prometheus, a descendant of the old gods, gives humankind, a short-lived, savage and uncultivated race, the ultimate technological breakthrough – fire. For this transgression he is punished by Zeus. Along with fire, humanity receives a more than impressive grand total of skills and technology. I believe it to be of quite some significance here that Prometheus has no personal gain from this action other than the benefit of an underprivileged community. Maybe he believes every chain to be only as strong as its weakest link (in this case, the pathetic Earthlings). Maybe he believes in resources and accessibility for all. Maybe he believes in knowledge as the ultimate tool for overall progress. (Because seriously, would you want to spend your days surrounded by ignorant people?) Or just make you own interpretation. If you’re into metaphors wrapped in symbols inside allusions, then here you have your bringer of light (in particular), who is also the bringer of knowledge (in general). Especially since we’re referring to a light one wouldn’t have to wait for by itself, but could proactively create whenever there is a need to shed light or enlighten. The rebelling fire-bringer is an archetype or trope in many mythologies: The Bible takes its lore directly from the Hellenistic heritage, even by linking the protagonist’s name straight to the word for “light”; in Norse mythology, Loki is the fire-bringer, and as a trickster he defies authority basically by definition; as far as I know, there are several Native American myths (or several versions of one myth) regarding the theft of fire. So there’s sort of a small world for you. If you are more into grounded comparative analysis, then Hesiod should come into the game. In Hesiod’s (far older) version of the story, Prometheus is a cunning and manipulative scoundrel receiving his due punishment. Aeschylus portrays him far differently, and the real villain is in the background, not ever appearing but pulling all the strings. If you’re into the very sombre approach of art imitating life, well then feel free to go wild on this one. In one corner, there is the idea of available knowledge and advancement for all. And that is accompanied by critical thinking, questioning and scrutinizing. In the other corner, even if nor physically appearing, there is a narcissistic, power-hungry dictator ruling by caprice and brute force, and sustaining his position through ignorance of his subordinates. (Again, you’ll find the same implicit character portrayal in the case of the Biblical God, for comparison.) It’s safe to say that covering all the social analogies would take quite a while. And still, “Prometheus Bound” probably wouldn’t be anyone’s first idea of a play in common terms. There is just relatively little action here. The scene is rather a single tableau, and the conflict is revealed through Prometheus himself and several supporting characters narrating their fate. Just think of it as dramatization of a myth, like basically all ancient plays were. So if it is about ideas and views, “Prometheus Bound” offers that to no end. If it is about some action being played out, then this a sort of tragedy you might rather want to hear or read than see.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Man do I like a rebel. Be it a god, a Titan,a pauper or rich. The constant questioning of the status quo and taking action to change the things that need changing no matter what. Actions, not just great words but actions. Prometheus is a revolutionary, the challenger of an oppressive order. Someone who sides with mankind against the immortals handing them enlightment and fire. Being punished with endless torture he does not repent. It's Greece so there is suffering and sacrifice. It's hard and R Man do I like a rebel. Be it a god, a Titan,a pauper or rich. The constant questioning of the status quo and taking action to change the things that need changing no matter what. Actions, not just great words but actions. Prometheus is a revolutionary, the challenger of an oppressive order. Someone who sides with mankind against the immortals handing them enlightment and fire. Being punished with endless torture he does not repent. It's Greece so there is suffering and sacrifice. It's hard and Rough but also inspiring

  15. 4 out of 5

    zeynab

    I guess Prometheus is the most loved god among humans. this play was amazing, unlike Hesiod, I enjoyed Aeschylus's poignant style. Prometheus is not just a jesus-like figure who sacrifices himself for humans and suffers because of them. The difference between Jesus and Prometheus is that Jesus is obeying God but Prometheus is defying God and that's what makes him more lovable than Jesus. he stands against the tyranny of a God. In this play, Prometheus keeps saying that one day someone will dethro I guess Prometheus is the most loved god among humans. this play was amazing, unlike Hesiod, I enjoyed Aeschylus's poignant style. Prometheus is not just a jesus-like figure who sacrifices himself for humans and suffers because of them. The difference between Jesus and Prometheus is that Jesus is obeying God but Prometheus is defying God and that's what makes him more lovable than Jesus. he stands against the tyranny of a God. In this play, Prometheus keeps saying that one day someone will dethrone Zeus but no one has dethroned Zeus as far as I know. I guess considering Prometheus's fascination with humans, it means that humans will dethrone him, and I guess they kind of did.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Chaikin

    41. Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, translated by Paul Roche 1st performed: c ~456 bce ?? (alternately 430 bce, authored by Aeschylus' son, Euphorion) format: 128 page Paperback - 1964 Mentor Classic acquired: unknown. It comes from my childhood home. Perhaps one of my parents used it in high school or college. read: July 2-3 rating: 4 I read this recently with a different translator. That review includes a brief summary. See HERE. As far as I can tell, Paul Roche is a pretty obscure translator. I tho 41. Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, translated by Paul Roche 1st performed: c ~456 bce ?? (alternately 430 bce, authored by Aeschylus' son, Euphorion) format: 128 page Paperback - 1964 Mentor Classic acquired: unknown. It comes from my childhood home. Perhaps one of my parents used it in high school or college. read: July 2-3 rating: 4 I read this recently with a different translator. That review includes a brief summary. See HERE. As far as I can tell, Paul Roche is a pretty obscure translator. I thought he created something really nice, keeping the poetry and recreating the rhythms. It's not as clean as David Grene, Robert Fitzgerald etc, and it's not as poetic as Philip Vellacott, but it is somewhere between these two. It's easily readable, but also provides noticeable poetic feel. Roche includes an introduction and various thoughts afterward in the format of questions and answers. I found the introduction particularly interesting as he talks about his struggle to translate this. He had translated about half the play unhappily. He studied the translation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, then went back to the Greek and noticed how clean the line endings were. Based on this, he re-worked the translation over again, trying to focus on clean line endings, with the rhyme, alliteration, assonance etc similar to the original. He even diagrams a few examples. No easy thing this, and very interesting to read about in brief, as he has it. As far as re-reading the play itself, I'm struck first by Prometheus's character. Pinned to a rock the entire play, literally just hanging there, everything hinges on what he says and how he says it. He is an elegant stoic, in the modern sense, never losing his composure regardless of the pain and the endlessness of it all. He also makes Zeus, who condemned him, out to be an absolute tyrant, in the sense of, say, a Persian emperor. Zeus can do as he pleases and command endless torture for any frivolous reason, and there is no one even to complain to. It's a clear political point. (Critics have felt the negative light he writes of Zeus is inconsistent with his other works. Some have tried to give the play to other authors.)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    The fight of right over tyranny.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Abdulla Awachi

    This is one of the most important tragedian works of Aeschylus which used to be played during ancient Greek era. Going back to Greek is an act/ step I consider it of vital importance in understanding the current philosophical thoughts and modern western thinking as it is undoubtably highly inflected / influenced by those earlier works. We can take one example of the contemporary Philosophers; Martin Heiddger who introduced a new way of thinking based in one part on going back to the first centurie This is one of the most important tragedian works of Aeschylus which used to be played during ancient Greek era. Going back to Greek is an act/ step I consider it of vital importance in understanding the current philosophical thoughts and modern western thinking as it is undoubtably highly inflected / influenced by those earlier works. We can take one example of the contemporary Philosophers; Martin Heiddger who introduced a new way of thinking based in one part on going back to the first centuries of Greek and Roman. I find this method is so fascinating in looking at and investigating the current body of knowledge we do possess. Going back to the Prometheus bound, this tragedy is considered a symbolic one in which Prometheus (one of the Greek Gods) violated the orders of Zeus (The biggest God as peer Greek) and he stolen the fire of arts which was just kept seceretly for the Gods. Prometheus has stolen this fire and given it to the Human kind. After which, they become so knowledgeable of everything (mathematics, languages, agriculture, manufacturing... Etc). As per this tragedy, human beings before the receipt of the fire of art from Prometheus was so fool and do not know to do anything. However, the status changed dramatically and in the opposite direction after that event. Many philosophers interpret the meaning of the fire of art as the age of human being scientific revolution and the move toward civilization. The tragedy, however, describes the punishment that was imposed on Prometheus as a result of his unacceptable act, which was to bound him in chains and to a rock for ages and ages.. And I will keep the end of both the original story and any further analysis open to the readers, so they go back and entertain those rich literature texts. Awachi 18 January 2017

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    Interesting little read which you can finish off in a sitting. It’s about a titan called Prometheus who stole he concept of fire from the Gods and gave it to humans as a gift. Zeus got pissed off with him for stealing something from him and giving it to the “people of a day” (love that description of humans) so he gets him ballasted up a mountain somewhere for eternity and gets one of his evillest red eyed eagles to pick away at his kidney for eternity – charming. Prometheus means foresighted (h Interesting little read which you can finish off in a sitting. It’s about a titan called Prometheus who stole he concept of fire from the Gods and gave it to humans as a gift. Zeus got pissed off with him for stealing something from him and giving it to the “people of a day” (love that description of humans) so he gets him ballasted up a mountain somewhere for eternity and gets one of his evillest red eyed eagles to pick away at his kidney for eternity – charming. Prometheus means foresighted (he could see the future) and he had a brother called Epitheseus (which means hindsight). I love all this Greek stuff. I used to watch clash of the titans as a kid 20 years ago and loved these Greek myths and this book references some of them also. Short book – worth the hour it takes to read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Po Po

    Poetic, dangerously verbose. Reading this makes it crystal clear to me that we are in a period that should be known as The Decline and Fall of Language. Why don't we speak with loquacious and romantic flair anymore? The bitter tears overfloweth from my grudging acknowledgment of my own personal contributions to the slang-ization and colloquial-bastardization of written language. * * * Anyway. What is this story about? In a nutshell: Prometheus is royally pissed at Zeus, everyone and everything, and Poetic, dangerously verbose. Reading this makes it crystal clear to me that we are in a period that should be known as The Decline and Fall of Language. Why don't we speak with loquacious and romantic flair anymore? The bitter tears overfloweth from my grudging acknowledgment of my own personal contributions to the slang-ization and colloquial-bastardization of written language. * * * Anyway. What is this story about? In a nutshell: Prometheus is royally pissed at Zeus, everyone and everything, and rightfully so. An extremely tragic Greek tragedy. Recommended to those who are keen on melodrama and scathing diatribes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Samir Rawas Sarayji

    Poor Prometheus, banished and punished for his compassion to us mortals, giving us the gift of fire that Jove wanted to keep for the gods alone. Quite shortsighted of these gods, no? How are we to prosper and flourish without fire? And how would their strength increase if we worshippers perish? Tsk tsk

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lazar

    How can someone LIKE AND ENJOY this boring piece of s*it ??? It's so terrible

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    This seminal Greek myth tells the story of the titan who defied Zeus by giving fire to mankind. Zeus, intent on destroying humanity, is furious that Prometheus, his former ally in Zeus’s revolt against the previous generation of gods, empowered humanity with the knowledge that would allow them to survive—not just fire, but the gifts of agriculture, shelter, shipbuilding and seafaring, trade, medicines to heal the sick, etc. Zeus orders Hephaistos to chain Prometheus to a rocky cliff at the edge This seminal Greek myth tells the story of the titan who defied Zeus by giving fire to mankind. Zeus, intent on destroying humanity, is furious that Prometheus, his former ally in Zeus’s revolt against the previous generation of gods, empowered humanity with the knowledge that would allow them to survive—not just fire, but the gifts of agriculture, shelter, shipbuilding and seafaring, trade, medicines to heal the sick, etc. Zeus orders Hephaistos to chain Prometheus to a rocky cliff at the edge of the world. In a series of brief dialogues, Prometheus is challenged to repent his arrogance in defying Zeus or face even graver punishment. Sometimes the conversations are with those who are sympathetic to Prometheus and sometimes they are with Zeus’s immortal minions. Prometheus too is immortal so Zeus cannot kill him but he can invent further punishments, as the last visitor, Zeus’s messenger Hermes, will reveal. Prometheus is sure that he is right, that he did offend Zeus but not in a manner worthy of such extreme punishment. To Prometheus Zeus is behaving like a tyrant mad with power. He rebuts and dismisses, sometimes angrily, the arguments for him to be reasonable, moderate, submissive to Zeus’s unquestionable power. Greek myth is ripe with such determined, even stubborn, resistance to calls for reasoned moderation. Some are rooted in principle, some in pride. Most involve both, a fact that makes them more compelling, more relevant, and rich with potential for reflection and debate. In some there is room for compromise (Antigone and Creon, Achilles and Agamemnon) but not always and perhaps not here. Prometheus refuses. “Pray, worship, fawn upon your despot of the moment. But Zeus means less to me than nothing. Let him rule a little while. Let him play King. He will not be the highest god for very much longer.” There is something Stalinesque about Zeus in Prometheus Bound. Hermes could easily be any KGB agent in a Lubyanka interrogation cell pushing a pre-written confession at a dissenter with no real promise that the prisoner will be spared a bullet in the neck. Prometheus is convincing that Zeus is a thug. "A tyrant's trust," he tells Hermes, "dishonors those who earn it." This is one of the beauties of the deities in Greek mythology--they are human with the powers of gods. No less than in the Judeo-Christian-Islamic world, gods are anthropomorphic in the Greek pantheon. The gods are made in our image (not the reverse) and they have all our faults, vices, weaknesses—including our susceptibility to power's corruption. The Greeks don’t pretend that Zeus or any of the gods are pure, perfect, altruistic. They knew humans are simply too fallible to create an infallible deity. To insist on perfection and the literalness of deed and word in scripture is to debase god, morality and religion with our own weakness of mind. Our infallible, inscrutably wise God is as fallible as an Egyptian pharaoh, a medieval Pope, a TV evangelist, or, more precisely, as infallible as an inspired but barely civilized scribe scribbling in the desert several thousand years ago is capable of making him. Fundamentalists can’t get around the fact that the God they worship is very like Joe Pesci in “Goodfellas,” or like Zeus. He is cranky, violent, intolerant and jealous. More powerful than others, but not more just or good. God needs rescuing from the limits of our imagination. Those believers who follow the spirit, not the letter, have, in a sense, accepted Prometheus’s greater gift, the tools of knowledge that create society and human civilization. Those who haven’t are like the god who chased Adam and Eve from the garden because they ate from the tree of knowledge. Zeus, I mean, God, doesn’t like that. Aeschylus may have been using the Promethean myth to take disguised issue with contemporary rulers or he might have been using myth to explore human nature in a crucible of unchecked injustice. In such cases, resistance, however doomed, might be the only correct course of action against tyrants human or divine.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Clif Hostetler

    When Aeschylus wrote this play 2500 years ago could he have anticipated that people would still be talking about it this many years later? Goethe, Shelley and Karl Marx all referenced the story of Prometheus in their writing. Wikipedia's discussion of the Promethean myth in modern culture has many examples where book titles, names used in science, game names, works of art, and numerous other examples where the name Prometheus has been used. With such a famous name, this story deserves to be read When Aeschylus wrote this play 2500 years ago could he have anticipated that people would still be talking about it this many years later? Goethe, Shelley and Karl Marx all referenced the story of Prometheus in their writing. Wikipedia's discussion of the Promethean myth in modern culture has many examples where book titles, names used in science, game names, works of art, and numerous other examples where the name Prometheus has been used. With such a famous name, this story deserves to be read. It should be acknowledged that the myth of Prometheus predated the play written by Aeschylus, so perhaps the playwright shouldn't get all the credit for the longevity of the story. The Great Books KC group selected this book for discussion because we had previously discussed Frankenstein, a Modern Prometheus. Our discussion spent considerable time discussing what Mary Shelly may have been thinking when she placed the name Prometheus into her book's subtitle. The logical conclusion is that Dr. Frankenstein was Prometheus and the Monster was the equivalent of saving humans, giving them fire and teaching them the secrets of divination. Assuming that Shelly intended the monster to be an example of a big mistake leading to unintended consequences, did Shelly think that humans were big mistake? One interpretation of the Prometheus is that he did a bad thing by defying Zeus's wishes and saving humans from being destroyed and giving them fire. Shelly must have been a romantic who thought that nature would be so much better off if humans were not on the scene. I prefer to believe that Shelly was thinking more about the fire given to humans than about humans themselves. Fire can do many good things, but too much of it can be undesirably destructive. It would follow that humans aren't good or bad, but rather how they use the fire given to them that's good or bad. The Promethean myth was a well known story to those living in the first century Greco-Roman world. That may explain why the new Christian religion spread as quickly as it did among the Greek culture of the middle east, and why they went on to developed the atonement theory. The image of Prometheus being spiked to a boulder has obvious similarities to the Christian crucifixion story. Both stories involve a god saving humans. Thus when a new religion came along that involved Christ dying for sinners, it made sense to the people at the time. It's interesting to note that Eastern Religions that were not influenced by Greek myths did not develop a religion that involved a god suffering for the benefit of humans. Perhaps God gave the Promethean myth to the ancient Greeks in order to prepare the mind set of the first Century Greco-Roman world to be open the Christian message.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cymru Roberts

    A disposition none can win, a heart that no persuasions soften -- these are his, the son of Kronos. What to do with such stark cosmology? I come back to Aeschylus for the language, for it is only he that can muster the voice of Titans, and give full dramatic weight to the gods. The character of Prometheus is so complex, and takes aspects of many myths we still take serious today: Christ for example, who suffered for the sake of man, or the aeternal rebel that stands against Tyranny. Modern readers A disposition none can win, a heart that no persuasions soften -- these are his, the son of Kronos. What to do with such stark cosmology? I come back to Aeschylus for the language, for it is only he that can muster the voice of Titans, and give full dramatic weight to the gods. The character of Prometheus is so complex, and takes aspects of many myths we still take serious today: Christ for example, who suffered for the sake of man, or the aeternal rebel that stands against Tyranny. Modern readers might be baffled to find that he is no perfect analog for any of the themes or characters which his figure represents, and it is in such ambiguity that the power of this play resides. Not only are we given the character of Prometheus, someone older and wiser than the gods (itself a fact that reaches sublime heights and rendered completely believable and darkly beautiful by Aeschylus), but we have to deal with the gods themselves, primarily the King of the Gods, Zeus. Cruel master he is, impervious to mortal agony. If Prometheus can be seen as a forerunner or analog for Christian figures like Christ or Eve, Zeus certainly contains within him the harshest aspects of Yahweh. I think of the Lord's message to Moses in Exodus 10:1-2: "Then the Lord said to Moses, 'Go in to Pharaoh; for I have hardened his heart and the heart of his servants, that I may show these signs of mine, among them, and that you may tell in the hearing of your son and your sons' son how I have made sport of the Egyptians and what signs I have done among them; that you may know that I am the Lord." To me, this is the language Zeus would use, only Zeus uses the various gods as mouthpieces, Hermes here, to speak for him. The tyrannical god, a god of power remorseless to the plight of man, is how I picture both Yahweh and Zeus; Prometheus Bound only highlights my opinion. One of the points of tragedy is to explain why pain exists on earth. A cruel overlord for God does a lot by way of explanation. And yet, most importantly and most tantalizingly, Aeschylus leaves us with one of the greatest cliffhangers of all time: Who shall overthrow Zeus?! Imagine today's clerics speaking in terms of another deity overthrowing the Abrahamic God? Unthinkable! And yet Prometheus speaks thus, and it is true heresy. Sin is ambivalently, and inextricably, linked to the righteous act of rebellion against Tyranny. The questioning of what to do and who to believe in becomes so tortuous and confusing that to sort it out one would have to rely on something like faith.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Grace Crandall

    This was such an odd little book. Part of me loves it, while the other part of me is still blinking in confusion, trying to reconcile the thousand little rabbit trails of philosophical thought that this play darted down. The play opens in a dreary wasteland, shortly after Zeus condemns Prometheus to an eternal life bound to a rock. At first it seems to concern itself less with Prometheus and more with his jailers--particularly Hephastios, who has made the Prometheus's chains. Hephastios has a so This was such an odd little book. Part of me loves it, while the other part of me is still blinking in confusion, trying to reconcile the thousand little rabbit trails of philosophical thought that this play darted down. The play opens in a dreary wasteland, shortly after Zeus condemns Prometheus to an eternal life bound to a rock. At first it seems to concern itself less with Prometheus and more with his jailers--particularly Hephastios, who has made the Prometheus's chains. Hephastios has a soft heart, and mourns Prometheus's fate; the other henchmen feel no pity for the god they see as a traitor. The rest of the play is spent with Prometheus himself, dealing with the varied well-wishers or mockers who come to visit him. Plot-wise, the play made little sense to me. I'm guessing there's a wealth of symbolism and meaning in the various events that I'm simply not picking up on (there usually is). Personally, my favorite part of this Prometheus Bound is the character of Prometheus himself. It's implied that he is an ancient being, who remembers a time before even the Titans, and who sees Zeus as nothing more than a petty tyrant of a ruler, doomed to fall. this ancientness colors Prometheus's speeches with a kind of bitter irony, which is honestly a joy to read. (Ironic heroes are the best heroes, in my opinion) :) Contrasting with his age and bitterness is Prometheus's love and care for mankind--'things that live and die', humanity is passed off as insignificant by the other gods, but not Prometheus. his crime against Zeus was loving humans too much--and for that, he refuses to repent, even if it means a life of pain and solitude. To recap: I really, really loved this play. And if you're in the mood to be confused and emotional over ancient greek myths, I'd definitely recommend giving this a read :)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

    I read a few reviews before composing mine, just to see how others took this story. They vary quite a bit, but I found particularly amusing the 2-star reviews that said things like "Uhhh...this guy got chained to a rock and was still chained at the end. Lame!" I liked this book, but mainly because even though I'm a mythology junkie who knew the Prometheus story, I didn't really get it until I read this. It would appear that Prometheus is the personification (or rather, deification) of human ingenu I read a few reviews before composing mine, just to see how others took this story. They vary quite a bit, but I found particularly amusing the 2-star reviews that said things like "Uhhh...this guy got chained to a rock and was still chained at the end. Lame!" I liked this book, but mainly because even though I'm a mythology junkie who knew the Prometheus story, I didn't really get it until I read this. It would appear that Prometheus is the personification (or rather, deification) of human ingenuity. He is also the lone champion among the immortals of "individual sovereignty." He treasured mankind, but Zeus had it slated for annihilation. Prometheus chose his own values over the ruler of the universe and was (literally!) chewed out for his troubles. It's a cautionary tale for anyone of strong beliefs who crosses a lesser mind with greater power. To me, this story had as potent a message as one named after a fellow titan (Atlas Shrugged). Towards the end, I halfway expected Zeus to come charging down from Mount Olympus shouting "You didn't build that!" Prometheus made a gamble based on his individual sovereignty and lost his sovereignty because of it. However, he would have surrendered his individual sovereignty had he sat idly by while Zeus destroyed mankind. The moral I took away was that someone who values their individual sovereignty must always be willing to risk it, or they will lose it by default.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Scriptor Ignotus

    Originally part of a trilogy, the other two parts of which are now lost, Prometheus Bound chronicles the wages of the titan's rebellion against the newly-triumphant Zeus. For giving humanity the intellectual arts and preventing their destruction, Zeus orders Hephaestus to bind Prometheus to a rock in Scythia; the Siberia of the ancient Greek world. In beautiful expanses of poetic dialogue, Prometheus curses Zeus and justifies his defiance. It was he who gave Zeus the technical knowledge that all Originally part of a trilogy, the other two parts of which are now lost, Prometheus Bound chronicles the wages of the titan's rebellion against the newly-triumphant Zeus. For giving humanity the intellectual arts and preventing their destruction, Zeus orders Hephaestus to bind Prometheus to a rock in Scythia; the Siberia of the ancient Greek world. In beautiful expanses of poetic dialogue, Prometheus curses Zeus and justifies his defiance. It was he who gave Zeus the technical knowledge that allowed him to overthrow Cronus, but giving that same gift to humanity invited the King-God's jealous wrath. The best part for me was the rapid exchange of snappy insults between Prometheus and Hermes near the end of the play. I could picture the Chorus shouting "Oooohhhhh, no he didn't!" after every line. The play ends with the Chorus on Prometheus's side, awaiting the overthrow of Zeus, whose lust for Io will produce the agent of his demise. It's interesting to consider that this play was originally a prelude to a Prometheus Unbound. It's intriguingly difficult to imagine how the characters would have been reconciled in the third play.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dylan Grant

    A Greek tragedy is always a truly delightful read. The phrases are beautiful and the stories are timeless. The characters in a Greek story like this move the heart as soon as they are introduced because each of them is more than just a character in a play: they are each of them one of the purest expressions of the archetypes in the Western mind. Prometheus is the primordial intellectual rebel, the first manifestation of the spirit of Galileo, Giordano Bruno or Tesla. To encounter this archetype A Greek tragedy is always a truly delightful read. The phrases are beautiful and the stories are timeless. The characters in a Greek story like this move the heart as soon as they are introduced because each of them is more than just a character in a play: they are each of them one of the purest expressions of the archetypes in the Western mind. Prometheus is the primordial intellectual rebel, the first manifestation of the spirit of Galileo, Giordano Bruno or Tesla. To encounter this archetype is a powerful and instantly gripping experience. Zeus, as he is portrayed in this play, is the primordial tyrant - the first Stalin. Reading a primary source of a Greek myth is always enlightening because they always reveal something intrinsic about the human experience. Myths are not only the stories of our ancestors, they are the mirrors of our souls. Highly recommended to anyone and everyone... but especially folks of European descent, because this story is a part of our glorious ancestral heritage.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Prometheus's mother is Themis, who according to Prometheus himself is akin to Gaia, the primordial deity of the earth. At the closing event of Aeschylus's drama, the Earth itself is cracked apart by Zeus to swallow Prometheus and the Oceanids - who have close ties to Prometheus according to Hesiod - into its abysmal pain. Thus Prometheus who is the daring will of man is an extension of the Earth and the Sea, the bodies of the world, and through his character we join the primal tragic unity of th Prometheus's mother is Themis, who according to Prometheus himself is akin to Gaia, the primordial deity of the earth. At the closing event of Aeschylus's drama, the Earth itself is cracked apart by Zeus to swallow Prometheus and the Oceanids - who have close ties to Prometheus according to Hesiod - into its abysmal pain. Thus Prometheus who is the daring will of man is an extension of the Earth and the Sea, the bodies of the world, and through his character we join the primal tragic unity of the kosmos, swirling in smoke and lightning. This universe is the eternal tragic force and orgy of the gods who give birth to us only to swallow us in the trenches of their wrathful bodies, consummating the cycle of wholeness -> shattering -> wholeness.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.