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La historia de mi vida (Biblioteca de la Memoria, Serie Menor nº 13)

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Helen Keller. Nació en 1880, y antes de cumplir dos años de vida perdió la vista y el oído en el transcurso de una enfermedad. «Durante casi seis años», dice, «viví privada del menor concepto sobre la naturaleza o la mente, la muerte o Dios. Puede decirse que pensaba con mi cuerpo, y, sin excepción, los recuerdos de aquella época están relacionados con el tacto... No había Helen Keller. Nació en 1880, y antes de cumplir dos años de vida perdió la vista y el oído en el transcurso de una enfermedad. «Durante casi seis años», dice, «viví privada del menor concepto sobre la naturaleza o la mente, la muerte o Dios. Puede decirse que pensaba con mi cuerpo, y, sin excepción, los recuerdos de aquella época están relacionados con el tacto... No había una chispa de emoción o racionalidad en esos recuerdos clarísimos, aunque meramente corporales; podía compararme con un insensible pedazo de corcho. De pronto, sin que recuerde el lugar, el tiempo o el procedimiento exacto, sentí en el cerebro el impacto de otra mente y desperté al lenguaje, el saber, el amor, a las habituales nociones acerca de la naturaleza, el bien y el mal». Lentamente, aprendió los nombres de las cosas que podía tocar; aprendió a hablar y a escuchar con las manos. Aprendió a escribir y a mecanografiar. Fue admitida en el Radcliffe College, y allí curso estudios. Ninguna mujer de su época ha sido tan merecidamente celebrada.


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Helen Keller. Nació en 1880, y antes de cumplir dos años de vida perdió la vista y el oído en el transcurso de una enfermedad. «Durante casi seis años», dice, «viví privada del menor concepto sobre la naturaleza o la mente, la muerte o Dios. Puede decirse que pensaba con mi cuerpo, y, sin excepción, los recuerdos de aquella época están relacionados con el tacto... No había Helen Keller. Nació en 1880, y antes de cumplir dos años de vida perdió la vista y el oído en el transcurso de una enfermedad. «Durante casi seis años», dice, «viví privada del menor concepto sobre la naturaleza o la mente, la muerte o Dios. Puede decirse que pensaba con mi cuerpo, y, sin excepción, los recuerdos de aquella época están relacionados con el tacto... No había una chispa de emoción o racionalidad en esos recuerdos clarísimos, aunque meramente corporales; podía compararme con un insensible pedazo de corcho. De pronto, sin que recuerde el lugar, el tiempo o el procedimiento exacto, sentí en el cerebro el impacto de otra mente y desperté al lenguaje, el saber, el amor, a las habituales nociones acerca de la naturaleza, el bien y el mal». Lentamente, aprendió los nombres de las cosas que podía tocar; aprendió a hablar y a escuchar con las manos. Aprendió a escribir y a mecanografiar. Fue admitida en el Radcliffe College, y allí curso estudios. Ninguna mujer de su época ha sido tan merecidamente celebrada.

30 review for La historia de mi vida (Biblioteca de la Memoria, Serie Menor nº 13)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    "Thus it is that my friends have made the story of my life. In a thousand ways they have turned my limitations into beautiful privileges, and enabled me to walk serene and happy in the shadow cast by my deprivation." This captivating memoir written by Helen Keller at the age of twenty-two was such a refreshing read! It really did manage to put a smile on my face and restore my spirit at a time when it seems so much negativity envelops us. There is no doubt that Helen was a remarkable woman and he "Thus it is that my friends have made the story of my life. In a thousand ways they have turned my limitations into beautiful privileges, and enabled me to walk serene and happy in the shadow cast by my deprivation." This captivating memoir written by Helen Keller at the age of twenty-two was such a refreshing read! It really did manage to put a smile on my face and restore my spirit at a time when it seems so much negativity envelops us. There is no doubt that Helen was a remarkable woman and her teacher, Anne Sullivan, a blessing and a devoted friend. Having lost her sight and her hearing at a very young age, Helen was most likely destined to a life full of isolation, frustration, and perhaps hopelessness. However, through some very influential connections -including one with the great Alexander Graham Bell himself, Helen was eventually put in touch with the Perkins Institute for the Blind in Boston and Anne Sullivan, one of the school’s distinguished graduates. In 1887, just before Helen’s seventh birthday, Anne arrived at the Keller’s home in Tuscumbia, Alabama. From this point, Helen’s life changed forever as she embarked on a journey of learning despite all odds. The perseverance of both student and teacher led to a remarkable accomplishment – that of Helen’s graduation from Radcliffe College with a Bachelor of Arts degree. What I loved most about Helen’s narrative was her positive outlook, her generosity towards others, and her love of nature and literature. I was quite surprised to read some of her descriptions of the world around her; one would not have guessed that her eyes and ears failed her. She used her other senses and her understanding of the things she learned to absorb everything almost like they were a part of her own being. Helen explained this more eloquently than I: "Each individual has a subconscious memory of the green earth and murmuring waters, and blindness and deafness cannot rob him of this gift from past generations. This inherited capacity is a sort of sixth sense – a soul-sense which sees, hears, feels, all in one." My only "criticism", if you will, of this memoir was that it also included a series of letters to and from Helen Keller throughout her young and college-aged life. While these were certainly interesting, they were also somewhat repetitive and later leaned heavily towards details of the series of exams Helen had to take throughout her schooling. That aside, this book truly was inspirational. When I think about what both Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan accomplished together, it really is exceptional. There were so many obstacles but these were overcome by the determination of the student and the dedication of the teacher. I was astounded to discover that Anne very often had to “read” textbooks to Helen by use of the manual alphabet when the Braille texts were not available. Anne’s eyesight, which was impaired to begin with, would also be strained and compromised by overuse. The friendship between these two is striking and heartwarming as well. Their companionship would last until Anne’s death in 1936. "I feel that her being is inseparable from my own, and that the footsteps of my life are in hers. All the best of me belongs to her – there is not a talent, or an aspiration or a joy in me that has not been awakened by her loving touch."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Story of My Life, Helen Keller The Story of My Life, first published in 1903, is Helen Keller's autobiography detailing her early life, especially her experiences with Anne Sullivan. Portions of it were adapted by William Gibson for a 1957 Playhouse 90 production, a 1959 Broadway play, a 1962 Hollywood feature film, and Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Black featuring Amitabh Bachchan in the role of Anne Sullivan. The book is dedicated to inventor Alexander Graham Bell. The dedication reads, "TO ALEX The Story of My Life, Helen Keller The Story of My Life, first published in 1903, is Helen Keller's autobiography detailing her early life, especially her experiences with Anne Sullivan. Portions of it were adapted by William Gibson for a 1957 Playhouse 90 production, a 1959 Broadway play, a 1962 Hollywood feature film, and Sanjay Leela Bhansali's Black featuring Amitabh Bachchan in the role of Anne Sullivan. The book is dedicated to inventor Alexander Graham Bell. The dedication reads, "TO ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL; Who has taught the deaf to speak and enabled the listening ear to hear speech from the Atlantic to the Rockies, I DEDICATE This Story of My Life." تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز دهم ماه نوامبر سال 1985 میلادی عنوان: داستان زندگی من - بانضمام نامه ها و ...؛ نویسنده: هلن کلر؛ مترجم: ثمینه پیرنظر (باغچه بان)؛ تهران، کتاب زمان، 1353؛ در 376 ص، مصور، مجموعه شرح حال؛ چاپ چهارم 1356؛ موضوع: سرگذشت نابینایان و نا شنوایان - سده 20 م عنوان: معجزه شگفت انگیز هلن کلر؛ نویسنده: هلن کلر؛ مترجم: امیر اسماعیلی؛ تهران، توسن، 1364؛ در 98 ص، مصور؛ عنوان: داستان زندگی من؛ نویسنده: هلن کلر؛ مترجم: فاطمه چادرباف؛ تهران، توسهعه کتابخانه های ایران، 1368؛ در 155 ص؛ چاپ ششم 1379؛ شابک: 9646209254؛ چاپ هفتم: 1385؛ هشتم: 1388؛ شابک: 9789646209251؛ عنوان: داستان زندگی من؛ نویسنده: هلن کلر؛ مترجم: محمدرضا دلفراقی؛ تبریز، جام جم، 1375، چاپ دوم 1378؛ در 120 ص؛ شابک: 9649086846؛ عنوان: داستان زندگی من؛ نویسنده: هلن کلر؛ مترجم و تلخیص: فروزنده داورپناه؛ تهران، موسسه همراه، 1376؛ در 79 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1380؛ شابک: 9646034233؛ مترجم: سپیده خلیلی؛ نقاش: فهیمه عینی؛ تهران، انتشارات مدرسه، در سال 1377؛ در 62 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1379؛ شابک: 9643532976؛ چاپ سوم 1380؛ بانوی نابغه «هلن کلر»، یک سال و شش ماهه بودند، که به خاطر «مننیژیت»، نابینا و ناشنوا شد، اما ایشان با یاری آموزگار خود، یکی از زنان پرآوازه، در جهان سده ی بیستم میلادی شدند. «هلن»، در یکی از روستاهای آمریکا، به دنیا آمده بودند، و در نیمه ی راه دو سالگی خویش نیز، بیمار شده بودند، خانواده ی ایشان، از بیماری و ناتوانیش، ناراحت بودند، و نمیدانستند، که چگونه باید، با «هلن»، رفتار کنند. آنها میاندیشیدند، هیچ راهی برای ارتباط نیست، و خود «هلن» نیز، نمیتوانست به تنهایی، کارهای خویش را انجام دهد. «گراهام بل»، که تلفن را اختراع کردند، آموزگار ناشنوایان بودند، خانواده ی «هلن»، از ایشان یاری خواستند، آنگاه که «گراهام بل» ایشان را دیدند، دانستن که «هلن»، دختر باهوشی هستند، و به خانواده ی او گفتند، که: آموزگار جوانی را میشناسند، که میتواند به ایشان آموزش بدهند، چون خانواده «هلن» ثروتمند بودند، توانستند آموزگار خصوصی برایش بگیرند. معلم «هلن»، که خانم «آنا سولیوان» نام داشتند، خود نیز «کم بینا» بودند، و در مدرسه ویژه ی نابینایان و ناشنوایان درس خوانده بودند، ایشان آن روزها تنها بیست و یکسال سال داشتند که توانستند، راهی را اختراع کنند، تا بتوانند به یاری آن راه، به «هلن» آموزش و مفاهیم را به ایشان یاد دهند. این راه همان علامتهایی بودند، که با فشاردادن آن علامت، روی کف دست «هلن»، ایشان را متوجه میکرد، و ایشان مفهوم آن علامتها را میفهمیدند. «هلن» در سن هشت سالگی، توانستند یاد بگیرند که چگونه میتوانند، با مردمان ارتباط داشته باشند، و این باعث معروف شدن ایشان در آن سن شد. «هلن» توانستند به دانشگاه هم بروند، ایشان با یاری آموزگار خود: «آنا سولیوان»، که هماره و در همه جا با ایشان بودند و سخنرانیها را، با فشار علامتها روی کف دست «هلن»، به ایشان می‌‌فهماندند، توانستند مدرک دانشگاهی خود را با همان روش بگیرند. «هلن» در طول سالهای تحصیل خود، از سوی همگان تشویق میشدند، تا زندگی خویش را بنویسند، تا همه بفهمند که ایشان چگونه پیشرفت کرده است، ایشان زندگینامه ی خود را، در همین کتاب: «داستان زندگی من» نوشته است. «هلن کلر»، در زندگی، با افراد معروف بسیاری دیدار کرده اند، و تجربه های بسیاری به دست آورده است. ایشان همه ی افرادی را که در دوران زندگی اش، رئیس جمهور آمریکا شده بودند را، دیدند. «هلن» با حس کردن، حتی میتوانستند آهنگها را بفهمند. او بیشتر وقت خود را، با شرکت در سخنرانیها، به همراه «آنا سولیوان»، آموزگار و دوست عزیزش میگذرانید. «سولیوان» ازدواج کرد، اما پس از گذشت مدت زمان کمی، طلاق گرفت، و پیش «هلن کلر» برگشت. «کلر» یک قهرمان برای نابینایان شد. او کتابهای بسیاری را در طول زندگی خود نوشت و چاپ کرد. مدال طلای سازمان ملی علوم اجتماعی، در سال 1952 میلادی به ایشان اهداء شد. در سال 1953 میلادی، از ایشان در دانشگاه «سوربون» فرانسه، تشکر شد. در سال 1964 میلادی، مدال آزادی ریاست جمهوری، توسط رئیس جمهور آن زمان «لیندون ب جانسون»، به وی اهداء شد. «هلن کلر» در روز نخست ماه ژوئن سال 1968 میلادی، در سن 88 سالگی فوت کردند. موسسات و انجمنهایی، از «هلن» به یادگار مانده، که به منظور پژوهش برای پایان دادن به نابینایی شکل گرفته اند. ا. شربیانی

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessaka

    To All My Goodreads Friends and to Others Who Have Enjoyed My Reviews I wish to thank you all!! I have been struggling with vision loss for some time, more in the last year. While I believe I can still write reviews and post them, so I am told, I have been struggling in the last two months with reading other people’s reviews, and so I really don’t feel as though I can just go through and like a review without reading it first. The last week has been the hardest for me. I have glaucoma and myopic de To All My Goodreads Friends and to Others Who Have Enjoyed My Reviews I wish to thank you all!! I have been struggling with vision loss for some time, more in the last year. While I believe I can still write reviews and post them, so I am told, I have been struggling in the last two months with reading other people’s reviews, and so I really don’t feel as though I can just go through and like a review without reading it first. The last week has been the hardest for me. I have glaucoma and myopic degeneration, and in December I had glaucoma surgery, which, while lowering my eye pressure has caused more vision loss. In the last week I have noticed words in my central vision fading and a lot of blurriness. So, I made the font dark, but those words began fading as well. Visual Services has been helping me, and yesterday one of my case workers put voice activation on my kindle, which so far is not working too well when it comes to Goodreads. And she put a program on my computer that takes months to learn. I have no idea what I can and can’t learn at this point, and I have no idea what learning it will do for me. Speaking of which, each and every one of you have inspired me with your own writings, and your comments on my own reviews have also been very inspiring and helped me to get over being shy about writing reviews. You all know that I like to add personal touches to my reviews, maybe too many personal touches, but I had found when reading books that they bring back childhood and adult members, so I add them because I enjoy doing it. As one friend once said to me, “I write for myself,” and while I do that, I also hope to entertain others with my own stories or just with my reviews on the books. I listen to audio books now, mostly from the Library of Congress for the Blind. I had hoped to read my Nancy Drew books before I couldn’t see them well enough, and now I am not sure of that, although I am told that my new Iphone will take a photo of a page and read it to me. Last summer I spent a week at the blind school learning how to be blind. It was fun being there; it was tiring, and it was nice meeting people and knowing that those that ran this program are also visually impaired. Only I wish that we could all see. It is just that it is encouraging to hear this, “There is life after blindness.” What do I see? Light but my world is darker. Objects but they are blurry. My house is darker than it used to be. I don’t like to go shopping unless it is a well lit store, which means I like grocery stories. I have eaten in the dark in my favorite restaurant in Ft. Smith, AR, Rolando’s. They believe that candle light is romanic. I told them that I would bring my own lamp next time; instead I am bringing a miner’s head lamp, that is, unless it mbarrasseswhoever is with me at the time. In which case I can say, Let’s get it to go. Since it is a Latino/Cuban/Mexican restaurant, It didn’t matter if the food was mixed up. I have accidentally touched people in dim lit stores thinking they were an object, and if I touched it, I would be able to recognize it. So far I have not been hit upside the head for doing so, but now I am more careful. I have a cane which I seldom use because it is embarrassing, but I find that when I do use it people are more helpful. Such as, in a doctor’s office they don’t run away from me thinking that I will follow them; instead they stay close. In a restaurant I can find a bathroom by myself unless it is too dark. I have been known to feel walls to find doors or papertowels in the restrooms. I have learned that I can still cook on the stove even when they blindfolded me at the blind school. I can chop vegetables without chopping off a finger, and I can pour liquids into a cup without having to clean up a mess. I learned how to reach for a glass of water without tipping the glass over, and I learned how to clean my house, which is no longer enjoyable since I can’t tell if it is dirty or not. I have given many of my books away, especially when learning that they are on audio for the blind. I am so glad that my new friend on here wanted my Native American books, which I gladly shipped to her. And my college friend took two boxes of my other books. I have many more books that I would love to read and can’t get on audio or on kindle. I am hanging on to them to see what can happen. It is hard to believe that people just use hand held magnifiers to read with, because that is not fun. The story doesn’t flow well. One good thing that I found is that after activating the voice on kindle the reader is so much better than Alexis. She sounds more natural and reads slower. Now I know that I can get to my thousands of kindle books that are not on audio. And most of all I am grateful that I love to read and that there are audio books. Again, thank you all. And if there are days that my eyes see better or I can figure out how to read your reviews, I will, but only a few at a time. And most of all I wish to thank my husband who helps me all he can, sometimes too much as I need to learn to do things myself. Note: I have yet to read this book, but maybe when I do I will find it inspiring.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

    I have always held Helen Keller in high regard. How can you not, really? She is a remarkable woman. I did a report on her in grade school, and though I forgot many facts of her life over the years, what I learned of her perseverance and strength of spirit left a lasting impression on me. Helen Keller's spirit certainly shines in this short but beautifully written memoir, which Helen wrote when she was just 22 (and, worth noting, attending Radcliffe College). I think most know that Helen lost her s I have always held Helen Keller in high regard. How can you not, really? She is a remarkable woman. I did a report on her in grade school, and though I forgot many facts of her life over the years, what I learned of her perseverance and strength of spirit left a lasting impression on me. Helen Keller's spirit certainly shines in this short but beautifully written memoir, which Helen wrote when she was just 22 (and, worth noting, attending Radcliffe College). I think most know that Helen lost her sight and hearing at a very young age (she was not yet 2) after suffering a mysterious illness her doctors did not think she would survive. It was not until several years later (almost 7) that her beloved teacher, Miss Sullivan, would arrive and introduce her to the world of language, and thus the world at large. I found it fascinating to learn of Helen's memories of those many years after she first became blind and deaf, and before she learned language. How does one makes sense of a world she cannot see or hear before she even has words to conceptualize it? It was amazing to me that she was able to understand so much about her surroundings at such a young age, and essentially only through touch, smell and vibration. I was also fascinated to learn how Miss Sullivan was able to so patiently and thoroughly introduce Helen to all the many complexities of language (and even abstract thoughts such as love) to a child who, up to that point, had no real idea such things existed. Even more remarkable is that Helen not only fully mastered English, but French, German and Latin as well. Helen's love of language is clearly displayed in her rich, descriptive writing. One reviewer called it "too flowery," but I thought her words to be often poetic. Perhaps what I found most remarkable was Helen's incredible sense of awe and wonder for the world -- at times her joy for life seemed to exude from the pages. Though she admits moments of extreme isolation and sadness, she writes, "Is it not true then, that my life, with all its limitations, touches at many points the light of the world beautiful? Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content." And later, "I try to make the light in others’ eyes my sun, the music in others’ ears my symphony, the smile on others’ lips my happiness." This is ultimately a story of her life (as it is appropriately titled), so those looking purely for a book on what it is like to be deaf and blind may be disappointed. But after all, that is truly Helen's legacy -- that she led such a rich life despite being blind and deaf.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This is an interesting book in that it exactly fails to answer the question that you wish it would answer: what is it like to be both blind and deaf? Of course her education was marvelous and it is amazing that a young woman with those disabilities was able to overcome them and become a productive member of society. However, I found that the book focused much more on "how I became normal" instead of on "how my life is different." I found the prose to be a bit flowery (perhaps a product of the er This is an interesting book in that it exactly fails to answer the question that you wish it would answer: what is it like to be both blind and deaf? Of course her education was marvelous and it is amazing that a young woman with those disabilities was able to overcome them and become a productive member of society. However, I found that the book focused much more on "how I became normal" instead of on "how my life is different." I found the prose to be a bit flowery (perhaps a product of the era? Perhaps a product of an over-eager Anne Sullivan? Perhaps a product of an over-eager editor?) and, well, completely unfocused. I'm genuinely sorry that I did not like this book better; such an amazing accomplishment should be commended--writing your autobiography as a blind and deaf woman...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    A remarkable story of a remarkable woman who defeats all the odds stacked against her. Helen at the age of 19 months old contracts an illness that renders her both deaf and blind. This story mainly focuses on Helen's earlier life and describes how she learns to read, write and communicate with the aide of her teacher Miss Sullivan after her family decide to take her to the Perkins Institute for the blind in Boston in 1886, Anne Sullivan becomes instrumental in her life teaching her methods in co A remarkable story of a remarkable woman who defeats all the odds stacked against her. Helen at the age of 19 months old contracts an illness that renders her both deaf and blind. This story mainly focuses on Helen's earlier life and describes how she learns to read, write and communicate with the aide of her teacher Miss Sullivan after her family decide to take her to the Perkins Institute for the blind in Boston in 1886, Anne Sullivan becomes instrumental in her life teaching her methods in communicating but then also later becoming a loyal friend and constant companion, her part in Helen's life I believe is paramount to Helen's wellbeing and where her love of learning and discovering develops. She describes in abundance her love of reading books, her appreciation of the written word leads her to forge ahead into higher education and takes on many courses to further her academics she becomes frustrated as her determination is impeded by the lack of ways that she is able to articulate her knowledge in the conventional ways and finds many methods to overcome many of the obstacles that threaten to detract her. She eventually succeeds in attending Radcliffe college and graduates there at the age of 24. This story is told beautifully in a tone that really captures the essence of Helen, she's feisty, stubborn willful and determined with an incorrigible thirst for knowledge, how she overcomes so much to succeed and even excel in her endeavours is truly admirable. She is one of a kind! I'm so glad to have read this book and it's infinitely inspiring on so many levels.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Helen Keller died at the age of 87 in 1968. At 19 months old, she came down with an illness ( Scarlet fever), that left her blind, deaf, and mute. Most people are familiar “The Miracle Worker”... the award winning play. Less are familiar of her many contributions. She became a writer, and publisher. She made many contributions into Human Rights. She helped many who were blind and death, but also fought for world peace and women’s rights. She attended Radcliffe, the prestigious college for women Helen Keller died at the age of 87 in 1968. At 19 months old, she came down with an illness ( Scarlet fever), that left her blind, deaf, and mute. Most people are familiar “The Miracle Worker”... the award winning play. Less are familiar of her many contributions. She became a writer, and publisher. She made many contributions into Human Rights. She helped many who were blind and death, but also fought for world peace and women’s rights. She attended Radcliffe, the prestigious college for women graduating cum laude. She received the first first honorary degree from Harvard - the first ever to go to a woman. “The World I live in”, ( a collection of essays), was Helen’s first book. ( written in 1908). Helen described her experience of the world through sensations: touch, smell, and vibrations. “The hand is easy to recognize as the face, that it reveals its secrets more openly and unconsciously. People control their countenances, but the hand is under no restraint. It relaxes and becomes listless when the spirit is low and dejected; the muscles tighten when The mind is excited or the heart glad; and permanent qualities stand written on it all the time”. This first book that Helen Keller wrote is out of print - but it’s a free kindle download. It takes about an hour to read. But took me longer - I paused a lot... thinking about things I haven’t in a long time. She included an essay with quotations from Shakespeare. ( there are a few grammatical spelling errors errors in this essay)... but I found it fascinating with Helen’s awareness of the speech of Shakespeare - in relationship to how she sees the world. When Cleopatra is threatened with the humiliation of gracing Caesar’s triumphant, “she snatched a dagger, exclaiming, I will trust my resolution and my good hands. With the same Swift instinct, Cassius trusts to his hands when he stabs Caesar: “Speak, hands, for me”. So many thought provoking references to our ‘hands’ as language. “We find the hand in time and history, working, building, inventing, bringing civilization out of barbarism. The hand symbolizes power and the excellent work”. “Allusions to moonbeams and clouds do not emphasize the sense of my addiction: they carry my soul beyond affliction’s narrow actuality”. “There is nothing, Misty or uncertain about what we can touch. Through this sense of touch I know the faces of friends, the illimitable variety of straight and curved lines, all surfaces, the exuberance of the soul, The delicate shape of flowers, the noble forms of trees, and the range of mighty winds. Beside objects, surfaces, and atmospherical changes, I perceive countless vibrations. I derive much knowledge of every day matter from the jars and jolts which are to be felt everywhere in the house”. Footsteps reveal and measure the character and the mood of the Walker. She picks up indecision, hurry and deliberation, activity and laziness, fatigue, carelessness, timidity, anger, and sorrow. ALL THROUGH A PERSON’S FOOTSTEPS!! Vibrations, ... animals, music, tones, taste, emotions, etc. I tried to look at everything in the way Helen did. Helen shares of being extremely sensitive to harshness of noises ... grinding, scraping, loosing of the earth rumbling, etc. I can relate - and I can see. I got into the experience of this ebook. Our daughter played the role of Helen Keller - “The Miracle Worker”, with a professional theatre company when she was 14.. A proud mom- she was phenomenal. I couldn’t believe how incredible she was with the combat choreography during the famous dinner scene. Sold out performances every night - with the show held over. I have bittersweet memories .. Great during the shows run for 6 weeks ( rather the the 5 planned)... but ‘less’ great because soon after she left for High School in Michigan.... ( Interlochen).. It was there when anorexia developed.... Playing Helen Keller was the last role I saw our daughter play for many years. Thankfully today - our daughter is vibrantly healthy- still acting in Los Angeles - ( singing - playing piano, dancing, writing, painting).... thriving. I’ve held a personal relationship with Helen Keller - since that play our daughter performed in.... But it’s been years - to never - to thinking - THIS PROFOUNDLY about being blind, deaf, mute, educated, and an incredible contributor to society. THAT WAS HELEN KELLER!!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chrissie

    What I was looking for in this book is not what I got, but I am still glad I read it. This is an autobiography written by Helen Keller (1880- 1968). It was published when she was still only twenty-two, when she began her education at Radcliffe. Thus, it does not cover her whole life and is in a sense biased in that she is telling us what SHE wants said. To get a full idea of her life, even just the first twenty-two year of it, you must read other books too. Clearly, Hellen Keller was an intelligen What I was looking for in this book is not what I got, but I am still glad I read it. This is an autobiography written by Helen Keller (1880- 1968). It was published when she was still only twenty-two, when she began her education at Radcliffe. Thus, it does not cover her whole life and is in a sense biased in that she is telling us what SHE wants said. To get a full idea of her life, even just the first twenty-two year of it, you must read other books too. Clearly, Hellen Keller was an intelligent and extremely talented woman. At nineteen months she became both deaf and blind due to an illness, which illness is not clear, but influenza or scarlet fever are today postulated. On March 3, 1887, Anne Sullivan came to teach her, this being three months short of her seventh birthday. Her family was wealthy and spared nothing in their endeavors to provide her with the best care and education that could be gotten. What she accomplished with the help she received from Anne IS remarkable, but Helen Keller’s dependence upon Anne Sullivan must be emphasized too. The book shies away from the emotional difficulties that Helen Keller had to surmount. Her struggle and frustrations are downplayed, scarcely spoken of. She is not forthcoming on a personal level. The book seems to be written to give encouragement, as a beacon shining light on what can be achieved rather an honest revelation of Helen’s personal difficulties. I wanted to see the world as she saw it before she was given an inkling of how we see it. She expresses herself with the words of those who do hear and see, which just ends up confusing me. She is attempting to show how capable she became, while I instead was looking for an understanding of the existence she was trying to escape. She is giving her success story. I was looking for her nightmare and how exactly, by what means and steps did she progress from one world to the other. How exactly did Helen communicate? We are told that Anne Sullivan “spelled into her hand". We are told that later she used books with "raised print". We are told she could understand what people were saying by feeling their lips. It is by the first two methods, Helen absorbed information at Radcliffe. We are told she learned to talk, but none of this is clearly explained in detail. It was such details I was looking for in this book. The prose style is dated and on the flowery side. Through her prose she is showing us her success and what her hard work has accomplished. One can understand why she chose to write in this manner. Her style mimics the renown writers she studied and the literature that she came to love. I would have preferred a more heartfelt, simpler prose. The last half of the book consists solely of letters written by Helen. They are written from 1887 to 1901, i.e. when Anne Sullivan first came to teach her to when she had been accepted at Radcliffe. Their content is not all that engrossing. They do reveal her increased writing capabilities. In addition, the letters’ optimistic tone draws a picture of her personality and reinforces the message she wished to relay with this book. The audiobook I listened to was narrated by Mary Woods. The narration is good—simple to follow, read at an appropriate speed and without dramatization.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    I always had an interest in Helen Keller. When I was young my parents nicknamed me Helen Keller, because I would go around to everyone's plates and demand food. I wouldn't eat off my plate, but I would gobble off others without remorse. I would still have this habit of munching off people's delectable morsels if I wasn't humiliated in High School. It was just second nature to me that I didn't even notice that I would grab a chip here and there. Helen Keller was introduced to me when I was very y I always had an interest in Helen Keller. When I was young my parents nicknamed me Helen Keller, because I would go around to everyone's plates and demand food. I wouldn't eat off my plate, but I would gobble off others without remorse. I would still have this habit of munching off people's delectable morsels if I wasn't humiliated in High School. It was just second nature to me that I didn't even notice that I would grab a chip here and there. Helen Keller was introduced to me when I was very young, and I introduced her to my daughter. I somehow got my daughter into Brad Meltzer's children books, Ordinary People Change the World. They are biographical picture books. The first one I brought home was about Martin Luther King Jr, and she loved it. The second was Helen Keller, which my husband and I read almost everyday. They are really cute and in comic book form. Since reading about Helen Keller to my daughter I wanted to read her biography, The Story of My Life. Helen Keller was not born deaf and blind, but became very sick at nineteen months. The sickness ran it course, but left a permanent mark. Did she let her disability defeat her? If you watched the movie, or watched the many versions making fun of her disability you know the answer. But no she did not. Instead she learned to speak and in multiple languages, went to college, and helped many people out. She was a well to do woman, a go-getter, and an inspiration for generations. I think if she had a disability or not she would have done something amazing with her life. She was that kind of person when said she was going to do something she did it. Life was tough for her, but she zig-zagged to get what she wanted. She is a wonderful woman. It is weird to find that Helen and I have some similarities, besides eating off other people's plates. Maybe, I was Helen Keller in my past life! Just kidding, she would be disappointment in me. She described a story about being at the beach. She was playing in the ocean when unfortunately she was sucked under a wave. She eventually resurfaced. I too had this happen to me or I thought it did. It is a really fuzzy dream, but very real in my mind. I remember being at the beach on a dark and stormy day. I don't remember who I was with though. I feel like my parents wouldn't take me to the beach at that time, but somehow I was there. There I was in the water, when all of a sudden I too was sucked under a wave. I remember being jostled around, and doing many flips in the water. I held my breath and closed my eyes. I was afraid. Then somehow I was back on the sand. Once I opened my eyes I noticed that I wasn't far from my group, but still I was pushed down the beach. I remember running back, and that is the end of my memory. I had some very lucky moments if it wasn't a dream. Also, her thoughts about college are very similar to mine. She said "One goes to college to learn, it seems not to think." Sometimes that is how I felt. Here you having a full course load, which is 15 credit hours, and you are expected to memorize all this information about individuals, concepts, theories,..etc, but not really to use them. During college I felt like everything was rush, rush, rush. I just learned the concept and how to solve the problem. I had other course work to do and I couldn't sit too long on a subject. I have a science major for goodness sakes! Take Organic Chemistry and feel the misery of all science majors. After college I have a lot of time on my hand to think of the knowledge that I have gained, and analyze other concepts. Then you are suppose to study 3 hours for every credit hour. All the information you read for one class can conflicted with the other classes' information, which leaves you only with a jumbled bag of information that isn't categorized. College is hard, and not thinking about the subject in depth causes more pain. Helen Keller leaves me inspired. Her thoughts are beautiful. For someone without sight, she had vision. As an abled body we take advantage of our surroundings. Sadly, most of us are on our phones all day. Today, I left my phone in the car to get some coffee from Starbucks after a dreaded day of grocery shopping. It felt so good to be detached. I honestly hate being on my phone, but it is also second nature to me now that I don't realize it. I saw everyone looking down at their phone, not looking at the barista, not seeing their world around them. Made me feel sad, especially after finishing the biography part of the book. She imagined a beautiful world. She could see the trees and the grass. She noticed the world around her. I feel like I should go in my front yard (not the backyard. I have dogs) and just stare at the world. Memorize the bark off the tree. Look at the lines of the petals and leaves like I use too. Just to be grateful of the world. Lastly, after reading this she makes you want to go do something with your life. She did all these amazing things, and I think what is really stopping me from doing something I want to do. There will always be challenges, but you can find a way around it if you really want it. Don't let anything stop you from doing something you want to do. I know it is hard, and you might face enormous challenges, but YOU CAN MAKE IT HAPPEN. That is what I learned from Helen Keller. I hope everyone had a wonderful New Year. I have tons of plans for 2017. Let's do this. *plays awesome music* Also, check out my blog herehttp://dancingbetweenthecovers.com/re...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Atkinson

    When I learned about Helen Keller, the impression I was given of her was that her life was ~so miserable~ until she was graciously granted a teacher who showed her the world and how to communicate. This book posits Helen's life as that of a blessing, one where she had moments of hardship, but she still felt guided by an excitement for life and experiencing new things rather than being revolted by them. This book was so fascinating because it painted a different picture of a historical figure I th When I learned about Helen Keller, the impression I was given of her was that her life was ~so miserable~ until she was graciously granted a teacher who showed her the world and how to communicate. This book posits Helen's life as that of a blessing, one where she had moments of hardship, but she still felt guided by an excitement for life and experiencing new things rather than being revolted by them. This book was so fascinating because it painted a different picture of a historical figure I thought I knew. It also reveals the extent of Helen's absolute genius to be able to learn and communicate as extensively as she did despite her disabilities. That Helen was so intelligent and driven to learn was really inspiring, and I liked listening to this on audio.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lubinka Dimitrova

    I just wish I had half her eagerness to learn, and even a smidgeon of her abilities, resilience, joie de vivre and determination. While reading, I was constantly wondering, how can a blind and deaf person exhibit such rich vocabulary and such detailed images of the world around us? Hope nothing's wrong with me for being jealous of her...

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Helen Adams Keller was born June 27, 1880 and died June 1, 1968. This informative and interesting memoir depicts her life as a healthy child, her critical illness at 18 months that resulted in the loss of her hearing and sight, and the long, hard road ahead that eventually lead to her unbelievable accomplishments and graduation from college in 1904.Helen was a remarkable child who learned patience and overcame extreme adversity due to the loving and unrelenting dedication of her Teacher Miss Ann Helen Adams Keller was born June 27, 1880 and died June 1, 1968. This informative and interesting memoir depicts her life as a healthy child, her critical illness at 18 months that resulted in the loss of her hearing and sight, and the long, hard road ahead that eventually lead to her unbelievable accomplishments and graduation from college in 1904.Helen was a remarkable child who learned patience and overcame extreme adversity due to the loving and unrelenting dedication of her Teacher Miss Anne Sullivan. Not enough can be said about this wonderful woman!Although Helen was a privileged child, that did not stop her from raising funds and developing programs for the blind and handicapped throughout her lifetime.Highly recommend this amazing non-fiction read that includes many of Helen's oh so sweet letters and her legion of famous friends such as Dr. Alexander Graham Bell, Dr. Oliver Windell Holmes and many more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A lovely, quotable book, similar to the writing of L.M. Montgomery. Which is also what bothers me about it. When I first read this, years and years ago, I was impressed by all the poetic imagery. And it is impressive that she was so well versed in the language of sight and sound. But reading the book now? All those bells, and crickets, and clouded, blue skies...just make me sad. She wasn't meeting us halfway. She was meeting us all the way. She touches on the problem, herself: At that time I eagerly A lovely, quotable book, similar to the writing of L.M. Montgomery. Which is also what bothers me about it. When I first read this, years and years ago, I was impressed by all the poetic imagery. And it is impressive that she was so well versed in the language of sight and sound. But reading the book now? All those bells, and crickets, and clouded, blue skies...just make me sad. She wasn't meeting us halfway. She was meeting us all the way. She touches on the problem, herself: At that time I eagerly absorbed everything I read without a thought of authorship, and even now I cannot be quite sure of the boundary line between my ideas and those I find in books. I suppose that is because so many of my impressions come to me through the medium of others' eyes and ears. But more than that, she had merged with her caretakers. The "story of [her] life" is essentially the story she'd been told: Helen, the burdensome invalid; Helen, the grateful student; Helen, under the bright, blue sky. This passage details her family's reaction upon hearing her speak for the first time: My eyes fill with tears now as I think of how my mother pressed me close to her, speechless and trembling with delight, taking in every syllable that I spoke, while little Mildred seized my free hand and kissed it and danced, and my father expressed his pride and affection in a big silence. The implications are heartbreaking. And, in fact, learning to utter a single phrase required hours on end of grueling repetition. Pleasing her family (often) seemed to be her only motivation. She could never truly express what she, alone, knew for the simple reason that there was no language for what she knew. She had no culture of her own. And so, ultimately, she had no voice. [Miss Sullivan] put the crab in a trough near the well where I was confident he would be secure. But next morning I went to the trough, and lo, he had disappeared! Nobody knew where he had gone, or how he had escaped. My disappointment was bitter at the time; but little by little I came to realize it was not kind or wise to force the poor dumb creature out of his element, and after a while I felt happy at the thought that maybe he had returned to the sea.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    I loved reading this book. I read it as a school girl and was awe struck. I lived in Alabama myself so I knew of her home and have visited it several times over the years. There was something wonderful about seeing from her own words how she had not only survived but thrived. She had such an indomitable spirit that shone through. She was my hero when I was a child and she has not lessened the impact she had on me even today. I have just re-read this book and I gained even more insight into her I loved reading this book. I read it as a school girl and was awe struck. I lived in Alabama myself so I knew of her home and have visited it several times over the years. There was something wonderful about seeing from her own words how she had not only survived but thrived. She had such an indomitable spirit that shone through. She was my hero when I was a child and she has not lessened the impact she had on me even today. I have just re-read this book and I gained even more insight into her beautiful life. I had forgotten that she was able to read in English, German, French and Latin. She met people like Alexander Graham Bell and began friendships that she carried all through her life. Her desire to learn and witness everything available to her was flawless. She attended plays and fairs and every event while having Anne sign into her hand a vivid description of her surroundings. She could describe these events in detail later in her life with such elegance that I could visualize it myself from her words. She worked tirelessly on learning to speak and her greatest pain came from knowing that she was unable to communicate in a manner that everyone could understand. She and Anne Sullivan worked on correcting her pronunciation throughout her life with that one goal in mind. Anyone that reads this will come out ahead realizing how amazing she truly was. With all her struggles she just pushed and pushed to make her life an amazing never ending adventure. Such an inspirational book, it is not to be overlooked.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The autobiography of Helen Keller, written when she was still quite young, as she had just finished college. It is a fascinating thing to even contemplate what a brilliant mind she had despite the obvious obstacles that were set in her way at such an early age. My greatest admiration goes to Miss Sullivan, without whom Helen Keller's mind would undoubtedly remained locked in her disabled body. Miss Keller describes things so vividly it is difficult to remember that she has not seen nor heard any The autobiography of Helen Keller, written when she was still quite young, as she had just finished college. It is a fascinating thing to even contemplate what a brilliant mind she had despite the obvious obstacles that were set in her way at such an early age. My greatest admiration goes to Miss Sullivan, without whom Helen Keller's mind would undoubtedly remained locked in her disabled body. Miss Keller describes things so vividly it is difficult to remember that she has not seen nor heard any of the things with which she has become acquainted by her senses of touch, taste and smell or her extensive reading. Throughout the reading you simply keep saying to yourself, "what a remarkable woman." Were the subject of this book not so fascinating, I doubt it would hold the interest as acutely as it does. I was amazed at the number of noted people who took an interest and had a direct impact on her life. Alexander Graham Bell being one of the key figures who enabled her to find a way out into the world and help to foster her education. Well worth reading, with a solid 3.5 star rating.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I am sure this has been reviewed. I have been enamoured with Helen since I was 5 years old.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hilary

    Helen Keller had a severe illness at 19 months old which left her deaf and blind. It is hard to imagine losing one of those senses but to lose both must have been such an unbearable sensory deprivation. So understandable that (view spoiler)[ Helen felt the need to lock her mother in her room (hide spoiler)] Luckily for Helen she had an understanding family wealthy enough for a tutor who helped her to learn all the subjects a hearing and sighted child would learn and more. An inspiring book full Helen Keller had a severe illness at 19 months old which left her deaf and blind. It is hard to imagine losing one of those senses but to lose both must have been such an unbearable sensory deprivation. So understandable that (view spoiler)[ Helen felt the need to lock her mother in her room (hide spoiler)] Luckily for Helen she had an understanding family wealthy enough for a tutor who helped her to learn all the subjects a hearing and sighted child would learn and more. An inspiring book full of evocative descriptions. I would like to have had more information on the teaching methods, I can understand how a doll could be passed and 'doll' written on Helen's palm, but I would have been very interested how words involving concepts were learnt. There is a shocking episode involving a court case against Helen at the age of 12 which is unbelievable. She achieved an amazing amount in the period the book covered, I would love to read how Helen's life progressed after her early 20's.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ammara Abid

    Absolutely agree, "Any teacher can take a child to classroom, but not every teacher can make him learn". ~Helen Keller I'm truly inspired by Helen Keller, she's a wonderful woman. One of the most beautiful & inspirational autobiography -biography I have ever read. I'm in awe what an extraordinary imagination she had, she was blind but honestly she can see more than me. The way she pictures her surroundings is exceptional. She's a true symbol of hope. What could be more beautiful than this! Absolutely agree, "Any teacher can take a child to classroom, but not every teacher can make him learn". ~Helen Keller I'm truly inspired by Helen Keller, she's a wonderful woman. One of the most beautiful & inspirational autobiography -biography I have ever read. I'm in awe what an extraordinary imagination she had, she was blind but honestly she can see more than me. The way she pictures her surroundings is exceptional. She's a true symbol of hope. What could be more beautiful than this! "What a joy it is to feel the soft, springy earth under my feet once more, to follow grassy roads that lead to ferny brooks where I can bathe my fingers in a cataract of rippling notes or to clamber over a stone wall into green fields that tumble and roll and climb in riotous gladness". ~ Helen Keller "Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn whatever state I may be in, therein to be content". ~Helen Keller

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jason Pellegrini

    When I heard this was the book that inspired The Miracle Worker, I really thought it was going to revolve around Anne Sullivan and the difficult process of breaking through the barrier of blindness and deafness to get to Helen Keller. I remember vague details of the play (and movie) from way back in middle school, and remember thinking then how interesting it all was. This wasn't the case with this book. What this book dives into is Keller's life after all the events of The Miracle Worker. Which When I heard this was the book that inspired The Miracle Worker, I really thought it was going to revolve around Anne Sullivan and the difficult process of breaking through the barrier of blindness and deafness to get to Helen Keller. I remember vague details of the play (and movie) from way back in middle school, and remember thinking then how interesting it all was. This wasn't the case with this book. What this book dives into is Keller's life after all the events of The Miracle Worker. Which is completely fine. I fully grasp why Keller wanted to share these moments of her life. It's just not what I thought it would be about, and couldn't really hold my attention. I'll admit it is difficult for a non-fiction book to really grab me and hold my attention, and this was simply just not a book for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I. just. can't. I suppose it's a matter of taste, but I hated this book. I didn't expect the life of a deaf and blind girl in the late 19th and early 20th century to be very exciting, but I had hoped for more...I don't know...emotion...substance...story... There are some nice moments in this book and Helen Keller's life is inspiring, but for the most part this book is mind numbing. ***** SPOILER ALERT***** This is what happened to Helen Keller: She had a horrible illness at nineteen months old which I. just. can't. I suppose it's a matter of taste, but I hated this book. I didn't expect the life of a deaf and blind girl in the late 19th and early 20th century to be very exciting, but I had hoped for more...I don't know...emotion...substance...story... There are some nice moments in this book and Helen Keller's life is inspiring, but for the most part this book is mind numbing. ***** SPOILER ALERT***** This is what happened to Helen Keller: She had a horrible illness at nineteen months old which caused the loss of her hearing and sight. She was taught to read, write, and (almost) speak by Anne Sullivan. She grew up. She learned a lot of different languages. She went to collage and graduated (inspiring!) She read a lot of books. She wrote a lot of books. She met a lot of famous people. She died. Maybe I was just ready to be done with this book, but the last three chapters just dragged on. Chapter 21 is all about her "book friends", meaning the books that she read and what authors she liked...but then she turns kind of douchey and is all "I also read Heidi in German!" I think that this is where the book turned for me, because in Chapter 22 she talks about her all of her different "tree friends" (she literally describes trees!) and her "dog friends" and then for the rest of the book she starts name-dropping like a mo-fo! Maybe the old-timey folks got off on that sort of thing, but I don't. And then there was this: "I also dislike people who try to talk down to my understanding. They are like people who when walking with you try to shorten their steps to suit yours; the hypocrisy in both cases is equally exasperating." I just hate it when people are courteous, don't you? Still, the book did yield one quote that I liked a lot describing her struggle with college: "I slip back many times, I fall, I stand still, I run against the edge of hidden obstacles, I lose my temper and find it again and keep it better. I trudge on, I gain a little, I feel encouraged, I get more eager and climb higher and begin to see the widening horizon. Each struggle is a victory. One more effort and I reach the luminous cloud, the blue depths of the sky, the uplands of my desire."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    This is my “Celebrity Memoir” book to fill the Book Riot Read Harder challenge for 2018. Helen Keller was rather famous in her day, being the first deaf-blind person to earn a BA degree. I believe she is still admired by many in the deaf community. I don’t suppose it is surprising that she was an avid reader, once her teacher Miss Sullivan managed to make the breakthrough that allowed Helen’s education to begin. It was an activity that she could pursue on her own at her own speed and, like all of This is my “Celebrity Memoir” book to fill the Book Riot Read Harder challenge for 2018. Helen Keller was rather famous in her day, being the first deaf-blind person to earn a BA degree. I believe she is still admired by many in the deaf community. I don’t suppose it is surprising that she was an avid reader, once her teacher Miss Sullivan managed to make the breakthrough that allowed Helen’s education to begin. It was an activity that she could pursue on her own at her own speed and, like all of us, gain information on subjects that intrigued her. I was surprised by how much she loved poetry, however. For me poetry is very much about hearing it—I often read it aloud in order to properly appreciate it. Since Helen was unable to hear it, she must have had a very sophisticated sense of the rhythm of the words, probably seeing many more nuances in it than I do. I was also amazed at the number of languages that she managed to master—German, French, Latin, Greek—and I wish I had the same facility with languages. I struggle to maintain my little bit of French and Spanish! I couldn’t help but notice how much the natural world and companion animals were part of her life. The smells of the garden or the seaside were ways of opening up her world and her pet cats, dogs and horses provided unjudgemental companionship. I had hoped that this was the story of Ms. Keller that I read during my childhood, but it was a different work. I think the book that I was familiar with was based on the life of her teacher, Anne Sullivan, and I hope to track it down some day for a reminiscent read—I remember reading it many times as a child and loving it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bridgette

    This was incredibly disappointing. Ms. Keller's book is too lighthearted. I have an immense respect for people who live, learn, and succeed against all odds but Ms. Keller's account of her early years is all sunshine and daisies. It is not believeable or real. There is no heartache, anger, or frustation that we all know that had to be a part of her daily life. She goes into way too much detail describing flowers and people and books she likes. There is no substance. Uggh... and I wanted to like This was incredibly disappointing. Ms. Keller's book is too lighthearted. I have an immense respect for people who live, learn, and succeed against all odds but Ms. Keller's account of her early years is all sunshine and daisies. It is not believeable or real. There is no heartache, anger, or frustation that we all know that had to be a part of her daily life. She goes into way too much detail describing flowers and people and books she likes. There is no substance. Uggh... and I wanted to like it :(

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    This book was purely inspirational to me. Helen Keller has some great insights on life that we can all learn from. One of my favorite quotes from her book in Helen's own words: “Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful? Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content. “Sometimes it is true, a sense of isolation enfolds me like a cold mist as I sit alone a This book was purely inspirational to me. Helen Keller has some great insights on life that we can all learn from. One of my favorite quotes from her book in Helen's own words: “Is it not true, then, that my life with all its limitations touches at many points the life of the World Beautiful? Everything has its wonders, even darkness and silence, and I learn, whatever state I may be in, therein to be content. “Sometimes it is true, a sense of isolation enfolds me like a cold mist as I sit alone and wait at life’s shut gate. Beyond there is light, and music, and sweet companionship; but I may not enter. Fate, silent, pitiless, bars the way, Fain would I question his imperious decree; for my heart is still undisciplined and passionate; but my tongue will not utter the bitter, futile words that rise to my lips, and they fall back into my heart like unshed tears, Silence sits immense upon my soul. Then comes hope with a smile and whispers, ‘There is joy in self-forgetfulness.’ So I try to make the light in others’ eyes my sun, the music in others’ ears my symphony, the smile on others’ lips my happiness” (Helen Keller, The Story of My Life [2003], 107-109).

  24. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    This is a sweet inspiring thin book (100+ pages excluding the Letters portion) and I finished this just in two days. Despite being deaf and blind, she was able to get a good education and helped people who were in the same situation as she was. This autobiography was written by Helen in 1903 but its strong message (that physical deformity should not be a hindrance to fulfill one’s dreams) still applies in generations to come. For me, a book can be defined as classic if it has a lesson that can t This is a sweet inspiring thin book (100+ pages excluding the Letters portion) and I finished this just in two days. Despite being deaf and blind, she was able to get a good education and helped people who were in the same situation as she was. This autobiography was written by Helen in 1903 but its strong message (that physical deformity should not be a hindrance to fulfill one’s dreams) still applies in generations to come. For me, a book can be defined as classic if it has a lesson that can transcend time and generations. I do not just read for entertainment as I would always want to learn something from the hours spent in a book. Helen may not be the best female writer (so far Ayn Rand and Louisa May Alcott are my favorites) but I believe that at one point in our life, we should spend sometime reading this sweet inspiring thin book. I do not have (luckily!) any relative who is blind but I just could not bear thinking that if somebody close to me is in the same situation as Helen, it will be just too sad.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    Her words are eloquent and timeless. I remember reading a kids' biography of Helen by Margaret Davidson multiple times over when I was younger (alongside a similar biography of MLK Jr) and certain parts of this brought back elements from that book that I'd completely forgotten. Most people know of Helen because of The Miracle Worker, but it's so important to remember that her story didn't end by the water pump when she was a child; that was when her world was truly reopened.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is an amazing autobiography of a girl who conquered her weaknesses. Hellen Keller was a deaf blind girl who learned sign language and braille, and founded a college for the deaf blind in Washington DC. She overcome all odds with an amazing possative attitude which was partly imparted from her long suffering patient teacher. I recommend everyone reads this and gets inspired. Be Blessed. Diamond

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Where I got the book: purchased from Amazon. A Book Wizards book club read. This was one of those books I managed to miss reading during my childhood years—I wonder what impression it would have made on me then? It is, of course, Helen Keller’s own story about how her teacher Annie Sullivan helped her escape the dark and silent world an early illness had thrust her into by teaching the deaf and blind girl to communicate via touch and, eventually, speech. I found many aspects of Helen’s story fasci Where I got the book: purchased from Amazon. A Book Wizards book club read. This was one of those books I managed to miss reading during my childhood years—I wonder what impression it would have made on me then? It is, of course, Helen Keller’s own story about how her teacher Annie Sullivan helped her escape the dark and silent world an early illness had thrust her into by teaching the deaf and blind girl to communicate via touch and, eventually, speech. I found many aspects of Helen’s story fascinating, although I wasn’t entirely sure I would have liked Helen had I met her. She admits to being a tyrant in her early years—to bullying the little black girl who was assigned to serve her and to venting her frustration on all those around her—and I suspect that the amount of attention she received as she grew up probably left its mark, despite the sugary-sweet language she uses in the style of her era. In an age where disability is seen as no bar to being out in the community, to employment and to acceptance, it’s hard to imagine how limited Helen’s prospects must have seemed when she was a child—and that was an aspect of things much discussed by the Book Wizards, who are all themselves cognitively disabled. And yet, then as now, the solution was money—Helen’s parents had the resources to employ a full-time, live-in teacher and this, combined with Helen’s high level of intelligence, determination and the gift of study, ensured that she was able to live up to her full potential. Teachers of the twenty-first century might note that Helen became proficient in several languages, both ancient and modern—how much we’ve lost! The edition I’m reviewing (the “Restored Edition” from Modern Library) is an excellent one, with plenty of photos (it’s amazing how many celebrities of the day Helen met, another indication of her privileged life) and supplemental materials such as letters and a piece written by Annie Sullivan. I didn’t get round to reading them, but I’m hoping to at some point.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wellington

    Mark Twain once said that the two most fascinating people of the 19th century were Napoleon and Helen Keller. I've yet to read anything on Napoleon but I can feel the fascination with Helen. This edition was in three parts. The first is a series of installments originally written for the Ladies Home Journal in 1902. Serial installments just don't strike me really well. Or it could just be that Helen Keller does not give herself credit to the person she became. Later I realized that it's the words Mark Twain once said that the two most fascinating people of the 19th century were Napoleon and Helen Keller. I've yet to read anything on Napoleon but I can feel the fascination with Helen. This edition was in three parts. The first is a series of installments originally written for the Ladies Home Journal in 1902. Serial installments just don't strike me really well. Or it could just be that Helen Keller does not give herself credit to the person she became. Later I realized that it's the words that she doesn't say that say the most. Helen if you do not know is both blind and mute. She writes better than most people and thinks more than most people. She wanted to do everything that everyone else did ... learn to talk, go to college ... and never did brag about it. Three's a quiet determined ... innocent strength about her. I've written about a load bravado of a strength within us that brandishes a sword in the middle of a bloodstained battlefield. There's the patient energy wisdom of an elder. Then there's Helen ... innocent and determined. Not knowing her limitations she has exceeded our expectations. Her letters filled the second part of the book. One must smile when watching the learning curve of her first letters to the advanced letters at the end. The final part Anne Sullivan writes her version. I appreciate Helen more after listening to Anne's version. Anna gives us some contrast to Helen against the world that we understand. Beautiful book about a beautiful person.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    One of the most inspiring people in the world would be Helen Keller. Born blind and deaf and lucky to have survived, she soon was able to fluently communicate and rise over her disabilities. It wasn't easy considering that the people of the century she lived in were often ignorant, but she proved to be a very talented individual. Her story is amazing and an interesting read, too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    John

    It's part of human nature to ocassionally feel sorry for yourself. "Why do I have to have it so hard?" "Why did this have to happen to me?" But it's hard to feel sorry for yourself when reading Keller's remarkable story. To paraphrase Faulkner, she didn't just survive, she prevailed!

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