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Experiencing God: Knowing and Doing the Will of God, Workbook

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Most Bible studies help people; this one changes them forever. For more than 15 years, God has used Experiencing God in His work, showing believers how to know Him intimately while encouraging them to


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Most Bible studies help people; this one changes them forever. For more than 15 years, God has used Experiencing God in His work, showing believers how to know Him intimately while encouraging them to

30 review for Experiencing God: Knowing and Doing the Will of God, Workbook

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Tucker

    I had no God previously since 1976; and I was introduced to Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism that came in after Gautama Siddhartha Buddhism which came down from the Primal Buddhism which there are no ancient writings just artifacts. My friend and I had trained during electronics in the making of pc boards, she was Japanese and we became friends and she introduced me to the Lotus Sutra. The Major Writings of Nichiren Daishonin Plus writings of Daisaku Ikeda. There is no god in Nichiren Shoshu. They held I had no God previously since 1976; and I was introduced to Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism that came in after Gautama Siddhartha Buddhism which came down from the Primal Buddhism which there are no ancient writings just artifacts. My friend and I had trained during electronics in the making of pc boards, she was Japanese and we became friends and she introduced me to the Lotus Sutra. The Major Writings of Nichiren Daishonin Plus writings of Daisaku Ikeda. There is no god in Nichiren Shoshu. They held to a monistic view believing that there is no separation between Creator and Creature but being protected by Buddhist, Hindu, and Shinto gods regarded as spiritual forces. The main chanting of mantra was enlightenment, propsperty, and healing from chanting nam-myoho-renge-kyo expressing devotion to the law of karma. Fulfilling worldly desires that brings enlightenment, which can be achieved in a life time. This was founded by Soka Gakkai in 1930 by Tsunesaburo Makiguchi (1871-1944. Not the same as Ancient Buddha which they only found artifacts of a Buddha sitting yoga style. Well the Lord had other plans for me my neighbors were Christians and they had a friend that played guitar it was the guitar that attracted me to church. I thought that is what they meant by church. So I attended and received salvation and lost my roommate. Was blessed with a good job, and gained prosperity in Spiritual things of God. I had spiritual encounters a few times before the Japanese roommates, but did not know how to seek God properly. I recommend this to all new born again Christians that need to develop a strong love and relationship with God. The author and I have many things in common except I do not have the Church religion background. I stepped out in faith, and I have the same fundamental experiences when face to face with God in my life with God...spiritually speaking. It is a must read book and their is scriptures and it is only for those who want to become wealthy spiritually instead of worldly wise.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Manuel

    Experiencing God is considered a modern Christian classic. Despite this, my thoughts on the book are mixed. The point of the book is to find ways to experience God. In particular to see where God is working, and to be involved in His work. Overall, I thought that the principles that Blackaby presents for doing this are pretty solid. Nothing comes to mind that made me really wary when came down to his basic principles of how to experience God. There were two things that I did dislike about the book Experiencing God is considered a modern Christian classic. Despite this, my thoughts on the book are mixed. The point of the book is to find ways to experience God. In particular to see where God is working, and to be involved in His work. Overall, I thought that the principles that Blackaby presents for doing this are pretty solid. Nothing comes to mind that made me really wary when came down to his basic principles of how to experience God. There were two things that I did dislike about the book though. First, it suffers from appearing to be a bit prideful. I don't know Henry Blackaby so I have no idea what he is really like, but the writing style of the book just smacks of arrogance sometimes. Even in trying to be humble at one point he says that God had to look high and low for someone as ordinary as me. Not to mention constantly referring to some conference where he tells how somebody's life was changed by reading his book. Not that it isn't good to have testimonials, but the frequency of such examples, with few examples that don't involve the book or Blackaby himself, started to rub me the wrong way. The second problem I had with the book, was that it gave a lopsided view of how God may speak to you. Many of Blackaby's examples are amazing. It is about how he and his wife were called to Canada to pastor a small church and all the amazing things that were done there or how people were called to serve God in amazing circumstances and amazing outcomes. These examples naturally led me to ask is this how God speaks to everybody? What about God speaking to people in the everyday, in our communities, in things that are not "full-time ministry." I think there has to be balance here; we need to be challenged that we are not just settling for the comfort we have where we are, but I do not believe that God calls everyone the same way. We are not all meant to be Paul or Moses at least in terms of our accomplishments. So while I thought it was solid on its principles, the tone of the book and the examples it gave slightly diminished its value in my eyes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    When I read this the first time I was so excited to find someone who believed exactly as I did about the way God speaks to His people. Of course, Blackaby provides a tremendous amount of scriptural support for his position, so that was also very helpful. His view remains unusual, though no longer unique. Where some might say, "Don't just stand there, do something," Blackaby answers "Don't just do something, STAND THERE." Be still and wait on the Lord. He will lead you (provided you are doing the When I read this the first time I was so excited to find someone who believed exactly as I did about the way God speaks to His people. Of course, Blackaby provides a tremendous amount of scriptural support for his position, so that was also very helpful. His view remains unusual, though no longer unique. Where some might say, "Don't just stand there, do something," Blackaby answers "Don't just do something, STAND THERE." Be still and wait on the Lord. He will lead you (provided you are doing the other things in the book...) Where others say, "the Lord helps those who help themselves," Blackaby answers that God often does nothing until His people can "cease striving" and rest in Him. I have never read a better explanation for the way God speaks, including how to know His voice, and the various media through which he speaks (whether scripture, other Christians, circumstances, or the Church). This is an excellent book and I cannot recommend it too highly. I'm glad they made a 'book' version. The workbook is probably better because it is so engaging. But so many people will not buy or really use a workbook, so the book version will reach a lot of people.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    We read this book with our Bible study group and it was a good one to dive into with others to discuss. Blackaby covers all the different ways we can experience God and how important it is to pay attention to each of these. The overall theme of the book is to pay attention to how God could be working around you and how He wants you to be part of that. Instead of asking in prayer all the things you want, ask Him what He wants for your life, what you should jump into and for guidance. The book dis We read this book with our Bible study group and it was a good one to dive into with others to discuss. Blackaby covers all the different ways we can experience God and how important it is to pay attention to each of these. The overall theme of the book is to pay attention to how God could be working around you and how He wants you to be part of that. Instead of asking in prayer all the things you want, ask Him what He wants for your life, what you should jump into and for guidance. The book discusses different ways that God can speak to his people and how each of us can experience Him as couples, in our children's lives, in the church, marketplace, and His kingdom. I will admit that at times I felt like there was story after story about Blackaby at a conference and how someone's life was changed by something he said. But if you can get past some of that there is good ideas to grasp onto and new ways to look at convening with God. Blackaby does a wonderful job at making sure the reader understands that this whole following God thing is not easy and that you will run into hardship and obstacles as you try to follow His will for your life. I wish he would have gone into this a little more but he does an overall good job of covering it. Best Parts: -I always view my circumstances against the backdrop of the cross, where God clearly demonstrated once and for all His deep love for me. -When you trust that God always gives His best, you will devote your heart to whatever assignment God gives because you know in that role you can experience everything God has in His heart for you. -God wants a watching world to come to know who He truly is. He does not call you to get involved in His activity merely so people can see what you can do. He will call you to an assignment that you cannot accomplish apart from His divine intervention. God's assignments have God-sized dimensions. -If you're focused on self, you'll always seek to protect yourself and pursue what is most comfortable and what most builds you up. ...But if you are God-centered, your focus remains on Him alone. Storms may rage around you, but as long as you have God in your sight, you'll stay the course.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shane Gliser

    A concerned Christian's review: Nobel intentions but with more theological holes than you can shake a cross at. For example the very thesis verse is taken out of context and thus flawed. To hear the flaw in theology, you can listen to Stand to Reason's podcast episode from 04/21/2013 ( http://www.strcast2.org/podcast/weekl...) and listen to the segment from 1:03:00 to 1:18:30. This is not to say that it is without value. It is good at getting people into the word and getting people used to the i A concerned Christian's review: Nobel intentions but with more theological holes than you can shake a cross at. For example the very thesis verse is taken out of context and thus flawed. To hear the flaw in theology, you can listen to Stand to Reason's podcast episode from 04/21/2013 ( http://www.strcast2.org/podcast/weekl...) and listen to the segment from 1:03:00 to 1:18:30. This is not to say that it is without value. It is good at getting people into the word and getting people used to the idea of seeking God on individual level. In that regard, it's great. However, due to the flawed theological premise, it could lead to long-term disillusionment, frustration, and unfounded fear and doubt for believers who have been told through the book that if they're not hearing from God that there is something wrong with their Christian walk. For a far better guide to good Christian living that can be used as a study, I would recommend Decision Making and the Will of God by Garry Friesen. http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/56...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Louis Lapides

    This book is filled with both good and bad theology. Unfortunately the bad theology is enough to cause the reader to be misled by the major theme of the book: how to find God's will? Blackaby bases his entire theological foundation on the misinterpretation and poor application of several passages in the fifth chapter of the Gospel of John. This makes the entire book built on a faulty interpretation of an important passage that is about the trinitarian nature of God and not about how the Christia This book is filled with both good and bad theology. Unfortunately the bad theology is enough to cause the reader to be misled by the major theme of the book: how to find God's will? Blackaby bases his entire theological foundation on the misinterpretation and poor application of several passages in the fifth chapter of the Gospel of John. This makes the entire book built on a faulty interpretation of an important passage that is about the trinitarian nature of God and not about how the Christian finds God's will. Most Christians will not agree with my take on this book because Blackaby's work is so popular and so many Christians have gone through an "Experiencing God" seminar. How can such a popular book be so wrong? My advice concerning this book is to Google "critiquing Experiencing God Henry Blackaby" and read what other apologists have said about the false information contained in Blackaby's book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a GREAT Study. It is very intense and hard core. It will literaly grip you and make you want to put it down because there is no way to get through it without being changed by it. If you are seriously committed to hearing what God wants you to do or what He is trying to tell you, then I highly recommend it. If you are struggling with your committment, i still recommend it, but you will be faced abbruptly with "His Will".

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Henry Blackaby cares a lot about God’s kingdom and about people. He wants people to experience true life-changing faith and that’s a wonderful impulse. But, he makes some logical flaws that could end up being detrimental to people’s faith. Blackaby promises that believers today can hear the voice of God the way people did throughout the Bible, ex. Joseph, Moses, Daniel, Paul. And God will give specific instructions to each of us. Blackaby does not account for believers today having the indwellin Henry Blackaby cares a lot about God’s kingdom and about people. He wants people to experience true life-changing faith and that’s a wonderful impulse. But, he makes some logical flaws that could end up being detrimental to people’s faith. Blackaby promises that believers today can hear the voice of God the way people did throughout the Bible, ex. Joseph, Moses, Daniel, Paul. And God will give specific instructions to each of us. Blackaby does not account for believers today having the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, which was not the case in the Old Testament, or believers today having the entirety of God’s inspired Word (the Bible). Hebrews 1:1 clearly teaches that God does not speak to people today the way He did in the past. Also, if tuning our hearts to listen to for specific instructions from the Holy Spirit was essential to being a good Christian as Blackaby says, you’d think the epistles from Romans to Jude would spend significant time telling people how to do it. But, I can’t find any such instructions. Instead the epistles are full of exhortations to follow the commands of Christ which are clearly known to anyone who has access to the written Gospels. Blackaby says that, just like in the Old Testament, when God speaks today we will clearly know it is God. This will be because we have such a deep relationship with God. I fear that as people do not clearly hear God’s voice to them, they will become depressed thinking it is their own fault because they are not devoted enough.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Brown

    As I participated in a group study on Henry Blackaby’s book: Experiencing God, I not only discovered some great insights (like the value of focusing on being Christ-centered verses self-centered, the power of the Holy Spirit, and the importance of fellowship, prayer, and God’s Word), but I have also found some areas of concern in the author’s methodology and philosophy. It may seem like semantics, but men cannot do God’s work, only God can do God’s work. More importantly, only by following Chris As I participated in a group study on Henry Blackaby’s book: Experiencing God, I not only discovered some great insights (like the value of focusing on being Christ-centered verses self-centered, the power of the Holy Spirit, and the importance of fellowship, prayer, and God’s Word), but I have also found some areas of concern in the author’s methodology and philosophy. It may seem like semantics, but men cannot do God’s work, only God can do God’s work. More importantly, only by following Christ as our example can we please God, and I believe that the only way to know how to be like Him is through careful (and prayerful) Bible study. Unfortunately, several of the author’s extra-biblical personal examples suggest that unless your goal or task is truly God-sized, it may not be what God wants you to be doing. Preposterous! Furthermore, I got the impression that Blackaby unequivocally believes that he indeed knew (and consistently knows) the will of God. Surely anyone can look back at a situation or an event and infer that God had a hand in the results (especially events that could be classed as miraculous), but to declare that you can accurately predict what is (or is not) God’s will is the height of presumption. Even more bombastic was Blackaby’s statement that, “If you have trouble hearing God speak, you are in trouble at the very heart of your Christian experience.” [1] Although obviously Scripture is quoted in each and every chapter, it reads like there is far more to a true relationship with God than reading and applying His Word in every aspect of your life; it implies that God speaks directly to us outside of His Word. This almost charismatic “sensing” or “feeling” of God’s will borders on mysticism which requires pure emotion rather than thoughtful biblical precision. To me, this approach is a far less reliable method of discerning God’s truth. Blackaby’s assertion that “Truth is a person” (Jesus) is a nice slogan, but it overly simplifies an answer to Pilate’s rhetorical question, “What is truth?” (John 18:38) Luckily, I happened to have another book that I was reading in parallel with this study, which provided an unexpected balance. It was simply a book of President Abraham Lincoln’s quotes and famous speeches. In it I found that Lincoln wrote, “I do not boast that God is on my side, I humbly pray that I am on God's side.” [2] Did honest Abe presume to know that he was doing the will of God? By no means! He simply hoped that his actions were in line with what he knew from his studies of Scripture. And did he know the Bible? Indeed he did! Years before his renowned political career, in a tiny one-room schoolhouse in Indiana, each student in turn regularly read from a single classroom Bible. Lincoln had read and listened to God’s Word in its entirety even before his own family could afford to buy a Bible of their own. Throughout his life he often quoted from this “Great Book” in his discussions, debates, letters, and speeches. What was Lincoln’s view of the Bible’s role in his own philosophy and how he conducted his life? Read the words he spoke to a delegation of black Americans who had presented the President with a Bible in 1864. “So far as able, within my sphere, I have always acted as I believed to be right and just; and I have done all I could for the good of mankind generally. In regard to this Great Book, I have but to say, it is the best gift God has given to man. All the good the Savior gave to the world was communicated through this book. But for it we could not know right from wrong.” [2] This, I think, brings the focus back on to where it should be…the Bible. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord.” (Isaiah 55:8) Was it God’s will that the Union should win that terrible War Between the States? Could not His will have still been done if the outcome had been reversed? In this case, would a Union defeat have meant that Lincoln was not on God’s side? Maybe someday we might know the answer to these questions, but I would conjecture that a defeat would not have changed Lincoln’s convictions. I believe that God can work his will in many ways, both through positive experiences and even through negative experiences resulting from the travesty of our human condition. Do we really require extra-biblical messages from God in order to know the Truth? Definitely not, and I hope to live my life like historian Wayne Temple wrote regarding President Lincoln, “The longer Lincoln lived, the closer he felt to God and the more he relied upon God for sustenance.” [3] References: [1] Henry Blackaby, Richard Blackaby, and Claude King, Authors, Experiencing God: Knowing and Doing the Will of God. [2] Gordon Leidner, Editor, Abraham Lincoln: Quotes, Quips, and Speeches. [3] Wayne Temple, Author, Abraham Lincoln: From Skeptic to Prophet.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I have tried numerous times to get through this workbook, and I have just been unable to. I find myself skimming the pages just to hurry and finish the days worth of information. I'm unable to put my finger on WHY. In most (although not all) instances I don't really disagree with what Blackaby is saying. Yet, I just can't get anything out of the study. No joy, no insight, no pull or enlightenment. Unfortunately, I've found completing it more of a chore than I desire. Perhaps, it's just the workb I have tried numerous times to get through this workbook, and I have just been unable to. I find myself skimming the pages just to hurry and finish the days worth of information. I'm unable to put my finger on WHY. In most (although not all) instances I don't really disagree with what Blackaby is saying. Yet, I just can't get anything out of the study. No joy, no insight, no pull or enlightenment. Unfortunately, I've found completing it more of a chore than I desire. Perhaps, it's just the workbook form that I dislike. Maybe I'll pick it back up and love it at some time in the future.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    This was a wonderful devotional--the best I've ever used. Henry Blackaby skillfully guides you through selected Scriptures and reflection questions to a deeper understanding of God, His word, and your faith in Him. I read this a long time ago--I actually want to get another copy of the workbook now, years later, and go through it all over again. Who can't use a little help with their spiritual walk?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    My roommate gave me this book because he somehow ended up with more than one copy of it, which happens from time to time with books.  This particular book offers readers a course on experiencing God, and it is meant to be taken with a small group as part of a congregation.  The authors assume that those taking the course will be married and parents, which is more than a bit irksome for those of us who are neither.  It can be said that the authors wish to deal with the subject of experiencing God My roommate gave me this book because he somehow ended up with more than one copy of it, which happens from time to time with books.  This particular book offers readers a course on experiencing God, and it is meant to be taken with a small group as part of a congregation.  The authors assume that those taking the course will be married and parents, which is more than a bit irksome for those of us who are neither.  It can be said that the authors wish to deal with the subject of experiencing God through Bible study and obedience and are decidedly anti-mystical in their approach [1].  As might be imagined, I am somewhat ambivalent to the authors' approach, not least because the authors seem to be Calvinist in their approach, caught in a tension between emphasizing God's initiative in calling people and the way that we should be rather than do and a need to emphasize obedience to God and action conducted in faith, something the authors fail to explain as deeply as they wish. In about three hundred pages or so the authors manage to include twelve weeks of five lessons apiece as part of a course.  Course topics include God's will, looking to God, God's pursuit of a "love relationship," God's invitation, God speaking (in two parts!), the crisis of belief, how we adjust our life to God, how we experience God through obedience, the relationship of believers and churches, how we become Kingdom people, and how we experience God in our daily lives.  Each of the units ends with some notes and plenty of questions that come from a dvd that I did not have, which was a bit irksome.  The book also has a closing section with names, titles, and descriptions of God, some simple artwork throughout, and encouragement for the people taking the course to sign an Experiencing God group covenant (!) and keep a spiritual journal as a discipline in helping them to hear God's prompting in scripture reading, which I suppose would be akin to the practices of medieval beginning mystics, as anti-mystical as the book is in general.  Throughout the book there are also a great many times where the author references how important the book was to other people, which is a bit off-putting and definitely humblebragging at best. All in all, my feelings about the book are mixed.  I am in favor of the authors' approach towards obedience and seeking to study the Bible, but find their viewing themselves as examples of faith and obedience to be rather irritating, especially considering their frequent use of the NIV translation rather than the superior M-text and their frequent references to the fictive and unbiblical Trinity.  In one drawing the authors even manage to claim that the Holy Spirit is a person, protesting a bit too strongly.  This is a book that offers a great deal of encouragement to obey God, but the authors as usual are pretty unspecific about what that means.  This is a book that tries to browbeat the reader into feeling bad about their depraved nature and making them distrust their own feelings and experiences while puffing up the pride and ego of the writers, which is all kinds of unsettling.  In many areas, the authors are simply contradictory in their approaches, urging ecumenical harmony with other congregations while slamming unspecified 'cults.'  One wonders if the authors failed to read the book to ensure a continuity of approach or if they were genuinely unaware of the tensions and contradictions inherent in this work and their feel-bad approach. [1] In stark contrast to most of what one reads about experiencing God.  See, for example: https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2012... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017... https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Autumn Slaght

    "Most Bible studies help people. This one changes lives forever." I'd have to agree. This workbook right here is one of the most life-changing experiences of my young adult life so far. Myself and a small group from my Bible study decided to start this Bible study in November, 2016. We broke each unit up into two weeks. This study really opened my eyes to what the Lord desires from me. Not from my entire life as much as from day to day. This book list seven things to go with the study beginning w "Most Bible studies help people. This one changes lives forever." I'd have to agree. This workbook right here is one of the most life-changing experiences of my young adult life so far. Myself and a small group from my Bible study decided to start this Bible study in November, 2016. We broke each unit up into two weeks. This study really opened my eyes to what the Lord desires from me. Not from my entire life as much as from day to day. This book list seven things to go with the study beginning with how God is always at work around us, how He desires a love relationship with us that is real and personal, how important and crucial it is to the Christian walk to obey Him. I didn't agree with everything in this book. The author spoke about making a covenant relationship with church members and also had one or two statements that I didn't quite agree with. However, the majority of it I did. If you ever decide to read this amazing study, I strongly encourage that you do! However, it will have an impact on you. Henry and Richard Blackaby and Claude King don't really use nice little watered down words...they're straight to the point. Are you willing to surrender all to God? Absolutely? If the Lord called you home this very second, could you stand before Him and truly say, "I love You with all my heart?" How would you rate your walk with God? Oh, yes, these were all tough questions. But I encourage you...this study is so worth it. Coming away from it, I can honestly say that I feel like I have a deeper relationship with God and not only that, but I have gained a whole new perspective on Him as my Lord and Sovereign King. This study really helped me recognize His activity where He was working somewhere near me and, as it says so often in the pages, to join Him.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sydneyann Chase

    God's timing is so good in having me read this book right now. I'm facing a decision right now, and this book talks a lot about discerning God's will and the importance of a love relationship with him. One of the quotes I really enjoyed was, "Truth is revealed, not discovered." I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in experiencing God in their lives.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy Cummings

    I give it a 5 because of the importance of it's driving points and consistency in delivering them. While a great testimony, some of the examples of God working in their lives seemed a little unrelatable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Winsor

    Concepts in this book have reshaped my thinking on spiritual gifts, God’s direction in my life, and how I hear from Him. Highly recommend this book for any follower of Christ.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    When I say that I am a Christian, I don't mean that I just believe in God, and go to church. I mean, I am a Bible believing, Gospel teaching, praying, hands up worshiping, church going, holy spirit filled, child of the King, Jesus praising, woman of God who has gained much wisdom - saved by God's grace - and humblingly receiving mercy on a continual basis for I am a sinful human being. Having said that, what I got from Experiencing God Bible Study, is we don't matter one iota to God except that w When I say that I am a Christian, I don't mean that I just believe in God, and go to church. I mean, I am a Bible believing, Gospel teaching, praying, hands up worshiping, church going, holy spirit filled, child of the King, Jesus praising, woman of God who has gained much wisdom - saved by God's grace - and humblingly receiving mercy on a continual basis for I am a sinful human being. Having said that, what I got from Experiencing God Bible Study, is we don't matter one iota to God except that we bring others to Christ through our works. If you go through spiritual boot camp in your life as a Christian, suffering, growing pains, lots of valleys, very few mountain tops, etc. it's because He is preparing you to do His work. That's all that matters. If you are disobedient, and don't do what he tells you to, he will use someone else to get the job done and then take everything away from you, never talk to you again, and basically throw you away. If God heals you, or blesses you in any way - it's only because He wants you to do some kind of big God-sized work. If you don't, you are useless. I'm not saying this is what the Bible says. I'm saying this is what I personally understood from this bible study. Also, he is inconsistent in his teachings. Especially in explaining how we hear from God (via the Holy Spirit). Which is a whole other rant I won't get into. See, I gave my life to the Lord in 1996. Near the beginning of the Millennium, I remember seeing on TBN, advertisements for a new approach for churches to grow. How they could follow a proven business plan, and it will make them rich. This is when the emergent church as we know it today, all started. Then, you have some new-age teachings that have crept into the church as well. For anyone who has spent the bulk of their lives as a Christian the past 2 decades, has been taught a slant on the Bible that teaches what God can do for us - not what we can do for God. The good news about this Bible study, is it offers a needed balance. The bad news is, it goes way overboard. The examples at the beginning of each chapter show how the "formula"(which he denies is a formula) he teaches, brings about a good work of God. And are mostly about planting churches. This is excellent. But, back up and read how it all started. Someone gets an idea or a feeling that God wants to do a work. But does he teach that is how we hear from God? Yes and no. It's not very clear because he contradicts himself. In one part, they shared the miraculous healing of their daughter from cancer. I wrote this along the side of the page: These people are so single mindedly focused on dedicating their lives to seeing how God wants to work through them - they seem to be more happy about how God used that to increase the faith of those who were praying, then they were about their daughter being healed. Being a Christian is no easy walk. But, if I were a baby Christian and did not have discernment - this book would be a thorny weed of impossible doom to choke out any hope.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles Erlandson

    Can Lead Christians to Experience God But Can Also Lead Them Astray “Experiencing God” by Henry Blackaby and Claude King (and now also Richard Blackaby) seems to be a book for which reviewers find no middle ground. Almost all of the reviewers on Amazon give the book 5 stars (with one 4 star book) and one 1 star review. I find that the book has the potential to lead many to a deeper, more meaningful experience with God but also has the potential to lead many into false views of how God works with Can Lead Christians to Experience God But Can Also Lead Them Astray “Experiencing God” by Henry Blackaby and Claude King (and now also Richard Blackaby) seems to be a book for which reviewers find no middle ground. Almost all of the reviewers on Amazon give the book 5 stars (with one 4 star book) and one 1 star review. I find that the book has the potential to lead many to a deeper, more meaningful experience with God but also has the potential to lead many into false views of how God works with His people today. For my complete review, see http://www.giveusthisdaydevotional.co...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Other than the Bible itself, which always always always has primacy as God's word to humanity, this book has helped me the most in connecting with God in an intimate and personal relationship. God's plan and purpose to be a personal God and friend to each and everyone is clearly expressed in the Bible, but Blackaby has done a wonderful job of making contemporary applications to help people find that connection. Also he has given a wonderful rule of thumb for that relationship: Find where God is Other than the Bible itself, which always always always has primacy as God's word to humanity, this book has helped me the most in connecting with God in an intimate and personal relationship. God's plan and purpose to be a personal God and friend to each and everyone is clearly expressed in the Bible, but Blackaby has done a wonderful job of making contemporary applications to help people find that connection. Also he has given a wonderful rule of thumb for that relationship: Find where God is at work and join him there. Highly Recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rick Sam

    This is a great book, I would recommend this to all Christians. The most important part of the Christian walk is, "love relationship." God has a plan, purpose, ways for everyone, in fact, we must join him. It is his world, not mine, so I am merely a vehicle. Often times, I become selfish and say, What should I do, rather, What God wants me to do? Currently, Psalm 38:4 is on my heart, For my sins have flooded over my head; they are a burden too heavy for me to bear. Deus Vult, Gottfried

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen Fonville

    Life Changing. Words cannot describe how this workbook and the 12 week Bible study have impacted my life, and the lives of the people I studied it with. It takes commitment to get the true benefit, but is well worth the effort. This is the type of study that must be lived and digested for awhile. There are levels to experiencing God, so you can definitely gain by repeating the study. I will do this again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Van Moorsel

    this is an excellent study i highly recommend it for everybody to take, for those who are seeking God's plan for their life challenges you to look at changing insight, practices that we are so used to in our comfort zones. this book study challenges us to get out of that comfort zone and go out and serve God where He needs us instead of of us coming up with a plan and asking God to bless what we think we should do for Him.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Five stars, times 2. I read this as part of a study group in my church, and it truly had a great impact on my life. The author was so right, I really experienced God in ways that I hadn't before while reading this book. It really helped me in my walk with God. I recommend it for everyone who desires to walk closer with God.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I never know if I should list things like this.. but I am because it was really huge. This was done in a time in which I had to think of God as huge in order to have hope. I loved reading story after story about how people's faith determined the magnitude of what God was able to do in their lives. Unfortunately, the last few weeks lost me, but the rest were pretty amazing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This book/study is not perfect, but I found it to be what I needed this year. God used the straightforward truth of Blackaby's teaching and experience with God to speak into my life. I would definitely recommend this study for anyone serious about diving deeper.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Though I cannot say I agreed with everything in this book I will say that this book was extremely helpful to me personally! Truly wonderful! It helped me understand my relationship with the Holy Spirit. I believe more baptist (laymen and ministers) need to read and learn from this book!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris Bates

    Profound in my spiritual development. I'm still seeking to experience God daily. Obedience is the turning point for me. I have been through this in s small group study and individually. Transformational!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kymberly

    Loving this book!!! Read three times so far!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Thought-provoking examination of relating to God through the life of Abraham. (I read an earlier edition, but can't get it to take.)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Calye Cochran

    Sigh. What to even say about this book? There is so much to it, and I believe that this is one of those books that you can read and reread again and again and find unique information relevant to your life and various times. I wish I had tabbed this book, because there was so much that stood out to me. I will do my best to recall some of these revelations. One interesting thing for me was that God is at work around me. All the time. That is interesting to me, because so often I think that I have t Sigh. What to even say about this book? There is so much to it, and I believe that this is one of those books that you can read and reread again and again and find unique information relevant to your life and various times. I wish I had tabbed this book, because there was so much that stood out to me. I will do my best to recall some of these revelations. One interesting thing for me was that God is at work around me. All the time. That is interesting to me, because so often I think that I have to be doing something big in order for God to be working around me. How can God be present in my day to day life? With that mentality how often do we miss God working around us? How often have I done this? That is a disturbing and sad thought. Blackaby, Blackaby, and King (to be referred to as Blackaby et al for the remainder of this post) state, “After God revealed to them what He was doing, they realized they had been missing out on God’s great work” (Experiencing God, pg. 71). There is an entire chapter devoted to seeing God’s work around you, and it held significant importance for me as I am about to embark on my career. Within the same chapter, Blackaby et al points out that just because you have a gifting in one area does not mean that God will not ever use you in another way (pg. 72). It is interesting to think that God will only use us in certain ways, because those ways are founded on our current skill set. It is an interesting thought, because where in the Bible does God ever really speak the same way twice? Did Moses see multiple burning bushes? Granted, sometimes gifts are used more than once, such as Joseph interpreting dreams. My, and I think Blackaby et al’s, point is that we should not be so close-minded in our thinking. If God wants to use you in a way that you do not particularly feel qualified for, pray about it. Get confirmation. But, perhaps, God wants to demonstrate His strength through you. The best part about it? You get to work alongside Him in His work. Anything challenging often reaps tremendous results. Read more on my blog at: https://calyecochran.wordpress.com/20...

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