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One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them. His phenomenal multi-million-copy bestseller A Brief History of Time introduced the fascinating landscape of theoretical physics to readers all over the workd. Now in a major One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them. His phenomenal multi-million-copy bestseller A Brief History of Time introduced the fascinating landscape of theoretical physics to readers all over the workd. Now in a major new lavishly illustrated book, Hawking turns to the most important breakthroughs that have occurred in the years since the release of his acclaimed first book. He brings to us the cutting edge of theoretical physics, where truth is often stranger than fiction, and explains in layman's terms the principles that control our universe. Like many in the international scientific community, Professor Hawking is seeking to uncover the grail of science - the elusive Theory of Everything that lies at the heart of the cosmos. In The Universe in a Nutshell, he guides us on his search to uncover the secrets of the universe - from supergravity to supersymmetry, from quantum theory to M-theory, from holography to duality. In this most exciting intellectual adventure he seeks to combine Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and Richard Feynman's idea of multiple histories into one complete unified theory that will describe everything in the universe. He takes us to the wild frontiers of science where superstring theory and p-branes may hold the final clue to the puzzle. The Universe in a Nutshell is essential reading for all those who want to undersand the universe in which we live.


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One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them. His phenomenal multi-million-copy bestseller A Brief History of Time introduced the fascinating landscape of theoretical physics to readers all over the workd. Now in a major One of the most influential thinkers of our time, Stephen Hawking is an intellectual icon, known not only for the adventurousness of his ideas but for the clarity and wit with which he expresses them. His phenomenal multi-million-copy bestseller A Brief History of Time introduced the fascinating landscape of theoretical physics to readers all over the workd. Now in a major new lavishly illustrated book, Hawking turns to the most important breakthroughs that have occurred in the years since the release of his acclaimed first book. He brings to us the cutting edge of theoretical physics, where truth is often stranger than fiction, and explains in layman's terms the principles that control our universe. Like many in the international scientific community, Professor Hawking is seeking to uncover the grail of science - the elusive Theory of Everything that lies at the heart of the cosmos. In The Universe in a Nutshell, he guides us on his search to uncover the secrets of the universe - from supergravity to supersymmetry, from quantum theory to M-theory, from holography to duality. In this most exciting intellectual adventure he seeks to combine Einstein's General Theory of Relativity and Richard Feynman's idea of multiple histories into one complete unified theory that will describe everything in the universe. He takes us to the wild frontiers of science where superstring theory and p-branes may hold the final clue to the puzzle. The Universe in a Nutshell is essential reading for all those who want to undersand the universe in which we live.

30 review for Universet i et nøtteskall

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marty Hirst

    Now I read this book cover to cover, line-by-line, methodically going back over passages that were "challenging", line-by-line, got to the last page, closed the book and said out loud; "Nope, sorry Steve, you lost me there".

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Hawking is an exceedingly clear and occasionally quite funny writer, not easy when the topic is quantum physics, etc. I would be lying if I claimed to understand much of this book, especially in the audiobook format in which an exceedingly pleasant British voice hurls a flood of Hawking's words and concepts, one more challenging than the previous one. It might, repeat: might, have been possible to understand this material on a printed page, which in this case included a lot of nifty diagrams, on Hawking is an exceedingly clear and occasionally quite funny writer, not easy when the topic is quantum physics, etc. I would be lying if I claimed to understand much of this book, especially in the audiobook format in which an exceedingly pleasant British voice hurls a flood of Hawking's words and concepts, one more challenging than the previous one. It might, repeat: might, have been possible to understand this material on a printed page, which in this case included a lot of nifty diagrams, on the presumption that repetition might have helped. But probably not. I did enjoy and generally understand the opening chapter in which Hawking explained the history of physics and our conception of the universe, with a beautiful presentation of the life and work of Einstein, and to a lesser extent his contemporaries and immediate intellectual followers. But after that, when Hawking moved into contemporary physics and the exploration of the cosmos (where he made his own contributions, mind you), I was mostly gasping for air, down for the count, you get the idea. Once I let go of the expectation that I could actually master the material, I kind of enjoyed the periodic appearance of concepts and phrases I had sort-of known about arrive in their natural and proper context, things like string theory, black holes, quanta, Heisenberg principle, nebula, etc. Perhaps more than anything, I enjoyed the ebulliance and delight with which Hawking presents his material, as if it is the simplest and most fun thing ever... which to him, it probably is.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Enck

    Stephen Hawking, stated in, " The Universe in a Nutshell" that our history is filled with infinite potentiality and what we "got” was due to disturbing the quantum field by our "observations." Profound, I thought, and pondered about his theory for months. To better understand Dr. Hawking's theory, I read everything on quantum physics I could understand and a pile of books on the brain, Bruce Hood's "The Self Illusion" was the most helpful. Below is what I believe correlates with Hawking's theory Stephen Hawking, stated in, " The Universe in a Nutshell" that our history is filled with infinite potentiality and what we "got” was due to disturbing the quantum field by our "observations." Profound, I thought, and pondered about his theory for months. To better understand Dr. Hawking's theory, I read everything on quantum physics I could understand and a pile of books on the brain, Bruce Hood's "The Self Illusion" was the most helpful. Below is what I believe correlates with Hawking's theory, It is from the book, The Nature of Personal Reality, by Jane Roberts, (Seth Material) I have included a quote and then how I am seeing life now through a magical lens. "An examination of your conscious thoughts will tell you much about the state of your inner mind, your intentions and expectations, and will often lead you to a direct confrontation with challenges and problems. Your thoughts, studied , will let you see where you are going. They point clearly to the nature of physical events. What exists physically existed first in thought and feeling. There is no other rule. What if our "observations" were first feeling-tone shared by all consciousness focused in physical reality. The cells and organs have their own awarenesses, and a gestalt one. So the race of man also has individual consciousness and a gestalt or mass consciousness of which makes up our physical reality. While physical we follow physical laws, or assumptions. These form the framework for corporeal expression. Within this framework you have full freedom to create your experience, your personal life in all of its aspects; the living picture of the world, your personal life, and to some extent your individual living experience, helped create the world as it is known in your time. It is important before we continue that you realize that consciousness is within all physical phenomena, however. It is vital that you realize your position within nature. Nature is created from within. The personal life that you know rises up from within you, yet is given. period. Since you are part of Being, then in a certain fashion you give yourself the life that is being lived through you." ~ Jane Roberts, Seth Material. “Although I cannot move and I have to speak through a computer, in my mind I am free.” ― Stephen Hawking When I fully realized my entire reality was created by me, and global consciousness, I could chose what to give my attention to for the change I wanted to see. The more you examine your thoughts and feelings the more excited you'll get when what you were thinking about appears. You'll notice "integrity" plays a role as well, (even when no one but you knows what good things you've done), because it's "liking yourself" that is most important in your ability to thrive without limitations. It only works if you truly believe. Just like Yoda said, “there is no try, only do.” Whatever you hold in your consciousness you put in your reality. If you are thinking about something, it will appear in a similar form. Don't get scared when you notice you have a lot of negative thoughts, about yourself and the world. These types of "thoughts" are your current vibration, giving you the reality you have now. Any change towards better inner-feelings about yourself and your surroundings will show up immediately in a in an event confirming your power to create your reality. I am now excited about cleaning up my thoughts -especially my deep inner feelings that were not as great as I wanted them to be. Below are examples of limiting beliefs you may want to remove. Example of limiting thoughts: 1. My behavior is hidden in my subconsciousness. 2. My life is a result of my childhood, or Karma, 3. Old age causes illness and regression. 4. People are out to screw me. Or People don't like me. 5. I am not smart enough, good enough, someone is better than me. 6. My religion is the right one, and so are my beliefs. 7. I have no control over the events in my life. 8. I am fat. 9. There is something wrong with money. People who have it are greedy, less spiritual than those who are poor. They are unhappier, and snobs. These are all beliefs held by many people. Those who have them will meet them in experience. Physical data will always seem to reinforce the beliefs, therefore, but the beliefs formed the reality. "The ego, which is ever changing based on a flow of new experiences looks out upon physical reality and surveys it in relation to those characteristics of which it is composed at any given time. It makes its judgments according to its own idea of itself." ~Jane Roberts I try to catch myself in conversation making jokes about myself, and stop it. ) When science has proven "consciousness creates everything in our reality" our focus will turn to beautiful stories, ideas and breathtaking environments. We will spot giving our attention to garbage news stories filled with violence and fear; because we don't believe what we hold these emotions in our consciousness mind. If I could ask Dr. Hawking one question it would be this: You said that we collapse waves when we observe an event. But what if-- our expectation collapsed the wave, our belief before the form existed. If this is true, consciousness is creating the collapsing of the field based on our inner-emotions, which would make the unpopular words, like "emotions, feelings and insights" the most valuable of all our senses. I learned most of my beliefs were secondhand and limiting, so I jumped those fences! I documented my journey in my memoir, "From Hollywood to God," by Kelly Granite Enck http://www.amazon.com/From-Hollywood-... I am leaving the link for those, like me, who love to explore the Inner Journey of the Mind! Thanks Stephen for all your years of passion! Love Kelly!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul O'Neill

    I’m not going to pretend that I understood most of it but he does raise a few thought-provoking points about the future of the human race. Plus it’s very well written.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Muthuvel

    First of all, I expected the Hawking's electronic voice for narrating the audiobook. Though it might sound silly, I'm more fond of his unique voice. After his international bestseller, A Brief History of Time in 80s, he wanted to propagandize the current frontier we're encountering but this time in a more brief way. The First two chapters serve as a prerequisite for proper understanding. Short but very well explained introductory concepts of Einstein-Relativity stuffs; Maybe because i used to rea First of all, I expected the Hawking's electronic voice for narrating the audiobook. Though it might sound silly, I'm more fond of his unique voice. After his international bestseller, A Brief History of Time in 80s, he wanted to propagandize the current frontier we're encountering but this time in a more brief way. The First two chapters serve as a prerequisite for proper understanding. Short but very well explained introductory concepts of Einstein-Relativity stuffs; Maybe because i used to read a lot of books in that subject (I've read more books on relativity than automobile engineering in which I've got a bachelor's recently). Weirdness of Quantum Mechanics and its unification attempts with relativity at the initial conditions of the universe. Time and extra dimensions for the maintenance of consistencies. Some little dip in the chaos theory but too much idea regarding it in this book. Some chapters on his (and his colleagues) attempts on the formulations of the Quantum Gravity theory, then evolving into Super Gravity, then String theories and eventually m-theory atleast for now (Eventually is not the correct usage). Blackhole information paradox and the concepts of imaginary time are correlated to hinder the optimistic possibilities of Time Travel atleast for now. The Paradox is a puzzle resulting from the combination of quantum mechanics and general relativity. I feel personally that this Part needs revisiting again. Even the simple terms and explanations, these are much more complex topics undergoing tedious *theoritical* research currently. He also reassures the readers sarcastically that this might be a part of government cover up for Time Travel Conspiracy; You get to know only when you get to meet one like HG Wells. What I can assure is, that one could get a better view on string theory based M-theory which currently has the higher chance to become the Theory of Everything and the concepts of brane worlds. And that is my Review in a Nutshell.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Brannigan

    The universe in a “bookshell” Tehe ;) *heavy sigh*

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Yes, I'm a dork, and in addition to reading grammar books for fun, I also read science books. I've been told that Stephen Hawking is not as complicated to read as one might assume. While I did learn a lot from this book, I also was left with a lot more questions. Furthermore, the illustrations were either confusing or totally unnecessary.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Ogilvie

    I really enjoyed A Brief History of Time and so was looking forward to The Universe in a Nutshell and its updated material. I was hoping it would be a "dumbed down" version of some of the high-end theoretical physics ideas that I haven't had the time or brain cells to keep up with. While I'm sure the content is dumbed down from Stephen Hawking's level, most of it is covered at a level and speed that kept it out of my comprehension. To be honest I find a lot of modern theories and ideas very skept I really enjoyed A Brief History of Time and so was looking forward to The Universe in a Nutshell and its updated material. I was hoping it would be a "dumbed down" version of some of the high-end theoretical physics ideas that I haven't had the time or brain cells to keep up with. While I'm sure the content is dumbed down from Stephen Hawking's level, most of it is covered at a level and speed that kept it out of my comprehension. To be honest I find a lot of modern theories and ideas very skeptical - it almost seems to me that the theories are created and given weight because they might be possible... and that's good enough because to prove otherwise is incredibly difficult. A part of me (no doubt remnants of thinking left there by my college professors) downplays my pessimism and wants to believe them at face value. In this book I was looking to confirm that part, but it just didn't happen. There didn't seem to be any real explanations or support (or maybe it was above my head and I zoned out). It was simply describing the theories (e.g., M Theory) and presenting them as fact. (We used to call this "hand waving" in my Physics classes in college - like a magician's hand waving as misdirection.) There were a lot of good parts that were interesting and engaging. Near the end there was a part on the evolution of life on Earth and humans that was really intriguing. It had to do with DNA as a form of evolutionary method of saving data which has now been augmented by humans' ability to store information outside of our DNA now. And I do now have a better understanding of the framework on some modern theories (like multi-dimensions) that I didn't have before. I particularly liked coming to a better understanding of the theory of our perception of reality being a mere projection of 4 dimensions (3d + time) that derives from a "real" existence that exists in a 5 dimensional "membrane" universe (much like a 3d object casts a 2d shadow). Cool stuff. Maybe I just need a bigger brain.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Vuković

    I really liked "A Brief History of Time" much more. While it isn't that bad (it's actually very good), in comparison with Brief History, it seems only to have many more illustrations and fewer thorough explanations. I understand that Hawking tried to write a popular science book with a branching non-linear structure without depending heavily on what has been said in the previous chapters, but I don't think that's actually possible. At least I honestly doubt it could be done without losing a signif I really liked "A Brief History of Time" much more. While it isn't that bad (it's actually very good), in comparison with Brief History, it seems only to have many more illustrations and fewer thorough explanations. I understand that Hawking tried to write a popular science book with a branching non-linear structure without depending heavily on what has been said in the previous chapters, but I don't think that's actually possible. At least I honestly doubt it could be done without losing a significant portion of quality and precision. I don't know, I read too much about these kinds of things anyway so I guess I might not be right, it could be just what an intelligent layman without too much time needs. But that's a big maybe. Try it, after all, I put 4 stars up there for a reason.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amirtha Shri

    I do not yet have intellect enough to comprehend the entirety of the book. However, for the extent I managed to understand, I must say it was incredibly brilliant. I didn't begin the book with the expectation of thorough understanding, so there was no disappointment. Furthermore, it was actually a relief that I could get a lot of the stuff in the book considering the fact that it is written by Hawking. I am glad I gave it a try. I will boldly explore science non-fiction from now on. As for the wr I do not yet have intellect enough to comprehend the entirety of the book. However, for the extent I managed to understand, I must say it was incredibly brilliant. I didn't begin the book with the expectation of thorough understanding, so there was no disappointment. Furthermore, it was actually a relief that I could get a lot of the stuff in the book considering the fact that it is written by Hawking. I am glad I gave it a try. I will boldly explore science non-fiction from now on. As for the writing, his simple language coupled with complicated theories resulted in a good flow. There is occasional intelligent humour that makes you chuckle in delight and subtle satire that helps you connect with Hawking.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Subhanî Zengil

    Discusses the pillars of the universe.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sleepydrummer

    We all owe a sacred debt to Stephen Hawking for his theories and contributions to physics. Approaching this book with a mild understanding of basic physics, I simply exhausted myself in his space-time, extra dimensions "Nutshell". The amount of energy it took to comprehend a fraction of what I read left me in a swirling vacuum fluctuation. It is an honor to have read Professor Hawking's book. I will tentatively rate three stars simply because the subject matter as presented was mind-numbing, alt We all owe a sacred debt to Stephen Hawking for his theories and contributions to physics. Approaching this book with a mild understanding of basic physics, I simply exhausted myself in his space-time, extra dimensions "Nutshell". The amount of energy it took to comprehend a fraction of what I read left me in a swirling vacuum fluctuation. It is an honor to have read Professor Hawking's book. I will tentatively rate three stars simply because the subject matter as presented was mind-numbing, although rightfully this material is five stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abbass Maanna

    It was my first ride with Stephen Hawking , and it wasn't bad at all. Reading about your UNIVERSE for the first time, in such a detailed explanation for what the writer aims to tell based on his wide knowledge in Quantum mechanics, theoretical physics and cosmology , necessarily requires a knowledgeable reader in the sciences I've just mentioned so he/she wouldn't be perplexed and then, he would get answers for many questions that may flash in his mind. In addition to the diverse information that It was my first ride with Stephen Hawking , and it wasn't bad at all. Reading about your UNIVERSE for the first time, in such a detailed explanation for what the writer aims to tell based on his wide knowledge in Quantum mechanics, theoretical physics and cosmology , necessarily requires a knowledgeable reader in the sciences I've just mentioned so he/she wouldn't be perplexed and then, he would get answers for many questions that may flash in his mind. In addition to the diverse information that one can get from reading this , he quietly doesn't get bored due to Hawking's sense of humor. It is highly recommended for those who care much about the universe and its studies.

  14. 4 out of 5

    L.S.

    This is my first time ever audio book. It is enjoyable, esspecially because of the voice - is calm. I am used to listening to scientific materials, most of them in form of debates. But listening to an audio book is nothing compared to reading - you cannot turn back the page or re-read a passage, you cannot make notes with a pencil on the page, you cannot highlight key definitions, aseertions, or conclusions in the text. Eye-sight is also a much more efficient tool in gathering information than t This is my first time ever audio book. It is enjoyable, esspecially because of the voice - is calm. I am used to listening to scientific materials, most of them in form of debates. But listening to an audio book is nothing compared to reading - you cannot turn back the page or re-read a passage, you cannot make notes with a pencil on the page, you cannot highlight key definitions, aseertions, or conclusions in the text. Eye-sight is also a much more efficient tool in gathering information than the ear.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mohamedridha Alaskari محمد رضا العسكري

    Simply, I love the way of Stephen Hawking in explaining his beliefs and knowledge, I think he's the most smartest man living on earth right now. In every chapter of his books he's showing us a great review about the universe. In this book I was surprised that he can easly explains how biology works as well. My next book written by his is A briefier History of Time

  16. 5 out of 5

    Menglong Youk

    4.25/5 stars This is the seventh Stephen Hawking's book I've read so far, and I have to confess that the last half of the materials in "The Universe in a Nutshell" are pretty difficult to wrap my brain around since most of the topics are about the frontiers of theoretical physics and cosmology. However, I enjoyed reading the first half of the book (where I can understand). I wouldn't dare to be the first to make that joke, but Professor Hawking joked that although he held Isaac Newton's chair as 4.25/5 stars This is the seventh Stephen Hawking's book I've read so far, and I have to confess that the last half of the materials in "The Universe in a Nutshell" are pretty difficult to wrap my brain around since most of the topics are about the frontiers of theoretical physics and cosmology. However, I enjoyed reading the first half of the book (where I can understand). I wouldn't dare to be the first to make that joke, but Professor Hawking joked that although he held Isaac Newton's chair as a Lucasian Professor of Mathematics, his is electric and Newton's was not. I will return to this book in the future once I have a better grasp on mathematics for theoretical physics; reading the theory in words alone doesn't help much.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vinicius Carvalho

    My rating is based on how genius SH is and the innovative and complicated theories he is up to explain to a lay audience. But definitely my choice of media was not wise as getting this information via an audiobook brought my comprehension to less than 50%. If I have the chance to read the illustrated version of the book, I expect to increase my chances of absorbing such fantastic but complicated concepts.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lucinda

    It's natural for our minds to wonder beyond the narrow confines of what's known, hence why not take that chance and adhere to your curious streak?! This illuminating and enlightening book takes one on the most thrilling venture through space and time, wherein extraordinary marvels lie in wait. The true genius of Stephen Hawking is something that cannot fail to surprise, as this book is filled with pages of diagrams and fantastically detailed images. The complexities, excentricities and ideas of It's natural for our minds to wonder beyond the narrow confines of what's known, hence why not take that chance and adhere to your curious streak?! This illuminating and enlightening book takes one on the most thrilling venture through space and time, wherein extraordinary marvels lie in wait. The true genius of Stephen Hawking is something that cannot fail to surprise, as this book is filled with pages of diagrams and fantastically detailed images. The complexities, excentricities and ideas of such a man is brilliantly captured in every page, therefore you'll never quite regard space and the universe in the same way ever again. 'It's all a matter of where one places themselves in life's continuous timeline' Here are some of my favourite quotes that I gained inspiration from the book... What keeps one grounded inevitably is slow in its origin That which fluctuates in peaks and troughs isn't generally relative to the common norm 'Politics for the moment, but an equation for eternity!' --Albert Einstein 'Nothing puzzles me like time and space. And yet nothing troubles me less than time and space, because i never think of them' --19th century author, Charles Lamb A scientific theory is a mathematical model that describes and codifies the observations we make. A good theory will describe a large range of phenomena on the basis of a few simple observations and will make definite predictions that can be tested. --FACT! Creation is hierachal like Dante's inferno, and we're all sinking with a gravitational pull! Time travel is possible with a vast imagination! Does one drift around in various areas (reflection), or move with the time's (progression)? This book is essential reading for those budding scientists keen to understand more about are universe, as it's packed with fascinating facts from a true legend and clever mind. You may say that there are different expressions to explain the same underlying theory, which is true, however Hawking's is one of the easier to understand and the most informative. The universe in a nutshell guides you on the search to discover those hidden secrets beyond our stratosphere, such as; supersymetry, M-theory, holography and many more while combining other scientists imput. Ideas from Einstein's general theory of relativity, and Richard Feynman's histories are included all in this fantastic compendium of knowledge. I certainly enjoyed reading this book and found it most informative and instructive for my own study purposes. Next to read: * A brief history of time * Black holes and baby universes and other essays

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed al-Jamri

    This is a kind of follow up for Hawking A Brief History of Time which sold over 10 million copies. The idea behind it -other than making a lit of money- according o the author is to explore some of the topic that were put in late chapters in the aforementioned book that were perhaps not read as well as sharing the later scientific discoveries (the first book was published in 1988, this one in 2001). Just as the first book the Hawking writings in general, the book is mostly easy to understand alth This is a kind of follow up for Hawking A Brief History of Time which sold over 10 million copies. The idea behind it -other than making a lit of money- according o the author is to explore some of the topic that were put in late chapters in the aforementioned book that were perhaps not read as well as sharing the later scientific discoveries (the first book was published in 1988, this one in 2001). Just as the first book the Hawking writings in general, the book is mostly easy to understand although it is not as good. In it he takles the follow tooics/questions: Einstein and the theories of special and general relativity, cosmological constant, What is time, String theory, Blackhole radiation, Time travel, Scientific discoveries in the early 20th century such as the existence of other galaxies and Expanding universe, Feyman's interpretation of quantum physics, Does the universe have a beginning or is it infinite?, The anthropic principle, History and future of the universe Astrology and future prediction, Scientific Determinism and uncertainty principle, Blackholes and predictions, Wormholes, Future of humanity, M theory, dark matter, artificial intelligence and Gravitational waves.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julia Reim

    This was a very compact version of the physics that surround our universe. Understandable for everyone and highly interesting. I would totally recommend it

  21. 5 out of 5

    minhhai

    Concise overview of the structure of the Universe. But unless you have certain knowledge in Astronomy, you hardly understand this book fully.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rexor1701

    the universe for dummies, 'nuff said

  23. 4 out of 5

    Diāna

    The book is an attempt to explain the nature of the universe using (mainly) String theory. Hawking is making assumptions along the way while discussing problems of quantum gravity, quantum physics and Einstein’s general relativity. Starting with superstring theory, P-Branes theory and arbitrary time, Hawkins conclude that our universe holds many hidden dimensions impossible for us to observe. The future of computers and genetic engineering could bring us closer to unified theory of everything or The book is an attempt to explain the nature of the universe using (mainly) String theory. Hawking is making assumptions along the way while discussing problems of quantum gravity, quantum physics and Einstein’s general relativity. Starting with superstring theory, P-Branes theory and arbitrary time, Hawkins conclude that our universe holds many hidden dimensions impossible for us to observe. The future of computers and genetic engineering could bring us closer to unified theory of everything or maybe this all is a hallucination of the mind? The most fascinating part for me however was discussion of time. We all think we experience time. In everyday thinking, time is being reduced to a level of an individual- linear perception and chains of recalled mind experiences. And here comes my personal admiration for Hawking trying to discuss universal time while dissolving individual perception of the mind. To say, trying to take a look on the universe with a God’s eye

  24. 5 out of 5

    Robert Cox

    As I renew my quest to dominate the world of casual physics, I am again met with the intellectually formidable presence of Stephen Hawkings. This actually has to be my least favorite of the Hawkings authored physics lite book, its lacks the accessibility that the other books inexorably maintained. My Astronomy 101 class (as always) proved integral to my understanding of the mysteries of the universe. I do however respect that Hawking appears to be the dude that can write about science without dr As I renew my quest to dominate the world of casual physics, I am again met with the intellectually formidable presence of Stephen Hawkings. This actually has to be my least favorite of the Hawkings authored physics lite book, its lacks the accessibility that the other books inexorably maintained. My Astronomy 101 class (as always) proved integral to my understanding of the mysteries of the universe. I do however respect that Hawking appears to be the dude that can write about science without dragging religion into it unduly. It appears in this work but you can tell he doesn't study science to attack some vengeful God of his youth. Read the Brief/Briefers first. If u like dem reed dis.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Soheil

    While you do need to remember more than a bit of your college's general physics to follow all this book has to offer, you can't find a better book that gives a better concise account of what our universe is, how it works, where it will possibly end up and some of the mystery's still remain in the realm of science. Stephen Hawking (RIP) offers a very understandable read here for those who are curious but lack the strong scientific muscle to understand everything. And that is my review in a nutshel While you do need to remember more than a bit of your college's general physics to follow all this book has to offer, you can't find a better book that gives a better concise account of what our universe is, how it works, where it will possibly end up and some of the mystery's still remain in the realm of science. Stephen Hawking (RIP) offers a very understandable read here for those who are curious but lack the strong scientific muscle to understand everything. And that is my review in a nutshell.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anamarija

    I feel kinda bad critiqueing Stephen Hawking, but this book felt like a mess. The ideas weren't really properly explained, it was mostly just: "Oh, me and Penrose, we proved that..." and he just tells us what they proved but there is no story behind the ideas, nothing feels personal or enthusiastic, whatever. It also makes it harder to read because that's boring. Also I feel like he wanted to explain too much too fast so the book doesn't feel unified. The illustrations are amazing tho.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shahin

    Very good

  28. 4 out of 5

    Georgina Schneider

    Black holes, space time, and awe-inspiring words of wisdom 👍👍

  29. 5 out of 5

    Quân Lê

    Make knowlegde in "A Brief of History" more easy to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chels Patterson

    It’s just a tiny bit out of date and it less in-depth than Hawkins other books

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