Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Forward Me Back To You

Availability: Ready to download

Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of place Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of places — a summer service trip to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. As bonds blossom between the travel-mates, Robin and Kat discover the healing superpowers of friendship. At turns heart-wrenching, beautiful, and buoyant, Mitali Perkins' new novel explores the ripple effects of violence — across borders and generations — and how small acts of heroism can break the cycle.


Compare
Ads Banner

Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of place Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of places — a summer service trip to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. As bonds blossom between the travel-mates, Robin and Kat discover the healing superpowers of friendship. At turns heart-wrenching, beautiful, and buoyant, Mitali Perkins' new novel explores the ripple effects of violence — across borders and generations — and how small acts of heroism can break the cycle.

30 review for Forward Me Back To You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mitali

    Wrote my heart into this book. Hope you like it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate ☀️ Olson

    Superb YA. And here’s a keyword review because time and longer writing aren’t in the cards for me today: . Sexual assault Survivor Kolkata Adoption Church Travel Babies Human trafficking Friendship Family Love . As soon as I started reading this I texted @definitelyRA and said, “I immediately thought of you!” - if you don’t know this, RA is a superhero advocate and fundraiser for groups that fight human trafficking and I knew this book would be perfect for her. . And overall, I adore Mitali Perkins and her work Superb YA. And here’s a keyword review because time and longer writing aren’t in the cards for me today: . Sexual assault Survivor Kolkata Adoption Church Travel Babies Human trafficking Friendship Family Love . As soon as I started reading this I texted @definitelyRA and said, “I immediately thought of you!” - if you don’t know this, RA is a superhero advocate and fundraiser for groups that fight human trafficking and I knew this book would be perfect for her. . And overall, I adore Mitali Perkins and her work, and this is yet another stellar book from her. Loved it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    Riveting ~ Heartwarming ~ Challenging tl;dr: Strength is much more than about muscles This book is a whole lot of trigger warnings probed and examined, including attempted rape, abandonment, poverty, and racism. Mitali Perkins is a well-known author, presenting balance and well-rounded multi-cultural characters. She uses all those skills here. The quick read, with fast moving short chapters, is hard to read in parts, thanks to the strong, and unflinching writing. In general, I definitely recommend Riveting ~ Heartwarming ~ Challenging tl;dr: Strength is much more than about muscles This book is a whole lot of trigger warnings probed and examined, including attempted rape, abandonment, poverty, and racism. Mitali Perkins is a well-known author, presenting balance and well-rounded multi-cultural characters. She uses all those skills here. The quick read, with fast moving short chapters, is hard to read in parts, thanks to the strong, and unflinching writing. In general, I definitely recommend this read, and I would love to see boys reading this one. I will say, there was that edge of PSA to it, at the parts where Human trafficking is discussed (a bit more didactic than literary). But overall, very strong book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen Reed

    Another honest and hopeful story by Mitali Perkins, author of You Bring The Distance Near. Thank you to Netgalley and publisher for an opportunity to review this e-galley. I will definitely be purchasing and recommending this to teen readers. I have to admit, when I read that the topic included attempted rape and human trafficking I was hesitant to start it. I've read so many heavy books lately I didn't know if I could handle another one. But I'm so glad I did because now I can reassure teens and Another honest and hopeful story by Mitali Perkins, author of You Bring The Distance Near. Thank you to Netgalley and publisher for an opportunity to review this e-galley. I will definitely be purchasing and recommending this to teen readers. I have to admit, when I read that the topic included attempted rape and human trafficking I was hesitant to start it. I've read so many heavy books lately I didn't know if I could handle another one. But I'm so glad I did because now I can reassure teens and parents that this is appropriate for teens, even younger teens. Mitali doesn't sugar coat any issues but she is careful not to dig too deep into the horrors that could push this into another age bracket or require trigger warnings. This book provides a great context to discuss cross-cultural service. I would recommend it to anyone going on service trips to read and discuss volunteerism vs toxic charity. What it means to go to another culture and provide what they need vs. what you think they need. Hope resources will be included in final copy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    I always rejoice when there is a new Mitali Perkins book. She tells good stories with real diverse, global characters. This one is no exception. From the riveting beginning with the after effect of Katina's sexual assault to an ending where neither Kat nor Robin achieve their desires and yet where both find a way forward that brings them hope, this book doesn't shy away from difficult topics like human trafficking, but still manages to have grace shine through. I especially like how the American I always rejoice when there is a new Mitali Perkins book. She tells good stories with real diverse, global characters. This one is no exception. From the riveting beginning with the after effect of Katina's sexual assault to an ending where neither Kat nor Robin achieve their desires and yet where both find a way forward that brings them hope, this book doesn't shy away from difficult topics like human trafficking, but still manages to have grace shine through. I especially like how the American students had to confront the fact that the Indians they work with know better than they do what is needed and how they are called to different roles. Why 4 stars and not 5? Occasionally, when presenting information about trafficking, the book feels a bit didactic. So it's not perfect, but that's a small quibble. Highly recommended for ages 12 and up. Review based on an ARC through NetGalley.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bidisha

    IT'S NOT EVEN OUT YET BUT I'M IN LOVE WITH THE BLURB GIVE IT TO ME ALREADY

  7. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Trauma, sexual assault, rape Forward Me Back to You is one those books that takes you by storm. Dealing with Kat's attempted rape, Forward Me Back to You is very much about her journey to deal with her own recovery, her fears, and her anger. At the same time it's about Ravi's struggles with his adopted parents, as well as dealing with issues in hist past that he doesn't even ha (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Trauma, sexual assault, rape Forward Me Back to You is one those books that takes you by storm. Dealing with Kat's attempted rape, Forward Me Back to You is very much about her journey to deal with her own recovery, her fears, and her anger. At the same time it's about Ravi's struggles with his adopted parents, as well as dealing with issues in hist past that he doesn't even have words for. It's a book about figuring out what we want and the impact we want to make in this world. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is a charming story of 2 young people who have a lot to unpack so that they can get on with the goodness of their lives. Told in alternating perspectives, Kat and Robin/Ravi undertake a derive trip to India to help young girls who have been trafficked. I’d never read a book about this topic, and I think this book will bring greater awareness about trafficking to young people. There are solid characters and successful arcs to both of their stories. I wasn’t fully bought in, maybe because the This is a charming story of 2 young people who have a lot to unpack so that they can get on with the goodness of their lives. Told in alternating perspectives, Kat and Robin/Ravi undertake a derive trip to India to help young girls who have been trafficked. I’d never read a book about this topic, and I think this book will bring greater awareness about trafficking to young people. There are solid characters and successful arcs to both of their stories. I wasn’t fully bought in, maybe because the set up happened rather quickly.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Ferencz

    This was lovely. The characters were realistic and their connections to one another seemed meaningful. The topics of human trafficking and sexual assault might be might be tough for certain readers, but I thought the author dealt with the subject matter sensitively.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Beautifully and sensitively told. My heart is a little bit broken and a little bit full. Can't wait to put it in the hands of young folk I love. This book had so many moments of beauty and was so well done. The main characters, Kat and Ravi were both sympathetic and well drawn, I appreciated the fact that the friendships and relationships in this book were nuanced and all of them given attention. The romance (what little there was) does not take center stage here at all. There was a lot of church Beautifully and sensitively told. My heart is a little bit broken and a little bit full. Can't wait to put it in the hands of young folk I love. This book had so many moments of beauty and was so well done. The main characters, Kat and Ravi were both sympathetic and well drawn, I appreciated the fact that the friendships and relationships in this book were nuanced and all of them given attention. The romance (what little there was) does not take center stage here at all. There was a lot of church stuff in this book, and as a person who has some bagge re: being a young person in a Christian church environment, I sometimes struggle with this kind of content-- but I felt like it was handled in an honest and healthy way, and was definitely essential to the story, the motivations of the characters, and so forth. There are so many huge topics in here-- religion, interracial adoption (and the trauma that comes with losing one's first family), child trafficking, PTSD, assault, forgiveness, etc. etc-- but the book never felt unwieldy or (to make up a word) "teachy." This is my first book by Mitali Perkins, but I will be visiting her backlist forthwith..

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Full review to come. Amazing story of strength, courage, and redemption. Deals with a lot of tough content, read reviews for trigger warnings.

  12. 4 out of 5

    grieshaber.reads

    Although Kat fought off her would-be rapist with her champion Brazilian jiujitsu skills, she is not left undamaged. She is suffering from PTSD and anger that her accusations left her attacker unpunished. In an effort to help her daughter, Kat’s mom sends her away from California to Boston to live with a an elderly (but awesome) family friend. Grandma Vee is loving and wonderful and so, so wise. She insists Kat attend a youth group meeting in order to get to know people Kat’s own age. In all her Although Kat fought off her would-be rapist with her champion Brazilian jiujitsu skills, she is not left undamaged. She is suffering from PTSD and anger that her accusations left her attacker unpunished. In an effort to help her daughter, Kat’s mom sends her away from California to Boston to live with a an elderly (but awesome) family friend. Grandma Vee is loving and wonderful and so, so wise. She insists Kat attend a youth group meeting in order to get to know people Kat’s own age. In all her wisdom, Grandma Vee knew Kat would form a connection with Robin, a member of the youth group. Robin was born in India, christened “Ravi” by the orphanage, and adopted by his loving white parents when he was three years old. Although Robin has enjoyed a life of luxury and love, he has always felt like something was missing. He’s getting ready to graduate but he has no idea what he wants to do with his life, he mostly keeps to himself, and he doesn’t have many hobbies. He feels like a no one. The night Kat attends the youth group meeting, the pastor tells the group about an opportunity. He will be taking a small group of students to Kolkata, India to learn about the realities of the sex trafficking trade and to help its victims in whatever ways deemed appropriate by the relief organization. Robin sees the trip as an opportunity to find his birth mother. Kat sees it as an opportunity to teach young girls self-defense as a way to never again be trafficked. Both will learn much, much more than they bargained for. Please read the rest of my review on the LibrariansLitBooks blog: https://www.librarianslitbooks.com/si...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sanchez

    After experiencing an assault in the school stairwell, Katina (Kat) is sent to Boston to live with a family friend, Grandma Vee, who will tutor Kat for the remaining part of the year. The elderly woman suggests Kat attend the local church youth group and befriend a boy named Robin Thornton who seems troubled too. His parents adopted him from an orphanage in India when he was three, and although he's happy to have his parents, he wonders about his path in life since he's more interested in fixing After experiencing an assault in the school stairwell, Katina (Kat) is sent to Boston to live with a family friend, Grandma Vee, who will tutor Kat for the remaining part of the year. The elderly woman suggests Kat attend the local church youth group and befriend a boy named Robin Thornton who seems troubled too. His parents adopted him from an orphanage in India when he was three, and although he's happy to have his parents, he wonders about his path in life since he's more interested in fixing an old VW than in attending college at the moment. He also discovers that Kat is the girl Grandma Vee asked him to make her feel welcome. The youth group leader announces he'll be traveling to India and the youth are also invited to volunteer over the summer with the Bengali Emancipation Society who fight human trafficking. After watching some film about one girl's trafficking story, Kat, Robin, and Grace sign on for the ten week summer trip. Secretly, Kat has a plan to teach these girls self defense moves and Robin, who now wants to be called Ravi, wants to use some of the time in India to try and track down his own story. The story is told from each of their point of view. The trafficking issues became more realistic to me, especially as the characters dealt with the victims, some of whom had babies because of their experiences. I really enjoyed the religious perspectives and the details about India. However, the plot line where Ravi resembled an Indian movie story wasn't resolved. I kept thinking the movie star could have been Ravi's twin brother or perhaps a trafficker, but the story was still very satisfying.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Short thoughts: This is the story of two teens impacted by different types of trauma. Kat fought off a sexual assault at school, but was traumatized by it and by the fact that she was not believed by her school or friends. Robin is now 18 and about to graduate from high school, but still is dealing with the trauma of his adoption, the loss of his birth family and country and culture. The two of them, along with another teen and a youth pastor go to India for the summer to work with an anti traff Short thoughts: This is the story of two teens impacted by different types of trauma. Kat fought off a sexual assault at school, but was traumatized by it and by the fact that she was not believed by her school or friends. Robin is now 18 and about to graduate from high school, but still is dealing with the trauma of his adoption, the loss of his birth family and country and culture. The two of them, along with another teen and a youth pastor go to India for the summer to work with an anti trafficking non-profit. None of them expect what they really end up doing for the summer, but the development of the story is skillfully done. This is really a Christian fiction book. It is not published by a Christian publisher or imprint, but the Christianity of the characters is central. It is not an overly simplistic book as many Christian fiction books are. The trauma of the characters is not magically solved. Trafficking is not solved by a few American teens. There were a few places where the book got a little too informational, but there are real issues that are explored and that exploration needs background. I thought that the book was starting to go too stereotypically wrong in a few places, but it never did. I pretty much never read Christian fiction. But this was well written and I will be reading more of Perkins' books. I alternated between the audiobook and the kindle book. The narration was very good. My longer thoughts are on my blog at http://bookwi.se/forward-me-back-to-you/

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    When three teens from different backgrounds, facing different challenges, go on a service trip to India, they each hope to find the solution to their worries and problems but they discover new friendships instead. Perkins has great characters and they are fully fleshed out. Kat is recovering after a sexual assault by throwing herself into jujitsu; Robin is struggling with who he is and where he belongs while facing questions about his adoption from India. I liked that this was not a romance - tha When three teens from different backgrounds, facing different challenges, go on a service trip to India, they each hope to find the solution to their worries and problems but they discover new friendships instead. Perkins has great characters and they are fully fleshed out. Kat is recovering after a sexual assault by throwing herself into jujitsu; Robin is struggling with who he is and where he belongs while facing questions about his adoption from India. I liked that this was not a romance - that is becoming more and more rare in YA contemporaries. Instead Robin and Kat's relationship is strictly a friendship as they slowly become more comfortable confiding in each other and their other travel mate Gracie. Also, the characters were so diverse and the book offered a nice glimpse into everyday life in India, while also showing the dark side of human trafficking. Unfortunately though, I felt overall like there was something lacking in the story and that it felt a little rushed. The ending tied everything up very quickly, but at the same time left many things unanswered. I appreciate this book for what it tries to do and the fact that it is diverse (the 3 main characters were biracial, latina, and Indian) and is mostly set outside of the US. Still, I was left wanting more from it.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Another really, really good book by Perkins, in which believable young people cope with their own traumas by helping others. Among the many things I liked and admired in this book: 1. The characterizations. 2. The friendships 3. The vivid settings 4. The adult characters, who acted like adults. They gave the teens freedom to act, but also gave them limits and had high expectations for them. I also liked the way faith was handled, with one minor quibble. The Latina character, Gracie, is Catholic. It' Another really, really good book by Perkins, in which believable young people cope with their own traumas by helping others. Among the many things I liked and admired in this book: 1. The characterizations. 2. The friendships 3. The vivid settings 4. The adult characters, who acted like adults. They gave the teens freedom to act, but also gave them limits and had high expectations for them. I also liked the way faith was handled, with one minor quibble. The Latina character, Gracie, is Catholic. It's a slight cliche that she comes from a huge family and therefore has tons of experience with babies. As a Catholic, I also didn't believe such a devout young woman would attend Mass on Fridays and then go to church with her Protestant peers on Sundays. But these are very minor quibbles. Though think "You Bring the Distant Near" would work better for an intergenerational (teens and adults) readership, with its focus on generations of women, adults, as well as teens, should enjoy "Forward me back to You". Four and a half stars, and warmly recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    After getting attacked by a guy at school, jujitsu champ Kat has trouble coping with her fee!ings about men, so her mother decides to send her to a friend in Boston, ultimately giving her the opportunity to travel to India to help and learn from young women who have also been victimized. Ravi was born in India and adopted in the U.S. after his mother gave him up. He wants to know why, so he joins the trip to India too. One might think that Perkins would have these two characters fall in love, bu After getting attacked by a guy at school, jujitsu champ Kat has trouble coping with her fee!ings about men, so her mother decides to send her to a friend in Boston, ultimately giving her the opportunity to travel to India to help and learn from young women who have also been victimized. Ravi was born in India and adopted in the U.S. after his mother gave him up. He wants to know why, so he joins the trip to India too. One might think that Perkins would have these two characters fall in love, but that's pleasantly not the case. Readers will learn a lot about human trafficking and the many ways women are victimized, even when they are strong, but also that we have many types of strength. I was bothered by the use of setting instructions at the beginnings of chapters, as if we are reading a script. It's not necessary. There's also a persistent plotline about how Ravi looks like an Indian film star that goes absolutely nowhere. Overall, a good read that will expose teens to another culture and some serious issues that supersede culture. Review from e-galley.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Kat lives in LA and studies Brazilian jujitsu. However, she has a secret and is having a hard time dealing with it so her mom sends her to Boston for the summer. Robin was adopted from an orphanage in India and is living in India. He's struggling to figure out what to do with his future and may need to come to grips with his past in order to accomplish that. Robin and Kat both end up on a summer service trip to Kolkata to work with survivors of human trafficking. They both end up discovering some Kat lives in LA and studies Brazilian jujitsu. However, she has a secret and is having a hard time dealing with it so her mom sends her to Boston for the summer. Robin was adopted from an orphanage in India and is living in India. He's struggling to figure out what to do with his future and may need to come to grips with his past in order to accomplish that. Robin and Kat both end up on a summer service trip to Kolkata to work with survivors of human trafficking. They both end up discovering some truths about themselves and about humanity in general that help them come to terms with their own lives and help them move forward through their own pain while helping others. Very well-written. Great characters. So descriptive, I could see the bustle of the streets in Kolkata. I read an ARC and I hope they change the cover a bit because most of my students are not being drawn to it - but at least now that I have read it, I can tell them how great the story is. ***trigger warning for rape and trafficking***

  19. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Looking for past often coincides with bumping into your future. I appreciated that the friendships in this book were as front and center as the potential relationship. All three of these young adults are trying to move forward. One wants to know his past. One needs to rediscover her strength and one needs to branch out from family. For me, I hated that Grace did not have her own voice. She is an aside in both the other stories even though she had a valuable story herself. She often felt like a w Looking for past often coincides with bumping into your future. I appreciated that the friendships in this book were as front and center as the potential relationship. All three of these young adults are trying to move forward. One wants to know his past. One needs to rediscover her strength and one needs to branch out from family. For me, I hated that Grace did not have her own voice. She is an aside in both the other stories even though she had a valuable story herself. She often felt like a way to move the plot along. Trauma is never experienced in exactly the same way. This book shows many ways it can impact the lives of everyone who encounter it. Ravi’s resemblance to the movie star was a little irritating as it went nowhere. It is well written and is an important story but some of it just didn’t work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Glenda Nelms

    This is a powerful, challenging, and well-written novel by Mitali Perkins. The story deals with sexual assault, abandonment, identity and human trafficking. She tells stories of courage and strength with diverse characters. The beginning of the story starts with the aftermath of Katina's sexual assault. Ravi searching for his birth parents in India. Told in different perspectives, Katina and Ravi take a mission trip to India to help young girls who have been victims of human trafficking. This bo This is a powerful, challenging, and well-written novel by Mitali Perkins. The story deals with sexual assault, abandonment, identity and human trafficking. She tells stories of courage and strength with diverse characters. The beginning of the story starts with the aftermath of Katina's sexual assault. Ravi searching for his birth parents in India. Told in different perspectives, Katina and Ravi take a mission trip to India to help young girls who have been victims of human trafficking. This book will bring awareness on the human trafficking problem, which continuing to be a heavy human rights issue around the nation and world.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kip

    I'm a longtime Mitali Perkins fan, and this one might just be my favorite yet. Love the dual POVs and the grounding in the settings (both Boston and Kolkata) and I love that it's a story about creating family and trusting and loving (and golden-ruling!) those around you while at the same time growing strong, physically, mentally, and emotionally. Besides all this that will appeal to any reader, the insight into terrifying trafficking going on in the world today is a necessary eye-opener to those I'm a longtime Mitali Perkins fan, and this one might just be my favorite yet. Love the dual POVs and the grounding in the settings (both Boston and Kolkata) and I love that it's a story about creating family and trusting and loving (and golden-ruling!) those around you while at the same time growing strong, physically, mentally, and emotionally. Besides all this that will appeal to any reader, the insight into terrifying trafficking going on in the world today is a necessary eye-opener to those who aren't aware. Highly recommend!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julianna

    Mitali has given us a fast-paced, well written novel with interesting characters. I loved Grandma Vee especially. Most of the story takes place in Kolkata where high school students, Kat, Grace and Ravi, accompany their youth pastor to serve in a ministry for victims of sexual trafficking. As their expectations for the summer change, they grow in their awareness of purpose for their lives and in their understanding of other people. The issues are tough and timely and the book is worth reading. R Mitali has given us a fast-paced, well written novel with interesting characters. I loved Grandma Vee especially. Most of the story takes place in Kolkata where high school students, Kat, Grace and Ravi, accompany their youth pastor to serve in a ministry for victims of sexual trafficking. As their expectations for the summer change, they grow in their awareness of purpose for their lives and in their understanding of other people. The issues are tough and timely and the book is worth reading. Recommended for young adults, aged 14 and up.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mish

    Wow. This book came out of left field for me, and slid right into home plate. I forgot that I even ordered this for my library, so when it came in I had no idea what to expect! And it was a beautiful book. Each of the characters within were looking for something, and they found it. It was not gimmicky, it was not pedantic. It was real, and the teens certainly acted like teens. It was a refreshing read. And I loved the way Kat viewed people, categorized people.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    Kat is a fierce jujitsu champion when she is sexually assaulted by a boy in her school. Her life crumbles and her mother, unsure what to do with her, sends her to l ive iwth a family friend. Full of anger, she finds herself on a church trip to India, where her close friend is struggling to find the truth about his Indian background (he was adopted by two rich white Americans). Great read. Love Mitali Perkins.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    I can not describe to you how much I loved this book. So let me tell you what was wonderful. It was tender and sweet. It was bitter and angry. it was about love and loss. It was about real friendship. it was about redemption turned on it's head. I loved both Ravi and Kat became real friends. No romantic tension, no love triangles. Just real support and kindness. Great for teens who like realistic fiction and faith dominant books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann

    This pulled me in with characters navigating their way through trauma and secrets. It is a book that wrestles with many heavy topics, yet the story shines with sweet moments and fully developed characters. I especially think teens will be drawn to the way Kat and Ravi move through their pain. They both find it hard to share their stories, and both more naturally retreat within themselves; yet it is through sharing, feeling and connecting that they are able to move forward.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Grace T

    This is my second Mitali Perkins book and it did not disappoint. I really loved Kat and Ravi's growing relationship, as well as Ravi and Gracie's. The book dealt with some heavy issues in a very caring way without diminishing the impact, and I think this combination of excellent characters and serious topics is what I really enjoy about both Perkins books I've read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sam Taylor

    LOVED this book! Mitali Perkins writes really thoughtful, powerful stories for teens and this is just another example of that. I really appreciated the depiction of teens finding peace and strength in their religion. That was something I wanted to find in books when I was a teen, and too often didn't. This book is an uplifting example, and I adore it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Excellent YA fiction, deals with adoption, searching for birth parents, sexual assault, trafficking, faith, and the meaning of family all in the context of an exciting and romantic story that shows both Christian and non-Christian characters as real people with complex motives, thoughts, and desires.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Great depiction of what goes through teenagers minds with regard to adoption and self-doubts, as well as the problems faced by those who have been traumatized by human trafficking.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.