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Forward Me Back To You

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School Library Journal Best YA Book of the Year Kirkus Reviews Best YA Book of the Year ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults Amelia Bloomer Top Ten Book for Young Feminists Junior Library Guild Selection Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanag School Library Journal Best YA Book of the Year Kirkus Reviews Best YA Book of the Year ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults Amelia Bloomer Top Ten Book for Young Feminists Junior Library Guild Selection Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of places — a summer service trip to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. As bonds blossom between the travel-mates, Robin and Kat discover the healing superpowers of friendship. At turns heart-wrenching, beautiful, and buoyant, Mitali Perkins' new novel explores the ripple effects of violence — across borders and generations — and how small acts of heroism can break the cycle.


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School Library Journal Best YA Book of the Year Kirkus Reviews Best YA Book of the Year ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults Amelia Bloomer Top Ten Book for Young Feminists Junior Library Guild Selection Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanag School Library Journal Best YA Book of the Year Kirkus Reviews Best YA Book of the Year ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults Amelia Bloomer Top Ten Book for Young Feminists Junior Library Guild Selection Katina King is the reigning teen jujitsu champion of Northern California, but she's having trouble fighting off the secrets in her past. Robin Thornton was adopted from an orphanage in Kolkata, India and is reluctant to take on his future. Since he knows nothing about his past, how is he supposed to figure out what comes next? Robin and Kat meet in the most unlikely of places — a summer service trip to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. As bonds blossom between the travel-mates, Robin and Kat discover the healing superpowers of friendship. At turns heart-wrenching, beautiful, and buoyant, Mitali Perkins' new novel explores the ripple effects of violence — across borders and generations — and how small acts of heroism can break the cycle.

30 review for Forward Me Back To You

  1. 4 out of 5

    mindful.librarian ☀️

    Superb YA. And here’s a keyword review because time and longer writing aren’t in the cards for me today: . Sexual assault Survivor Kolkata Adoption Church Travel Babies Human trafficking Friendship Family Love . As soon as I started reading this I texted @definitelyRA and said, “I immediately thought of you!” - if you don’t know this, RA is a superhero advocate and fundraiser for groups that fight human trafficking and I knew this book would be perfect for her. . And overall, I adore Mitali Perkins and her work Superb YA. And here’s a keyword review because time and longer writing aren’t in the cards for me today: . Sexual assault Survivor Kolkata Adoption Church Travel Babies Human trafficking Friendship Family Love . As soon as I started reading this I texted @definitelyRA and said, “I immediately thought of you!” - if you don’t know this, RA is a superhero advocate and fundraiser for groups that fight human trafficking and I knew this book would be perfect for her. . And overall, I adore Mitali Perkins and her work, and this is yet another stellar book from her. Loved it!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sahitya

    CW: past sexual assault, human trafficking, parental abandonment This book was on my TBR for 2019 and now it’s also on my 20 books to read in 2020 list, so I knew I wanted to read it soon. After almost languishing on my couch for four days without reading anything, I finally decided to pick this up. And I don’t know if it was the right pick at the moment, I can’t deny that it was a very profound read. The one thing I can tell you about the author’s writing is that it’s very engaging from the firs CW: past sexual assault, human trafficking, parental abandonment This book was on my TBR for 2019 and now it’s also on my 20 books to read in 2020 list, so I knew I wanted to read it soon. After almost languishing on my couch for four days without reading anything, I finally decided to pick this up. And I don’t know if it was the right pick at the moment, I can’t deny that it was a very profound read. The one thing I can tell you about the author’s writing is that it’s very engaging from the first page, with the right amount of pacing that makes you wanna breeze through it without taking any break - which is exactly what I ended up doing. The actual issues that are dealt within the book can be a bit tough to read, and the author never shies away from confronting us in a very straightforward way which can force us to think, but it still works well with her choice of using a dual POV as well as short chapters. The writing is very hard hitting and we feel deeply all the emotions that the characters are feeling, and I couldn’t have asked for anything less. The story takes place a bit in Boston and a lot of it in Kolkata, and I thought the author did a brilliant job bringing both the cities to life, and I almost felt transported there through her words. I also like the choices that the author made in the story - keeping things more realistic, not neatly tying up everything in a bow and leaving us with a sense that this is just the beginning, not the end. There are so many important themes explored in the story but the author never lets them overwhelm the readers. Human trafficking is the major underlying theme here but the author doesn’t focus on why it happens, but more on what can be done to help the survivors, the kind of support and resources they need and how difficult it maybe to help them thrive in the outside world. Religion and church is also a major foundation of this book, with service and volunteering forming the major way through which our characters find their way forward and purpose in life. The aftermath of sexual assault and the grief of abandonment/ the uncertainty of being an adopted child also are other major issues that the characters face and I thought the author handled them with a lot of thought and sensitivity. Kat is a fierce, confident, ambitious and determined high school girl who’s life in thrown into disarray when she is assaulted. As a jiu-jitsu belt holder, she manages to defend herself but it still leaves a mark and it was tough watching her deal with panic attacks, nightmares and just complete discomfort about being in the space with a group of men. But through meeting an old grandmotherly teacher, a new group of church friends and working with the trafficking survivors, she learns that there are more ways of being empowered than just self defense, and she also understands the different ways in which she can help those in need. Robin/Ravi has grown up with privilege in a wealthy family but being a brown adopted child of two white parents has always left him feeling conflicted, and he has never had the opportunity to explore or identify his feelings about this. But when he gets an opportunity to go to Kolkata, he finally decides to look for his birth mother. He has lots of hopes and dreams about his reunion and going to back to India really brings out a lot of feelings in him - unimaginable grief and anger and a deep desire to help the survivors; he also finds himself becoming more confident, assertive, finally trying to love himself and also accept the love that he has received from his parents without feeling guilty. There are also some wonderful side characters we meet like the church group who are exactly the kind of supportive friends both Kat and Ravi need, Grandma Vee who makes such a positive impact on Kat letting go of her anger and helplessness, Ravi’s parents who are so compassionate and loving, Banto who is the most adorable friend they make in India and the amazing group of people working for the emancipation of trafficked children and the brave group of survivors. Every relationship written in this story is very meaningful, with each person helping the other grow in some way or the other and I just loved reading about all of them. To conclude, the issues that this book talks about maybe tough but it is a beautifully written and emotionally engaging book. It has a great ensemble of characters who are all faithful and compassionate and just want to do good. If you like reading about complicated youngsters and books that fall between contemporary and literary fiction, you should totally check this out. As religion plays a very important part in this story, the writing did feel didactic at times but never overly preachy and it didn’t affect my reading experience much. I really loved being with these characters and I can’t wait to read the author’s next works.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Smucker

    A beautiful, whole-hearted, compelling read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Libby

    I always rejoice when there is a new Mitali Perkins book. She tells good stories with real diverse, global characters. This one is no exception. From the riveting beginning with the after effect of Katina's sexual assault to an ending where neither Kat nor Robin achieve their desires and yet where both find a way forward that brings them hope, this book doesn't shy away from difficult topics like human trafficking, but still manages to have grace shine through. I especially like how the American I always rejoice when there is a new Mitali Perkins book. She tells good stories with real diverse, global characters. This one is no exception. From the riveting beginning with the after effect of Katina's sexual assault to an ending where neither Kat nor Robin achieve their desires and yet where both find a way forward that brings them hope, this book doesn't shy away from difficult topics like human trafficking, but still manages to have grace shine through. I especially like how the American students had to confront the fact that the Indians they work with know better than they do what is needed and how they are called to different roles. Why 4 stars and not 5? Occasionally, when presenting information about trafficking, the book feels a bit didactic. So it's not perfect, but that's a small quibble. Highly recommended for ages 12 and up. Review based on an ARC through NetGalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Seema Rao

    Riveting ~ Heartwarming ~ Challenging tl;dr: Strength is much more than about muscles This book is a whole lot of trigger warnings probed and examined, including attempted rape, abandonment, poverty, and racism. Mitali Perkins is a well-known author, presenting balance and well-rounded multi-cultural characters. She uses all those skills here. The quick read, with fast moving short chapters, is hard to read in parts, thanks to the strong, and unflinching writing. In general, I definitely recommend Riveting ~ Heartwarming ~ Challenging tl;dr: Strength is much more than about muscles This book is a whole lot of trigger warnings probed and examined, including attempted rape, abandonment, poverty, and racism. Mitali Perkins is a well-known author, presenting balance and well-rounded multi-cultural characters. She uses all those skills here. The quick read, with fast moving short chapters, is hard to read in parts, thanks to the strong, and unflinching writing. In general, I definitely recommend this read, and I would love to see boys reading this one. I will say, there was that edge of PSA to it, at the parts where Human trafficking is discussed (a bit more didactic than literary). But overall, very strong book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    A thoroughly satisfying book that I had a hard time putting down. about an important and rarely written about topic. Just a note, all of Mitali Perkins' books are on my We Need Diverse Books Seminar reading list. Students get to choose which books they want to read and come out of the class with a collection development list.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. D

    Funny story: I took my kids to the library and my 2yo decided to take this book home with us. I figured that it looked pretty good (okay, okay, I'm totally one to judge a book by the cover), and it is certainly worth the read. I hope there is a sequel, or that the author has another few books for my son to grab on to for my sake. CW: deals with human trafficking, sexual assault, infant abandonment, pretty heavy issues. It is not done in a way to shock the reader, it is respectful and not graphic Funny story: I took my kids to the library and my 2yo decided to take this book home with us. I figured that it looked pretty good (okay, okay, I'm totally one to judge a book by the cover), and it is certainly worth the read. I hope there is a sequel, or that the author has another few books for my son to grab on to for my sake. CW: deals with human trafficking, sexual assault, infant abandonment, pretty heavy issues. It is not done in a way to shock the reader, it is respectful and not graphic. The teens in this book deal with real life problems, and most high schoolers would benefit from reading work like this.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Karen Reed

    Another honest and hopeful story by Mitali Perkins, author of You Bring The Distance Near. Thank you to Netgalley and publisher for an opportunity to review this e-galley. I will definitely be purchasing and recommending this to teen readers. I have to admit, when I read that the topic included attempted rape and human trafficking I was hesitant to start it. I've read so many heavy books lately I didn't know if I could handle another one. But I'm so glad I did because now I can reassure teens and Another honest and hopeful story by Mitali Perkins, author of You Bring The Distance Near. Thank you to Netgalley and publisher for an opportunity to review this e-galley. I will definitely be purchasing and recommending this to teen readers. I have to admit, when I read that the topic included attempted rape and human trafficking I was hesitant to start it. I've read so many heavy books lately I didn't know if I could handle another one. But I'm so glad I did because now I can reassure teens and parents that this is appropriate for teens, even younger teens. Mitali doesn't sugar coat any issues but she is careful not to dig too deep into the horrors that could push this into another age bracket or require trigger warnings. This book provides a great context to discuss cross-cultural service. I would recommend it to anyone going on service trips to read and discuss volunteerism vs toxic charity. What it means to go to another culture and provide what they need vs. what you think they need. Hope resources will be included in final copy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    I can not describe to you how much I loved this book. So let me tell you what was wonderful. It was tender and sweet. It was bitter and angry. it was about love and loss. It was about real friendship. it was about redemption turned on it's head. I loved both Ravi and Kat became real friends. No romantic tension, no love triangles. Just real support and kindness. Great for teens who like realistic fiction and faith dominant books.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bidisha

    IT'S NOT EVEN OUT YET BUT I'M IN LOVE WITH THE BLURB GIVE IT TO ME ALREADY

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this fabulous book that manages to raise awareness about #humantrafficking as well as tell an incredibly compelling story about two individuals who heal together through a service trip to Kolkata. . 〰️ 〰️ I read this in one day and was completely drawn in by Katina and Robin/Ravi’s stories. Kat is biracial and a jiu jitsu champ who is struggling after an attempted sexual assault. She moves to Boston to live with family friend Vee who she immediately connects with. Robin is of Indian ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this fabulous book that manages to raise awareness about #humantrafficking as well as tell an incredibly compelling story about two individuals who heal together through a service trip to Kolkata. . 〰️ 〰️ I read this in one day and was completely drawn in by Katina and Robin/Ravi’s stories. Kat is biracial and a jiu jitsu champ who is struggling after an attempted sexual assault. She moves to Boston to live with family friend Vee who she immediately connects with. Robin is of Indian heritage and cherished by his white adoptive parents but he wants to meet his birth mother. The two teens along with Gracie (Latinx) travel to India for a summer church service project to learn about human trafficking and help out however they can. . 〰️ 〰️ I loved both perspectives. I loved Kat especially — she is such a multilayered character. I love how the two main characters are not romantically interested in each other, but instead support each other as friends. (there is a wonderful romance in here, too, though!). . 〰️ 〰️ Reviews say ages 14+, but I am buying a copy of this for my more mature 8th grade readers, particularly students interested in activism and social justice. Besides highlighting the problem of human trafficking, which is a global problem, there are also important messages in here about finding a way to contribute and help people (but also respecting local cultures and serving only when asked). . 〰️ 〰️ #yalit #booksbooksbooks #bookstagram #forwardmebacktoyou @mitaliperkins #yabooks #amreading #librariesofinstagram #librariansofinstagram

  12. 4 out of 5

    RuthAnn

    Recommended I would definitely recommend YA novel for teens and their adults to read together. It comes from an interesting perspective of two teenagers who are learning about human trafficking. In that way, I think it holds a lot of value for people looking into the situation and encountering what can be horrifying facts and figures. There's a lot to talk about here. How do we process difficult facts about modern slavery (or other injustice)? What unique skills or story do you bring to the table Recommended I would definitely recommend YA novel for teens and their adults to read together. It comes from an interesting perspective of two teenagers who are learning about human trafficking. In that way, I think it holds a lot of value for people looking into the situation and encountering what can be horrifying facts and figures. There's a lot to talk about here. How do we process difficult facts about modern slavery (or other injustice)? What unique skills or story do you bring to the table as an activist? What do you do when your original plan doesn't work? I also appreciated the nuanced way that the story dealt with the impulse to rush in and be a hero or to parachute down with a solution we assume will work, which I think applies to all of us. One surprising element for me was how church-y this book was. The teens go to church, attend a small group, and are chaperoned by their pastor. There's no proselytizing, and it's all matter-of-fact (refreshingly so), but I was just surprised! I'm curious how other readers will receive that aspect of the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Jack

    When Kat and Ravi travel to Kalkata, India with their church group they go with very different intentions. Kat wants to escape the past and Ravi wants to discover it. Kat is the reigning teen Jiu-Jitsu champion of Northern California. But even her physical skills couldn’t protect her from sexual assault at her high school. When she leaves for India, she’s desperate to remove herself from anything that reminds her of the experience and the power it still holds over her. Ravi is having a hard time When Kat and Ravi travel to Kalkata, India with their church group they go with very different intentions. Kat wants to escape the past and Ravi wants to discover it. Kat is the reigning teen Jiu-Jitsu champion of Northern California. But even her physical skills couldn’t protect her from sexual assault at her high school. When she leaves for India, she’s desperate to remove herself from anything that reminds her of the experience and the power it still holds over her. Ravi is having a hard time imagining his future. Adopted from India as a baby, he’s never felt completely at home in his white community, always playing sidekick to his more popular friend. This trip to India is his chance to find his birth mother and come to terms with why she gave him up. The trip to Kolkata challenges Kat and Ravi in different ways. For Kat, she must find the strength to help girls younger than herself who have traumatized by human trafficking. For Ravi, he must play detective to find his birth mother and confront the painful truths of why she gave him up. Both realize that coming to terms with the past is the only way to move forward. Their small acts of heroism make a big impact in each other’s lives and the lives of those they love.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jabiz Raisdana

    This is a powerful readable book about some tough topics. The very first page starts with a sexual assault and it moves into sexual child trafficking. But the entire story is told with grace and an earnest need to help young peoplke learn about these issues whilst finding ways to get involved. It is filled with interesting, believable multi-cultural characters who are trying to figure out who they are in the world and what their roles may be. The story at times feels a bit too Christian for read This is a powerful readable book about some tough topics. The very first page starts with a sexual assault and it moves into sexual child trafficking. But the entire story is told with grace and an earnest need to help young peoplke learn about these issues whilst finding ways to get involved. It is filled with interesting, believable multi-cultural characters who are trying to figure out who they are in the world and what their roles may be. The story at times feels a bit too Christian for readers of other faiths or atheists, but Perkins does a nice job of not being too preachy. Overall I would recommend this book grade 8's and above as the issues it tackles are relevant and important. And it is well written.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adira

    I gave this book 3.5 stars. Mitali Perkins tells a story that is rife with tension, pain, and the joy of finding peace of mind once you heal from the pain that life can cause you. This novel deals with sexual assault, intercultural adoption, sex trafficking, and abandonment and trauma issues from dealing with all the above. While confronting these things, Perkins make sure to allow bright spots to appeAr the characters lives where they exist just as teenagers would without the pain that their lif I gave this book 3.5 stars. Mitali Perkins tells a story that is rife with tension, pain, and the joy of finding peace of mind once you heal from the pain that life can cause you. This novel deals with sexual assault, intercultural adoption, sex trafficking, and abandonment and trauma issues from dealing with all the above. While confronting these things, Perkins make sure to allow bright spots to appeAr the characters lives where they exist just as teenagers would without the pain that their life experiences may bring. I highly suggest this book if you don’t mind reading a raw and unfiltered story that has religious undertones.

  16. 4 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Trauma, sexual assault, rape Forward Me Back to You is one those books that takes you by storm. Dealing with Kat's attempted rape, Forward Me Back to You is very much about her journey to deal with her own recovery, her fears, and her anger. At the same time it's about Ravi's struggles with his adopted parents, as well as dealing with issues in hist past that he doesn't even ha (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: Trauma, sexual assault, rape Forward Me Back to You is one those books that takes you by storm. Dealing with Kat's attempted rape, Forward Me Back to You is very much about her journey to deal with her own recovery, her fears, and her anger. At the same time it's about Ravi's struggles with his adopted parents, as well as dealing with issues in hist past that he doesn't even have words for. It's a book about figuring out what we want and the impact we want to make in this world. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Estee

    3.25 stars Two teens (with their own issues) from the same church youth group go to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. The book doesn’t go into the stories of the survivors, just the two main characters. The book felt a little bit too religious at parts and some of the middle chapters dragged a bit. I liked Grandma Vee. And I liked reading about her interactions with everyone and especially with Kay. I didn’t think the story needed to go to India. Or maybe not for such a long tim 3.25 stars Two teens (with their own issues) from the same church youth group go to India to work with survivors of human trafficking. The book doesn’t go into the stories of the survivors, just the two main characters. The book felt a little bit too religious at parts and some of the middle chapters dragged a bit. I liked Grandma Vee. And I liked reading about her interactions with everyone and especially with Kay. I didn’t think the story needed to go to India. Or maybe not for such a long time. It was almost like two different books in one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Missy

    I picked this book up after reading the rave year-end reviews. It's a very good realistic YA fiction. The characters meet at church, and church activity takes place throughout the story. I notice some reviewers felt it was preachy, but it was accurately described based on my experience. The story ends on a hopeful note, which is a breath of fresh air in YA literature!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    This is a charming story of 2 young people who have a lot to unpack so that they can get on with the goodness of their lives. Told in alternating perspectives, Kat and Robin/Ravi undertake a derive trip to India to help young girls who have been trafficked. I’d never read a book about this topic, and I think this book will bring greater awareness about trafficking to young people. There are solid characters and successful arcs to both of their stories. I wasn’t fully bought in, maybe because the This is a charming story of 2 young people who have a lot to unpack so that they can get on with the goodness of their lives. Told in alternating perspectives, Kat and Robin/Ravi undertake a derive trip to India to help young girls who have been trafficked. I’d never read a book about this topic, and I think this book will bring greater awareness about trafficking to young people. There are solid characters and successful arcs to both of their stories. I wasn’t fully bought in, maybe because the set up happened rather quickly.

  20. 4 out of 5

    vaishnavi

    3.5 stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Well develop characters. The author is also great at describing the locations that are in the story. This is a great read, I would totally recommend.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karamm.z

    You can't just rewind life; sometimes you just need to push play". RATINGS:🌜🌜🌜🌜 💫BOOK REVIEW 💫 "Foward me back to you" follow two main teens names kat and robin. Kat is suffering from a traumatic situation and wants to move away in order to breathe. On the other hand Robin is struggling with his identity as he was adopted when he was younger which made an impact on him. Well in summary you can say that they are both figuring out who they are. They got involved with a trip to India with their small You can't just rewind life; sometimes you just need to push play". RATINGS:🌜🌜🌜🌜 💫BOOK REVIEW 💫 "Foward me back to you" follow two main teens names kat and robin. Kat is suffering from a traumatic situation and wants to move away in order to breathe. On the other hand Robin is struggling with his identity as he was adopted when he was younger which made an impact on him. Well in summary you can say that they are both figuring out who they are. They got involved with a trip to India with their small church group. Robin was raised in India and heading back there, where he undergo loads of bad memories which affected him. I loved the way Mitali Perkins wrote the story and how she depicted India brought me back memories as i did stayed there for a while. She knows how to captivate the young readers on some of the most important discussions like rape culture and bullying as these are some of the heavy topics which they are facing on the day to day basis.She talks a lot about relationships, empowerment and rape. Kindly beware if you are not comfortable with these topics do not pick it up😊

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Ferencz

    This was lovely. The characters were realistic and their connections to one another seemed meaningful. The topics of human trafficking and sexual assault might be might be tough for certain readers, but I thought the author dealt with the subject matter sensitively.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Beautifully and sensitively told. My heart is a little bit broken and a little bit full. Can't wait to put it in the hands of young folk I love. This book had so many moments of beauty and was so well done. The main characters, Kat and Ravi were both sympathetic and well drawn, I appreciated the fact that the friendships and relationships in this book were nuanced and all of them given attention. The romance (what little there was) does not take center stage here at all. There was a lot of church Beautifully and sensitively told. My heart is a little bit broken and a little bit full. Can't wait to put it in the hands of young folk I love. This book had so many moments of beauty and was so well done. The main characters, Kat and Ravi were both sympathetic and well drawn, I appreciated the fact that the friendships and relationships in this book were nuanced and all of them given attention. The romance (what little there was) does not take center stage here at all. There was a lot of church stuff in this book, and as a person who has some bagge re: being a young person in a Christian church environment, I sometimes struggle with this kind of content-- but I felt like it was handled in an honest and healthy way, and was definitely essential to the story, the motivations of the characters, and so forth. There are so many huge topics in here-- religion, interracial adoption (and the trauma that comes with losing one's first family), child trafficking, PTSD, assault, forgiveness, etc. etc-- but the book never felt unwieldy or (to make up a word) "teachy." This is my first book by Mitali Perkins, but I will be visiting her backlist forthwith..

  25. 4 out of 5

    grieshaber.reads

    Although Kat fought off her would-be rapist with her champion Brazilian jiujitsu skills, she is not left undamaged. She is suffering from PTSD and anger that her accusations left her attacker unpunished. In an effort to help her daughter, Kat’s mom sends her away from California to Boston to live with a an elderly (but awesome) family friend. Grandma Vee is loving and wonderful and so, so wise. She insists Kat attend a youth group meeting in order to get to know people Kat’s own age. In all her Although Kat fought off her would-be rapist with her champion Brazilian jiujitsu skills, she is not left undamaged. She is suffering from PTSD and anger that her accusations left her attacker unpunished. In an effort to help her daughter, Kat’s mom sends her away from California to Boston to live with a an elderly (but awesome) family friend. Grandma Vee is loving and wonderful and so, so wise. She insists Kat attend a youth group meeting in order to get to know people Kat’s own age. In all her wisdom, Grandma Vee knew Kat would form a connection with Robin, a member of the youth group. Robin was born in India, christened “Ravi” by the orphanage, and adopted by his loving white parents when he was three years old. Although Robin has enjoyed a life of luxury and love, he has always felt like something was missing. He’s getting ready to graduate but he has no idea what he wants to do with his life, he mostly keeps to himself, and he doesn’t have many hobbies. He feels like a no one. The night Kat attends the youth group meeting, the pastor tells the group about an opportunity. He will be taking a small group of students to Kolkata, India to learn about the realities of the sex trafficking trade and to help its victims in whatever ways deemed appropriate by the relief organization. Robin sees the trip as an opportunity to find his birth mother. Kat sees it as an opportunity to teach young girls self-defense as a way to never again be trafficked. Both will learn much, much more than they bargained for. Please read the rest of my review on the LibrariansLitBooks blog: https://www.librarianslitbooks.com/si...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    Excellent YA fiction, deals with adoption, searching for birth parents, sexual assault, trafficking, faith, and the meaning of family all in the context of an exciting and romantic story that shows both Christian and non-Christian characters as real people with complex motives, thoughts, and desires.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    Full review to come. Amazing story of strength, courage, and redemption. Deals with a lot of tough content, read reviews for trigger warnings.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Public library copy I really enjoyed this, especially Robin/Ravi's story, but it was definitely more of a Young Adult book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary Sanchez

    After experiencing an assault in the school stairwell, Katina (Kat) is sent to Boston to live with a family friend, Grandma Vee, who will tutor Kat for the remaining part of the year. The elderly woman suggests Kat attend the local church youth group and befriend a boy named Robin Thornton who seems troubled too. His parents adopted him from an orphanage in India when he was three, and although he's happy to have his parents, he wonders about his path in life since he's more interested in fixing After experiencing an assault in the school stairwell, Katina (Kat) is sent to Boston to live with a family friend, Grandma Vee, who will tutor Kat for the remaining part of the year. The elderly woman suggests Kat attend the local church youth group and befriend a boy named Robin Thornton who seems troubled too. His parents adopted him from an orphanage in India when he was three, and although he's happy to have his parents, he wonders about his path in life since he's more interested in fixing an old VW than in attending college at the moment. He also discovers that Kat is the girl Grandma Vee asked him to make her feel welcome. The youth group leader announces he'll be traveling to India and the youth are also invited to volunteer over the summer with the Bengali Emancipation Society who fight human trafficking. After watching some film about one girl's trafficking story, Kat, Robin, and Grace sign on for the ten week summer trip. Secretly, Kat has a plan to teach these girls self defense moves and Robin, who now wants to be called Ravi, wants to use some of the time in India to try and track down his own story. The story is told from each of their point of view. The trafficking issues became more realistic to me, especially as the characters dealt with the victims, some of whom had babies because of their experiences. I really enjoyed the religious perspectives and the details about India. However, the plot line where Ravi resembled an Indian movie story wasn't resolved. I kept thinking the movie star could have been Ravi's twin brother or perhaps a trafficker, but the story was still very satisfying.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    Short thoughts: This is the story of two teens impacted by different types of trauma. Kat fought off a sexual assault at school, but was traumatized by it and by the fact that she was not believed by her school or friends. Robin is now 18 and about to graduate from high school, but still is dealing with the trauma of his adoption, the loss of his birth family and country and culture. The two of them, along with another teen and a youth pastor go to India for the summer to work with an anti traff Short thoughts: This is the story of two teens impacted by different types of trauma. Kat fought off a sexual assault at school, but was traumatized by it and by the fact that she was not believed by her school or friends. Robin is now 18 and about to graduate from high school, but still is dealing with the trauma of his adoption, the loss of his birth family and country and culture. The two of them, along with another teen and a youth pastor go to India for the summer to work with an anti trafficking non-profit. None of them expect what they really end up doing for the summer, but the development of the story is skillfully done. This is really a Christian fiction book. It is not published by a Christian publisher or imprint, but the Christianity of the characters is central. It is not an overly simplistic book as many Christian fiction books are. The trauma of the characters is not magically solved. Trafficking is not solved by a few American teens. There were a few places where the book got a little too informational, but there are real issues that are explored and that exploration needs background. I thought that the book was starting to go too stereotypically wrong in a few places, but it never did. I pretty much never read Christian fiction. But this was well written and I will be reading more of Perkins' books. I alternated between the audiobook and the kindle book. The narration was very good. My longer thoughts are on my blog at http://bookwi.se/forward-me-back-to-you/

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