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Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution

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More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio. Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio. Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn't help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a “treatment center” and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie's sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process.


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More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio. Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted More trouble at school and at home — and the discovery of a missive from her late soldier sister — send Angie and a long-ago friend on an RV road trip across Ohio. Sophomore year has just begun, and Angie is miserable. Her girlfriend, KC, has moved away; her good friend, Jake, is keeping his distance; and the resident bully has ramped up an increasingly vicious and targeted campaign to humiliate her. An over-the-top statue dedication planned for her sister, who died in Iraq, is almost too much to bear, and it doesn't help that her mother has placed a symbolic empty urn on their mantel. At the ceremony, a soldier hands Angie a final letter from her sister, including a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit when she got home from the war. With her mother threatening to send Angie to a “treatment center” and the situation at school becoming violent, Angie enlists the help of her estranged childhood friend, Jamboree. Along with a few other outsiders, they pack into an RV and head across the state on the road trip Angie's sister did not live to take. It might be just what Angie needs to find a way to let her sister go, and find herself in the process.

30 review for Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received an ARC of this book for free from the publisher (Candlewick Press) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 3.5 stars which rounds up to 4. First off, I just want to put out a trigger warning since this book deals with a lot of serious topics such as fat shaming, bullying, grief, homophobia, and self-harm. This book is the sequel to Fat Angie, and going into this book I did not know that. I had thought it was a standalone book. Even though I did not read the first book, I was I received an ARC of this book for free from the publisher (Candlewick Press) in exchange for an honest review. I give this book 3.5 stars which rounds up to 4. First off, I just want to put out a trigger warning since this book deals with a lot of serious topics such as fat shaming, bullying, grief, homophobia, and self-harm. This book is the sequel to Fat Angie, and going into this book I did not know that. I had thought it was a standalone book. Even though I did not read the first book, I was still able to understand what was happening in this book. There were a few things that I was confused about in the beginning, but I managed to figure it out. I liked the plot of the book, particularly the road trip aspect. The reason why I wanted to read this book was because it was about an RV road trip. I’m an RVer so that appealed to me. The best parts of the book involved the road trip. The beginning of the book is really heavy subject-wise, so the road trip came at the perfect time. However, the execution of the book wasn’t great. The writing style wasn’t my favorite. It was a bit awkward and clunky at times. I wished it flowed more smoothly. Overall, I enjoyed the story despite some flaws in the execution.

  2. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Angie's life is in absolute shambles. It is the start of a new school year, her sister is dead, killed while serving overseas in the military, her girlfriend has moved away to Texas and her best friend has ghosted. Returning to school, Angie faces extreme bullying and random acts of violence. During one particularly heinous incident, she stands up to her bully and breaks his nose. Since none of her peers will come forward and tell the truth, that she was protecting herself from a violent assault Angie's life is in absolute shambles. It is the start of a new school year, her sister is dead, killed while serving overseas in the military, her girlfriend has moved away to Texas and her best friend has ghosted. Returning to school, Angie faces extreme bullying and random acts of violence. During one particularly heinous incident, she stands up to her bully and breaks his nose. Since none of her peers will come forward and tell the truth, that she was protecting herself from a violent assault, Angie is now facing expulsion. Her mother, an absolutely atrocious woman who can CHOKE, is threatening to send Angie away to in inpatient treatment center. Suffering from severe depression, grief over the loss of her sister and debilitating panic attacks, Angie is left to navigate what is left of her life essentially on her own. This book was difficult to read. I was uncomfortable pretty much the entire time and now that I am done, I am not comfortable assigning a star-rating. I know this may seem silly but I just can't narrow down my thoughts to one number. This book was oddly compelling. The writing was a little strange to me and the narrative was much more 'stream of consciousness'-based than I tend to like but I could not stop reading. I wanted to know where Angie would end up and how her life would go. She is a character who is in a really bad place, physically, mentally, emotionally and literally, her home is terrible. She doesn't feel positive about anything in her life and was just so down on herself. It hurt to read this. In addition to all of that, there are horrible scenes of violence, rampant fat-shaming and hate speech. I questioned whether or not it was necessary for the plot progress and to be honest, I'm not sure. At times, it felt like certain aspects were thrown in more for shock value but I don't know, life does get messy sometimes. Ugh, I am just so torn on this one, you guys. As a consumer reviewer, I can tell you this story made me uncomfortable, but I feel by 'judging' (aka. adding a rating) it, I am in essence casting judgement on the author's story. 'Isn't that what we always do?' you may ask. In a way, yes, but this story just felt so personal, probably due to the 'stream of consciousness' narrative, and it did have a lot of aspects to it that I liked and respected but other things that felt 'off'. I am making zero sense right now, I know. That is what this book will do you. I wouldn't know where to begin in recommending this book to anyone. Trigger warnings are too numerous to list but there was a lot of diversity and a lot of serious topics that should be explored more. The road trip aspect of the story was my favorite element. Basically, before Angie's sister was killed, she wrote a letter to Angie listing a bunch of things she wanted to experience with her, via a road trip in their state, when she got back home. Since she never made it back, Angie, along with her sister's urn, convinces an old friend to take her parent's RV and drive them to the different locations listed in the letter. They are joined by two additional characters and your typical road trip hijinks ensue. It is important to note that this book is a continuation to a prior book, titled Fat Angie. I never read that first book and I don't feel like I was missing anything. This felt like a complete story to me. If you are interested in this one, and haven't read the first, it is my opinion that you do not need to go back and read that first one. This is not my typical review. In fact, I have been dreading writing this. No gifs, no attempts at humor, this story just doesn't seem the place for it. My final decision is to not add a star rating. I want people to read this. I want to hear other's opinions on this. I think there are so many important issues throughout this that should be discussed more, not just the 'real life' issues but how we express and take in those topics via literature.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cheyenne

    I received this review copy for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Check out my reviews at https://cheyennereads.home.blog ! Before I begin, I’d like to point out that there’s some content in this book that may be troubling to some readers. Trigger warnings for homophobia, hate speech, and suicide. Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is the story of a teenage girl who is having a hard time with her ex girlfriend moving away, her friends being distant, her sister dying in service I received this review copy for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Check out my reviews at https://cheyennereads.home.blog ! Before I begin, I’d like to point out that there’s some content in this book that may be troubling to some readers. Trigger warnings for homophobia, hate speech, and suicide. Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is the story of a teenage girl who is having a hard time with her ex girlfriend moving away, her friends being distant, her sister dying in service and becoming a hero, and old friends trying to become close again. When she gets a postcard her sister wrote before she died stating all the things she wanted them to do together, she enlists the help of her former friend Jamboree, Jamboree’s friend Zeke, and Zeke’s cousin, Angie’s bully’s best friend, Darius. This story really broke my heart. Angie goes through the worst things – extreme bullying, what I would call abuse from her mother, and untreated mental illness. She has frequent panic attacks and is laughed at or treated as a nuisance rather than helped. That honestly made me so sad, it seems like such a common thing so many people go through. I can’t imagine what it’s like to be suffering from mental illness and have the whole world against you and no one to support you. Her mother is absolutely awful. Like, she’s so evil she’s almost a caricature. Every scene she was in made me so angry I almost had to put the book down. It made me so upset to think of someone living with someone like that, having to be berated every day when what you need is help and love. It was kind of depressing. Once Angie begins her road trip with Jamboree, Zeke, and Darius, the fun begins. Jamboree and Zeke are really great people. They truly want to help Angie with her sister’s list (Zeke documenting along the way) and help her to move on and get the acceptance she needs. Darius is a more morally grey character, as he’s her bully’s best friend but is starting to realize his best friend isn’t who he used to be. He struggles with the decision to keep his best friend, or stand up and tell the truth about what happened between them and Angie. The road trip is a lot of fun. They do things like visit cheesy landmarks, do the things that scare them, and get out of their comfort zone. It’s a beautiful journey to watch, and I was cheering for them along the way. The journey Angie goes on is a beautiful one, and I really enjoyed the story. The writing is kind of iffy for me. It’s not really my style. Despite the language, it reads a little young. I wasn’t a huge fan of all of it, although I did mostly enjoy the book overall. I would recommend this book to anyone who can handle the previously mentioned trigger warnings and wants to read a cute story about a teenage girl finding herself and finding acceptance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Angie's journey reminds us that grief is a long road. Her romance with the glamorous KC over, Angie is still a pariah in her family (that mom!) and her school. Her new "woo woo" psychologist is trying, but is Angie getting it? Can't wait for the broader release (I read an ARC copy!)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Page

    Rebellion (n): The defiance of authority. Classic rebellions include but are not limited to: the Haitian Revolution, the French Revolution, and the American Revolution. Not to be mistaken for the Beastie Boys’ “Fight for Your Right” lyrical revolution.The first novel, simply titled Fat Angie, traveled through some heavy territory: mental health, bullying, emotional abuse, coming out, losing a sister in the military to terrorists. Things in high school were hard for Fat Angie, who was repeating 9 Rebellion (n): The defiance of authority. Classic rebellions include but are not limited to: the Haitian Revolution, the French Revolution, and the American Revolution. Not to be mistaken for the Beastie Boys’ “Fight for Your Right” lyrical revolution.The first novel, simply titled Fat Angie, traveled through some heavy territory: mental health, bullying, emotional abuse, coming out, losing a sister in the military to terrorists. Things in high school were hard for Fat Angie, who was repeating 9th grade after a very public mental breakdown and suicide attempt. But meeting new student KC and falling in love with her, all with the support of her neighbor, the popular Jake, was an upswing in life. She fought through her emotions, losing her persona “Fat Angie” and becoming “Angie.” In Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution, she’s in 10th grade, still a year behind everyone else, and KC has moved away to live with her dad. Jake is being weird, and Angie is worried that he was only her pity friend as a promise to her dead military hero sister. Sliding into the old horrors of verbal and physical assault, our main character struggles to avoid being “Fat Angie,” a version of herself that she sees as not only fat, but stupid, weird, and embarrassing. What I love about Charlton-Trujillo’s work is that she isn’t making a cute nerd who gracefully trips and is caught by an adorable boy. No, Angie is so weird that I cringe when I read, both because I want to be her friend and support system, and because she appears socially irredeemable. Angie is less a Jenny Han teen girl and more like Deb from Napoleon Dynamite taking glamour photos, telling her clients “Okay, hold still right there. Now, just imagine you’re weightless. You’re in the middle of the ocean. . . surrounded by tiny little sea horses” — that kind of teen girl. Case in point: Angie receives a postcard from her dead war hero sister with an agenda of things that she planned on doing with Angie when she returned from the military. Living in Ohio, the sister tied the events to the state, such as rollerskating to a specific song and visiting the world’s largest basket (which I know is the headquarters of the Longaberger company (thanks, Granny!)). Realizing she has to escape her vile, abusive lawyer mother, Angie leaves town with no mode of transportation to do her sister’s road trip alone. That’s when she enlists her former friend Jamboree, who has her hippy parents’ RV. One of the scheduled stops plans for Angie to do a very public thing that she is utterly terrified to do. Angie is told “don’t stress”:Angie gave her the but-I-am-clearly-stressed look after fishing a creased birthday hat out of her backpack and slipping it on her head. The crosswalk light signaled WALK. “I don’t want to criticize another woman’s entry into the revolution but . . .” Zeke said, walking beside Angie. “But maybe lose the hat.” “It contains me,” Angie said.OMG, what?! I’m dyin’! How could you NOT be friends with that supremely weird person who, by the way, is not under the influence of drugs or alcohol. There are so many moments like this in Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution that slide into home base so naturally. One thing I notice when I talk to teens today is that they don’t always explain their feelings in a complex way — and that’s perfectly normal. The more experiences you accumulate, the more you process and understand your emotional responses. Angie reads like a teen, not like a thirty-something woman (which describes almost every YA author I’ve read). Everyone wants to know how she’s surviving the very public death of her war hero sister, what it’s like to be on the news, how she feels about the memorial statue and yellow ribbons adorning her town. Angie knows she’s too weird to be socially acceptable, and tries to explain it:“You can’t let them hear you,” Angie said. “The cameras, the neighbors, the terrorists — the f-ing ribbons. You can’t let them hear you dying every second of every minute of every hour of every day. There are 86,400 seconds of screaming-not-screaming in every single day. Crying-not-crying. Feeling-not-feeling. But it’s still so loud, you know? How can it be that loud?If you think too hard about what Angie’s said, it makes sense and it doesn’t. It’s clumsy and accurate, both in the best way. I get what she wants her friends to know, but it’s still so unexplained. I was glad there wasn’t a heartwarming moment during which Angie knows exactly how she feels and communicates herself perfectly. It just wouldn’t be genuine. Because I’ve become accustomed to the perfect-but-not-too-perfect endings of young adults novels (see Dumplin’, Puddin’, The Hate U Give, Mammoth, Vintage Veronica, etc.), I’m always relieved that Charlton-Trujillo remains realistic. You’re not leaving with the warm and fuzzies, but the author doesn’t burn you alive in a dumpster fire, either. A character with deep emotional issues isn’t going to acknowledge all the flaws in his/her life and promise to do better the in the future. But for all her efforts to live her life one foot in front of the other, Angie is occasionally awarded a good moment, a small progress, a speck of hope. Love it, highly recommend it, but be aware that you need to read Fat Angie before you read Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution. Aren’t you lucky? For those of you looking for a novel with diverse characters: we have a fat girl, queer girls, gender non-conforming girls, an Asian boy, two Hispanic characters (Charlton-Trujillo is Mexican American), and some disability representation. If you can’t buy the book, please request it through your library. Cheers! This review was originally posted at Grab the lapels.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    I liked this a lot more than the first book. Although Angie is still struggling, she is progressing, and she's making connections. It felt more hopeful. Plus, it's a road trip book! Full review at the Lesbrary.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review 2.5 stars This book really was not it for me. I definitely did not enjoy the writing style, I didn't feel any connection to the story. Therefore, it was really hard to actually finish the book as well as why it took me so long. The thing that I did appreciate was the character growth and the way this was displayed. I think that was really well done and an essential aspect of the story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brenna

    Definitely a book to read. This copy is the 2nd of a series. The first I did not read, but i did not feel at a loss for what was going on. A lot goes on, and Charlton-Trujillo fit it all in very well. Angie, a sophomore in high school is dealing with bullying, death of a sister, and the feeling that her friends have left her stranded. One step at asking for help, Angie goes on an adventure with several people she's not so sure are friends anymore. The characters that Charlton-Trujillo include ar Definitely a book to read. This copy is the 2nd of a series. The first I did not read, but i did not feel at a loss for what was going on. A lot goes on, and Charlton-Trujillo fit it all in very well. Angie, a sophomore in high school is dealing with bullying, death of a sister, and the feeling that her friends have left her stranded. One step at asking for help, Angie goes on an adventure with several people she's not so sure are friends anymore. The characters that Charlton-Trujillo include are teens dealing with health issues, sexual identity, body shaming, and acceptance. All the while trying to figure out how to remain, become, or return as a friend. I am excited to check out the first in the series and to see what's coming up in future books. ****This book was received from Candlewick Press through a giveaway for Multichildren's Book Day****

  9. 5 out of 5

    Manon the Malicious

    *3.5 Stars* I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I had already started this when I saw on Goodreads that this was actually a sequel. It didn't bother me all that much though. One can read this without having read this first book. I wouldn't know how to describe this plot, but I'm gonna try. So, Angie is gay, fat and bullied because of it. Her whole school only contains idiots and assholes and her best friend is now dating her torturer. So everything is going horribly *3.5 Stars* I was provided an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I had already started this when I saw on Goodreads that this was actually a sequel. It didn't bother me all that much though. One can read this without having read this first book. I wouldn't know how to describe this plot, but I'm gonna try. So, Angie is gay, fat and bullied because of it. Her whole school only contains idiots and assholes and her best friend is now dating her torturer. So everything is going horribly when she receives a belated letter from her dead sister and she decides to go on a trip to achieve this bucket list her sister meant to do with her. But she doesn't have a car and is supposedly grounded since her mother is the worst. But she goes for it anyway with her ex-friend who ghosted her years ago. This is a shitty summary but it'd have to do. This has some good sides and some not so good sides. I felt for Angie most of the time, her entire support system is kind of the worst. She's also very stubborn and has lots of flaws but that only made her more relatable. I enjoyed the road trip but some of the other characters felt too forced and not real, I guess? I don't know what to say. I'm not sure how I felt. I liked this ok but I don't think I'll read the first book in this series... It did make me feel a lot at times though. Especially because of her mother, whom drove me insane. Anyway, this might have been my worst written review yet but I'm going with it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Angie is still in a rotten place: bullies at school, her mom still seems to hate her, but she’s got a better therapist, MIA dad, her friend KC has moved away, her mom wants her to go a ‘camp’ to be ‘reprogrammed.’ Her sister, had a road trip in Ohio planned with her when she got back: 1. Rollerskate 2. Dance on America’s shortest street. 3. Sing a song with a band in front of audience. 4. Have picnic at the world’s largest basket. So she goes on the road trip with a friend, who brings her friend Angie is still in a rotten place: bullies at school, her mom still seems to hate her, but she’s got a better therapist, MIA dad, her friend KC has moved away, her mom wants her to go a ‘camp’ to be ‘reprogrammed.’ Her sister, had a road trip in Ohio planned with her when she got back: 1. Rollerskate 2. Dance on America’s shortest street. 3. Sing a song with a band in front of audience. 4. Have picnic at the world’s largest basket. So she goes on the road trip with a friend, who brings her friends, with an RV. “’When my sister went missing, my mom pulled me to the side,’ Angie said. ‘Before we talked to the cameras. She said ‘Don’t cry. Don’t let them know they hurt us.’ Like she thought, I guess, they would just give her back if we weren’t crying? Angie shook her head at the absurdity of the question…’You can’t let them hear you,’ Angie said. ‘The cameras, the neighbors, the terrorists—the f- ing ribbons. You can’t let them hear you dying every second of every minute of every hour of every day.’” (221) Recommended by Rachel Lapkin from Odyssey Books on The Roundtable on WAMC on 4/23/19. I borrowed this from inter library loan.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    A great read, uncomfortable reading at times but tells an important story that needs to be shared. Great representation, made me cry a few times. This is well worth reading it’s well paced, the characters are well written and relatable. Moving is an understatement Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for a free copy for an honest opinion

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brooklynne

    Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo is one of those books that I feel so torn on, I read the synopsis on Net Galley and it sounded queer, body positive and fun. Exactly my type of reading you’d think and while I loved the story, I have more than a few complaints about the book. I’ll start with the things I didn’t like about this book, as the things I did like I think are more important in this case. The first was the writing style was extremely awkward and frustrating at ti Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution by e.E. Charlton-Trujillo is one of those books that I feel so torn on, I read the synopsis on Net Galley and it sounded queer, body positive and fun. Exactly my type of reading you’d think and while I loved the story, I have more than a few complaints about the book. I’ll start with the things I didn’t like about this book, as the things I did like I think are more important in this case. The first was the writing style was extremely awkward and frustrating at times to understand with hyphenated phrases like “perfect-not-perfect”, “visibly-invisible” and “not-silent-silence” plaguing nearly every paragraph is was hard to comprehend what was actually trying to be conveyed. This added to the repetitive referring to certain characters by these hyphenated nicknames made the overall book seem like it was trying too hard to connect with youth through language the writer thought would appeal. Which is made ironic by the fact that there is barely a pop culture reference that isn’t old enough to drink in the United States, every song, movie, or book mentioned is from the 1980s or before, with the exclusion of the mention of John Hughes’s 2009 death. Finally in my list of complaints is often Angie seems to have chubbily crossed the path with her pudgy neck and plump voice and, we get it she’s fat. While in the long run, the character comes to a happy place with her weight I felt overall the way it was written about at times was very humiliating as a fellow plus-sized pal. Luckily, once I adjusted to the awkward writing style and overcame the constant weight references I found much more about this book that I enjoyed than disliked. First, the representation in this book is pretty great, we have a black girl, and Mexican characters who aren’t all stereotypes and taco eating. We have a character with a disability and real-life struggles around them, and a lot of talk around mental health in a more positive manner. Our main characters are 3 dimensional and have realistic flaws. Angie herself is an interesting and compelling character, you want to protect her and push her to do something all at once, and the plot is all excruciatingly believable. No epic implausible trips across the country, nor despicable mothers who suddenly change their mind about everything. Everything just seems realistic and possible. Even Angie’s sudden anger building due to grief, loss, abuse and teasing is so realistic, and the way that despite everything the blame falls on her, replicates the story we see often in society. Refreshingly there is no absolute happy over the rainbow ending, it’s clear that Angie is happier but her life doesn’t suddenly become perfect on page 352. While this was a sequel which I wasn’t aware of, until after I had finished it, I can proudly say it stand up on its own and would recommend it if Queer Young Adult Romance is your thing. I really wanted to give this book a higher rating but the negatives knock at least two stars off the overall novel. To read a fuller review head over to www.lostinliterature.com

  13. 5 out of 5

    Blue

    Fat Angie punched me in the heart. Legit, a massive closed fist directly to the heart. It was brutally awesome! I love books that have a great deal of emotion in it, a lot of pain and a great deal of hope. This needs to happen more in my opinion. There are way too many fairy tales stories, even in contemporary that everything works out perfectly for the characters. These are the kind of books were nothing bad happens to them, their family and friend life is completely happy. But as we all know LIF Fat Angie punched me in the heart. Legit, a massive closed fist directly to the heart. It was brutally awesome! I love books that have a great deal of emotion in it, a lot of pain and a great deal of hope. This needs to happen more in my opinion. There are way too many fairy tales stories, even in contemporary that everything works out perfectly for the characters. These are the kind of books were nothing bad happens to them, their family and friend life is completely happy. But as we all know LIFE IS NOT LIFE THIS! Our main character Angie literally has life rolled her down a rocky hill and she stumbles and picks herself up, brushes the dirt of her knees and keeps on going. What life throws at Angie: - Her ex is moving away - Her friends being distant and hardly speaking to her - Her sister dies while being a hero and serving her country - Bullying - Mental illness - Panic attacks - Her mother is the female version of Satan See what I mean? Life isn’t in Angie’s favour, and its raw realistic and AMAZING! Oh Should I mention that she gets a postcard from her sister after finding out she has died? Fist to heart moment right there. Honestly I count myself lucky that I haven’t had a life like Angie’s but I know soo many people that have had a life just as cruel if not worse. The importance of contemporary’s shining a light on these subjects this heavily should be done more often. It is rare to find a book like this. I feel as though in today’s society there are people who have no idea that life can be this cruel and those that broke a nail thinking that their life is over. Obviously there are other categories of humans as well but let’s focus on these two for a minute. Without books like Fat Angie, they probably wouldn’t have a realisation that the world is harsh and the need it. You see our characters grow on the road trip and you see Angie, almost escaping reality at moments while she tries to wrap up the messy burrito that is her life. The cards are on the table and she just has to pick which ones she wants to have in her deck. Will she make a stand for herself? Though everything about this book was a massive tick for me, I wasn’t overly impressed with the writing style, and at moments thought that the tone of the book could have been written differently to aid the story. Nothing against the writer, obviously, but it just didn’t match the book itself. Overall this is a cute little read and I highly recommend that people read and embrace this book and the story it provides, just get ready to be punched in the heart.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Fetters

    "Life is heart and ache. You can’t have one without the other." I’ve been waiting for this second book for six years and it’s finally here. Fat Angie was one of those books that opened my eyes to the world of bullying and it made so many emotions come pouring out of my soul all at once. I was happy, sad, and sometimes angry at the people and scenarios of the book. I’m glad Angie is back with a more hopeful story. Angie is in her sophomore year of high school and she's hoping that this year is diff "Life is heart and ache. You can’t have one without the other." I’ve been waiting for this second book for six years and it’s finally here. Fat Angie was one of those books that opened my eyes to the world of bullying and it made so many emotions come pouring out of my soul all at once. I was happy, sad, and sometimes angry at the people and scenarios of the book. I’m glad Angie is back with a more hopeful story. Angie is in her sophomore year of high school and she's hoping that this year is different. But she soon learns that things haven't changed and people are making it their top priority to make her life a living hell. Making her relive her breakdown at a pep-rally and the death of her sister. And it's not like she is getting any help from her Mother at home. Things are not going her way this year and she is ready to throw in the towel. Her best friend, Jake is dating someone who used to bully her, Gary Klein is at his worst and tormenting Angie until she almost gives up, and her ex-friend Jamboree is back and thinner than ever. She feels as if there is no one else to go to, now that her sister and her best friend are gone. Angie's mother is making her go see a therapist about her behavior lately but she has to prove to her new therapist that she is getting better and learning how to stand up for herself. Angie is trying to stay strong as they dedicate a memorial statue to her deceased sister. At the memorial service, someone that knew her sister leaves a letter her sister wrote to her before she passed away. Reading the note floods Angie with emotions and now she's on a mission to live out the dreams of her sister. Angie and Jamboree put the past behind them as they go on a journey of a lifetime and live out Angie's sister last wishes. They are traveling through Ohio and seeing the sights her sister wanted them to go visit and to get Angie out of her comfort zone. In a packed RV, will Angie learn to love herself without her sister? Or will she let her past ruin her life? Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution was a really good book. It was emotional to get through because of what Angie was dealing with. It really hurt when her own Mother wouldn't stand up for her and chose to believe someone else. That really got to me. But the end was something of a fairy tale and it filled me with joy. The deeper meaning is what holds this all together.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Quionna (theblacklitqueen)

    Unfortunately, I was unable to connect with this book. I just didn't really care about any of the characters or the plot in general. I didn't know that this was a sequel until I was in the middle of the book so I knew this was not going to be a book I rate highly. Honestly, the struggles Angie had to faced seemed too inorganic. It was your classic "mean girl" and "asshole" type bullying and those narratives usually just bore me to death and this was no different. I was a "fat Angie" at my high s Unfortunately, I was unable to connect with this book. I just didn't really care about any of the characters or the plot in general. I didn't know that this was a sequel until I was in the middle of the book so I knew this was not going to be a book I rate highly. Honestly, the struggles Angie had to faced seemed too inorganic. It was your classic "mean girl" and "asshole" type bullying and those narratives usually just bore me to death and this was no different. I was a "fat Angie" at my high school and maybe it was just my experience but bullying (public displays of embarrassment) wasn't that prominent and so this book seemed outdated to me. The beginning where she was getting bullied by that asshole guy just made my eyes roll. I also get that the title is "Fat Angie" but the narrative was so focused on Angie's weight that she became a 2D character, Yes, her weight is a part of who she is but we really didn't get to see anything else from her. Other than that, everything else in the book seemed boring and I just don't think this was the right book for me. I wasn't a fan of the writing either, as it was a tad bit choppy for my taste. I appreciated the diversity but the representation seemed to lack.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Fat Angie Rebel Girl Revolution is the sequel to the Stonewall Award winning Fat Angie. The novel opens with the fallout from the previous novels’ ending. Angie has been dealing with a suicide attempt, the loss of her girlfriend, who moved away, and the death of her military sister. An outcast at school, for being overweight and a lesbian, Angie struggles with intense bullying. As if what is happening in her life isn’t enough, Angie’s relationship with her mother is toxic. “Why did it have to be Fat Angie Rebel Girl Revolution is the sequel to the Stonewall Award winning Fat Angie. The novel opens with the fallout from the previous novels’ ending. Angie has been dealing with a suicide attempt, the loss of her girlfriend, who moved away, and the death of her military sister. An outcast at school, for being overweight and a lesbian, Angie struggles with intense bullying. As if what is happening in her life isn’t enough, Angie’s relationship with her mother is toxic. “Why did it have to be the good one?” Angie overhears her mother in reference to her daughter’s death. Without a support system at home, the bullying escalates at school so much that Angie’s mom will be sending her to a faith based rehabilitation facility to focus on her “sexual identity crisis”. With life kicking her when she’s already down, Angie embarks on a journey her deceased sister has left. There are so many 80’s and 90’s references you’d think Angie lived during that time. Even the road trip quest fits the nostalgic feel. This feel provides a fun balance to the heaviness of Angie’s struggles. The dynamic between Angie and her mom is so heart wrenching I would be interested in seeing how that transcends in the future.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    I'm not sure what to say about this book. It was good, however the writing was hard to get through. However, I feel like the representation was important. There's the main character, who's fat, gay, and has mental health issues. There's Zeke, who is nonbinary and has a stoma. So much important representation, that it really did overpower the less than stellar writing. Thank you to NetGalley for providing me this book in exchange for my honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Z

    I received an ARC of this from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When I requested this, I didn’t realize it was the second book in a series. With that being said, it was easy to figure out what had happened in the previous novel and just continue on with the story from there. There’s a lot of raw emotion in this novel and many many important issues that seem to run the gamut of the death of a loved one, body shaming, extreme bullying and violence, grief, denial, and s I received an ARC of this from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. When I requested this, I didn’t realize it was the second book in a series. With that being said, it was easy to figure out what had happened in the previous novel and just continue on with the story from there. There’s a lot of raw emotion in this novel and many many important issues that seem to run the gamut of the death of a loved one, body shaming, extreme bullying and violence, grief, denial, and some really messed up parents...but there’s also hope. Angie’s character is complex but one that you can’t help loving and rooting for. She sets on out a journey that was supposed to be with her sister but now Angie finds herself in some mixed company. In many ways, It’s a journey of self discovery not only for Angie, but the people with her. I really enjoyed this novel and at the end of it, I just wanted to give Angie a hug. Here’s to many more rebel girl revolutions. Can’t wait for another book to check in with her.

  19. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: fatphobia, physical assault, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempt, self-harm, homophobia, panic attacks, depression, anxiety Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is a challenging read. Angie is encountering trouble from all angles: emotionally and physically bullied at school, dealing with her mother who wants to send her to a 'treatment center' because of Angie being both fat and gay, re (Disclaimer: I received this book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: fatphobia, physical assault, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempt, self-harm, homophobia, panic attacks, depression, anxiety Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is a challenging read. Angie is encountering trouble from all angles: emotionally and physically bullied at school, dealing with her mother who wants to send her to a 'treatment center' because of Angie being both fat and gay, reeling from the death of her sister, and having trouble getting through to her friends. My heart ached for Angie and the first half of this book is really difficult to get though, but as soon as Angie embarks on the road trip, I began to see Angie bloom as a character. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi... The first half of the book just consisted of my empathy for Angie's situation - trapped in a family who doesn't understand her (her mother is just something else entirely), without any friends, and struggling with her grief. Part of what make my heart ache for Angie is how much her mother does not understand her, how emotionally abusive and just downright toxic she is. And so I'm rooting for Angie to prevail, even though basically everything is against her.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Duff

    *I received this book in a Goodreads Giveaway Though this book, like the former novel, is absolutely infuriating with its abuse, I think the author does a good job of representing minorities and mental health. This book deals with panic attacks, medical issues, cutting, depression, eating disorders, abuse, extreme bullying and violence, and LBGTQ youth. I actually liked this one a lot more than the first book, probably because Angie begins to actually stick up for herself in this one. She breaks *I received this book in a Goodreads Giveaway Though this book, like the former novel, is absolutely infuriating with its abuse, I think the author does a good job of representing minorities and mental health. This book deals with panic attacks, medical issues, cutting, depression, eating disorders, abuse, extreme bullying and violence, and LBGTQ youth. I actually liked this one a lot more than the first book, probably because Angie begins to actually stick up for herself in this one. She breaks her bully’s nose and pepper sprays him, leaves home on a road road trip and makes great friends, and stands up to her evil mother. Speaking of which, her mother still never seems to learn her lesson, which I actually liked, because it was realistic. As someone who has extreme anxiety, I liked that this book also had a panic attack represented in it. I don’t think I have ever seen that in a book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nate Wright

    This was a rough one to read. But not in an-this is a hard to get through book-sort of way, but in a -this is hard to stay positive reading- sort of way. From the opening lines you get enmeshed in the main character's anxiety, (which is written and portrayed quite well) and the absolute sadness that envelops her life. And then it gets even more depressing. From school, to her home life, to inside her own head, Angie just can't seem to get a positive break in her world. It's heartbreaking to read This was a rough one to read. But not in an-this is a hard to get through book-sort of way, but in a -this is hard to stay positive reading- sort of way. From the opening lines you get enmeshed in the main character's anxiety, (which is written and portrayed quite well) and the absolute sadness that envelops her life. And then it gets even more depressing. From school, to her home life, to inside her own head, Angie just can't seem to get a positive break in her world. It's heartbreaking to read and on more than one occasion I put the book down because I just didn't want to keep adding to the heap of misery that haunts the reality of being who she is. Luckily for her and for my own deflated feelings, things do in fact get better. Sorta. I won't spoil anything for anyone, but I will say that the betterment in her world starts from inside and she allows that to work it's way outward and create a peace that soothes her wounded universe. That said, I still can't shake the feeling and wish, that this was a story that didn't need telling. That Angie shouldn't have had to fight for her freedom of mind like she did. This was an eye opener into a realm I'm certain when I started I didn't want to fully envelop and know about. It didn't take me long to realize that I'd much rather have closed this book and ignored the fat shaming and sexual bias that tears through this book like a rabid dog. What stopped me from doing just that was Fat Angie herself. You see it was about 20 pages in, (yes, that early and already I was squeamish to the point of stopping!) that it dawned on me I could do just that. Stop. Angie couldn't. For too many people out there the same sentiment could be mirrored and it just plain sucks! If there are people out there that can live through this everyday, then I sure as heck could suck it up and deal with it for a few of my own and vicariously, at that! It's raw and real in it's portrayal of just how easily and blindly we allow hate speech and the damages it causes, through participation, ignorance or ignoring it, to exist in our society. But it also shows the heart and beauty that can grow from creating and building a safe place with those you love and can come to love. If nothing else, I recommend this book for the pause I hope it gives everyone that reads it and the courage it may lend the few that need it. It's funny where it needs to be, serious when it has to be, and heart-wrenchingly good throughout.

  22. 4 out of 5

    CR

    My Review: Although this had a lot of trigger warnings (listed below) this was such a good title. I wasn't to sure about it because I really didn't care for the cover but the story was very good. At the time that I started this book I didn't even realize that this was a book two. But even once I found that out (when I went to write this review) I didn't feel like I missed out on anything. I do think that since I enjoyed this title that I will go back and read book one though. I really enjoyed th My Review: Although this had a lot of trigger warnings (listed below) this was such a good title. I wasn't to sure about it because I really didn't care for the cover but the story was very good. At the time that I started this book I didn't even realize that this was a book two. But even once I found that out (when I went to write this review) I didn't feel like I missed out on anything. I do think that since I enjoyed this title that I will go back and read book one though. I really enjoyed that this story took place on a road trip. With summer being around the corner I had a fun time with this title and my dreams of RVing around the US. This story was so compelling and I just felt so sorry for Angie from start to finish. I really think that the school she was in needed to invest in some cameras. And that more people need to stand up to bullies. Because it's not ok and things need to change. In the end this was one of those titles that you just really don't know what to say. It had all the feels and I hope that we get another title in this series. Go Into This One Knowing: Fat Shaming, Bullying, Grief, Homophobia, Self-Harm

  23. 4 out of 5

    Camille

    At first this book made me really uncomfortable. The amount of violence, fatphobia and homophobia in the first quarter or so of the book was almost unbearable for me to read but I kept going. I was really close to completely give up on it to preserve myself but then the road trip part happened and drastically changed my mind. It was so revigorating to read about Angie, a fat, depressed, lesbian and suffering from panic attacks girl going through this process of freeing herself and learn to be un At first this book made me really uncomfortable. The amount of violence, fatphobia and homophobia in the first quarter or so of the book was almost unbearable for me to read but I kept going. I was really close to completely give up on it to preserve myself but then the road trip part happened and drastically changed my mind. It was so revigorating to read about Angie, a fat, depressed, lesbian and suffering from panic attacks girl going through this process of freeing herself and learn to be unapologeticaly her in front of others. The moment we met Zeke was the moment I knew I would love this book. It was refreshing to have a main character like Angie and just like her you cannot help but start to love every other character she becomes close to in this story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Mousha-book

    I loved this book! Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is the continuation of Fat Angie which won the Stonewall Award and follows the story of Angie, a fat, queer girl who is on a journey to discover her identity while enduring the ruthless bigotry of her fellow classmates as well as mourning the loss of her soldier sister. This is the follow up I had hoped it would be. While there are some dark moments, this book sparks hope for the reader and is complete with 80s music references, an epic road tr I loved this book! Fat Angie: Rebel Girl Revolution is the continuation of Fat Angie which won the Stonewall Award and follows the story of Angie, a fat, queer girl who is on a journey to discover her identity while enduring the ruthless bigotry of her fellow classmates as well as mourning the loss of her soldier sister. This is the follow up I had hoped it would be. While there are some dark moments, this book sparks hope for the reader and is complete with 80s music references, an epic road trip and some amazing new characters. This book is a celebration of queer and fat bodies and I can't wait to read more.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I'd give this one a 3.5 for its snarky dialogue and interesting characters. The author clearly has her fingers on the pulses of many teens who don't fit into their current situations at home or in school. The book picks up not long after its predecessor, Fat Angie, left off. Angie has become even more of a pariah at William Anders High School in Dryfalls, Ohio after a failed suicide attempt and stay in a hospital. As her sophomore year begins, she's not thrilled about having to repeat the year o I'd give this one a 3.5 for its snarky dialogue and interesting characters. The author clearly has her fingers on the pulses of many teens who don't fit into their current situations at home or in school. The book picks up not long after its predecessor, Fat Angie, left off. Angie has become even more of a pariah at William Anders High School in Dryfalls, Ohio after a failed suicide attempt and stay in a hospital. As her sophomore year begins, she's not thrilled about having to repeat the year or the fact that her girlfriend, KC Romance, has moved to Texas. When her best friend, Jake, fails to show up to walk her into the building and to class, leaving her even more vulnerable, she becomes the object of attention for Gary Klein, a football player who commences to bully her physically and verbally. Things go from bad to worse as Gary continues to harass her until she finally stands her ground later in the year. Meanwhile at home, her mother--what a piece of work!--is consumed with plans for a memorial for Angie's older sister who died in Iraq and seems to have little time or compassion for Angie or her adopted brother, Wang. After learning that her sister had a bucket list of sorts with places she wanted to visit and things she wanted to do with Angie, she hits the road with an unlikely set of companions, trying to tick off all those items. Along the way, she gains some self-acceptance, launches her own revolution, and begins coming to terms with her grief. And maybe, just maybe, she starts on the road toward loving herself, warts and all. Many teen readers will be able to relate to her issues with body awareness and anxiety as well as how her mother keeps trying to fix her by depriving her of food. The narrative can take some getting used to as Angie's thoughts often jump all over the place, and sometimes the musical references can make readers question when the book is set since there are songs by Tori Amos, Joan Jett, the Smiths, and Prince mentioned. If nothing else, those will send readers scurrying online to listen and learn. While parts of the book are certainly not easy to read, given the bullying Angie endures and her own anger bubbling just below the surface, the author has completely nailed how hard it is to love oneself when no one else seems to see one's value. The scenes where Angie struggles to find clothing that fits or seeks solace in chocolate bars stashed away in her bedroom are powerful, real, and painful. And while it's true that Angie has a heavy load to bear, her weight is only a symptom of what's wrong. Read this book and fall in love with Angie while watching her come to terms with herself as well. Perhaps the ending is a bit happier than it might be in real life, but if anyone deserves that, Angie does.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lenoire

    Angie is miserable and the sophomore year just began. Her girlfriend, KC, recently moved away to spend time with her father in Texas. Her best friend, Jake has been distant and flaky. And Greg, her bully, has become increasingly violent towards Angie. Her sister had an over the top funeral with a statue dedicated to her. Her mother, Connie, placed a symbolic urn on their mantel to mourn her daughter's death. All of this just adds to the sadness Angie is feeling. During her sister's ceremony, a v Angie is miserable and the sophomore year just began. Her girlfriend, KC, recently moved away to spend time with her father in Texas. Her best friend, Jake has been distant and flaky. And Greg, her bully, has become increasingly violent towards Angie. Her sister had an over the top funeral with a statue dedicated to her. Her mother, Connie, placed a symbolic urn on their mantel to mourn her daughter's death. All of this just adds to the sadness Angie is feeling. During her sister's ceremony, a visiting soldier gave Angie a letter from her sister. The letter was a list of places she wanted the two of them to visit together when they got home from the war. After an incident at school, her mother threatens to send Angie to a treatment center. Angie decides to enlist a childhood friend along with her schoolmates to tackle the list her sister left. Together they travel across the state to cross off items from her sister's list. Will this list be what Angie needs to finally let her sister go and find herself? I thought the portions of the book where Angie and her friends travel to different landmarks to be interesting. It was nice to see someone be supportive and caring towards Angie after having to deal with hostility at home and at school. The book was a bit " raw" to me in the sense, that it was very graphic and had violence towards people who didn't fit the "standard mold". However, it was nice seeing some characters getting their chance of redemption.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This book had me in a love-hate relationship with the main character. At the beginning, I thought that Angie, the main character was wallowing in self pity. Her woes were her total world. Angie seemed to only care about herself. Angie lost her girl friend and was devastated and she had an argument before her sister left for the Middle East and was killed. Those are legitimate woes. But it took me a while to know that her mother was truly messed up. Then bullying came into the story and I underst This book had me in a love-hate relationship with the main character. At the beginning, I thought that Angie, the main character was wallowing in self pity. Her woes were her total world. Angie seemed to only care about herself. Angie lost her girl friend and was devastated and she had an argument before her sister left for the Middle East and was killed. Those are legitimate woes. But it took me a while to know that her mother was truly messed up. Then bullying came into the story and I understood that. I was bullied a lot when I was a preteen and I tended to stay away from people. But she did not notice that other people were having tough times and I really did not like that. I did like the idea of Angie doing things on her sister's list of what she would like to do with Angie after she returned from military duty and I do love road trips. I grew up in Indiana and I learned some strange stuff about Ohio. I stayed up in the middle of the night lapping up the road trip. But on and off I really loved the story and I did not understand the story. 50% great and 50% huh? I received an Advance Reading Copy of this book as a win from LibraryThing from the publishers in exchange for a fair book review. My thoughts and feelings in this review are totally my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tesha Ham

    I have to start with saying that I didn't realize this was a follow-up book so I found the beginning to be a fast-paced whirlwind since I hadn't read the first book. Having said that, I gave the book the benefit of the doubt that had I read the first book it wouldn't have been so bad in the start. I did enjoy that it strayed away from many 'fat-girl' stories where the main character's sole focus is losing weight and fitting in, it was a nice change of pace there. I found Angie to be relatable in I have to start with saying that I didn't realize this was a follow-up book so I found the beginning to be a fast-paced whirlwind since I hadn't read the first book. Having said that, I gave the book the benefit of the doubt that had I read the first book it wouldn't have been so bad in the start. I did enjoy that it strayed away from many 'fat-girl' stories where the main character's sole focus is losing weight and fitting in, it was a nice change of pace there. I found Angie to be relatable in the way that her mother was neglectful and emotionally abusive, she was mourning her sister whom she was very close with, she is an ostracized LGBTQ+ high school that is constantly bullied in vile ways. She reaches a range of audiences with these things. She does seem a little self-wallowing at first until you see what she lives through every day and gain the understanding of where she's coming from. I think this book is pretty good, BUT READ THE FIRST ONE FIRST!! I voluntarily read and received a free ARC copy of this title through NetGalley in exchange for a review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jazz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This one still focused on Angie. It talks Angie a lot and follows from the first book. It introduces her new best friend, a transgender person and it introduces issues involving transgender people (eg: bathrooms, pronouns,etc) but at a a bystander point of view, whitch I liked because it did not take away from Angie’s story but introduced a very important issue. It also introduced issues with homophobia, especially highlighting Angie’s bad mum and the threading to send her to a “de-gay” camp due This one still focused on Angie. It talks Angie a lot and follows from the first book. It introduces her new best friend, a transgender person and it introduces issues involving transgender people (eg: bathrooms, pronouns,etc) but at a a bystander point of view, whitch I liked because it did not take away from Angie’s story but introduced a very important issue. It also introduced issues with homophobia, especially highlighting Angie’s bad mum and the threading to send her to a “de-gay” camp due to the belief that Angie’s sexuality is for attention (and other issues) and how friends can be a great support for homophobic behavior. It taked a lot about Angie’s sister and the grief process that goes behind loss, and how it’s messy for everybody. And it also talked about the incredible bond between two sisters and how to keep this bond going when one passes away. Also, Angie learns to not let the bullies get to her: promoting self love and self acceptance. It was good to see Angie loving herself at the end! :) I loved how a YA book talked about such IMPORTANT issues!

  30. 5 out of 5

    H

    Didn't love this YA book about Angie, a depressed and anxiety ridden girl in a small Ohio town who is desperately trying to make her way through a repeated sophomore year. Her mother is cold, her father is absent, her girlfriend has moved away, and her sister is dead - killed in a high profile abduction as she served in Iraq. When her sister's fiance gives Angie a "wish list" of experiences to do, Angie gathers up a frenemy and a few strays and tries to follow through. I think my main issue with Didn't love this YA book about Angie, a depressed and anxiety ridden girl in a small Ohio town who is desperately trying to make her way through a repeated sophomore year. Her mother is cold, her father is absent, her girlfriend has moved away, and her sister is dead - killed in a high profile abduction as she served in Iraq. When her sister's fiance gives Angie a "wish list" of experiences to do, Angie gathers up a frenemy and a few strays and tries to follow through. I think my main issue with this book is I have a hard time believing any group of kids and adults could be as universally unfeeling as the parents, teachers, and students in this book, who torment a girl who is obviously suffering major trauma. But maybe I have too much faith in people. I did like that the ending gave Angie some positive place to go, but wasn't all sunshine and happiness - leaving her in a realistic place.... but this book wasn't my favorite. Best for grades 8-10.

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