Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

One part Mari Andrew, one part Marjane Satrapi, I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir is a triumphant tale of self-discovery, a celebration of a family's rich heritage, and a love letter to American immigrant freedom. Malaka Gharib's illustrations come alive with teenage antics and earnest questions about identity and culture, while providing thoughtful insight into One part Mari Andrew, one part Marjane Satrapi, I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir is a triumphant tale of self-discovery, a celebration of a family's rich heritage, and a love letter to American immigrant freedom. Malaka Gharib's illustrations come alive with teenage antics and earnest questions about identity and culture, while providing thoughtful insight into the lives of modern immigrants and the generation of millennial children they raised. Malaka's upbringing will look familiar to anyone who grew up in the pre-internet era, but her particular story is a heartfelt tribute to the American immigrants who have invested their future in the promise of the American dream. The daughter of parents with unfulfilled dreams themselves, Malaka navigates her childhood chasing her parents' ideals, learning to code-switch between her family's Filipino and Egyptian customs, adapting to white culture to fit in, crushing on skater boys, and trying to understand the tension between holding onto cultural values and trying to be an all-American kid. I Was Their American Dream is at once a journal of growing up and a reminder of the thousands of immigrants who come to America in search for a better life for themselves and their children.


Compare
Ads Banner

One part Mari Andrew, one part Marjane Satrapi, I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir is a triumphant tale of self-discovery, a celebration of a family's rich heritage, and a love letter to American immigrant freedom. Malaka Gharib's illustrations come alive with teenage antics and earnest questions about identity and culture, while providing thoughtful insight into One part Mari Andrew, one part Marjane Satrapi, I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir is a triumphant tale of self-discovery, a celebration of a family's rich heritage, and a love letter to American immigrant freedom. Malaka Gharib's illustrations come alive with teenage antics and earnest questions about identity and culture, while providing thoughtful insight into the lives of modern immigrants and the generation of millennial children they raised. Malaka's upbringing will look familiar to anyone who grew up in the pre-internet era, but her particular story is a heartfelt tribute to the American immigrants who have invested their future in the promise of the American dream. The daughter of parents with unfulfilled dreams themselves, Malaka navigates her childhood chasing her parents' ideals, learning to code-switch between her family's Filipino and Egyptian customs, adapting to white culture to fit in, crushing on skater boys, and trying to understand the tension between holding onto cultural values and trying to be an all-American kid. I Was Their American Dream is at once a journal of growing up and a reminder of the thousands of immigrants who come to America in search for a better life for themselves and their children.

30 review for I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    Such an important memoir! It really looks at what it means to grow up in a multi-ethnic home. I loved that the author not only explored her own culture and up-brining, but also how living in America influenced thoughts that she had about herself and being a person of color. I’ll definitely be doing a full review on this so stay on the look out!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    Awesome! What a book about growing up in a cultural / religious / nationality diverse family and how your own and other people’s views of diversity change and differ according to context and time . Nothing raunchy in the book but the identity complexity probably better for middle grade and up. A very special book. Next to New Kid my favourite MS GN for this year

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Jimenez

    THIS BOOK. MY LITTLE MEXICAN/ITALIAN/AMERICAN HEART! If you couldn't guess, I adore this graphic novel. And no, not just because I worked on it (which was awesome to do) but because it has so much gosh darn heart and smarts. Often when I work on books I get to see bits and pieces of either text, images, or whatever the project is at the time. Working on this, while measuring or just spot checking, I couldn't stop myself from reading. A page here and there started to turn into a chapter until I h THIS BOOK. MY LITTLE MEXICAN/ITALIAN/AMERICAN HEART! If you couldn't guess, I adore this graphic novel. And no, not just because I worked on it (which was awesome to do) but because it has so much gosh darn heart and smarts. Often when I work on books I get to see bits and pieces of either text, images, or whatever the project is at the time. Working on this, while measuring or just spot checking, I couldn't stop myself from reading. A page here and there started to turn into a chapter until I had to force myself to stop reading it until it was totally complete. Not to mention I got to meet Malaka when she came to visit the office one day and she was so insanely sweet! So, without further ado, my usual review: LIKED: SO MUCH. It's so important to hear people's stories from all sorts of backgrounds, and this graphic packs a powerful message. Our author is Egyptian/Filipino/American and talks in great detail about balancing those three backgrounds. I totally was able to relate to it, especially having so much of my family in Mexico. Malaka's drawings are so well done. Everyone is so expressive, and I love all of the little details in the background. The color is really well done also. Who knew you could have so much expression while only using red, blue, and black. The writing and scene choices were fantastic as well and kept me hooked. By the end of the graphic novel it had me feeling like I knew Malaka's entire family, and totally had me cheering for all of them! DISLIKED: I wish there was more! Sometimes the changes between chapters was a little abrupt, and had me making a mental pivot to a new topic. OVERALL, I loved this graphic novel and think anyone who picks it up will love it, too. It especially resonates with anyone who has ever felt like they don't quite fit in in one place, or is maybe stretched a little too thin. But wonderful illustrations, great storytelling, and an awesome book. Please do yourself a favor and pick this up when it comes out (in late April, I believe). It doesn't take long to read at all. I read it in one day! You absolutely won't regret it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    a beautiful, honest, and sweet tribute to her egyptian-filipino-american family :’) everyone should read!!!!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bogi Takács

    I liked it and wished it was longer. I appreciated the art - the bold choice of going with "American colors" worked for me and made the book pop - and also felt that the experimentation with format wasn't in-your-face but a seamless part of the whole. (The book has both a dress-up doll and a minizine. I thought that was cool :) ) I realized only after reading how much of a relief it was to read something focused on immigration to the US and parents, and not have it be about how embarrassed the au I liked it and wished it was longer. I appreciated the art - the bold choice of going with "American colors" worked for me and made the book pop - and also felt that the experimentation with format wasn't in-your-face but a seamless part of the whole. (The book has both a dress-up doll and a minizine. I thought that was cool :) ) I realized only after reading how much of a relief it was to read something focused on immigration to the US and parents, and not have it be about how embarrassed the author is about their weird parents. (I am a current-gen immigrant and I guess one of those weird parents.) _____ Source of the book: Lawrence Public Library

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kim Yi Dionne

    What a great story, beautifully written and illustrated. I wish I had this book growing up. Being hapa, so much of it resonated with my own experiences!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    A perceptive and heartfelt memoir of growing up with multiple cultural heritages. The graphic format works well as the author communicates feelings of confusion, pride and love. I enjoyed and learned a lot from her in this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I loved the color palette and the section describing her confusion, annoyance, but also appreciation of juggling practicing both of her parents' religions after their divorce.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rosa Kwak

    powerful storytelling that made me laugh, cry, and relate to ✨

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    I absolutely adored this. Read it!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sian Lile-Pastore

    I loved the art work and the story was sweet and touching and lovely.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maddie

    This was great - I love the way the author/artist explores her multi-ethnic identity while also reflecting on how in addition to her Filipino (mom) and Egyptian (dad) heritage she has the overlay of American that makes her unique in her families. I also like how she repeatedly examines the commonalities and differences between those three cultures. Not sure why my library has this classified as YA? I get that for the majority of the book Malaka is a child/teen but none of Lucy Knisley's memoirs This was great - I love the way the author/artist explores her multi-ethnic identity while also reflecting on how in addition to her Filipino (mom) and Egyptian (dad) heritage she has the overlay of American that makes her unique in her families. I also like how she repeatedly examines the commonalities and differences between those three cultures. Not sure why my library has this classified as YA? I get that for the majority of the book Malaka is a child/teen but none of Lucy Knisley's memoirs that are set at her younger ages are in the YA section? And of course as a MEMOIR, the book's protagonist is younger.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This is the coming-of-age story of a young Filipino-Egyptian-American. That automatically sounds interesting, but when I got this from the library, I was pleased to discover that it's even better than it sounds. This book is colorful, fun, and creative, and I loved learning about Malaka's family and cultural experiences. She shares a lot of funny and illustrative stories about growing up in the nineties and two-thousands, and because her narrative voice is so lively and authentic, she addresses This is the coming-of-age story of a young Filipino-Egyptian-American. That automatically sounds interesting, but when I got this from the library, I was pleased to discover that it's even better than it sounds. This book is colorful, fun, and creative, and I loved learning about Malaka's family and cultural experiences. She shares a lot of funny and illustrative stories about growing up in the nineties and two-thousands, and because her narrative voice is so lively and authentic, she addresses cultural and racial issues in America with unusual nuance, in addition to sharing about the typical childhood and young adult experiences that she had within her unique context. This story covers a period of history in which people's ideas about race and ethnicity were greatly changing, so as Malaka tells her story, she shows how her own views adjusted over time. For example, when she attended high school in a highly ethnic community, "What are you?" was a normal question to ask upon making someone's acquaintance, but after she moved to New York for college, she learned that many people find this question reductive or offensive. Although a lesser book might simply set forth Appropriate Messages About Race, this book tells a story, and you get to see how this woman's views on race and identity developed in phases over time. Even aside from the serious elements, however, this is one of the best graphic novels that I have ever read, and I would recommend it to anyone. If you have a unique cultural background, you'll love this and relate to it, and if you don't, you'll find it just as educational and interesting as I did. Best of all, because objectionable content is limited to a few swear words and a reference to college hook-ups, this story is appropriate for a wide range of ages. At my library, this book is cataloged as an adult graphic novel, but nothing should deter teens from reading this. It's a great story, well-told, and I'll look forward to seeing what else this graphic artist does in her career.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    As another “whitewashed” Filipino American, who didn’t fit in with other Filipinos and the white people I thought were so cool, and who also went to Cerritos High School, Malaka Gharib’s graphic memoir I WAS THEIR AMERICAN DREAM really resonated with me. Things like: being called a Twinkie for being an Asian who liked “white people things” and struggling to identify with my family’s culture and somehow finding a way to make it feel like mine too. Gharib shares her story in such a funny, heartfel As another “whitewashed” Filipino American, who didn’t fit in with other Filipinos and the white people I thought were so cool, and who also went to Cerritos High School, Malaka Gharib’s graphic memoir I WAS THEIR AMERICAN DREAM really resonated with me. Things like: being called a Twinkie for being an Asian who liked “white people things” and struggling to identify with my family’s culture and somehow finding a way to make it feel like mine too. ⁣ ⁣ Gharib shares her story in such a funny, heartfelt, and vibrant way with spunky and honest language and colorful cartoons too! Like when was even the last time I read a book with pictures? I’m so grateful for this book because it highlights a similar experience a lot of us go through—one that, at the time, we probably felt like was unique to only us. This book lets so many people know that they’re not alone. ⁣ ⁣ Reading this book made me really happy. It gave me a sense of nostalgia but also a different perspective on how to look at my past. This book also made me a little sad because it made me realize I’ve spent a lot of time feeling othered and disconnected from my “Filipino-ness” and that as an adult I have yet to completely come to terms with it. This is the kinda book that after you finish it makes you call your grandma to thank her for everything, to tell her you love her and to you ask her to teach you how to cook her favorite recipe. Reading Gharib's family story left me curious to ask questions about my own and for that this book is probably my favorite thing I’ve read all year. ⁣

  15. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

    The discussion surrounding the question "what are you?" was really well done. Malaka grew up being asked and didn't see anything wrong with it until the context changed when she attended a majority-white school with peers that didn't seem to want to appreciate her Filipino and Egyptian cultures. I also enjoyed the themes of feeling like she didn't necessarily belong in just one category. She highlighted the overlap between the cultures her parents were born into, and what she experienced living The discussion surrounding the question "what are you?" was really well done. Malaka grew up being asked and didn't see anything wrong with it until the context changed when she attended a majority-white school with peers that didn't seem to want to appreciate her Filipino and Egyptian cultures. I also enjoyed the themes of feeling like she didn't necessarily belong in just one category. She highlighted the overlap between the cultures her parents were born into, and what she experienced living in America. She also illustrated how difficult it can be to connect with a culture when you're removed from it. For example, she spent summers in Egypt as a kid with her dad, but when she grows up, she doesn't feel as though she experienced it fully because she didn't learn much Arabic. Basically, I liked the conversations surrounding culture, but I think they could have been delved into more. This didn't really feel like a graphic memoir.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Khalia

    A cute read! It's presented in a lighthearted fashion. Yet, I must write this observation: I got the impression that Malaka Gharib doesn't plan to speak Arabic to her children. In the last chapter, she and her husband Darren enjoy a cruise on the Nile and she predicts: " I probably won't be able to translate Arabic for them." No, she shouldn't translate Arabic for them because they ought to be fluent! Fluent in Arabic and Tagalog. She admitted that during high school, she felt "white> whateve A cute read! It's presented in a lighthearted fashion. Yet, I must write this observation: I got the impression that Malaka Gharib doesn't plan to speak Arabic to her children. In the last chapter, she and her husband Darren enjoy a cruise on the Nile and she predicts: " I probably won't be able to translate Arabic for them." No, she shouldn't translate Arabic for them because they ought to be fluent! Fluent in Arabic and Tagalog. She admitted that during high school, she felt "white> whatever the hell I was". Are the remnants of presumed inferiority lingering in her projection of her children? I don't mind Malaka not continuing the superstitions but I feel not speaking the language would be a massive decimation in their cultural wealth. Don't let me stop you from reading this book. It's pleasurable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mitalee

    Storyline/Overview - Malaka’s coming-of-age tale of self discovery and a quest to find more about her identity and culture. My opinion - Keeping up with my trend of reading graphical memoirs this year, I got this one from my library and enjoyed it. Malaka explores growing up in a multi-ethnic family and also how living in America influenced the thoughts she had as a person of color. Her parents are Filipino and Egyptian and she is growing up in a cultural/religious/nationality diverse family whil Storyline/Overview - Malaka’s coming-of-age tale of self discovery and a quest to find more about her identity and culture. My opinion - Keeping up with my trend of reading graphical memoirs this year, I got this one from my library and enjoyed it. Malaka explores growing up in a multi-ethnic family and also how living in America influenced the thoughts she had as a person of color. Her parents are Filipino and Egyptian and she is growing up in a cultural/religious/nationality diverse family while trying to adapt to white culture to fit in! Her parents have unfulfilled wishes and they are hoping she lives up to them. I loved how Gharib has described the period where the ideas about race and ethnicity changed and she shares it in a very funny,vibrant but honest way. The graphics are superb and very expressive. Towards the end of the story, I knew Malaka’s family and was cheering for them along! Wonderful illustrations, nice story telling and amazing book. Her story is a tribute to American immigrants who come here in search for a better future. Conclusion - If you have a unique cultural background, you’ll relate to this story. Even if you don’t, it is always interesting to read immigration stories of people from all sorts of backgrounds.

  18. 5 out of 5

    San

    I first learned about Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir on social media then shortly after, I saw it at a local book fair so I had to get it! This graphic memoir explored significant topics about race and diversity that many of us in America constantly experience. It conveyed something that was familiar to me and yet so unique. Stories like this that are diverse on religion, culture, and nationality topics are rarely seen. Unless I search for them on the Internet and I first learned about Malaka Gharib’s I Was Their American Dream: A Graphic Memoir on social media then shortly after, I saw it at a local book fair so I had to get it! This graphic memoir explored significant topics about race and diversity that many of us in America constantly experience. It conveyed something that was familiar to me and yet so unique. Stories like this that are diverse on religion, culture, and nationality topics are rarely seen. Unless I search for them on the Internet and forgotten bookshelves at the library, I don’t get to see stories that I can relate to or read about. More importantly, it was portrayed in a creative way and on a “trendy” medium such as a graphic novel, so I was very excited to have found this book. This book is quite relevant to me on many levels having immigrated to the United States when I was a teenager. I have certainly been “whitewashed” after having moved away from home at an early age. It is a continuous struggle for me to try and connect with my heritage and I could empathize with many of the instances mentioned in this book. The questions Gharib were asked as a high school student, “What are you?” was a reminder to when I was intermingled with other military service members. Having served in the military, I was exposed to many different types of racial backgrounds and nationalities. Questions such as “What are you?” and “Where are you from?” were more common than having asked, “What’s your name?” "What are you?" Image credit: Malaka Gharib, NPR.org Finally, the illustrations and graphics are unpretentious. I like the simplicity of it which supplemented to the great storytelling instead of inundating it with more unnecessary details. As one reader had pointed out, Gharib had used the colors red, white, and blue extensively to represent her American culture among the amalgamation of other events in her life. It’s like she’s telling us that with all the pages in the chapters of her life, they paint the colors that make her a true American. The one thing that I regret was not knowing that Gharib herself was at the book fair, and it would have been cool to get her autograph my copy 🙂 Read this review and other reviews on my blog at https://stadeodesign.wordpress.com/20...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sachi Argabright

    I WAS THEIR AMERICAN DREAM is a witty and thoughtful graphic memoir about a girl growing up between three cultures: Filipino, Egyptian, and American. Born from two immigrants, a Filipina mother and an Egyptian father, and living in the U.S. gave Malaka a unique experience that made her different even from her diverse peers. This memoir illustrates being stuck between conflicting ideals, the differences between being in a community with mostly POC versus white people, and what it means to have a I WAS THEIR AMERICAN DREAM is a witty and thoughtful graphic memoir about a girl growing up between three cultures: Filipino, Egyptian, and American. Born from two immigrants, a Filipina mother and an Egyptian father, and living in the U.S. gave Malaka a unique experience that made her different even from her diverse peers. This memoir illustrates being stuck between conflicting ideals, the differences between being in a community with mostly POC versus white people, and what it means to have a large and somewhat unconventional family in a fun and heartfelt way. What a delightful read! I think this is the most creative and unique graphic memoir I’ve ever read. With character cutouts and zine excerpts, Malaka’s personality really shines through in this new memoir. While Malaka’s biracial experience was much different than mine, and I didn’t relate to it as much as I’d hoped, it was still a great reminder of the wide range of experiences us biracial individuals have. I also learned a lot about both Egyptian and Filipino culture, and the major differences between the two! Perfect for readers who love immigrant stories and/or graphic memoirs!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karen Geiger

    This graphic memoir was such a joy to read. Malaka Gharib grew up in Cerritos, CA with her mother’s boisterous Filipino, Catholic family. She spent summers in Egypt with her Egyptian, Muslim father and stepmother. Her high school was ethnically diverse, but had virtually no whites. She went to college in Rochester, NY, which was not diverse at all, and eventually married a white guy from the South. Her cultural experience was full of differences, conflicts, and potential contradictions - yet she This graphic memoir was such a joy to read. Malaka Gharib grew up in Cerritos, CA with her mother’s boisterous Filipino, Catholic family. She spent summers in Egypt with her Egyptian, Muslim father and stepmother. Her high school was ethnically diverse, but had virtually no whites. She went to college in Rochester, NY, which was not diverse at all, and eventually married a white guy from the South. Her cultural experience was full of differences, conflicts, and potential contradictions - yet she approaches it in this book with such an open heart, and by finding common ground in the people she loves. Sooo many of her experiences resonated with me - how her friends called her an egg or banana, how she adored Felicity (the tv show), and how she always craved rice! I was laughing so hard recognizing myself and my family on these pages. Malaka Gharib is seriously my people.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This was a light but fun read. I was sad when it was over. Gharib has been making zines since she was in high school, so you definitely get that feel from the pages of lists and diagrams interspersed throughout the narrative. It was fascinating to see into what it was like for Gharib growing up as half-Filipino and half-Egyptian. She doesn't ever get to dark, or too person, in her musings, but her experiences are still unique and universal in their own way. I wouldn't have minded if the book wer This was a light but fun read. I was sad when it was over. Gharib has been making zines since she was in high school, so you definitely get that feel from the pages of lists and diagrams interspersed throughout the narrative. It was fascinating to see into what it was like for Gharib growing up as half-Filipino and half-Egyptian. She doesn't ever get to dark, or too person, in her musings, but her experiences are still unique and universal in their own way. I wouldn't have minded if the book were longer!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joy Johnson

    Malaka is an American born to immigrant parents who came here to escape Marshall law and to seek the American dream. Her mother is Filipino and her father Egyptian. Malaka tells her coming of age story, raised mostly by her Filipino mother, growing up with parents of wildly different cultures and religions. It was difficult and confusing at times, but her story is told with humor and love while she sets off to seek a sense of belonging and acceptance in a place different from the one she was rai Malaka is an American born to immigrant parents who came here to escape Marshall law and to seek the American dream. Her mother is Filipino and her father Egyptian. Malaka tells her coming of age story, raised mostly by her Filipino mother, growing up with parents of wildly different cultures and religions. It was difficult and confusing at times, but her story is told with humor and love while she sets off to seek a sense of belonging and acceptance in a place different from the one she was raised.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    This is a cute memoir children of immigrants can relate to. Gharib is Filipino and Egyptian. I completely understand her extended family and its obligations and the struggles to forge a separate identity, which is the American way. Like the author, I too was asked what color I was and did not understand exactly why. It was difficult to be so dark and hairy compared to the white girls in school. But this is also a celebration of the differences and how Gharib appreciates the colorfulness of her f This is a cute memoir children of immigrants can relate to. Gharib is Filipino and Egyptian. I completely understand her extended family and its obligations and the struggles to forge a separate identity, which is the American way. Like the author, I too was asked what color I was and did not understand exactly why. It was difficult to be so dark and hairy compared to the white girls in school. But this is also a celebration of the differences and how Gharib appreciates the colorfulness of her family, warts and all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Gervacio

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As 1st generation filipino-canadian immigrant kid this book absolutely triggered me in the BEST WAY POSSIBLE. I really didn't think a lot of people felt the same way I did but a lot of this was so relateable??? ESPECIALLY the part about feeling guilty about moving away from home since I read this while across the country from my family for a job 😭😭😭 i REALLY really REALLY needed to read this and im so glad i came across it im the book store oh my goodness, i read it in 1 hour straight up THANK U As 1st generation filipino-canadian immigrant kid this book absolutely triggered me in the BEST WAY POSSIBLE. I really didn't think a lot of people felt the same way I did but a lot of this was so relateable??? ESPECIALLY the part about feeling guilty about moving away from home since I read this while across the country from my family for a job 😭😭😭 i REALLY really REALLY needed to read this and im so glad i came across it im the book store oh my goodness, i read it in 1 hour straight up THANK U SO MUCH MALAKA ("monica with an L")

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    Surprisingly entertaining and informative. The artwork is deceptively simple but does an effective job of telling the story. I was a substitute teacher in many ESL middle and high school classes as well as instructor for adult ESL sessions. Nice to see the perspective from the other side--it's not always what you think it is and often goes much deeper than language alone. Worth reading for middle-schoolers through adult.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I really enjoyed this memoir about the author's childhood as a child of immigrants: her mom is Filipina and her dad is Egyptian. Both parents divorce and her father ends up returning to Egypt and remarrying. So she splits her time between her extended Filipino family in California, and her dad's family in Egypt in the summers. It discusses how strange this is, especially since her mother was a devout Catholic and her father a devout Muslim. I thought this was pretty well done.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nore

    3.5 to 4 stars. I don't have much to say about this other than it was very interesting, particularly the section where she discusses the question "What are you?" and how it can be insulting or open a conversation into your culture, depending on the context. The main reason I docked a star and a half is because of the pacing - there's huge timeskips and the chapters seem to be completely unrelated. Gave me a bit of whiplash jumping from topic to topic so suddenly!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chalida

    Gharib captured my complete attention in this graphic novel discussing her bi-ethnic, bicultural identity as Egyptian and Filipina. Felt validated in her infographics about microaggressions, her love and hate for the "What are you?" question and her chart comparing her cultures with what it means to be "American." Well done and one I think many of my students will enjoy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    I loved this graphic memoir! I heard it recommended on a podcast during Asian American Heritage Month. I really enjoyed the humorous and authentic portrayal of what the author’s life has been like trying to straddle multiple cultures. Her illustrations are amusing and charming, and her story is moving.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Geraldine

    I loved reading about Malaka’s experience growing up being Filipino and Egyptian. I identified with a lot of her story as someone who is Filipino American. The artwork was really fun and I especially liked the interactive pages, like the zine you could cut out and make and the paper cut outs for Malaka’s different identities in college. Really creative graphic novel.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.