Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen (inklusive Ausmalbilder und Cliparts zum Download): The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies; Ausmalbuch, Malbuch, Cliparts, Icon, Emoji, Sticker, Peter Hase, Kinder, Kinderbuch, Klassiker, Schulkinder, Vorschule, 1. 2. 3. 4...

Availability: Ready to download

Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen ist eine Originalgeschichte von Beatrix Potter. Wenn sich die Vorräte im Kaninchenbau der Flopsy Häschen dem Ende neigen, macht sich die ganze Familie auf, um nach Nahrung zu suchen. Sie finden zwar schon bald alten Salat auf einem Haufen Gemüseabfall von Herrn McGregor, aber wer konnte schon die Schrecken erahnen, die sie ereilen sollt Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen ist eine Originalgeschichte von Beatrix Potter. Wenn sich die Vorräte im Kaninchenbau der Flopsy Häschen dem Ende neigen, macht sich die ganze Familie auf, um nach Nahrung zu suchen. Sie finden zwar schon bald alten Salat auf einem Haufen Gemüseabfall von Herrn McGregor, aber wer konnte schon die Schrecken erahnen, die sie ereilen sollten, während sie sich ein kurzes Mittagsschläfchen gönnten. Mit 24 liebevoll gestalteten Farb- und 15 Schwarzweißillustrationen, 23 Cliparts zum Download und 4 Ausmalbildern. Frei überarbeitet und übersetzt von Elizabeth M. Potter.


Compare
Ads Banner

Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen ist eine Originalgeschichte von Beatrix Potter. Wenn sich die Vorräte im Kaninchenbau der Flopsy Häschen dem Ende neigen, macht sich die ganze Familie auf, um nach Nahrung zu suchen. Sie finden zwar schon bald alten Salat auf einem Haufen Gemüseabfall von Herrn McGregor, aber wer konnte schon die Schrecken erahnen, die sie ereilen sollt Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen ist eine Originalgeschichte von Beatrix Potter. Wenn sich die Vorräte im Kaninchenbau der Flopsy Häschen dem Ende neigen, macht sich die ganze Familie auf, um nach Nahrung zu suchen. Sie finden zwar schon bald alten Salat auf einem Haufen Gemüseabfall von Herrn McGregor, aber wer konnte schon die Schrecken erahnen, die sie ereilen sollten, während sie sich ein kurzes Mittagsschläfchen gönnten. Mit 24 liebevoll gestalteten Farb- und 15 Schwarzweißillustrationen, 23 Cliparts zum Download und 4 Ausmalbildern. Frei überarbeitet und übersetzt von Elizabeth M. Potter.

30 review for Die Geschichte von den Flopsy Häschen (inklusive Ausmalbilder und Cliparts zum Download): The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies; Ausmalbuch, Malbuch, Cliparts, Icon, Emoji, Sticker, Peter Hase, Kinder, Kinderbuch, Klassiker, Schulkinder, Vorschule, 1. 2. 3. 4...

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies is the fourteenth book in Beatrix Potter's famous series of 23 little children's books, which are mainly about animals. The author wrote these between 1902–1930, and they were published by Frederick Warne. She had already written two full-length tales with a rabbit as the central character, for this publisher, "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" and "The Tale of Benjamin Bunny", and felt reluctant to write another. However, the demand from her young audience was so great, t The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies is the fourteenth book in Beatrix Potter's famous series of 23 little children's books, which are mainly about animals. The author wrote these between 1902–1930, and they were published by Frederick Warne. She had already written two full-length tales with a rabbit as the central character, for this publisher, "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" and "The Tale of Benjamin Bunny", and felt reluctant to write another. However, the demand from her young audience was so great, that she wrote The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies, featuring both Peter and Benjamin, and adding new characters. It was published in 1909. The watercolour depictions of the garden in the background are simply beautiful, and considered to be some of the finest illustrations Beatrix Potter created. For her inspiration here, she had looked to a semi-formal garden of archways and flowerbeds at the home of her aunt and uncle in Wales. It is perhaps no surprise that Beatrix Potter's illustrations are so carefully executed, and so detailed. She had been a respected watercolourist, illustrating plant life, insects, fossils and various archaeological artefacts, as well as the pets and small animals she had always painted, even as a child. Prior to these books featuring rabbits, she had also previously, in 1893, illustrated the "Uncle Remus" stories by Joel Chandler Harris. However, the rabbits invented by Beatrix Potter are very different from Joel Chandler Harris's cunning and wily character of "Brer Rabbit". Beatrix Potter's rabbits are from a gentler world. They are equally keen to have adventures, and are full of mischief, but they are mostly motivated by a sense of fun. This story is a perfect example. It has danger certainly, and a few heart-stopping moments. But there is little sense of planning in the trickery; it is more a case of "turning the tables" and playing tricks on the big people, in a strong mischievous spirit which young children will recognise and love. There is also another life lesson here too for youngsters. We learn that it was the importunance of the parents, their constant having to "borrow" from Flopsy's brother Peter, which led to their young being put into great danger. But the story is a light hearted one for all that. The book starts, “It is said that the effect of eating too much lettuce is 'soporific'.” And because the author has introduced a word which few children listening to this will ever have encountered, she quickly goes on to explain (with a definition) in a chummy way, “I have never felt sleepy after eating lettuces; but then I am not a rabbit.” And opposite the text, we have a naturalistic illustration of several little rabbits, all asleep on their backs against a lettuce plant. Perfect! The book instantly flashes back to how Benjamin Bunny had married his Cousin Flopsy, and being very "improvident and cheerful" the consequence was ... quite a lot of little "Flopsy Bunnies". In fact they had not always enough cabbages to go round their large family, so often used to ask for some from Flopsy's brother, who was, (fanfare please!) Peter Rabbit. But when Peter had no cabbages to spare, we all know who he had to get them from ... Mr. McGregor. The story follows all the nameless little Flopsy Bunnies (there are too many to remember their names, the author assures us) as they go scavenging in Mr. Mcgregor's rubbish heap, finding enough lettuces to make them very drowsy indeed, and to have to indulge in a little nap. I particularly enjoyed the picture of Peter Rabbit, complete with paper bag over his head to keep off the flies! But when Mr. McGregor returns and empties some lawn clippings over the little Flopsy Bunnies, he spies what might be the tips of six little pairs of ears peeping out and ... Oh calamity! These six little rabbits are destined for the pot! How they eventually escape, is down to a new character, brave little Thomasina Tittlemouse, a woodmouse with a long tail (and very sharp teeth). Mrs. Tittlemouse is herself honoured, featuring as the central character in a book the following year. The ensuing adventure is very exciting, as we follow the distress of Flopsy (wondering where all her little bunnies have disappeared to), the clever contrivances of Benjamin and Thomasina, the glee of Mr. McGregor, followed by a scolding by his wife, who had ambitious but nasty plans on what to use the rabbits for, and accused her husband of having "done it a purpose". It ends with a very crestfallen Mr. McGregor, and a cute little codicil, about how the Flopsy Bunnies rewarded Thomasina Tittlemouse. The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies has all the classic hallmarks of one of the best Beatrix Potter stories. It is a timeless story of danger and friendship. Little children will hug themselves, first with fear as the rabbits are in danger of their lives, and then with glee as Mr. McGregor is outwitted. The pictures beautifully illustrate how all the animals watch as their plan goes into action. We used to visit the Lake District every year, to try some of the more gentle climbs up the fells. We stayed in a guest house in Near Sawrey. Just along the road is another little village called Far Sawrey, where we sometimes visited Beatrix Potter's house "Hill Top". Her furnishings are still there and much of her memorabilia. Beatrix Potter had bought "Hill Top", in her beloved Lake District, in 1905 with the profits from her books and a small legacy left to her by her aunt. A working farm, which she continued to maintain all her life, "Hill Top" soon became a retreat, and her home away from London, as Beatrix Potter established her life and career there. After three years in her new home, Beatrix Potter wrote a four-page letter with illustrations of the rabbits in her garden at "Hill Top", to one of her young fans, “dear little William Warner”. She said that she was “trying dreadfully hard to think about another story about ‘Peter’” because “all the little boys and girls like the rabbits best”. But so far she hadn't managed to think of one. “I thinked and thinked and thinked last year; but I didn’t think enough to fill a book! … So I made a story about Jemima Puddleduck instead – and it will be in the shops very soon. I hope you will like it.” “The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck” was number twelve in the series, and was published in 1908. Only a few months later, in the autumn of 1908, Beatrix Potter wrote to her publisher Harold Warne saying that she had several ideas for new books. These included the book which is reviewed here, The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies, which was intended as a sequel to "The Tale of Benjamin Bunny", as it featured Benjamin's offspring, the Flopsy Bunnies. Another tale she sent Warne was about the village shop in Far Sawrey. That story eventually became the next one, "The Tale of Ginger and Pickles", number fifteen in the series. Both books were subsequently published after the letter, during the next year, 1909. Spurred on by the fact that the very letter to “dear little William” is to be auctioned this weekend, I read this little book, and was enchanted. Here is the final page of the letter. What a privileged little boy William Warne was, to be sure! Last time we visited "Hill Top", we wandered around the pretty cottage garden. It has a large vegetable patch, which is maintained much as it would have been when Beatrix Potter lived there. The carrots, lettuces and radishes all grow in neat rows, exactly as if Mr. McGregor had just popped inside for a moment. It is so very easy to imagine the tips of a few furry "Flopsy Bunny" ears sticking up out of a pile of grass clippings. Or a glimpse of Benjamin's bright little eyes in a furry face peeping out at you from behind the lettuces. Or perhaps ... just maybe ... it is not merely the imagination at work.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Joey Woolfardis

    It is said that the effect of eating too much chocolate is "soporific". I have never felt sleepy after eating chocolate, but then I am not a lightweight. (The effect is most likely known as "diabetes", however.) I also did not grow up to marry my cousin, which-though possibly legal-is not a sufficient enough gap in the gene pool to stop the potential of a sixth or seventh finger. But Benjamin Bunny doesn't care for all of that. He married his cousin and also probably his sister, as well. Which expl It is said that the effect of eating too much chocolate is "soporific". I have never felt sleepy after eating chocolate, but then I am not a lightweight. (The effect is most likely known as "diabetes", however.) I also did not grow up to marry my cousin, which-though possibly legal-is not a sufficient enough gap in the gene pool to stop the potential of a sixth or seventh finger. But Benjamin Bunny doesn't care for all of that. He married his cousin and also probably his sister, as well. Which explains his children's lack of stamina. Woe betide any rabbit that cannot handle his lettuce. Woe betide also Mr Mcgregor who seems to have no luck, be it with catching rabbits or doing right by his wife.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.D. Absolutely

    Pulitzer-awardee Margaret Edson mentioned this book The Tale of Flopsy Bunnies and Mrs. Tittlemouse in her play Wit that I read and reviewed early this week. The character of the play, the cancer patient, recalled that the first book her father read to her was this. It is also in this book when she first encountered the word "soporific" that made her interested on words, then on stories, then on literature study. She was a professor at Cambridge specializing on John Donne poems when she died. I l Pulitzer-awardee Margaret Edson mentioned this book The Tale of Flopsy Bunnies and Mrs. Tittlemouse in her play Wit that I read and reviewed early this week. The character of the play, the cancer patient, recalled that the first book her father read to her was this. It is also in this book when she first encountered the word "soporific" that made her interested on words, then on stories, then on literature study. She was a professor at Cambridge specializing on John Donne poems when she died. I looked for this book and I was very lucky to find a hardbound edition with music and being sold for P80 ($2) at a second-hand bookstore a couple of days back. I bought this right away because I was intrigued on how a book could make a person really interested on literature and end up as a literature teacher. I think Edson was right. I think Edson, a kindergarten teacher when she won the Pulitzer, used this book as this made herself interested on literature. The word "soporific" is mentioned in the very first sentence of the story and one can not ignore it (I do that sometimes) and see if you'll be able to understand by the way it is used in the paragraph. Yes, there is something about the little bunnies being sleepy after eating lettuce because their father has no money to buy carrots. However, the word "soporific" is with quotes so whoever is reading the story to children listening should know what that means. It seems like Potter (the author, Beatrix Potter not Harry Potter. Oh why should I even have to say that) wants the adult reader to explain that big word. The story is heartfelt. The Flopsy Bunnies were put in a sack by the farmer so that his wife can cook (my assumption) them for dinner but they were saved by a Mrs. Tittlemouse. There is also a side story on Mrs. Tittlemouse life and her scrupulous cleaning of her abode but it seems like a separate story and not a heartfelt one at all. My second book by Potter and I still liked it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley doruyter

    i wonder if those poor flopsy bunnies knew how close they got to being eten

  5. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    Soporific. But in this specific case, it's a compliment. __________________________________________ I must share with you this wonderful passage from John Evelyn's Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets (1699), quoted in McGee's On Food and Cooking:... by reason of its soporifous qualities, lettuce ever was, and still continues the principal foundation of the universal tribe of Sallets, which is to cool and refresh, besides its other properties, which include beneficial influences on morals, temperance Soporific. But in this specific case, it's a compliment. __________________________________________ I must share with you this wonderful passage from John Evelyn's Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets (1699), quoted in McGee's On Food and Cooking:... by reason of its soporifous qualities, lettuce ever was, and still continues the principal foundation of the universal tribe of Sallets, which is to cool and refresh, besides its other properties, which include beneficial influences on morals, temperance and chastity.I still have a few reservations about the Flopsy Bunnies' morals, but I would not dare cast aspersions on their temperance or chastity.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bri

    I loved this, but why, just why, did two close cousins have to get married and have children? I get that they're not humans, but that's still weird.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ღ Ruqs ღ

    Such a delightfully sweet story!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Katy Grainger

    One of my most prized possessions is my ‘Tales of Peter Rabbit and Friends’ box set. I remember my Mum and Dad reading the stories to me before bedtime, and when I became a more confident reader I would sit and read the books for hours, admiring the beautiful illustrations. In fact, sometimes I just looked at the pictures because I loved them so much. One of my favourites from the collection has to be ‘The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies’. This is a story of Benjamin Bunny’s children. They venture in One of my most prized possessions is my ‘Tales of Peter Rabbit and Friends’ box set. I remember my Mum and Dad reading the stories to me before bedtime, and when I became a more confident reader I would sit and read the books for hours, admiring the beautiful illustrations. In fact, sometimes I just looked at the pictures because I loved them so much. One of my favourites from the collection has to be ‘The Tale of The Flopsy Bunnies’. This is a story of Benjamin Bunny’s children. They venture into Mr. McGregor's (scary farmer) garden and find lots of overgrown lettuces. Amazed by their find, they decide to eat way too many lettuces and end up falling asleep. When tragedy strikes and the little bunnies go missing, Benjamin and Flopsy do everything they can to find their children. Although there are a few peculiar elements within the book (Benjamin is married to his cousin Flopsy); I particularly like the theme of greediness and mischievousness that runs through this book. The plot is simple but still captures the attention of children with a few scary moments between pages. The traditional water-coloured illustrations are adorable and really compliment the story well. I fully intend to make use of this box set and read the stories aloud to Key Stage 1 and possibly early Key Stage 2 children.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Set in the future, Benjamin Bunny marries his cousin Flopsy, and their children are nearly captured by Mr. McGregor to be used for his own wife's cloak, before the kids are saved with the help of a new character and friend. This is the third appearance of Mr. McGregor (see: The Tale of Peter Rabbit and the Tale of Benjamin Bunny). Readers sensitive to depictions of the threat of violence or kidnapping may want to avoid this tale. Readers interested in a suspenseful sequel to the Tale of Benjamin Set in the future, Benjamin Bunny marries his cousin Flopsy, and their children are nearly captured by Mr. McGregor to be used for his own wife's cloak, before the kids are saved with the help of a new character and friend. This is the third appearance of Mr. McGregor (see: The Tale of Peter Rabbit and the Tale of Benjamin Bunny). Readers sensitive to depictions of the threat of violence or kidnapping may want to avoid this tale. Readers interested in a suspenseful sequel to the Tale of Benjamin Bunny or a story about parents and community members working together to save children, should be entertained by this tale.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This review goes for all the bunny-centric Beatrix Potter books, including The Tale of Peter Rabbit, The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, and The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit. I'm just attaching it to The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies because I think it has the cutest drawings (leetle behbeh bunneh ears!). You don't realize, when you are a child, how perfect and lifelike Beatrix Potter's illustrations are. That takes adult eyes. Looking at the drawings for these 4 books, I couldn't get over how lifelike Pott This review goes for all the bunny-centric Beatrix Potter books, including The Tale of Peter Rabbit, The Tale of Benjamin Bunny, and The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit. I'm just attaching it to The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies because I think it has the cutest drawings (leetle behbeh bunneh ears!). You don't realize, when you are a child, how perfect and lifelike Beatrix Potter's illustrations are. That takes adult eyes. Looking at the drawings for these 4 books, I couldn't get over how lifelike Potter's rabbits were. It was clear to me that she knew her subjects in the most intimate way; she had been observing the wildlife of northern England for years to be able to draw rabbits in such lifelike ways, even while anthropomorphizing them (Mrs. Flopsy Bunny in her little housekeeper's apron?!? Adorable!). The tenderness and reality of the colors are also amazing: the variations of brown in the bunnies' coats; the shades of green in a lettuce leaf; the slightly misty quality to views of Old Mr. MacGregor's garden that evoke a golden age of the English countryside that probably never existed. Or maybe it did. Or maybe it does, in our imaginations and hearts. Looking back, one might think Beatrix Potter's tales are a bit harsh for children (e.g., The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit: The Bad Rabbit beats up another rabbit and takes his carrot, then gets shot at by a hunter. He doesn't die, only loses his tail and whiskers, but Oi! Violence!). However, I don't think they are excessively so (the Bad Rabbit does not die; there is no bloody bunny carcass displayed on the meadow or hanging from the hunter's fist), and I read these books as a child and turned out fairly fine, so I have very little qualm about passing them on to the next generation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dione Basseri

    Whoof. One of the more...not precisely bloody, but certainly perilous of Potter's stories. While foraging in the McGregor garbage heap, the young Flopsy Bunnies fall asleep and are snatched up by the farmer. He intends to kill and skin them, but their father, Benjamin Bunny, manages to get help and save them in good time, and the only damage is one of the bunnies getting smacked with a root vegetable. Oddly, still a bit dire, but they are bunnies, after all. Good for a bit of suspense. Especially Whoof. One of the more...not precisely bloody, but certainly perilous of Potter's stories. While foraging in the McGregor garbage heap, the young Flopsy Bunnies fall asleep and are snatched up by the farmer. He intends to kill and skin them, but their father, Benjamin Bunny, manages to get help and save them in good time, and the only damage is one of the bunnies getting smacked with a root vegetable. Oddly, still a bit dire, but they are bunnies, after all. Good for a bit of suspense. Especially since this is one of the few stories involving Farmer McGregor where he is clearly the villain. Most other times, the animals are stealing food from his actual farm, but this time, they're eating from the garbage when caught. It makes it a bit easier for backyard farmers to be okay with the story. While you can buy Potter stories individually, I have to advocate for getting a complete or near-complete collection of her stories. While Mr. Jeremy Fisher will entertain most children for one or two readings, it does not shine unless taken in with the rest of Potter's works. And make absolutely sure you get one a collection with the original illustrations of Beatrix Potter herself. Her genius was not just in text, but in her visual storytelling. The watercolor technique in general is quite difficult and unforgiving, but Potter seems to have practiced it with as much ease as if she's gone into a countryside with a modern camera. Crisp and lively, these pictures are true works of art. Keep in mind, all of Beatrix Potter's works are in the public domain! You can find fairly cheap copies out there, since royalties don't need to be paid to anyone. Just double-check quality before putting your money down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    GoldenjoyBazyll

    No disrespect to Ms. Potter BUT WHAT was shge thinking???? This sotry reads like a horror show. Come on... 5 wee fluyffy bunnies go out one day in search of some tasty lettuce..... find the compost heap and thing "HUMMMM I hit the lotto"... proceed to much lettuce that NO ONE wants and then take a nice little nap. Along comes the farmer sees 5 wee soft little bodies and snatches them up and throws them in a bag. Luckily someone is paying attention- in a cunning act of heroism...the parents of th No disrespect to Ms. Potter BUT WHAT was shge thinking???? This sotry reads like a horror show. Come on... 5 wee fluyffy bunnies go out one day in search of some tasty lettuce..... find the compost heap and thing "HUMMMM I hit the lotto"... proceed to much lettuce that NO ONE wants and then take a nice little nap. Along comes the farmer sees 5 wee soft little bodies and snatches them up and throws them in a bag. Luckily someone is paying attention- in a cunning act of heroism...the parents of the victimized rabbits find their babies in the sack and get them out- replacing them with turnips. One evil farmer returns and grabs the bag brining it home to his accomplice in crime (one farmers wife) stating they will be eating bunny stew. Ha, ha on them..... they get turnip's. Not my style of read. SORRY I like wee fluffy bunnies!!!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    2010: This is one of my son's favorite books, and mine too. Mr. McGregor catches the six little flopsy bunnies in a sack, but they escape and make him angry instead. I don't know why this book isn't more popular. Is it the mention of tobacco, or the mention of the rabbits being skinned and their heads cut off? 2019: My younger son likes this book now too. There are so many words and objects in the story that he's not familiar with, but it's still captivating. I enjoy reading this one to my kids m 2010: This is one of my son's favorite books, and mine too. Mr. McGregor catches the six little flopsy bunnies in a sack, but they escape and make him angry instead. I don't know why this book isn't more popular. Is it the mention of tobacco, or the mention of the rabbits being skinned and their heads cut off? 2019: My younger son likes this book now too. There are so many words and objects in the story that he's not familiar with, but it's still captivating. I enjoy reading this one to my kids much more than the latest television spin-off.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Audryaunna

    Grimms' Fairy Tales anyone? This book is dark and graphic. This is the story of bunnies who are tossed in a sack and are ready to be skinned and eaten. Fortunately, the bunnies are able to excape, but wow!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    Starts out as a social commentary on large families who cannot feed kids. I wish Potter had stayed with this... Peter Rabbit's so much cooler than his cousin :)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maria Carmo

    Reading Beatrix Potter because I saw the movie about her and was delighted by her sensible delicacy and mixture of imagination and pragmatism. Maria Carmo, Lisbon 2 February 2015.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kirstie

    Some very long words for a children's book but I lovely night time read for Minnie :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Gutzwiller

    A magical story to share with everyone. The words and pictures are classic. Beatrix Potter wrote this story many moons ago and it was good then and it is still good now. As most old tales, this one is not totally happy, but it teaches that you should listen to your parents. I found this book on a website for free for an honest review. Peter, Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton Tale all live with their mother under the fir tree. One day mother went to the store and asked her children to be good and not go in A magical story to share with everyone. The words and pictures are classic. Beatrix Potter wrote this story many moons ago and it was good then and it is still good now. As most old tales, this one is not totally happy, but it teaches that you should listen to your parents. I found this book on a website for free for an honest review. Peter, Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton Tale all live with their mother under the fir tree. One day mother went to the store and asked her children to be good and not go in Mr. McGregor 's patch. The girls were good as they always were. Peter went to McGregor's Vegetable Garden. He started eating and eating. He turned a corner and there he was, Mr. McGregor. He chased Peter all over. He finally got tired and went back to his garden. Peter found the tool shed and went into a bucket to hide. Did Mr. McGregor find him? What did he do? You will get to read to find out.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    Here we see Benjamin Bunny grown up and married with little bunnies of his own. We get the impression that Benjamin was not quite as industrious as he should have been because he seemed to depend on relatives to help provide for his immediate family. One of these relatives is Peter. Apparently Peter turned out pretty well because in this book he owns his own farm and is prospering. Sometimes he can help Benjamin with extra cabbage, sometimes he has none to spare. Or maybe like all of us, he gets Here we see Benjamin Bunny grown up and married with little bunnies of his own. We get the impression that Benjamin was not quite as industrious as he should have been because he seemed to depend on relatives to help provide for his immediate family. One of these relatives is Peter. Apparently Peter turned out pretty well because in this book he owns his own farm and is prospering. Sometimes he can help Benjamin with extra cabbage, sometimes he has none to spare. Or maybe like all of us, he gets tired of free loading family members taking advantage of his hard work and using the plight of the children as a guilt tool. But this is a children's book. Sweep away those cynical thoughts. Benjamin then resorts to thievery. Off he goes to Farmer McGregor's. And here the adventure begins. The Flopsy bunnies are kidnapped (by guess who) and now Benjamin and his wife must figure out how to rescue them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    K.

    Rarely will you find a children's book that contains the words "improvident" and "soporific" and "doleful". But hey, Beatrix Potter doesn't have time to explain her vocabulary to your kids, okay? She's got bunnies to draw (and dissect). But her illustrations in this are as gorgeous as they ever were:

  21. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    I read this book to my 2 year old daughter. She seemed to enjoy the illustrations, but the story itself seemed poorly executed. It was lacking the suspense that could have been present. We watch the bunnies get caught by Mr. McGregor, but it in quite a dull way. Their escape is anti-climatic. Unfortunately, I won't be revisiting this book with my children.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    Great art. Benjamin Bunny is a pappa here and he has little bunnies. They spend a day eating well and sunny when the little bunnies are caught. It was not disturbing to my niece. They do escape and all is well. I enjoyed this little story as did my niece. She wanted to hear another one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rants and Bants

    I am a 25-year old adult and this is my first time seeing the word "soporific". And Mr. MacGregor is even more evil than I thought D: But once again, the bunnies prevail. (\_/) (^_^) (") (")

  24. 5 out of 5

    Charity Yost Reed

    Peter Rabbit is still our favorite, but the setup of this printing is so perfect for children that we won't read any other prints of Beatrix Potter than F. Warne & Co. Original and Authorized Editions.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Hofer

    Much like the second book in the series this one was a little too dark for me (for me to read it to my daughter). Still a cute tale but 3 stars because it could have been told without the potential skinning and killing.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Classic Children's books.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristofer Petersen-Overton

    Who thought it would be a good idea to scrap the original illustrations?

  28. 5 out of 5

    Corinne Fowler

    A very cute story. Beatrix Potter's characters are the CUTEST.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Vidal

    Classic Beatrix Potter.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    Some young rabbits get into trouble. A good story with enchanting illustrations. Reading time around ten minutes.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.