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In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying

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At thirty-six years old, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche was a rising star within his generation of Tibetan masters and the respected abbot of three monasteries. Then one night, telling no one, he slipped out of his monastery in India with the intention of spending the next four years on a wandering retreat, following the ancient practice of holy mendicants. His goal was to throw At thirty-six years old, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche was a rising star within his generation of Tibetan masters and the respected abbot of three monasteries. Then one night, telling no one, he slipped out of his monastery in India with the intention of spending the next four years on a wandering retreat, following the ancient practice of holy mendicants. His goal was to throw off his titles and roles in order to explore the deepest aspects of his being. He immediately discovered that a lifetime of Buddhist education and practice had not prepared him to deal with dirty fellow travelers or the screeching of a railway car. He found he was too attached to his identity as a monk to remove his robes right away or to sleep on the Varanasi station floor, and instead paid for a bed in a cheap hostel. But when he ran out of money, he began his life as an itinerant beggar in earnest. Soon he became deathly ill from food poisoning--and his journey took a startling turn. His meditation practice had prepared him to face death, and now he had the opportunity to test the strength of his training. In this powerful and unusually candid account of the inner life of a Buddhist master, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche offers us the invaluable lessons he learned from his near-death experience. By sharing with readers the meditation practices that sustain him, he shows us how we can transform our fear of dying into joyful living.


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At thirty-six years old, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche was a rising star within his generation of Tibetan masters and the respected abbot of three monasteries. Then one night, telling no one, he slipped out of his monastery in India with the intention of spending the next four years on a wandering retreat, following the ancient practice of holy mendicants. His goal was to throw At thirty-six years old, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche was a rising star within his generation of Tibetan masters and the respected abbot of three monasteries. Then one night, telling no one, he slipped out of his monastery in India with the intention of spending the next four years on a wandering retreat, following the ancient practice of holy mendicants. His goal was to throw off his titles and roles in order to explore the deepest aspects of his being. He immediately discovered that a lifetime of Buddhist education and practice had not prepared him to deal with dirty fellow travelers or the screeching of a railway car. He found he was too attached to his identity as a monk to remove his robes right away or to sleep on the Varanasi station floor, and instead paid for a bed in a cheap hostel. But when he ran out of money, he began his life as an itinerant beggar in earnest. Soon he became deathly ill from food poisoning--and his journey took a startling turn. His meditation practice had prepared him to face death, and now he had the opportunity to test the strength of his training. In this powerful and unusually candid account of the inner life of a Buddhist master, Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche offers us the invaluable lessons he learned from his near-death experience. By sharing with readers the meditation practices that sustain him, he shows us how we can transform our fear of dying into joyful living.

30 review for In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying

  1. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    This is a tricky one to rate. There's two aspects to it, really: the Monk's journey (or, the beginning of it) and Buddhist teachings on life and death. I think it was the contrast between the two that made this such a slow read for me, because it's two topics I'm rather fascinated by but it was jarring to switch between the two constantly with this book. The journey: Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche has lived his life as a Buddhist monk in relative comfort and luxury. He has risen through ranks with/>The/>There's This is a tricky one to rate. There's two aspects to it, really: the Monk's journey (or, the beginning of it) and Buddhist teachings on life and death. I think it was the contrast between the two that made this such a slow read for me, because it's two topics I'm rather fascinated by but it was jarring to switch between the two constantly with this book. The journey: Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche has lived his life as a Buddhist monk in relative comfort and luxury. He has risen through ranks with dedication to the teachings of Buddhist ways and is highly respected and thus treated with considerable respect. However he's decided it's time to discover how to 'be comfortable being uncomfortable' (my words, not his) so he sneaks out of the monastery compound with little money and possessions and sets out to explore. This book follows the first leg of his journey, where he sleeps at a train station for a few nights then moves on to a Buddhist site (sorry, the names are all a thousand letters long and hard to pronounce, so equally hard to remember and attempt to spell) where he eventually becomes sick. The plug of the novel is what this book can teach you from his experience of nearly dying, but the near-death occurrence doesn't happen until nearly 200 pages in. So a lot of this book is spent waiting for things to take that dark turn, and when it does it's kind of ... underwhelming. SORRY. This guy actually nearly died and here I am talking about how his relating the experience was underwhelming! SORRY. But he's just so CHILL about it! It was really interesting but also I was just so baffled that he did nothing except meditate on it. I'm not reaching enlightenment any time soon, my sense of self-preservation is way too strong. To be honest, I would have been really fascinated to read about his entire 'wander', since he apparently wandered for four years, and this only detailed a few weeks or so. It was fascinating to read about how his teachings comforted him (or didn't) when faced with unique experiences. However, the story itself was constantly interrupted by ... The teachings: While there were some interesting ideas amongst it all, this is heavy stuff. It is pages and pages of walls of text and it is full of concepts that kind of start by making sense but drift into me wondering where I lost the thread. It is full on. It was kind of like a race-car driver trying to explain to a two-year-old how to drive. With instructions like, 'the accelerator makes you move so you just stick your foot on it and drive' but the kid doesn't even know what any of those words mean. It's me. I'm the kid. I tried really hard to follow all the stuff about bardos and in-between and dying every day etc but in the end I honestly had no fkn clue what this dude was talking about. He's just so used to his way of life that it's impossible for him to dumb it down because he already thinks he is. That was my impression, anyway. Perhaps people smarter than me, or with more experience of Buddhist teachings, will appreciate his message a little more. So the story itself was a 4-star, but way too bogged down by the teachings. And the ideas in the teachings were about a 3-star, but then they were too dense for my dense mind to understand so the delivery was 2-star. So overall I guess we have a 3-star novel with an interesting story, interesting ideas, but a slow, tedious, confusing sort of delivery. Not one to read on a whim, friends, but if you want some deep insight into Buddhist living this account is well worth a read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Oppenheimer

    An intimate teaching story A first-person narrative of the author’s coming to terms with the teachings of his traditions. Written clearly and without pretending.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    “I am a monk; a son, a brother, and an uncle; a Buddhist; a meditation teacher; a tulku, an abbot, and an author; a Tibetan Nepali; a human being. Which one describes the essential me?” In 2011 Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche left a note on his bed, walked out of his monastery in India and began a four year wandering retreat. Inspired by Tibetan Buddhist Yogis of the past, he aspired to achieve enlightenment and experience his true Buddha nature. Following the Tibetan pr “I am a monk; a son, a brother, and an uncle; a Buddhist; a meditation teacher; a tulku, an abbot, and an author; a Tibetan Nepali; a human being. Which one describes the essential me?” In 2011 Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche left a note on his bed, walked out of his monastery in India and began a four year wandering retreat. Inspired by Tibetan Buddhist Yogis of the past, he aspired to achieve enlightenment and experience his true Buddha nature. Following the Tibetan principle of ‘adding wood to the fire’ he deliberately embraced difficult situations to work with them directly to reveal his Buddha nature. Little did he realise that within days he would be facing his own death. This book is part travelogue, part memoir and teachings on the Bardos - how we face the transitions and changes in our lives. Including the transition from life to death. Thank you to NetGalley for the advance copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anneke

    Book Review: In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying Author: Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche and Helen Tworkov Publisher: Random House Spiegel & Grau Publication Date: May 7, 2019 Review Date: March 30, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb: “A rare, intimate account of a world-renowned Buddhist monk’s near-death experience and the life-changing wi Book Review: In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying Author: Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche and Helen Tworkov Publisher: Random House Spiegel & Grau Publication Date: May 7, 2019 Review Date: March 30, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the blurb: “A rare, intimate account of a world-renowned Buddhist monk’s near-death experience and the life-changing wisdom he gained from it.” This is a fantastic book for Tibetan Buddhism students. When I requested the book on NetGalley, I was under the impression that it was a biography and memoir. That was how it was labeled. I am not a student of Tibetan Buddhism, or any type of Buddhism for that matter. It turned out that the book is primarily a teaching book for Tibetan Buddhist students, based on the Rinpoche’s illness and near-death experience. So, I was disappointed, as I was more interested in memoir, in his life story, then the teachings he presented. The writing is clear; the story was interesting. I was not interested in the teachings, and was impatient for the story to continue. So…if you are a Tibetan Buddhist student, this may be a book you’d very much want to read. If you want to read a memoir/biography, I’d give this book a pass. Unless you want to learn about Tibetan Buddhism. If I had purchased this book, thinking I had bought a memoir. I would have been disappointed and less than happy. With these caveats, I give the book 3 1/2-4 stars. 5 Stars if you want to read about Tibetan Buddhism. Thank you to Random House for allowing me an early look at this book. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon. #netgalley #randomhouse #tibetanbuddhism

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    "...pause and notice what we already have..."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dorie

    In Love With The World : A Monks Journey Through The Bardos of Living and Dying by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche due 5-7-2019 Random House/Spiegel & Gran 5.0 / 5.0 Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche began studying Tibetan Buddhism and attending retreats to help learn how to deal with death. A bardo believes the stage between dying and rebirth is becoming. Yongey felt it would help him come closer to the state of Pure Awareness. Yongey went on a retreat and became deathly ill with food poisoning. He was told In Love With The World : A Monks Journey Through The Bardos of Living and Dying by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche due 5-7-2019 Random House/Spiegel & Gran 5.0 / 5.0 Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche began studying Tibetan Buddhism and attending retreats to help learn how to deal with death. A bardo believes the stage between ´dying´ and ´rebirth´ is ´becoming´. Yongey felt it would help him come closer to the state of Pure Awareness. Yongey went on a retreat and became deathly ill with food poisoning. He was told he might die. Yongey was able to use his studies to practice his training with living with death. This is beautifully written and presented in a way that is easy to understand and follow. The idea of perpetual awareness-staying open to the moment-not grasping for permanence....the idea that everything you ever wanted is here in your present moment of awareness really resonate with me. Its one of the reasons I began studying Buddhism years ago. When we attempt to equate productivity with success, to grasp on to life, make them solid and we begin to lose ourselves. The trick is to stay open and accepting to the present. I loves this...its a great introduction to an awesome mindset. Thanks to the publisher and author for this e-book ARC for review. #netgalley #InLoveWithTheWorld

  7. 4 out of 5

    Producervan in Cornville, AZ from New Orleans & L.A.

    In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche and Helen Tworkov. Nonfiction. Kindle Edition. Published 07 May 2019. 5 Stars. Superb. An intense, introspective and one-of-a-kind memoir as Rinpoche takes us through his soul-searching journey from ego and physical death to his amazing emergence from its ashes. You’ll find yourself in the capable hands of a passionate and seasoned teacher as he generously shares his journey and In Love with the World: A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche and Helen Tworkov. Nonfiction. Kindle Edition. Published 07 May 2019. 5 Stars. Superb. An intense, introspective and one-of-a-kind memoir as Rinpoche takes us through his soul-searching journey from ego and physical death to his amazing emergence from its ashes. You’ll find yourself in the capable hands of a passionate and seasoned teacher as he generously shares his journey and practices from overcoming anxiety to a miraculous rebirth. This book is a pungent observation of human frailty through an enlightenment process that does not surrender its wisdom easily. Transmuted to gold by the crucible of life, he emerges with a truth as ancient and glowing as the Buddha himself. Highly recommend!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Lee

    p1-adding wood to the fire c1 who are you labels' value change along time under challenge of fire, normal awareness to meditative aware to pure aware, as from dual to single c2 acknowledge the wave but stay with the ocean remember the constant original questions:reaction ture?assumption correct?where from? unpleasant feelings,not run away, not manipulate to pleasant, just stay with what is with whatever arises c3 born with a silver spoon c p1-adding wood to the fire c1 who are you labels' value change along time under challenge of fire, normal awareness to meditative aware to pure aware, as from dual to single c2 acknowledge the wave but stay with the ocean remember the constant original questions:reaction ture?assumption correct?where from? unpleasant feelings,not run away, not manipulate to pleasant, just stay with what is with whatever arises c3 born with a silver spoon c4 impermanence and death don't cling to things that don't last keep the view as vast as space, keep your actionss as fine as flour come in terms with physical death with everyday minideath c5 letting wisdom arise bad ego/good ego four stages of wave experience invite death, welcome birth c6 what will you do in the bardo bardo as interval between death and birth c7 lessons from milarepa c8 varanasi rail station c9 emptiness not nothingness name as denotation mistaking impermanance to permanance is the primary cause of surffering c10 if you see something say something c11 a visit from panic my old friend fist come panic, then is wisdom every emotions is already free in and of itself let it be, then it leaves when me immutable, ego bad; when I without attachment,ego good c12 a day at the ghats not push away, not invite, attachment would dissolve acknowledge minideath, birth comes with ease c13 of sleeps and dreams c14 learning to swim c15 memonto mori discover what's already there p2-returning home c16 where the buddha die c17 what is your happy dream c18 coming through darkness don't hold tight to things that can't really be held c19 a chance encounter creativity means staying open to change and risking failure c20 naked and clothed c21 no picking no choosing c22 working with pain neutral attitude towards pain, it would reduce suffering c23 the four rivers of natural suffering birth, aging, sick, death you can learn to live with death, to make yourself bigger than this loss. Then you can hold the sadness and not drown in sorrow. c24 recalling the bardos c25 giving everything away imporntant to acknow- feelings without drowning in stories giving with no self-reference offer something with offering emptiness c26 when death is good news physical death helps enlightment helps helping others c27 awareness never dies child luminasity and mother luminasity c28 when the cup shatters it's not his time to die c29 in the bardo of becoming ready to die every day, free of embarrasment, welcome natural flow of change epilogue accept impermanance is the key

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Tessman

    The story of a monk who sheds himself of all his worldly possessions and creature comforts to go on a wandering retreat in search of enlightenment. Unfortunately, for me, the book seemed to be more focused on Buddhist practices and teachings than the monk’s journey. The beginning is so promising, filled with the rich imagery and excitement of Mingyur Rinpoche’s clandestine departure from his monastery. But, then, the story quickly loses all its charm by bogging the reader down in lessons of the The story of a monk who sheds himself of all his worldly possessions and creature comforts to go on a wandering retreat in search of enlightenment. Unfortunately, for me, the book seemed to be more focused on Buddhist practices and teachings than the monk’s journey. The beginning is so promising, filled with the rich imagery and excitement of Mingyur Rinpoche’s clandestine departure from his monastery. But, then, the story quickly loses all its charm by bogging the reader down in lessons of the most exhausting detail. Additionally, the rambling, repetitive nature of the writing simply caused me to lose interest altogether, making it a chore to finish the book. Beyond that, I found Mingyur Rinpoche to be unbearably whiny at times, likely the result of the pampered lifestyle he led up to the retreat. That said, I did appreciate his complete honesty in the telling of his experiences and felt I could have learned much from his keen insights if only the writing had been better. Finally, I really wish the book would have covered more of Mingyur Rinpoche’s 5-year journey and not just the first 6 months. In short, both tedious and enlightening - worthwhile if you are interested in obtaining a better understanding of Buddhism, but not if you are looking for a biographical account of Mingyur Rinpoche’s life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian Wilcox

    Having read the Tibetan Book of the Dead and, likewise, a leading commentary on it, this I found to be more helpful in appreciating the process of the bardos, as well as applying them to impermanence generally. Here is a real-life documentary from within the process, and it being by a living contemporary reinforced the treatment for me. This view of life-dying-death-rebirth challenges the Near Death Experience phenomena. This challenge is not in denying NDEs, mostly pleasant, a few no Having read the Tibetan Book of the Dead and, likewise, a leading commentary on it, this I found to be more helpful in appreciating the process of the bardos, as well as applying them to impermanence generally. Here is a real-life documentary from within the process, and it being by a living contemporary reinforced the treatment for me. This view of life-dying-death-rebirth challenges the Near Death Experience phenomena. This challenge is not in denying NDEs, mostly pleasant, a few not, but questions the nature of them. The Tibetan view is that such experiences, being transitory as all experience - seeing Buddha, Jesus, deceased family members, ... - are to be released in recognition that this phantasmic parade is a continuation of impermanent stream-of-mind residue from dualistic consciousness. This book challenged me to reassess what is important to give attention to in this transitory life. As well, it inspired me to continue to work with the fact of death within everyday life experience and time set aside for 'meditation', and gave some helpful wisdom in doing this practically.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    Contents Mingyur Rinpoche (2019) (09:48) In Love with the World - A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying Prologue Part I: Adding Wood to the Fire 01. Who Are You? 02. Acknowledge the Wave but Stay with the Ocean 03. Born with a Silver Spoon 04. Impermanence and Death 05. Letting Wisdom Arise 06. What Will You Do in the Bardo? 07. Lessons from Milarepa 08. Varanasi Rail Station 09. Emptiness, Not Nothingness Contents Mingyur Rinpoche (2019) (09:48) In Love with the World - A Monk's Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying Prologue Part I: Adding Wood to the Fire 01. Who Are You? 02. Acknowledge the Wave but Stay with the Ocean 03. Born with a Silver Spoon 04. Impermanence and Death 05. Letting Wisdom Arise 06. What Will You Do in the Bardo? 07. Lessons from Milarepa 08. Varanasi Rail Station 09. Emptiness, Not Nothingness 10. If You See Something, Say Something 11. A Visit from Panic, My Old Friend 12. A Day at the Ghats 13. Of Sleep and Dreams 14. Learning to Swim 15. Memento Mori Part II: Returning Home 16. Where the Buddha Died 17. What Is Your Happy Dream? 18. Coming Through Darkness 19. A Chance Encounter 20. Naked and Clothed 21. No Picking, No Choosing 22. Working with Pain 23. The Four Rivers of Natural Suffering 24. Recalling the Bardos 25. Giving Everything Away 26. When Death Is Good News 27. Awareness Never Dies 28. When the Cup Shatters 29. In the Bardo of Becoming Epilogue Acknowledgments Glossary

  12. 4 out of 5

    John

    As a Buddhist, 5/5 - I loved it. I really enjoyed the way the author made very complex aspects of Tibetan Buddhism accessible and easy to understand. I will be reading more of Mingyur Rinpoche's work on this subject. As a writer, 3/5 - The narrative arc of almost 85-90% of the book is about a journey that, in the end, we don't get more than about a month of. I was very interested in the process by which Rinpoche identified the labels he lived by and tried to peel back those layers of identity to As a Buddhist, 5/5 - I loved it. I really enjoyed the way the author made very complex aspects of Tibetan Buddhism accessible and easy to understand. I will be reading more of Mingyur Rinpoche's work on this subject. As a writer, 3/5 - The narrative arc of almost 85-90% of the book is about a journey that, in the end, we don't get more than about a month of. I was very interested in the process by which Rinpoche identified the labels he lived by and tried to peel back those layers of identity to get to an authentic experience; also, the contrast between what was essentially a life of privilege and comfort and jumping into a more "real world" existence with such dirty things as money, hunger and train tickets was very interesting and I would have loved to read more about that process over his retreat. However, the narrative seemed to get hijacked by his near-death experience which... really just took over and finished the book. I'm left wondering if the remaining story is taken up somewhere else. Overall, 4/5 I loved the book, it was definitely worth the read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    From the blurb/seeing the author talk, I was expecting a travelogue of his four-year wandering retreat; instead, this was a deep dive into the first couple weeks, from leaving the monastery to a near-death experience, and what these experiences taught him about impermanence, emptiness, and dying. After the initial surprise wore off, this made enough sense – it did a nice job of illuminating the spiritual lessons that can be learned from everyday moments and in adversity. I probably wo From the blurb/seeing the author talk, I was expecting a travelogue of his four-year wandering retreat; instead, this was a deep dive into the first couple weeks, from leaving the monastery to a near-death experience, and what these experiences taught him about impermanence, emptiness, and dying. After the initial surprise wore off, this made enough sense – it did a nice job of illuminating the spiritual lessons that can be learned from everyday moments and in adversity. I probably would have benefited from a deeper knowledge of Tibetan Buddhist theology going in, but it's written clearly enough for a broad audience, so despite some perhaps unavoidable density, I could generally get the picture well enough. All in all, lots of food for thought – I think the overall message, to embrace life's impermanence, is a great counterpoint in a culture that prefers not to think about it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Janet Moulton

    I read so much that I often forget to post reviews, as I did with this book. Today, October 1st, 2019, I realized I did not write a review. I was very fortunate to have been selected as one of the winners of a book giveaway which I entered via good reads. I absolutely loved this book. It is the tale of a Buddhist monk's adventure outside of the protections he was used to in a monastery. He tells the story with minute personal details which enriched the reading experience. I felt I was on the tra I read so much that I often forget to post reviews, as I did with this book. Today, October 1st, 2019, I realized I did not write a review. I was very fortunate to have been selected as one of the winners of a book giveaway which I entered via good reads. I absolutely loved this book. It is the tale of a Buddhist monk's adventure outside of the protections he was used to in a monastery. He tells the story with minute personal details which enriched the reading experience. I felt I was on the train, in the depot, experiencing a new world with the author. I have been interested in mindfulness meditation and learned more about how to meditate from reading this book. I highly recommend this book. Please read other reviews if you would like more details. I have tried to leave out spoilers.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    This book was not what I expected, but it was useful and made me think. I expected more about Mingyur Rinpoche's 3+years wandering retreat itself, but the first 70% of the book covered the first 2 weeks of it only, describing his struggles to adjust to the real world (simple things like buying a train ticket) after living in monasteries where ordinary things were taken care for him. He also vividly described his emotions and feelings evoked by his ego and being self-consciousness in these everyd This book was not what I expected, but it was useful and made me think. I expected more about Mingyur Rinpoche's 3+years wandering retreat itself, but the first 70% of the book covered the first 2 weeks of it only, describing his struggles to adjust to the real world (simple things like buying a train ticket) after living in monasteries where ordinary things were taken care for him. He also vividly described his emotions and feelings evoked by his ego and being self-consciousness in these everyday situations. What I struggled with was his - Buddhist - approach to his circumstances: meditating even though he was dying and ruminescing for days about whether to ask for help or just sit and accept his dying body in order to get to the next 'bardo'. It's not an easy read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book is absolutely fabulous. The insights and wisdom shared by Mingyur Rinpoche are endless. I listened to this book on Audible and after chapter 1 purchased it in hard copy as it is lesson upon lesson of how to move beyond everything you identify with source your identity from pure awareness. I laughed, I got sweaty palms as he had to beg for his first meal...I cried as he wrestled with the decision for life or death. This book is beauty, love and wisdom. It is a must read for life!

  17. 5 out of 5

    ag Berg

    Loved this book! I have been following Mingyur Rinpoche for about 6 years. He was on his long retreat when I first learned about him, Tergar, and Tibetan buddhism. This book brings meditation to our everyday lives. Rinpoche explains it in terms of life's ups and downs and how meditation can change your life, perspective of life and how you view the world. I am so glad he survived and has come back to share his knowledge. Anyone interested in meditation should look him up, his videos are great fo Loved this book! I have been following Mingyur Rinpoche for about 6 years. He was on his long retreat when I first learned about him, Tergar, and Tibetan buddhism. This book brings meditation to our everyday lives. Rinpoche explains it in terms of life's ups and downs and how meditation can change your life, perspective of life and how you view the world. I am so glad he survived and has come back to share his knowledge. Anyone interested in meditation should look him up, his videos are great for starting a meditation practice. He has a wonderful sense of humor and great way of instructing different ways of meditation. His own experiences with mastering mediation let you know that it is a process uniquely individual.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I listened to the audiobook, which may have been a mistake. The narrator had a very un-monk-like way of speaking, a bit too performative or something. I found myself unable to fully concentrate or really get into his words because he sounded like a newscaster or the kind of speech that you would just ignore, not like someone who is talking to you. I might still try to read it again to capture some of the spiritual teachings though. I think there’s some good material in there if you’re interested I listened to the audiobook, which may have been a mistake. The narrator had a very un-monk-like way of speaking, a bit too performative or something. I found myself unable to fully concentrate or really get into his words because he sounded like a newscaster or the kind of speech that you would just ignore, not like someone who is talking to you. I might still try to read it again to capture some of the spiritual teachings though. I think there’s some good material in there if you’re interested in that, but this time around I will probably attempt the book version.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    In Love with the World by Yonget Mingyur Rinpoche is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early May. The writings of Rinpoche, a Buddhist monk on retreat/sabbatical to study other religions and end-of-life rituals in Asia. It has some elements of The Celestine Prophecy where the journey is the book’s way of conveying lessons and teachings (i.e. chaptered vignettes on mindfulness, facing and acknowledging anxious thoughts and transgressions, impermanence, experiencing both awareness and empt In Love with the World by Yonget Mingyur Rinpoche is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early May. The writings of Rinpoche, a Buddhist monk on retreat/sabbatical to study other religions and end-of-life rituals in Asia. It has some elements of The Celestine Prophecy where the journey is the book’s way of conveying lessons and teachings (i.e. chaptered vignettes on mindfulness, facing and acknowledging anxious thoughts and transgressions, impermanence, experiencing both awareness and emptiness).

  20. 5 out of 5

    FARSHAD

    NB. I read the first 60 percent of the book. The rest I flipped through. It is a good book, full of interesting passages from Tibetan Buddhism interlaced with a fascinating journey in India. It is good to read it but experience is more important. The book is like a nod to the moon; you wanna see the moon for yourself rather than focus on the nod. Some concepts keep recurring too. To me it was boring.

  21. 5 out of 5

    J Katz

    Loved this book although reading was slow in teaching parts. The story of a highly regarded and well treated monk who leaves the life long security of his station to go on a "wander" is amazing. He has never, for instance, had to buy his own train tickets or figured out many other mundane life problems. When he gets deathly ill the description of dying is amazing. I really felt his explanations about meditation were helpful too.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Victor

    Really enjoyed this book. Learned a lot about the nature of the mind and Tibetan Buddhism. However, i was expecting the author to tell more story about his journey. Instead, he only talked about the first incident and sped through the rest. The jumping back and forth from story and teaching is sometimes jarring. Nevertheless, still a recommended book if you are interested about meditation and the mind.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Roger Whitson

    This is probably the best dharma book I've read since I started practicing. I'm not as familiar with Tibetian practices than other forms of mindfulness meditation, so some of the book required some translation. But Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche has a very unique and powerful mind, and the most amazing parts of this book was simply watching him as he struggled with the defilements and embraced emptiness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marc Mannheimer

    Wonderful book. Not only was this autobio, from roughly a month of a Buddhist monk's life, interesting, the teachings, both directly expressed and implicit helped me greatly in understanding several points of Buddhist experience on which I had been in the dark. The author, having experienced panic disorder throughout his life, made me feel at home with the teachings, and hopeful for my own progress, as I, too, suffer from anxiety.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard Ladew

    There is a lot to process here, and I highly recommend it! It’s not a typical meditation instruction manual, nor is it solely a collection of dharma talks. It’s really interesting how this book is a hybrid of meditation practice and an adventure story of gaining wisdom, (perhaps even enlightenment?) from leaving absolutely everything and everyone behind in your life.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    In Love With the World - a fascinating journey and fabulously complicated read that threads one man’s longing for direct experience of ‘reality’ with profound and often elusive teachings of Buddhism. Many of the teachings are far beyond my grasp. Still I was captivated to follow this one person’s experience of ‘being with’ deeper dimensions of consciousness and awareness.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bram

    Near death experience and a primer on Tibetan Buddhism Mingyur Rinpoche has written a captivating memoir about his first wandering pilgrimage. He describes secretly leaving his monastery and the challenges (including a near death experience) he encountered, while weaving in a great primer of Tibetan Buddhism.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike Morris

    If you’re hoping for an exotic travelogue, this may not be your book. But, if you want a remarkably candid and intimate first hand look at the inner life of an authentic and well-respected Buddhist teacher - and a clear and accessible teaching on recognizing and experiencing the bardos within your present life and experience - you won’t be disappointed.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    I enjoy this book. It was more helpful than the Dalai Lama's book "The Art Of Happiness." I think this because I could contact with Rinpoche more than I could with the Dalai Lama. Both books are written by someone else. In this book, I could relate with Rinpoche. In the Dalai Lama's book, I was getting info from a third party. Sincerely, Gary

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sia

    "If this is my time to die, let me accept my death. If this is my time to live, let me accept my life. All of life is a magic display of light and form, a universe of infinite blessings that invites us to turn our hearts inside out, and love completely, to love until the inexhaustible end of dreams."

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