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An Introduction To Philosophy Of Education

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Published in the year 1988, An Introduction to Philosophy of Education is a valuable contribution to the field of Education.


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Published in the year 1988, An Introduction to Philosophy of Education is a valuable contribution to the field of Education.

42 review for An Introduction To Philosophy Of Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Fulton

    This book is certainly interesting. But you have to read through a lot of bad logic before the book becomes useful. I found chapters 1-9 to be full of poor logic, ironic since it is a philosophy book. The authors are committed to rationalism, even when they fail to provide a real reason. "Second, despite what was said above about the difficulty of knowing in some cases what would count as relevant reasons for establishing or rejecting certain premises, there are surely some premises or some worldv This book is certainly interesting. But you have to read through a lot of bad logic before the book becomes useful. I found chapters 1-9 to be full of poor logic, ironic since it is a philosophy book. The authors are committed to rationalism, even when they fail to provide a real reason. "Second, despite what was said above about the difficulty of knowing in some cases what would count as relevant reasons for establishing or rejecting certain premises, there are surely some premises or some worldviews that we simply cannot accept as rational. It is of course quite true that in saying that it is irrational to base one's behavior on a premise such as 'God expects us to shoot when pigeons fly by', or'The Aryan race is entitled to preferential treatment', one is appealing to others to adopt one's view of the sorts of thing that do not seem to be supported by anything that could count as good reasons. It is not clear how one could prove that it is not true that God expects us to shoot people when pigeons fly by. But we may still argue that it seems to us an irrational belief, since we cannot see anything remotely resembling a good reason for believing it." Essentially, it is irrational because I see it as being irrational. The authors use poor logic here. They also use seemingly willfully poor logic to bash Catholics on their examples of indoctrination and then make the strange claim that "The very nature of scientific activity precludes the possibility of indoctrination in science." "But we have to proceed by reasoning, trusting that students will come to see such things for themselves, and not by coercion or distortion. So it is not the natural desire to uphold and share our values that is at issue: it is determining to impose those values and beliefs so that they stick, come what may, that is reprehensible." Based on the example above, the authors would say that it is reprehensible to impose the belief that rape, torture, and murder are always wrong on children. If you impose it, you indoctrinate them. Now, I doubt the authors would agree with my characterization of this argument, but their logic leaves them vulnerable on this point. I expected more from a philosophy book. Than said, chapters 10-13 are actually quite excellent.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amber Strocel

    I read this book because it was assigned as the textbook for a class I took, not because I chose to. Even so, I found it to be a surprisingly accessible and quick read. Would I take it to the beach? No. Would I re-read it at some point in the future if I want a refresher on the philosophy of education? Yes.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hoda Marmar

    The overall message of the book really stuck to my mind and it goes something like: if you do not like pluralism and insist on the dichotomous static view of philosophy, then you are going against life itself, since life is all about dynamic change and diversity.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Great book, easy to read. An analytical work on various topics in education such as creativity, rationality, etc. The last few pages has a 'further reading' list with more books to look into on the various chapters in the book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hamisi Ng'Oloko

  6. 4 out of 5

    K E

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yarden Melloul

  8. 5 out of 5

    Berr

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Olinyk

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Gills

    This book is what it is. A text book about the philosophy of education.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Justin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sumita

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fazu

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dogukan Gumusatam

  16. 4 out of 5

    Summa Daines

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ogunya Nchagwa

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Freeman

    so far it the type of book that i try to read about education and it's ok for now

  19. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter Houston

  21. 5 out of 5

    Silas Yeem

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tenisha Toppin

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ogunya Nchagwa

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dilip Chetan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Duggan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ari

  28. 4 out of 5

    Asharie Whittingham

  29. 5 out of 5

    Marts (Thinker)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bukola

  31. 4 out of 5

    Jaejun Ha

  32. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jennilee

  34. 5 out of 5

    Kumar Talukdar

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ufuk YILDIRIM

  36. 4 out of 5

    Bania

  37. 5 out of 5

    Dionisia Pugong

  38. 4 out of 5

    Manguboniphace

  39. 4 out of 5

    suannai

  40. 4 out of 5

    Roy Sheehan

  41. 5 out of 5

    Minda Divinity

  42. 5 out of 5

    Merve Olgun

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