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Animal Farm (Classics To Go)

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Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. (Wikipedia)


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Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. (Wikipedia)

30 review for Animal Farm (Classics To Go)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Better Eggs

    Amazon's very Orwellian involvement with this book at the end. If Amazon ever partnered Facebook they'd own us. This is not really a review, but one of those moments where everything that was clear to you suddenly becomes utterly muddied and you really can't say what lies beneath the murky waters although a moment before you were sure you could. I'm reading Christopher Hitchen's astonishingly percipient and brilliant Arguably: Essays. I read Animal Farm too young to identify the individual animals Amazon's very Orwellian involvement with this book at the end. If Amazon ever partnered Facebook they'd own us. This is not really a review, but one of those moments where everything that was clear to you suddenly becomes utterly muddied and you really can't say what lies beneath the murky waters although a moment before you were sure you could. I'm reading Christopher Hitchen's astonishingly percipient and brilliant Arguably: Essays. I read Animal Farm too young to identify the individual animals with actual characters on the stage of communism (the old boar Major is Marx, Farmer Jones is the Tsar, the pigs Napoleon and Snowball, Stalin and Trotsky respectively) so this essay is giving me a lot to think about. So far, nothing more so than this quote (below). (Background to the quote): A group of Ukrainian and Polish refugees in a displaced persons' camp had discovered sympathetic parallels with their own plight in Orwell's parable and had begged him for permission to translate his almost-totally unknown book. But... The emotions of the American military authorities in Europe were not so easily touched. They rounded up all the copies of Animal Farm they could find and turned them over to the Red Army to be burned. The alliance between the farmers and the pigs so hauntingly described in the final pages of the novel were still in force. The book is banned in Cuba, North Korea, Burma, Iran, Kenya and most Arab countries. It is banned in the UAE not because of it's content but because it has anthropomorphic talking pigs which are unIslamic (is this not Orwellian in itself?). It is still censored in Vietnam. These nations wouldn't want ordinary people reading the book and looking at their own ruling porcine elites and seeing any parallels now would they? Who knows what kind of thoughts and actions that might lead to? Amazon and Animal Farm On 17 July 2009, Amazon.com withdrew certain Amazon Kindle titles, including Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, from sale, refunded buyers, and remotely deleted items from purchasers' devices after discovering that the publisher lacked rights to publish the titles in question. Notes and annotations for the books made by users on their devices were also deleted. After the move prompted outcry and comparisons to Nineteen Eighty-Four itself, Amazon spokesman Drew Herdener stated that the company is "changing our systems so that in the future we will not remove books from customers' devices in these circumstances." However, Amazon does not seem to a guarantee in its ToS that they won't don't this again and I understand that authors have the ability to edit (read 'change') parts of their books. This is because you can't buy a Kindle book, only rent one and Amazon can update (read 'change') them. Wikipedia and other sources Next step: Fahrenheit 451. Get the firemen out to burn the books, only ebooks allowed where content can be controlled. Original review 30 Oct 2011, updated several times.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a book I've been meaning to read for ages but never got around to - last week I not only read it but gave a lesson on the historical context for the grade 8 class, who will be reading this book and The Wave. As I found, out of the class of 24, about 20 of them had already read the book, and at least one kid knew it was an allegory of the Russian Revolution. Still, my lesson wasn't totally redundant :) For anyone who isn't familiar with the story, Animal Farm is about the animals on a farm This is a book I've been meaning to read for ages but never got around to - last week I not only read it but gave a lesson on the historical context for the grade 8 class, who will be reading this book and The Wave. As I found, out of the class of 24, about 20 of them had already read the book, and at least one kid knew it was an allegory of the Russian Revolution. Still, my lesson wasn't totally redundant :) For anyone who isn't familiar with the story, Animal Farm is about the animals on a farm in England rising up against the incompetent, cruel farmer (Mr Jones, who represents the deposed Tsar, Nicholas II) and taking over the farm, renaming it Animal Farm (USSR) and - so the glorious vision intended - running it for themselves, so their lives would be better. The vision is given to them by a pig, Old Major, who dies not long afterwards. Old Major probably represents Vladimir Lenin and Karl Marx, and it's not the socialist ideal put forward that is critiqued by this book but how that vision is corrupted by certain other characters, namely another pig called Napoleon, who represents Joseph Stalin. Napoleon chases a pig called Snowball (Leon Trotsky) off the farm with his personally trained dogs (while still just the General Secretary of the Party, Stalin recruited people who would follow him blindly, so that when Lenin died in 1924 he was able to defeat Trotsky for the leadership position and his "dogs" kept everyone else in line). The pigs then take charge, and with their literacy skills keep changing the rules the animals established in order to suit themselves, using a pig called Squealer to convince the other animals that their memories are faulty. After all, as the drafthorse Boxer keeps saying, "Comrade Napoleon is always right". Boxer is - for me - the most heartbreaking character in the novel. He represents the peasants, and is the most hardworking animal on the farm. He has utter faith in the leadership of Napoleon and works himself to the bone - literally. His reward is very telling, though I don't want to give it away. Most of the characters represent either a person, several people or groups of people, and for the complete list you can check it out on Wikipedia. Orwell, while a socialist, was very cynical about Stalin's communist USSR - and for good reason! Animal Farm is a very well-written critique of how socialist ideals are corrupted by powerful people, how the uneducated masses are taken advantage of, and how the dictator or communist leaders turn into capitalists (just look at China). It's a wonderful example of how effective the allegorical style/format can be, and a well-deserved classic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The only good pig is a dead pig. Yeah, yeah, everyone claims Orwell wrote this as about the Russian Revolution, Stalin, and the rise of Communism. Pshttt. Whatever. You know what I think he was really saying? Beware the Other White Meat! Ok, maybe not. Look, I know what you're thinking, That pig looks adorable!, but the next thing you know, that piggy is all grown up and stealing your cookies! And you'll let it steal your cookies because Mr. Pig has convinced you that giving up your cookies every The only good pig is a dead pig. Yeah, yeah, everyone claims Orwell wrote this as about the Russian Revolution, Stalin, and the rise of Communism. Pshttt. Whatever. You know what I think he was really saying? Beware the Other White Meat! Ok, maybe not. Look, I know what you're thinking, That pig looks adorable!, but the next thing you know, that piggy is all grown up and stealing your cookies! And you'll let it steal your cookies because Mr. Pig has convinced you that giving up your cookies every day was a part of the original agreement! Besides, what do you know, you're just a stupid sheep... Plus, it's just a cookie, where's the harm? Not to mention, the last guy who complained about giving up his cookie ended up mauled by that dog. Probably just a coincidence, though. Right? But it's ok because pigs are smart. That's what everyone says, right? Smarter than you are, at any rate. And if the pig says it's ok, then it's ok. I mean look at it! It couldn't possibly have anything but your best interests at heart! Alright, I'm outta pig gifs. So, I thought this was a pretty cool book. Sure, it's supposed to be about Russia, but it could just as easily be about the working class in my country. Bottom line? We need to stop listening to the spin doctors on the boob tube and start thinking for ourselves. Question everything, especially the things we think we know are true. It might be a good idea to teach our kids that it's ok not blindly believe everything we tell them, too. Besides, if we're right, then our ideals can stand up to the scrutiny of children. Otherwise, we risk raising a generation of idiots. Oh! I found one more pig gif!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    A perfect book. People will still be reading this in a thousand years time, when communism is just a footnote.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Claudia Ramírez

    “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” Those damn PIGS. I can't even.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tessa De Guzman

    Funnily enough, i read this book as a child and thought that it really WAS about animals. I remember thinking, Evil Pigs, I'm glad you're bacon in MY world, and Poor Hardworking Horsies, come live on my farm instead. You can have all the hay and makopa you want (sadly, no apples, tropical climate). I reread it after education spoiled my natural inclinations for fast and absolute punishment of evildoers and eternal rewards for the good. I do find it pleasantly strange that these animals are symbol Funnily enough, i read this book as a child and thought that it really WAS about animals. I remember thinking, Evil Pigs, I'm glad you're bacon in MY world, and Poor Hardworking Horsies, come live on my farm instead. You can have all the hay and makopa you want (sadly, no apples, tropical climate). I reread it after education spoiled my natural inclinations for fast and absolute punishment of evildoers and eternal rewards for the good. I do find it pleasantly strange that these animals are symbols for political stereotypes and yet people still appear in the book. Isn't that CRAZY? That's literary perversion in a class all its own. I'm thankful i read this in my formative years, before I had all this intellectual baggage (emphasis on baggage, piano on the intellect), because I got to appreciate it like a child would, almost like the way I appreciated Charlotte's Web. To me, back then, it was just another story about animals, albeit a wordy one, with no pictures. Which is probably why I still experience a certain righteous thrill when eating crispy bacon.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    564. Animal Farm, George Orwell Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism, an attitude that was critically shaped by his experiences during the Spanish Civil War. The Soviet Union, he believe 564. Animal Farm, George Orwell Animal Farm is an allegorical novella by George Orwell, first published in England on 17 August 1945. According to Orwell, the book reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917 and then on into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union. Orwell, a democratic socialist, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and hostile to Moscow-directed Stalinism, an attitude that was critically shaped by his experiences during the Spanish Civil War. The Soviet Union, he believed, had become a brutal dictatorship, built upon a cult of personality and enforced by a reign of terror. In a letter to Yvonne Davet, Orwell described Animal Farm as a satirical tale against Stalin ("un conte satirique contre Staline"), and in his essay "Why I Write" (1946), wrote that Animal Farm was the first book in which he tried, with full consciousness of what he was doing, "to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole". Old Major, the old boar on the Manor Farm, summons the animals on the farm together for a meeting, during which he refers to humans as "enemies" and teaches the animals a revolutionary song called "Beasts of England". When Major dies, two young pigs, Snowball and Napoleon, assume command and consider it a duty to prepare for the Rebellion. The animals revolt and drive the drunken and irresponsible farmer Mr. Jones from the farm, renaming it "Animal Farm". They adopt the Seven Commandments of Animalism, the most important of which is, "All animals are equal." Snowball teaches the animals to read and write, while Napoleon educates young puppies on the principles of Animalism. Food is plentiful, and the farm runs smoothly. The pigs elevate themselves to positions of leadership and set aside special food items, ostensibly for their personal health. Some time later, several men attack Animal Farm. Jones and his men are making an attempt to recapture the farm, aided by several other farmers who are terrified of similar animal revolts. Snowball and the animals, who are hiding in ambush, defeat the men by launching a surprise attack as soon as they enter the farmyard. Snowball's popularity soars, and this event is proclaimed "The Battle of the Cowshed". It is celebrated annually with the firing of a gun, on the anniversary of the Revolution. Napoleon and Snowball vie for pre-eminence. When Snowball announces his plans to modernize the farm by building a windmill, Napoleon has his dogs chase Snowball away and declares himself leader. ... عنوان: قلعه (مزرعه) حیوانات - نویسنده: جورج اورول؛ (جامی،...) ادبیات انگلستان؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش متن نسخه انگلیسی: در سال 1975 میلادی مترجمها: بدون هیچ ترتیبی آنهایی را که یافتم 44 نامدار را بنگاشتم. گویا باید در رکوردهای گینس ثبت شود مترجم 01 - امیرامیرشاهی در 154 ص؛ مترجم 02 - محمد فیروزبخت در 136 ص؛ مترجم 03 - احسان واحدی در 133 ص؛ مترجم 04 - رضا زارع در 120 ص؛ مترجم 05 - علی گرانمایه در 152 ص؛ مترجم 06 - سیروس نورآبادی و محسن موحدی زاد در 130 ص؛ مترجم 07 - احمد کسایی پور در 171 ص؛ نشر ماهی 1394 در 147 ص؛ مترجم 08 - مرضیه صدر در 108 ص؛ مترجم 09 - نرگس حیدری منجیلی در 128 ص؛ مترجم 10 - صالح حسینی و معصومه نبی زاده در 158 ص؛ مترجم 11 - آزاده دادفر در 195 ص؛ مترجم 12 - مریم صالحی در 127 ص؛ مترجم 13 - شهاب حبیبی در 176 ص؛ مترجم 14 - مجید نوریان در 78 ص؛ مترجم 15 - همایون نوراحمر در 131 ص؛ مترجم 16 - همایون بهشتی در 139 ص؛ مترجم 17 - مرجان غیبی در 234 ص؛ مترجم 18 - یولاند گوهرین در 160 ص؛ مترجم 19 - غلامرضا صالحی معوا در 128 ص؛ مترجم 20 - زهرا نوروزی در 117 ص؛ مترجم 21 - زینت علیزاده در 128 ص؛ مترجم 22 - بهروز غریب پور در 92 ص؛ مترجم 23 - سمانه فلاح در 104 ص؛ مترجم 24 - وحید کیان در 139 ص؛ مترجم 25 - محمدرضا آخوندی و زهرا محمدی در 108 ص؛ مترجم 26 - مریم رشتی زاده در 124 ص؛ مترجم 27 - محمد هاشمی و سعید هاشمی در 112 ص؛ مترجم 28 - حوریا موسایی در 126 ص؛ مترجم 29 - منصوره چراغی در 126 ص؛ مترجم 30 - مجتبی پایدار در 112 ص؛ مترجم 31 - پژمان کوشش در 155 ص؛ مترجم 32 - آوینا ترنم در 128 ص؛ مترجم 33 - حوراء وحیدی در 128 ص؛ مترجم 34 - ادریس باباخانی در 90 ص؛ مترجم 35 - مژگان احمدی در 120 ص؛ مترجم 36 - حلیمه بیع آتی در 112 ص؛ مترجم 37 - قدیر گلکاریان در 120 ص؛ مترجم 38 - علی اصغر افرجی در 132 ص؛ مترجم 39 - مهنوش جواهری در 141 ص؛ مترجم 40 - علی جواهرکلام در 128 ص؛ مترجم 41 - حجت امامی در 127 ص؛ مترجم 42 - محمدعلی جدیری و صمد محمدی آسیابی در 111 ص؛ مترجم 43 - حمیدرضا بلوچ در 127 ص؛ مترجم 44 - اجمدکسایی پور در 147 ص؛ مزرعه ی حیوانات، یا: «قلعه حیوانات»، رمانی پاد آرمان‌شهری، به زبان انگلیسی، و نوشته ی جُرج اُروِل است. ایشان این رمان را، در طول جنگ جهانی دوم نوشته، و در سال 1945 میلادی، در انگلستان منتشر کرده است. مزرعه ی حیوانات، درباره ی گروهی از جانوران اهلی ست، که در اقدامی آرمان‌ گرایانه و انقلابی، صاحب مزرعه: (آقای جونز) را، از مزرعه‌ اش فراری می‌دهند، تا خود اداره ی مزرعه را به‌ دست گرفته، و «برابری» و «رفاه» را، در جامعه ی خود، برقرار سازند. رهبری این جنبش را، گروهی از خوک‌ها، به‌ دست دارند، ولی پس از مدتی، این گروه انقلابی نیز، به رهبری خوکی به نام: «ناپلئون»، همچون همان آقای «جونز»، به بهره‌ کشی از حیوانات مزرعه می‌پردازند، و هرگونه مخالفتی را سرکوب می‌کنند. اورول، با نگارش این رُمان، از استبداد طبقه ی حاکم شوروی، به سختی ناراضی، و باور داشت نظام شوروی به یک دیکتاتوری بدل گشته، و بر پایه ی کیش شخصیت، بنا شده است. داستان، با توصیف شبی شروع می‌شود، که خوکی به نام «میجر پیر» حیوانات را جمع کرده، و از ظلمی که انسان بر حیوانات روا داشته، برای آنان سخن می‌گوید، و حیوانات را، به شورش علیه انسان دعوت می‌کند. وی سپس، یک سرود قدیمی را که بعداً به سرودی انقلابی، در بین حیوانات مزرعه تبدیل می‌شود، به آنها یاد میدهد. پس از چندی، حیوانات در پی شورشی، مالک مزرعه، به نام: آقای «جونز» را، از مزرعه بیرون کرده، و خود اداره ی آن را به دست می‌گیرند. پس از این انقلاب حیوانی، خوکها (که از هوش بالاتری نسبت به سایر حیوانات برخوردار هستند) نقش رهبری حیوانات مزرعه را به دست می‌گیرند. اما پس از چندی در بین خود حیوانات، یک سری توطئه و کودتا انجام می‌گیرد؛ ناپلئون که یکی از دو خوک پرنفوذ مزرعه است، با استفاده از سگ‌های درنده‌ ای که مخفیانه تربیت کرده؛ سنوبال، دیگر خوک پرنفوذ مزرعه را فراری داده، و خود به رهبر بلامنازع مزرعه می‌شود. پس از آن، سنوبال عامل جونز معرفی شده، و تمام اتفاقات بد و خرابکاری‌هایی که در مزرعه صورت می‌گیرد، به وی یا عوامل او در داخل مزرعه نسبت داده می‌شود؛ و به فرمان ناپلئون عده ی زیادی از حیوانات ،به جرم همکاری با سنوبال، توسط سگ‌ها اعدام می‌شوند. در ادامه ی داستان خوک‌ها به‌ تدریج تمامی قوانین حیوانات را زیر پا می‌گذارند. قانون اساسی حیوانات معروف به «هفت فرمان» به تدریج محو و تحریف می‌شود، خواندن سرود قدغن، و حیوانات با غذای روزانه ی کم، مجبور به کار زیاد می‌شوند. در حالیکه خوک‌ها فرمانروایی می‌کنند، و غذای زیادی می‌خورند؛ و از تمام امکانات رفاهی سود می‌برند؛ و حتی یاد می‌گیرند که چطور روی دوپا راه بروند، و با انسان‌ها معامله کنند. از جمله برنامه‌ های ناپلئون، ساخت «آسیاب بادی» ست که قرار است برای بهبود کیفیت زندگی حیوانات ساخته شود. نقشه اولیه آسیاب، توسط سنوبال طرح‌ریزی شده بوده، و در ابتدا ناپلئون به مخالفت با آن برمی‌خیزد، ولی با بیرون راندن سنوبال، ایده ی ساخت آن را پی می‌گیرد، اما به دلیل بی کفایتی ناپلئون، ساخت آن به شکل مطلوبی پیش نمی‌رود. در پایان، ساخته شدن آسیاب، که با فداکاری‌ها و زجر و تحمل فراوان حیوانات مزرعه، امکان‌پذیر گردیده، نه تنها به بهبود وضعیت زندگی حیوانات منجر نمی‌شود، که خود به آسبابی برای بهره‌ کشی بیشتر از حیوانات بدل می‌گردد. ا. شربیانی

  8. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Reads

    All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. Okay, this is why I avoid "great literature." I get that this is an important novel, but good lawd. I did not enjoy it. A Big Effing Disclaimer Just because I don't like a novel doesn't mean I didn't "get" it. Is this novel important? Yes. Is it a brilliant allegory? Sure, if you read enough history to pick it apart. But is it a good story? This is where I'm diverging from the group. I (personally) did not enjoy reading it. My All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others. Okay, this is why I avoid "great literature." I get that this is an important novel, but good lawd. I did not enjoy it. A Big Effing Disclaimer Just because I don't like a novel doesn't mean I didn't "get" it. Is this novel important? Yes. Is it a brilliant allegory? Sure, if you read enough history to pick it apart. But is it a good story? This is where I'm diverging from the group. I (personally) did not enjoy reading it. My rating/review reflects that. I'm no longer in any English class, therefore I'm under no obligation to pretend to enjoy the book. I agree it is important, that it sends an essential message but that doesn't change the fact that I didn't like it. But this is only one opinion, and my interpretation may differ from your (equally valid) view on this novel. Farmer Jones, a mean old bastard, owns the Manor farm where he keeps his animals (a variety of pigs, sheep, cows, etc) essentially in enslavement. He doesn't take particularly good care of these poor creatures and (as a result), they begin to consider some very...interesting ideas. Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself. Led by Napoleon and Snowball, two pigs, the animals form a revolt and soon take over the farm for themselves. They have a list of rules, a set of standards and a few catchy sayings. Four legs good, two legs bad. But, as things often do, everything goes south. Napoleon takes over and runs Snowball out of town. Soon their peaceful, and idyllic, barn is in upheaval. Animals are dying left and right. Everyone is quickly turning to violence, and soon there might not be anyone left at all. The only good human being is a dead one. Without further ado - this book sucked. And no, being a brilliant allegory does not excuse it for being a sucky book. I suppose, I could go into more of an analysis mode - break down this and that...relate it to the allegory and compare against the real-life events. ...but I'm no longer in any sort of English class, so I'm under no obligation to write anything deeper for my analysis. I absolutely loved it when all the animals were working together and helping each other live their best possible lives...and when things went south, oh did I hate this book. To put this into context - 1984 was really well done. The characters, the narrative, etc. Even if you took away any of the main themes, you are still left with a great story. Animal Farm... not so much. Without the allegory, it feels flat to me. So much needless death and destruction. So much hate and violence. All without a valid reason or cause. (Yes, there is a reason if you look into the allegory, but without knowing that the audience is left in limbo.) Characters are introduced solely to kill them off, and my heartstrings were yanked here and there without any payoff. It felt like George Orwell just threw the characters around cause he wanted to force a narrative on his audience and I absolutely hated it. 10/10 would not recommend. Blog | Instagram | Twitter

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    I first read this in Grade 11 and decided it was my favourite book. I knew a reread needed to happen right away, but it took me four years to finally get around to it when my boyfriend gifted me this beautiful illustrated edition. Animal Farm is a book I often think about and often quote, and it was a bit nerve-wracking to go back to it to see if it actually lived up to everything I had built it up to be. Thankfully, I'm thrilled to say it did. In many ways it's a little bit underwhelming the sec I first read this in Grade 11 and decided it was my favourite book. I knew a reread needed to happen right away, but it took me four years to finally get around to it when my boyfriend gifted me this beautiful illustrated edition. Animal Farm is a book I often think about and often quote, and it was a bit nerve-wracking to go back to it to see if it actually lived up to everything I had built it up to be. Thankfully, I'm thrilled to say it did. In many ways it's a little bit underwhelming the second time around, because the plot (which lots of people will already know because it's a retelling of the Russian revolution) is extremely simplistic. This meant, however, that I was able to focus more on motivations and symbols and the other meaty stuff outside of the plot (which, don't get me wrong, was still hella exciting). The big question: is this still my favourite book? Yes. I've not yet read a book that so succinctly and simply drives home an idea with wonderful intricacies and nuances. After all this time I also feel so comfortable with this book, I get it and love talking about it and see reflections of it all the time. Also, in response to this edition, I loved the illustrations. They were sinister and childlike and felt like political caricatures - I think Orwell would like them. Apparently Andy Serkis is going to be making a film adaptation of Animal Farm and I'm super jazzed. That doesn't really have anything to do with this review, but I wanted to share my joy. Finally, thank you to Greg for gifting me this pretty book, reading it aloud with me over FaceTime, and letting me go on big rants about why Benjamin is the WORST. <3 June 23rd, 2012: One of my favourite classics. Absolutely brilliant. Just great. Read it in Grade 11 and never looked back! Really introduced me into loving classics.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Ebaid

    "I won't read again to this writer", that was my first impression to "ANIMAL FARM". George Orwell was recommend to me by his two most famous books:"ANIMAL FARM" and "1984", and I had started reading "ANIMAL FARM" first by chance. Then I though that Orwell, almost, hadn't have something to talk about in his other book; because he "has summarized up all what is happening in the occupied revolutions". Later, I knew that "1984" was about Dystopian world that occurs after ANIMAL FARM's world. and Over "I won't read again to this writer", that was my first impression to "ANIMAL FARM". George Orwell was recommend to me by his two most famous books:"ANIMAL FARM" and "1984", and I had started reading "ANIMAL FARM" first by chance. Then I though that Orwell, almost, hadn't have something to talk about in his other book; because he "has summarized up all what is happening in the occupied revolutions". Later, I knew that "1984" was about Dystopian world that occurs after ANIMAL FARM's world. and Overall, the book was full of simple comprehensive metaphors, and reminded me of Bolshevik traitors comrades like Trotsky and Kautsky, LOL. لن أقرأ لهذا الكاتب ثانية". كان هذا أول ما تبادر إلى ذهني عندما انتهيت من هذا الكتاب" تم ترشيح جورج أورويل لي من خلال كتابيه الأشهر "مزرعة الحيوانات" و"1984"، وبدأت بمزرعة الحيوانات لا لشيء سوى الصدفة "وارتأيت بعدها أن أورويل، على الأغلب، لم يعد لديه ما يقوله لي في كتابه الثاني، فأرويل قد "لخص كل اللي بيحصل في الثورات الفاشلة *** مازلتم تريدون سماع المزيد عن الرواية؟ أرشح لكم مراجعة "فهد" التي تحكي الطريق الذي خاضه أورويل لكتابتها، مع بعض التحليل اللطيف، وتنتهي في الفقرة الأخيرة بملخص بسيط عن القصة فيه شيء من حرق الأحداث. وهذه المراجعة منتقاة من بحر من المراجعات السيئة ذات التقييم العالي.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mischenko

    This book is featured on Shabby Sunday @ https://readrantrockandroll.com/2018/... I read Animal Farm when I was in college and it was one of those reads where you think it’s going to be boring, but it turns out to be a favorite. It’s an allegorical tale representing the Russian Revolution where the characters in the book represent people during this time. I won’t go into the plot too much, but in a nutshell, this story is about a group of farm animals who rise up against the evil farmer who cares This book is featured on Shabby Sunday @ https://readrantrockandroll.com/2018/... I read Animal Farm when I was in college and it was one of those reads where you think it’s going to be boring, but it turns out to be a favorite. It’s an allegorical tale representing the Russian Revolution where the characters in the book represent people during this time. I won’t go into the plot too much, but in a nutshell, this story is about a group of farm animals who rise up against the evil farmer who cares for them. They basically take over the farm by cause of Old Major (Marx/Lenen), the pig all about change. He get’s all the animals together into an uprising against Mr. Jones, the farmer (Tsar Nicholas II). The animal characters then run the farm themselves and develop their own hierarchy being lead by Snowball (Trotsky) and Napoleon (Stalin). In a way, the story reminds me of an Aesop’s Fable because the animal characters in the book have human characteristics and there are morals and messages that are quite obvious. Young readers can read it and they won’t pick up on the meaning–they’ll just think it’s a story about a group of rebellious farm animals against humans, but I believe the message that Orwell wanted to express is that power corrupts. Also that people need to think for themselves, educate yourself and make your own decisions. Don’t let others think for you. Someone recently asked me who my favorite character was in the book which is a really difficult question to ask, in my opinion. I liked a handful of the characters including Boxer, Snowball, Benjamin, and Clover, but if I had to choose a favorite, it would have to be Snowball. Snowball’s ideas were in the best interests of the animals and he was always fair. He wanted to educate the other animals and make life easier for them. He was intelligent, brave, and stood up for his beliefs which is why he’s my favorite character in the book. I’m not sure exactly how old my edition of Animal Farm is because no publication date is given, however, Goodreads seems to have this Signet Classic published in 1956. This thin paperback is in great shape for it’s age with clean, crisp pages. My rating on this one is 5*****

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sid

    ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL BUT SOME ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS ! In the start, I thought this book would be from the view point of animals; about how they are treated, how they expect to be treated and how man is cruel towards them. But but but; I am amazed at how Orwell criticizes the political maneuvers and totalitarian rule, using animals to explain what humans do. The author beautifully portrays the way a revolution is started to stop what is happening and going full circle comes to the same point i ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL BUT SOME ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS ! In the start, I thought this book would be from the view point of animals; about how they are treated, how they expect to be treated and how man is cruel towards them. But but but; I am amazed at how Orwell criticizes the political maneuvers and totalitarian rule, using animals to explain what humans do. The author beautifully portrays the way a revolution is started to stop what is happening and going full circle comes to the same point it started from. Just the face of power is changed. This book tells how the ruling class makes fool of the working class, uses their energies and resources for their own pleasure. What happens behind the closed doors of power. How the working class is being brain washed that they are happy and satisfied and free despite of the obvious slavery they have been undergoing. My favorite character was Benjamin (yes, a donkey) , who remains a neutral throughout and says nothing despite understanding everything. A huge applause to Orwell for being able to explain human psyche, political and social dilemma wrapped in the form of this story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Under the leadership of the pigs, the animals of Manor Farm overthrow their human owner and go into business for themselves with all animals doing their part. However, some parts involve a lot less work than others and things quickly change... I somehow managed to dodge this landmine in high school and the ensuing couple decades. However, I had a few conversations about it at work and decided it was time to give it a read. Animal Farm is a dystopian tale of revolution and the ensuing government. A Under the leadership of the pigs, the animals of Manor Farm overthrow their human owner and go into business for themselves with all animals doing their part. However, some parts involve a lot less work than others and things quickly change... I somehow managed to dodge this landmine in high school and the ensuing couple decades. However, I had a few conversations about it at work and decided it was time to give it a read. Animal Farm is a dystopian tale of revolution and the ensuing government. According to everyone, it's an allegory of the Russian revolution of 1917. However, it could easily be an allegory of every revolution ever. Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. The revolution happens fairly quickly. The pigs organize the other animals and send farmer Jones out on his ass. After that, the future looks bright for about fifteen minutes. Then the pigs start maneuvering against each other and fucking over the other animals. There's also scapegoating, lying, rewriting history, and all sorts of things no government today does. That was sarcasm, before anyone decides to chime in. This is a powerful little book with many messages. Power corrupts. Communism doesn't work. Those who don't know the past are doomed to repeat it. People are dicks. There are some classics that are as dry as a geriatric's vagina and pretty joyless to read. Other classics are fairly easy reads containing a wealth of wisdom. Animal Farm is firmly in the second camp. In today's uncertain political climate, it is definitely a must read, although it may be a case of closing the barn door after the horse has already left. Five out of five stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Animal Farm is a dystopian tale of revolution and the ensuing government that takes over afterwards. It could easily be a symbolism of most revolutions that occur in history. A new leader comes in and it’s the same as the old leader. Rinse. Repeat. (Note to self): Must. Not. Get. Too. Political. With. This. Review. I absolutely loved this book and the tale of this animal farm should concern anyone that believes in a free-thinking society. All it takes is a revolution, distrust in facts, listening t Animal Farm is a dystopian tale of revolution and the ensuing government that takes over afterwards. It could easily be a symbolism of most revolutions that occur in history. A new leader comes in and it’s the same as the old leader. Rinse. Repeat. (Note to self): Must. Not. Get. Too. Political. With. This. Review. I absolutely loved this book and the tale of this animal farm should concern anyone that believes in a free-thinking society. All it takes is a revolution, distrust in facts, listening to false propaganda of any new administration and not questioning the slow changes that occur that gives government total control over personal freedoms and liberties. Animal Farm is a simple tale but it’s well written and holds many timeless truths. It’s a story of power and the absolute power that can corrupt any type of democratic society. George Orwell was a flippin' genius to write this tale. Just read it. It terrified me and it should terrify you as well.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav

    George OrwellI got stunned for a while when I finished Animal Farm-a masterpiece from George Orwell- for the novella depicts our society so perfectly- the role of power, how corrupts those who are apex of a social system and eventually they eliminate their competitors, and it happens with almost every social system, it's like a treatise on our society. Napolean is not inherently evil, Napoleon's subsequent adoption of nearly all of Mr. Jones' principles and after that the animals treat fellow ani George OrwellI got stunned for a while when I finished Animal Farm-a masterpiece from George Orwell- for the novella depicts our society so perfectly- the role of power, how corrupts those who are apex of a social system and eventually they eliminate their competitors, and it happens with almost every social system, it's like a treatise on our society. Napolean is not inherently evil, Napoleon's subsequent adoption of nearly all of Mr. Jones' principles and after that the animals treat fellow animals as human do their fellow counterparts. The original commandments are: Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. No animal shall wear clothes. No animal shall sleep in a bed. No animal shall drink alcohol. No animal shall kill any other animal. All animals are equal. Some commandments were later changed- No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets. No animal shall drink alcohol to excess. No animal shall kill any other animal without cause. The pigs and dogs take most of the power for themselves, thinking that they are the best administrators of government. Eventually the power corrupts them, and they turn on their fellow animals, eliminating competitors through propaganda and bloodshed. The novella is fable where an imaginative narrative is used, the allegorical nature allows anyone to read the novel without the need to understand the historical significance although it makes the characters easily identifiable for those who know the historic parallels. The narrator is an uninvolved third person who we know nothing about and never see, and who is not biased to any side. He weaves in and out of the creatures' heads, cluing us into things like Clover's distress about the executions. The voice of narrator is passive for most of the book as the narrator remains strictly neutral throughout the book . "It was noticed that they were especially liable to break into "Four legs good, two legs bad" at crucial moments in Snowball's speeches." In Animal Farm, personification is a common theme. “the pigs could already read as well as write perfectly.” Irony is also a literary element which features throughout in all its forms. It doesn't made any difference to animals when one leadership / social system is replaced with another one- their fate remains same " Some animals are more equal than others" We see that irony is used to show the eventual fate of animals- however narrator never involves himself, he shows his helplessness through irony- one notices that it's quite ironical that eventually 'Pigs' become indistinguishable from the humans as they acquire characteristics of human-,in the end pigs can be seen toasting not to Animal farm but to “The Manor Farm” . Orwell used satire to show his disapproval of the "system." Satire makes light of a very serious issue by making it almost ridiculous and is a literary technique widely used. Though Orwell used the allegorical farm to symbolize the communist system of Soviet Russia but I find that the novella represents the corruption of power which can be associated with any social system.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    George Orwell's Animal Farm is undeniably one of the best short novels ever written in the English language. It is a deceptively simple tale, which even older children could read. About an animal uprising, it is written in the style of a fable, and yet it can be read on so many levels. It is clearly both a satire and an allegory, a dystopian tale, and its author George Orwell made no secret of what regime, and which politicians, he was so mercilessly parodying. Yet as with all great novels, it s George Orwell's Animal Farm is undeniably one of the best short novels ever written in the English language. It is a deceptively simple tale, which even older children could read. About an animal uprising, it is written in the style of a fable, and yet it can be read on so many levels. It is clearly both a satire and an allegory, a dystopian tale, and its author George Orwell made no secret of what regime, and which politicians, he was so mercilessly parodying. Yet as with all great novels, it speaks to us today and holds many timeless truths. It is the sort of novel where a reader will find new depths in each rereading. The inspiration for the novel came from a real-life episode. Orwell had just left the BBC, in 1943, and was uneasy about some propaganda he could see distributed by the then "Ministry of Information". He says, "I saw a little boy, perhaps ten years old, driving a huge carthorse along a narrow path, whipping it whenever it tried to turn. It struck me that if only such animals became aware of their strength we should have no power over them, and that men exploit animals in much the same way as the rich exploit the proletariat." George Orwell wrote Animal Farm between November 1943 and February 1944, but the novel was not published straightaway, because of the USSR's status as an ally in the Second World War. George Orwell was a socialist writer, so the fact that he chose to do such a savage critique of the Soviet Union may come as a bit of a surprise to a present-day reader. One might have expected him to choose the far right, rather than the far left. But he personally felt that the Soviet Union (now Russia) of that time had itself become a brutal dictatorship, and that its original ideals had become perverted. Animal Farm was subsequently published in England in 1945, just after the war, and ironically it quickly became a great commercial success when it did finally appear, partly because the Cold War so quickly followed the Second World War. However the book was immediately banned in the USSR and other communist countries. To this day it is still banned or censored in some places; the United Arab Emirates, Cuba, North Korea, and China. In his story George Orwell chronicles the rising to power of Joseph Stalin, who is depicted by the pig "Napoleon" in the novel. The story parallels his emergence as a natural leader, and gradually follows his rise to power as a dictator. Near the beginning of the novel, the farm animals overthrow their oppressor, the farmer "Mr Jones". This is a direct analogy to the Bolshevik Revolution of October 1917, when the Russian Tsar Nicholas II, who had abdicated in February, was executed by the Bolsheviks along with the rest of his family, in July 1918. Interestingly, Orwell said the drunken farmer Jones, who neglects his animals, was based on the real life Tsar Nicholas II. But their democratic coalition of animals, all with a vision of independence, comfort and freedom from constraints, is gradually broken down. There is straightaway a consolidation of power among the pigs, who do no work because they are the "brainworkers" with what is tacitly agreed as superior intelligence. Just as the Soviet intelligentsia did, the pigs establish themselves as the ruling class in the new "free" society. In Animal Farm they then immediately begin to manipulate and control the new state for their own benefit. At the start of the novel, "Major" a middle white boar, has a dream, which he relates to all the animals, in a lengthy impassioned speech. It is a dream of the future, and of freedom for all creatures. It captures their imaginations, and inspires their actions from then on. Major is based on a combination of Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin. Just as Lenin's embalmed body was put on display for the people,(view spoiler)[ Major's skull is initially mounted as an emblem for the animals to revere, although by the end this is removed, and the animals are expected to worship Napoleon. (hide spoiler)] Major's principles provide the foundation for the code of the revolution and the philosophy of "Animalism". The other main character at the start of the novel is the pig, "Snowball" who is based on Leon Trotsky. Just as in the Soviet Union, these two characters vie for power, with "Napoleon" using subterfuge and manipulation to his own ends. He arranges false confessions, show trials and executions to enforce his power, frequently changing history as the story unfolds. "Squealer" is a pig who works on behalf of Napoleon, employing various devious means to misrepresent and confuse the animals. He is apparently based on Molotov. Squealer speechifies, using elaborate philosophical ideas which the animals cannot really follow, often using the Socratic dialogue to get the answer he desires. And this is always used to justify the pigs' greedy and unprincipled behaviour; anything which is self-serving and goes against the original ideas of fairness. George Orwell is keen to show the corruption of "Animalist" ideals by those in power, not that the ideals themselves were wrongly held. In 1947, George Orwell wrote, "For the past ten years I have been convinced that the destruction of the Soviet myth was essential if we wanted a revival of the socialist movement ... I thought of exposing the Soviet myth in a story that could be easily understood by almost anyone and which could be easily translated into other languages." For instance, Squealer works on the animals so that they accept a slogan which is almost the direct opposite of its original, "Four legs good, two legs bad" becomes "Four legs good, two legs better" overnight, as bleated by the impressionable, keen to follow, sheep. The reason for this is clear from the story. And "Snowball" (based on Trotsky) is (view spoiler)[thus expelled from the revolutionary state (hide spoiler)] by a malicious comrade eager to dominate, using any violent means available to achieve his ends. Nobody knows who they can trust any more. The irony is at its highest in the depiction of corruption; the tyranny and hypocrisy of the pigs as led by Napoleon. The food rations get increasingly smaller, yet it is "proved" to them that they are all much better off than they were formerly under Farmer Jones. The animals' ideology of liberation and equality gradually disintegrates. The rules change secretly, slowly and silently, so nobody is sure what is really the truth any longer. History is rewritten; memories become unreliable; the brainwashing is slow and subtle. The animals can read, but there is little documentation, except for seven commandments, painted on the barn wall, (view spoiler)[1. Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. 2. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. 3. No animal shall wear clothes. 4. No animal shall sleep in a bed. 5. No animal shall drink alcohol. 6. No animal shall kill any other animal. 7. All animals are equal. (hide spoiler)] Yet over time, each of these is amended, to the advantage of the pigs, until in the end there are no words showing at all, and the final famously nonsensical maxim is spouted without question, "All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." (view spoiler)[The rousing song "Beasts of England", which all the animal took as their National Anthem at the beginning of the story, is banned. The symbol depicting the horn and hoof, on their green flag, which indicated their Animalism philosophy and power, is obliterated. (This was similar in real life to the hammer and sickle on the Soviet flag.) (hide spoiler)] The novel is a dual critique against the Stalinist regime of violence, but also against the imposed rhetoric, against the language employed, logic and ideals. Another character indicated by George Orwell is his depiction of Adolf Hitler, as one of the farmers, "Mr Frederick", who wants to take over the renamed "Animal Farm". But there are many minor characters whom we all recognise in our own lives. Take the cat, who votes for both sides at the same time. Who has never come across a "two-faced" person? Or the pony "Mollie", the stereotypically vain and lazy original Essex girl, with her penchant for wearing ribbons in her hair and looking at herself in a mirror, regardless of any greater good which may come about by a little hard work. The story of the carthorse "Boxer" will break your heart. His courage, his steadfastness; with his personal motto, "I will work harder!" he is the archetypal salt of the earth. But he is naïve and gullible, and the reader fears that he will be taken advantage of to a devastating conclusion. You will cry, internally at least, but you will also laugh with this book. Here is an extract from the pompous poet pig, Minimus's, eulogy about Napoleon. "Friend of the fatherless! Fountain of happiness! Lord of the swill-bucket!" The conclusion of the book is predictable, but perhaps not in quite the simple way the reader expects. Yes, the oppressees become the oppressors, but in a fiendishly clever denouement. All the political manipulations of the novel are recognisable today. Wherever you live, you will not have to look very close from home to find such a regime. And also, the brilliance of this novel is that those characteristics of scheming, dishonesty, cynicism, and underhanded ways of achieving a particular end, are not confined to politics. Who has never watched a skilled manipulator diverting attention from one major problem by concentrating on a minor one? It may have been in politics - or it may have been in a committee meeting - or even, dare it be said, around your own dinner table. Large or small scale, these observations by George Orwell are, sadly, truths about the human condition and human behaviour. They are timeless, and present in any institution, cooperation, business, family - in fact any group of people. One critic has even suggested that Orwell has put himself in the novels as Benjamin, the donkey, a wise old creature who is the only one who pessimistically repeats, "Life will go on as it has always gone on - that is, badly." Have you actually read Animal Farm? No? Then please do. You read it years ago? Then try reading it again. It is an outstanding novel, with the hallmarks of a true classic; it is both entertaining and profound.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    George Orwell leaves absolutely nothing to the imagination. This is a blatant political statement. There’s no reading between the lines in order to ascertain the meaning, it’s all here on the page. After around page twenty it was very obvious how this book would end. History repeats itself and in this case it goes full circle. Nothing changes. And a wise old Donkey was the only one in the piece aware of this. We can presume he has seen it before, though, on a character level he was a bit of an a George Orwell leaves absolutely nothing to the imagination. This is a blatant political statement. There’s no reading between the lines in order to ascertain the meaning, it’s all here on the page. After around page twenty it was very obvious how this book would end. History repeats itself and in this case it goes full circle. Nothing changes. And a wise old Donkey was the only one in the piece aware of this. We can presume he has seen it before, though, on a character level he was a bit of an ass not to tell anybody what was coming. See what I did there? I’m good. I know. The problem I had with Animal Farm is that I could not engage with it. The characters aren’t really characters. The setting isn’t really a setting. And the plot isn’t really a plot. They are all mere devices, a means for Orwell to blurt out his political statement. The entire book is one big author filibuster, an entire situation and a group of characters created for the simple reason of showing Orwell’s opposition to communism and, more specifically, the Stalin regime. It’s cleverly written, and it is funny at times, but such direct authorial intention took something away from the reading experience. I couldn’t lose myself within the writing. The pigs were used as an insult to mankind. Their leader Napoleon (aptly named?) slowly distances the pigs from the animals of the revolution. They begin to take on the traits of humans, and after a few chapters they have set themselves up as the thing they originally usurped. They become corrupt and driven by money and profit. They’re above their peers, ultimately, destroying their own aims. By doing this Orwell is calling humans pigs; he is calling post-revolutionaries pigs. For me reading this, this was more of an insult to pigs than humans. Pigs are lovely animals. (Nicer than humans?) The metaphor certainly relies much on the reader’s interpretation of what a pig is. That’s me just being pedantic and silly, but I guess I just like pigs. And I feel like I’ve read Animal Farm before. I feel like I know this story, and that’s because it is the history of mankind; it is the history of revolution. So, needless to say, Orwell has captured a large sense of this on the page. When it has been read, it is definitely something that cannot be unread. The allegory is pertinent and, in a sense, an almost pessimistic truism, though the inner romantic in me finds such a defeatist attitude, well, defeating. It’s undoubtedly very intelligent writing, but I just didn’t enjoy it. When I read literature, whether it be poetry, play or novel, I like imagining things; I like coming up with my own interpretation, meaning, or criticisms. With this, Orwell has said it all. I feel like I didn’t need to read it, a plot summary would have given me everything the writing did. - This is the first book I read on my 2017 reading challenge, I hope I enjoy the others more!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Manny

    "They always call the other side ‘the elite’. Why are they elite? I have a much better apartment than they do. I’m smarter than they are. I’m richer than they are. I became president and they didn’t. And I’m representing the greatest, smartest most loyal best people on Earth – the deplorables, remember that?" - Donald Trump, June 20 2018 "Four legs good, two legs better!" - George Orwell, Animal Farm, 1945

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Not as formidable as 1984, this modern day fable, though, bears down hard on socialism and even more on the very aspects of our nature that brings power struggles about. First published in 1945, this allegorical criticism of Stalinist communism is nonetheless still relevant today as a cautionary satire on totalitarianism in general.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ujjawal Sureka

    Genre: Political Satire Publication Date: August 1945 Love this book. This book is satiric and humourous. Orwell has depicted the political and civil issues of early Russia in a beautiful way. His writing is clever and makes the reader find himself very much engaged with the story and at times sympathetic towards the animals, only to realise that it is an allegory and all this had actually happened to people before and such misuse of power and trust still happen all around the world.

  21. 4 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    Wow. Everything about this was so clever. I think my mind just exploded. Around the Year in 52 Books Challenge Notes: 8. A classic with less than 200 pages

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samin

    I absolutely loved this book. It wasn't boring to me at all. I think Orwell did a great job of symbolizing all the injustice that happens in name of an outside force and how simple minded people who do not educate themselves get taken advantage from, be it West for Soviet Russia, America for Iran or Terrorists for the United states.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trina (Between Chapters)

    I read this in high school and hated it because it terrified me. It still terrifies me. Read this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Khush

    “All animals are equal” is the original commandment – when the Farm is still ruled by the cruel and alcoholic Mr. Jones. Once he is overthrown, and the animals take over the Farm. The clever animals slightly modify the slogans to suit their own needs, for instance, now, they say “all animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.” These more 'equal animals' are the ruling pigs in the book – a few pigs who oppose them are wiped out. The ruling pigs modifies laws, “no animal shall “All animals are equal” is the original commandment – when the Farm is still ruled by the cruel and alcoholic Mr. Jones. Once he is overthrown, and the animals take over the Farm. The clever animals slightly modify the slogans to suit their own needs, for instance, now, they say “all animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others.” These more 'equal animals' are the ruling pigs in the book – a few pigs who oppose them are wiped out. The ruling pigs modifies laws, “no animal shall kill any other animal, without cause.” 'Without cause' is the modification to the original slogan which the pigs add to remain Ruling Pigs What interests me about this book (and also about Orwell's 1984) is the constant refrain by the reviewers that Orwell wrote this book against 'Communism.' Against the Soviet Union. This could possibly have triggered ideas in him, but to dwell too much on it and claim that the book is against communism is insincere, false, and misleading. He just had human beings in mind when he wrote animal farm. It is a powerful and compelling book both in content and style. It is amazing to see how animal world mirrors the human world – no matter how much we try to distance ourselves and put the blame solely on communists. In the book, the Pigs in particular not only mirror human being, they become them. And then we see, how these animals, when having absolute power, spawn new knowledge systems and act cruelly. The Pigs destroy other animals though claiming to be their Saviors. While Benjamin, a donkey, and Boxer, a horse, remain my favorites. I guess even the powerful pigs- like human beings all over the world when reading this book will most probably make similar claims. In such an atmosphere of cruelty unleashed by the Pigs on other innocent animals, and thinking of the climate we live in today, I admire the cats as they are shown in the book. I also understood the vain horse who leaves the farm. Sometimes, or perhaps always, even though it could have terrible consequences, one should avoid becoming pigs and donkeys, if one can do so. In the book, for instance, Pigs would not have become the Pigs if the majority animals were like cats. Allegory does not only act like an allegory in the book; it becomes real, urgent like the world we inhabit. Orwell's rage must have been maddening, but it is fascinating to see how he reigned his rage in the form of a book. I wonder if in today's world someone can write 1984 or Animal Farm, or even can one distinguish between the modern-day pig and the Benjamin? It is depressive to see the modern-day pig pretending to be Benjamin. Modern day Benjamin might work for others by day, and later have drinks with the pigs to make sure that “some animals remain more equal than others.” In other words, the ruthless pig and modern avatars of Benjamin and Boxer are now close buddies. In such a scenario it is no longer clear who is Benjamin. Most pigs imagine themselves as Benjamin as they gorge on milk and eggs. Since it is difficult to choose and figure out things in the age of alternative facts, I prefer to be cat-like. One occupies a little space and does what one likes best such as reading books and writing reviews, and let others do their piggy stuff. I do not want to be a victim, nor an oppressor.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lou

    Animal Farm was such a great book and demands a re-read. That time is way overdue it has been a while since I read this and I was trying to find a way to review what Orwell was trying to convey in this story. I found couple of good reviews that put it so much better in perspective so why try myself when it's been written about by so many people. When I read it again in the not so distant future I will add my own thoughts So here's to what some readers wrote in a couple of other websites. ”Power Animal Farm was such a great book and demands a re-read. That time is way overdue it has been a while since I read this and I was trying to find a way to review what Orwell was trying to convey in this story. I found couple of good reviews that put it so much better in perspective so why try myself when it's been written about by so many people. When I read it again in the not so distant future I will add my own thoughts So here's to what some readers wrote in a couple of other websites. ”Power corrupts, but absolute power corrupts absolutely-and this is vividly and eloquently proved in Orwell's short novel. "Animal Farm" is a simple fable of great symbolic value, and as Orwell himself explained: "it is the history of a revolution that went wrong". The novel can be seen as the historical analysis of the causes of the failure of communism, or as a mere fairy-tale; in any case it tells a good story that aims to prove that human nature and diversity prevent people from being equal and happy ,or at least equally happy.” “‘Animal Farm’ tells the simple and tragic story of what happens when the oppressed farm animals rebel, drive out Mr. Jones, the farmer, and attempt to rule the farm themselves, on an equal basis. What the animals seem to have aimed at was a utopian sort of communism, where each would work according to his capacity, respecting the needs of others. The venture failed, and "Animal Farm" ended up being a dictatorship of pigs, who were the brightest, and most idle of the animals.” “So, it appears that the revolution was doomed from the beginning, even though it began in idealistic optimism as expressed by the motto" no animal must ever tyrannize over his own kind. Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers. "When the animals drive out Mr. Jones, they create their "Seven Commandments" which ensure equality and prosperity for all the animals. The pigs, however, being the natural leaders, managed to reverse the commandments, and through terror and propaganda establish the rule of an elite of pigs, under the leadership of Napoleon, the most revered and sinister pig.” "Animal Farm" successfully presents how the mechanism of propaganda and brainwashing works in totalitarian regimes, by showing how the pigs could make the other animals believe practically anything. Responsible for the propaganda was Squealer, a pig that "could turn black into white". Squealer managed to change the rule from "all animals are equal" to" all animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others". He managed to convince the other animals that it was for their sake that the pigs ate most of the apples and drank most of the milk, that leadership was "heavy responsibility" and therefore the animals should be thankful to Napoleon, that what they saw may have been something they "dreamed", and when everything else failed he would use the threat of " Jones returning" to silence the animals. In this simple but effective way, Orwell presents the tragedy and confusion of thought control to the extent that one seems better off simply believing that" Napoleon is always right". http://more2read.com/?review=animal-farm-by-george-orwell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Fabian

    The inherent evil in Teletubbies. The satanic perversion of one very Disneyfied utopia. Orwell's super scary fairy tale is PERFECT. The tenderness in the animals easily translates to that shared by all mankind for itself. And, oh, so easily do modern political players fill the spots of pigs or dogs. Basically in "A.F." all the little animals contracted serious rabies simultaneously. Who will survive the plague? A.F.=America. The fairy story of SHORT MEMORIES & DUPES. This is the first time I r The inherent evil in Teletubbies. The satanic perversion of one very Disneyfied utopia. Orwell's super scary fairy tale is PERFECT. The tenderness in the animals easily translates to that shared by all mankind for itself. And, oh, so easily do modern political players fill the spots of pigs or dogs. Basically in "A.F." all the little animals contracted serious rabies simultaneously. Who will survive the plague? A.F.=America. The fairy story of SHORT MEMORIES & DUPES. This is the first time I read this baffling novel. AF! Its NEVER too late to acquaint oneself with this authentic gem.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The man-to-pig metamorphosis is wellknown since Odysseus met Circe, but the opposite transformation works equally well. Probably more equally well than the other way round, considering the privileged equality of pigs. One could almost get the notion that pigs and men are interchangeable, and somehow it is hard to know beforehand which species would be more (equally) offended by the comparison. I reread Animal Farm today for professional reasons, and I was surprised how much I still appreciate it a The man-to-pig metamorphosis is wellknown since Odysseus met Circe, but the opposite transformation works equally well. Probably more equally well than the other way round, considering the privileged equality of pigs. One could almost get the notion that pigs and men are interchangeable, and somehow it is hard to know beforehand which species would be more (equally) offended by the comparison. I reread Animal Farm today for professional reasons, and I was surprised how much I still appreciate it after several decades. In a way, I could argue that it gains truth each year in the same way 1984 moves into the realm of reality from a darkly funny dystopia. But then again, we all know that truth isn't truth, so I must be mistaken on that. If memory clashes with modified truth, it is memory that must be faulty. Animal Farm is of course a satire describing a very specific era in history, the corruption of the communist revolution under Stalin. But that strikes me as less important than the fact that Orwell created archetypes of human behaviour that manage to transcend the original setting and cross the border of time and space to move into our contemporary pigly power play. Who doesn't find an equivalent of a vindictive Napoleaon urinating on the brilliant plans of a rival, only to steal them afterwards? Who doesn't recognise the type of narcissistic "leader" who offers himself all available honours while crying "Snowball" whenever something goes wrong? Who doesn't know the herd of sheep who are barely capable of reproducing the most simple slogans, but still dominate each meeting with their loud and braindead bleating? Who doesn't know the hardworking, honest horse who refuses to let disappointment break him down until his life is completely spent under the yoke? Who doesn't know one of those cynical donkeys who see the world for the depraved place it has always been and will always stay? We're all there, in the Animal Farm, and we share Muriel's confusion when she reads the commandments which seemingly prove that her memory is wrong. All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others. Brutal truth in a world that has discovered the most powerful sword there is to guide humanity (aka piggity): the written word. If you control the word, you control the world. That is the true teaching of Animalism. Pigism and sheepism are just variations on the general theme. The one thing that made me laugh out loud in sheer pleasure was the attempt to form a re-education committee for the wild creatures. You can't tame rats and rabbits! Why is that such a good thought? There won't be any rabbitism or ratism, just rabbits and rats doing what their wild nature leads them to do. I'm with them, for sure!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” When I read this in school I flew through it. I do remember it made me uncomfortable, but at the time I couldn't figure out why. I don't think I understood very much of it. Reading it so many years later, I can see how witty and intelligent it is. With all that's going on in the world right now it definitely still makes me uncomfortable...and in many ways scared. At any rate I'm glad I re-read it. I do appreciate it much more “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” When I read this in school I flew through it. I do remember it made me uncomfortable, but at the time I couldn't figure out why. I don't think I understood very much of it. Reading it so many years later, I can see how witty and intelligent it is. With all that's going on in the world right now it definitely still makes me uncomfortable...and in many ways scared. At any rate I'm glad I re-read it. I do appreciate it much more than I did back then. “Man serves the interests of no creature except himself.” “The distinguishing mark of man is the hand, the instrument with which he does all his mischief.”

  29. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Vellacott

    "All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others." What a great book. I can't believe I haven't read it before. Written at a time when the evils of communism hadn't been fully exposed and some still thought it could work in practice, Animal Farm was sure to be an eye opener. The setting is a "normal" farm--controlled and managed by humans. But one day the animals have had enough of being oppressed and abused as human slaves. They rise up and take over the farm. Their goal is fo "All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others." What a great book. I can't believe I haven't read it before. Written at a time when the evils of communism hadn't been fully exposed and some still thought it could work in practice, Animal Farm was sure to be an eye opener. The setting is a "normal" farm--controlled and managed by humans. But one day the animals have had enough of being oppressed and abused as human slaves. They rise up and take over the farm. Their goal is for all animals to be equal--to work for the good of the farm and for the sake of their community. Communism in action, in theory. But what will happen in practice? I can see why this book has become a classic. It demonstrates that all ideas based around a communist model are doomed to failure from the outset. Humans are basically selfish due to sin--they cannot motivate themselves to work for the good of the masses. There will always be dictators who will rise up and seek to control the workers. Who will make the rules if everyone is equal and how will they be enforced? What happens to those who depart from the agreed standards? I wasn't expecting a short read like this to cover so many aspects of life. Previously accepted historic facts are airbrushed out of existence, and the animals in time become convinced that they have imagined things. It reminded me of those who seek to deny the Holocaust or even the death and resurrection of Jesus--both historically proven but now widely doubted or ignored. The animals are kept superficially satisfied by being inundated with statistics, facts and figures. These tell them why they are better off than they used to be and how things are improving all of the time. Of course, this is not how the animals actually feel--they are hungry and miserable. But, the facts don't lie, right? Ceremonies and certificates galore compensate for the meaninglessness of the animals futile daily activity. I witnessed this exact phenomenon whilst serving in the police--statistics can be manipulated to say exactly what the powers that be want them to say. A community feels that their neighbourhood is becoming more dangerous and that crime is on the rise. But, have you ever heard a politician or a police chief say that? Of course not, crime is always falling, unemployment is going down and the cities are safer than ever...... From a Christian perspective there is much to be learned also from Animal Farm. We know that communism will fail because of human nature towards selfish behaviour. Those who believe that the early believers in Acts were practicing a form of communism are forgetting that the text tells us that they voluntarily shared their possessions with each other. There was no force involved. Even then there were leaders who instructed the people and organised them. That is the way society has become since the original fall of man--there will be some rich and some poor. The Christian life is about what we do with the resources, talents and abilities we have been given by God, we can use them to bless others. Assuming that a common level of limited wealth would lead to satisfaction is a gross error because it removes our innate desire for innovation and to carry out a hard day of work and reap the benefits. To be able to share with others out of our abundance or even in our poverty. It amazes me that despite the numerous (and tragic) failures of communist countries worldwide there are still so many people that think it can work. They point to an insignificant aspect of each dictatorship as the reason for the demise ignoring the obvious--communism will never work no matter the circumstances or favourable conditions because it is not part of God's plan for mankind which has been clearly laid out in the Bible. I recommend this book to all readers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    This took me waaay too long to read.. it's like 90 pages and it took me 3 days?? It was really interesting nonetheless. Definitely a good book to start if you're trying to read more classics since the writing style is pretty simple.

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