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The Point of Light

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For fans of All the Light We Cannot See, Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and The Nightingale comes an emotionally gripping, beautifully written historical novel about one woman’s epic, triumphant search for war crimes evidence during the darkest times of World War II. May 1940. As Catelyn, a new photojournalism graduate steels herself for Germany's coming invasion of her hometown P For fans of All the Light We Cannot See, Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and The Nightingale comes an emotionally gripping, beautifully written historical novel about one woman’s epic, triumphant search for war crimes evidence during the darkest times of World War II. May 1940. As Catelyn, a new photojournalism graduate steels herself for Germany's coming invasion of her hometown Paris, she comes face-to-face with the French Resistance. These are the freedom fighters who will face down the German army after the French government has surrendered to Hitler almost without a fight. She takes up arms against the Germans in her own way: armed with her 35 mm camera she looks for the one photograph that will expose the Nazi horror for what it is. But then she is captured and imprisoned at Auschwitz. She is taken to the home of the second-in-command and tasked with schooling his twin daughters. It is then she meets Pietor, the young German doctor at Auschwitz fighting to help the prisoners at every turn. Catelyn is drawn to him and he to her. A key Nazi, hiding in the shadows of Auschwitz, commits an unspeakable atrocity and Catelyn secretly captures it on film. Then the man claims he was never there. Can she now smuggle the photograph out of Auschwitz and preserve it for the war crimes trial in Nuremberg? Or will his secret die with her as the SS hunts her down? Buy now and settle in with a book that will transport you to a different time and place where you will meet people you run from and people you love. From USA TODAY bestseller, John Ellsworth. AMAZON HAS SAID, "WE ARE INSPIRED BY THE SUCCESS OF THIS WRITER AND HOW HE IS DELIGHTING READERS"--AMAZON PRESS RELEASE 10/15/18


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For fans of All the Light We Cannot See, Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and The Nightingale comes an emotionally gripping, beautifully written historical novel about one woman’s epic, triumphant search for war crimes evidence during the darkest times of World War II. May 1940. As Catelyn, a new photojournalism graduate steels herself for Germany's coming invasion of her hometown P For fans of All the Light We Cannot See, Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and The Nightingale comes an emotionally gripping, beautifully written historical novel about one woman’s epic, triumphant search for war crimes evidence during the darkest times of World War II. May 1940. As Catelyn, a new photojournalism graduate steels herself for Germany's coming invasion of her hometown Paris, she comes face-to-face with the French Resistance. These are the freedom fighters who will face down the German army after the French government has surrendered to Hitler almost without a fight. She takes up arms against the Germans in her own way: armed with her 35 mm camera she looks for the one photograph that will expose the Nazi horror for what it is. But then she is captured and imprisoned at Auschwitz. She is taken to the home of the second-in-command and tasked with schooling his twin daughters. It is then she meets Pietor, the young German doctor at Auschwitz fighting to help the prisoners at every turn. Catelyn is drawn to him and he to her. A key Nazi, hiding in the shadows of Auschwitz, commits an unspeakable atrocity and Catelyn secretly captures it on film. Then the man claims he was never there. Can she now smuggle the photograph out of Auschwitz and preserve it for the war crimes trial in Nuremberg? Or will his secret die with her as the SS hunts her down? Buy now and settle in with a book that will transport you to a different time and place where you will meet people you run from and people you love. From USA TODAY bestseller, John Ellsworth. AMAZON HAS SAID, "WE ARE INSPIRED BY THE SUCCESS OF THIS WRITER AND HOW HE IS DELIGHTING READERS"--AMAZON PRESS RELEASE 10/15/18

30 review for The Point of Light

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Just-About-Cocky Ms M

    Three things right up front: 1. Based on their exploits, Pino Lella, the Italian Forrest Gump in Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and Claire Vallant, the amazing teenaged super photojournalist in The Point of Light, won WWII all by themselves. No need whatever for John Wayne, D-Day, Band of Brothers, or anyone or anything else. 2. Every reviewer who just adored this book and commented on its accuracy knows absolutely nothing about WWII in general and the events in France in particular because of the errors Three things right up front: 1. Based on their exploits, Pino Lella, the Italian Forrest Gump in Beneath a Scarlet Sky, and Claire Vallant, the amazing teenaged super photojournalist in The Point of Light, won WWII all by themselves. No need whatever for John Wayne, D-Day, Band of Brothers, or anyone or anything else. 2. Every reviewer who just adored this book and commented on its accuracy knows absolutely nothing about WWII in general and the events in France in particular because of the errors large and small littering virtually every page. I grew tired rather soon of highlighting all the mistakes from the first page through page 125 when I finally just quit. 3. Good historical fiction should treat history with respect and accuracy, and its characters should also be faithful—or at least believable—to the period. Claire Vallant and the entire cast of characters here are unbelievable in the real sense of that word. Now let’s proceed with the review. No well-respected graduate school of journalism [or any other subject for that matter] would accept a 17-year-old girl who had not completed her studies at a lycée. This École Supérieure de Journalisme [that translates as graduate school and not “superior school” as the author thinks] had a worldwide reputation to maintain, so no children allowed. No Paris newspaper, real or imagined, especially with an editor named—incorrectly—Marseilles, would give Mademoiselle Claire Vallant, our plucky, feisty, unbelievable teenaged heroine a job. M. Marseilles would never send her off with a camera to photograph German soldiers allegedly sneaking into France. He would not expect her to snap Jews being rounded up in Paris in 1940 when deportations did not begin until months later. This editor would never ask Claire to deliberately allow German soldiers to capture her so she could take photographs from a concentration camp. And because so many of these appalling novels Must Have a Romance amid all the horrors of war, Claire has her alleged childhood friend, Remy Schildmann, son of a German ambassador, whose first name is not the French “Rémy” but the amazingly incorrect “Remington.” Although this obligatory Love Interest joins the SS—how many times have we seen this trope, dear readers?—he is still loyal to France, where he grew up, and vows to join the resistance or, in the alternative, sabotage the German war effort from his position in the Waffen SS. The Resistance would have shot the improbably named Remy had he tried to join, and the SS would have discovered his “plan” in about a nanosecond. There is an excellent book, When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light under German Occupation, 1940-1944, that provides an accurate timeline, richly described, of every event that occurred before May 10, 1940, and after the Allies forced the Germans to surrender on August 25, 1944. Had the author bothered to consult this book, or even Wikipedia, the default source for the lazy and uninformed, at least this novel might have had fewer obvious mistakes. The writing is dreadful.: hackneyed, trite, inane, clunky, wooden, and amateurish. The point-of-view switches gave me whiplash, changing as they did between paragraphs and pages with little reason or clarity. The author frequently lost his plot points and repeated events and conversations. He did not work with a timeline, since Claire and her friends, and sometimes The Love of Her Life, Remy, swore to join the Resistance, and then had already joined it, and then considered joining it, all of these “actions” occurring in a muddle. As an aside, the author’s version of the Resistance is so wrong that it is cringe-inducing. Some other reviewers more enlightened regarding WWII historical fiction also pointed out that the author used word-for-word Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier’s Nuremberg testimony without the slightest attribution. I am not surprised at this. He has already trivialized her life and work beyond belief with his silly, simpering, and utterly improbable Claire Vallant. I would love seeing the spirit of Marie-Claude rousing all her formidable Communist Resistance compatriots from wherever they rest now and publicly shame this author for his travesty of a novel.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Disappointing and plagarized from war crimes testimony, word-for-word I am very disappointed in this book. I have read Mr. Ellsworth's other books and enjoyed them, so I had high expectations. I was very disappointed. I read a lot of historical fiction and I am especially interested in World War II. This book falls far short. One of the problems is the change in Point-of-view. Sometimes the action was described in 1st person while other times the text recounted events in a sort of documentary styl Disappointing and plagarized from war crimes testimony, word-for-word I am very disappointed in this book. I have read Mr. Ellsworth's other books and enjoyed them, so I had high expectations. I was very disappointed. I read a lot of historical fiction and I am especially interested in World War II. This book falls far short. One of the problems is the change in Point-of-view. Sometimes the action was described in 1st person while other times the text recounted events in a sort of documentary style. There was one sentence that stated that Claire was in the dorm for what we would call "sex workers" for 9 months. One sentence for that?!? There are other authors who could write a whole book about everything contained in that one sentence. Another thing that I found very disturbing was his virtually uncredited use of the experiences of Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier. He mentions her (almost in passing) in a post-script at the end of the book. So I looked up her Nuerenberg testimony and I was shocked. He lifted her testimony almost word-for-word in his descriptions of Claire's time in Auschwitz. Word-for-word. This is disgusting in a fiction work. He did not create a fictional world as is required by an author of historical fiction. Instead, he merely stated facts in an odd style and when authentic details were required, he merely lifted the words he needed from testimony at the war crimes trials. I will never again read a book by this author.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hk office

    I am the child of holocaust survivors Yes, you need to correct both grammar and spelling errors. They are a distraction from this important book. My father was taken to the labor camp... but was a watchmaker and spoke 7 languages. He was useful to the Nazis, until he wasn’t... but he jumped off a moving train. My mother, grandmother and sister were hidden by my father’s former Christian girlfriend, behind two suitcases. In a basement. That’s where my sister was born. She had Ricketts, lice, soars I am the child of holocaust survivors Yes, you need to correct both grammar and spelling errors. They are a distraction from this important book. My father was taken to the labor camp... but was a watchmaker and spoke 7 languages. He was useful to the Nazis, until he wasn’t... but he jumped off a moving train. My mother, grandmother and sister were hidden by my father’s former Christian girlfriend, behind two suitcases. In a basement. That’s where my sister was born. She had Ricketts, lice, soars and grossly under weight. There is more to their story of survival. We, the progeny of survivors, must never allow the world to forget that humans are fragile and in a flash we can all be vaporized.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Reading this book was like reading a rough outline of a potentially excellent novel. The book is full of inconsistencies and typographical errors. The paragraphs are disjointed and the writing is, well, atrocious. For example, Claire and her younger sister are both said to be 17. A young woman captured by the Germans and forced to work in a hospital finds opportunities to go on secret picnics with a new love. If she can go on picnics, can’t she escape? Such anomalies occur throughout the book. W Reading this book was like reading a rough outline of a potentially excellent novel. The book is full of inconsistencies and typographical errors. The paragraphs are disjointed and the writing is, well, atrocious. For example, Claire and her younger sister are both said to be 17. A young woman captured by the Germans and forced to work in a hospital finds opportunities to go on secret picnics with a new love. If she can go on picnics, can’t she escape? Such anomalies occur throughout the book. While the time period for this book and “All the Light We Cannot See” are similar, that is the only thing the two books have in common. I was very disappointed in “The Point of Light.” This important story was not served well.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Some typos distract There were more typos in the beginning than toward the end. The story is the one you know, but which can never be told often enough. However, this authors story telling, fell short on effectual description and character insight. I sometimes felt like he wasnt telling the whole story for some unknown reason.

  6. 4 out of 5

    P.R. Oliver

    I have been a fan of Ellsworth's attorney novels for some time but i was turned off early in the novel by the number of historical mistakes, primarily events that could not have taken place at the time he depicts them. Historical fiction should be realistic. The characters must fit into the era of the story and the story about the characters should be realistic for that time and place. What theses characters did was not believable, it could not have happened.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Skye

    Nothing in this book was cohesive or linear. It felt like the Author could not finish one thought before jumping to another. Do I even need to mention how it felt like non of this book was realistic in the least bit?!? This was a waste of my time and as an avid historical fiction reader I strongly suggest others do not waste their time either. I don’t know how this book has so many good reviews!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vickie Sarmina

    This genre is not usually one that I read. I was a little hesitant at first, but as usual, John Ellsworth has done it again. This book is the story of a courageous female photojournalist, Claire Vallant. She was not afraid to share with the world the atrocities that the Jewish people endured when Germany overtook Paris. Claire was only in her early twenties, when she was called by one of her longest and dearest friends, Remy Schildmann, to rescue a small child from being sent to the labor camp, This genre is not usually one that I read. I was a little hesitant at first, but as usual, John Ellsworth has done it again. This book is the story of a courageous female photojournalist, Claire Vallant. She was not afraid to share with the world the atrocities that the Jewish people endured when Germany overtook Paris. Claire was only in her early twenties, when she was called by one of her longest and dearest friends, Remy Schildmann, to rescue a small child from being sent to the labor camp, Auschwitz. Remy’s father, had sent him to become part of the Germany army, even though Remy was a Parisian. Remy didn’t like the fact that he had to send his own people to Auschwitz. He knew that the majority of them would never survive the camp. They would die either by the atrocious living conditions, or they would be sent to the gas showers. Claire began her career as a photojournalist for the Jacques Marseilles, the managing editor of the Paris Soir. Claire would take pictures of the Jewish families, as they were being herded onto the trains that were headed to Auschwitz. Her pictures captured heart wrenching moments of husband and wives being separated from each other, as well as mothers being separated from their children. The culprit of all of the monstrosities was a man by the name of Sigmond Skorzeny, Waffen - SS. He was the head of the concentration camp. Skorzeny was a heartless monster, and Claire was determined to let the world know what he was. What could she possibly do, when she found her sister was in the Auschwitz camp? Will Claire be able to get her sister out of the camp? She waited for the moment when these monsters would be held accountable for their war crimes. Will Claire succeed in finding this criminal? Will she be able to fulfill her mission to see these men stand trial for all of their vile acts against humanity? I thoroughly enjoyed the historical background that was set for this book. The characters had you either cheering for them or wishing that you could wreak vengeance on them yourself. The amount of research that must have gone into this book had to have been tremendous, and it certainly was captured in the plot of this book. I became completely immersed in the book within the first few pages, and had a difficult time putting the book down. This book really did open my eyes up to the types of horrendous acts that were done to the Jewish people, all in the name of Hilter. No human being should have ever gone through what the Jewish people endured during this time. I won’t spoil the rest of the book, but I do believe you will like to read this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    The Point of Light was written by John Ellsworth. The story is loosely based on the life of French photojournalist and Auschwitz survivor Marie-Claude Valliant Couturie. She was a member of the Resistance and was sent to Auschwitz and Ravensbruck. However, Claire, in the book, has gone beyond Marie-Claude in this book. Claire Vallant wanted to be a photojournalist for as long as she could remember. She loved taking phtos and was very good at it. Her Father ran the Vallant dealership in Paris and The Point of Light was written by John Ellsworth. The story is loosely based on the life of French photojournalist and Auschwitz survivor Marie-Claude Valliant Couturie. She was a member of the Resistance and was sent to Auschwitz and Ravensbruck. However, Claire, in the book, has gone beyond Marie-Claude in this book. Claire Vallant wanted to be a photojournalist for as long as she could remember. She loved taking phtos and was very good at it. Her Father ran the Vallant dealership in Paris and her Mother was a surgeon. She had a younger sister and two younger brothers. Claire was considered the “good” one while Esmee was always getting into trouble. They were raised to do good for others and to be themselves and do what they wanted to do. When the Nazis were threatening Paris, Claire decided she wanted to do something. She ended up joining a resistance group. One member of this group was Remy Schildmann, the son of a German General. She had known Remy since they were in elementary school. She considered him her best friend while he was in love with her. They became reacquainted in the resistance and fell in love. Then, Remy was sent to Germany, by his Father, to join the SS and become the SS officer he was destined to be. He decided to go along with them and work against the Nazis from the inside. However, it did mean he would have to be actively involved in the deportation of Jews. He was leading a raid on the Naussenbaum family. They arrested Mr. and Mrs. Naussenbaum; but Remy hid their sleeping daughter in her amoire. He then called Claire to tell her where Lima was. Claire went to get her and then kept Lima as her own since they didn’t know where any relatives were. In order to keep her safe, Claire and Remy married and adopted Lima. Then Remy’s unit was sent to the front. Claire was left to bring up Lima and to do what she could to stop the Nazi momentum. The story continues through collaboration, resistance, arrest, torture, and being sent to Auschwitz and later Ravensbruck. How will Claire and Remy survive the War? Will they stay together afterwards? Will Lima’s parents come back? The book is very interesting and keeps your attention through the entire book. You are kept on the edge of your chair not knowing how Claire will get out of tough places and if she and the others will survive. The really weak spot is when Remy begins working to document for war crimes. His sudden dropping from Claire’s life just isn’t realistic.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Hall

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I must admit to being a huge fan of author John Ellsworth! While he is known for his legal fiction, his move into historical fiction does not disappoint! General *Spoilers* Follow Claire, a young Parisian photographer, as she joins the French Resistance to fight against the horrors of Nazi Germany. From taking in a young Jewish girl separated from her family to photographing the brave moves of the Resistance and the brutality of the SS and the Nazis, Claire risks everything to bring the atrocities I must admit to being a huge fan of author John Ellsworth! While he is known for his legal fiction, his move into historical fiction does not disappoint! General *Spoilers* Follow Claire, a young Parisian photographer, as she joins the French Resistance to fight against the horrors of Nazi Germany. From taking in a young Jewish girl separated from her family to photographing the brave moves of the Resistance and the brutality of the SS and the Nazis, Claire risks everything to bring the atrocities to light and save those she can. She braves separation from her family, including childhood friend, now husband, Remy, when she is betrayed and sent to Auschwitz, the notorious concentration camp. Claire's heroic character is based on a real life heroine, French photojournalist and Auschwitz survivor, Marie-Claude Vaillant-Couturier. This story gives an inside look at the horrors of Nazi Germany, the courage of those who resisted and the anguish of the survivors. You won't regret this powerful read. In fact, you may never forget it! I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gail A.

    The author is brilliant in detailing the horrors of WWll through the experiences of the Resistance, the death camps, and surviving and dying from the evil of Hitler's regime. The blending of love, and sacrifice, and determination to make a difference against the injustice left me breathless. The lengths those resisting went to was brave and frightening and often futile. The deceptions and betrayals horrifying. Those being convicted of war crimes gave me brief solace. This author is so skilled in The author is brilliant in detailing the horrors of WWll through the experiences of the Resistance, the death camps, and surviving and dying from the evil of Hitler's regime. The blending of love, and sacrifice, and determination to make a difference against the injustice left me breathless. The lengths those resisting went to was brave and frightening and often futile. The deceptions and betrayals horrifying. Those being convicted of war crimes gave me brief solace. This author is so skilled in bringing to light harsh truths of war that rendered me to my emotional knees in tears. This book is not for the faint of heart. And at the risk of being political, the parallels between our current political climate of eugenics and white supremacy is disturbing on so many levels.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Pegge D Marjamaa

    It has been several years sense I have been so captivated by a book! I read " Alaska" by James A. Michener and after all these years it has stayed in my mind as the best story I had ever read and now your book has affected me in the same way. I am so very impressed with your writing that I can't wait to get in the next two books 📚 that I have. I ha e always loved history and am so glad that I came across your three books and on!y hope the next two will keep me so involved in the story as this one It has been several years sense I have been so captivated by a book! I read " Alaska" by James A. Michener and after all these years it has stayed in my mind as the best story I had ever read and now your book has affected me in the same way. I am so very impressed with your writing that I can't wait to get in the next two books 📚 that I have. I ha e always loved history and am so glad that I came across your three books and on!y hope the next two will keep me so involved in the story as this one has. If I could I would have rated this with ten stars. Thank you so very much for a journey I am sure will stay in my mind for ever! My

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    "She fled the floor and vowed she'd never go back. If she did, she feared she would die there, too, which did no one any good because then the flow of pictures to the outside world would cease and her camera warfare would screech to a halt." The Point of Light is a unique take on historical fiction. The prologue had me hooked and the details fully immersed me into the time period. The harsh reality of World War II is well represented but so is a strong heroine and her story. It was intertwined pe "She fled the floor and vowed she'd never go back. If she did, she feared she would die there, too, which did no one any good because then the flow of pictures to the outside world would cease and her camera warfare would screech to a halt." The Point of Light is a unique take on historical fiction. The prologue had me hooked and the details fully immersed me into the time period. The harsh reality of World War II is well represented but so is a strong heroine and her story. It was intertwined perfectly with a sprinkle of law. I will carry this story with me for a very long time- a must read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adelejo

    Piercing, horrific truths I have read, seen films .and have been told the facts of the demonic mission of the Reich. Your story taken from the experience of Vaillant, made me sick but gave me hope. The truth will out and I loved the way you told it. I did not know that a real woman had lived it till the end pages. A true heroine. I can handle the truth. Yet it is hard to imagine human beings' capacity for evil and also the capacity for for enduring resisting, fighting and overcoming evil forces. Piercing, horrific truths I have read, seen films .and have been told the facts of the demonic mission of the Reich. Your story taken from the experience of Vaillant, made me sick but gave me hope. The truth will out and I loved the way you told it. I did not know that a real woman had lived it till the end pages. A true heroine. I can handle the truth. Yet it is hard to imagine human beings' capacity for evil and also the capacity for for enduring resisting, fighting and overcoming evil forces. Thank you for choosing to write historical fiction. I was quite real to me. I recommend it highly.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

    Survive to tell my story The story of Clare and Remy and of all those persecuted during the Holocaust and World War II. Clare told her story the only way she could through photographs. How much courage it must have taken to snap a picture of her sister being killed at the instant it was happening. To keep her sanity the only thing she had was the thoughts of her adopted daughter Lima and justice for her sister and all the other victims of the horrible crimes which took place. It was a good book t Survive to tell my story The story of Clare and Remy and of all those persecuted during the Holocaust and World War II. Clare told her story the only way she could through photographs. How much courage it must have taken to snap a picture of her sister being killed at the instant it was happening. To keep her sanity the only thing she had was the thoughts of her adopted daughter Lima and justice for her sister and all the other victims of the horrible crimes which took place. It was a good book to read although quite sad.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura Mae

    The light in the world The author states that the title refers to the light from the camera, and also how light works on the optic nerve. However, the point of light here is how people will overcome evil. It might not be easy, it might not happen right away, but there is hope and goodness in the light that shines within us. Claire is a character of heroic proportion. You owe it to yourself, to those that died, to read this story based on that of a real life hero. You might cry but ultimately you’l The light in the world The author states that the title refers to the light from the camera, and also how light works on the optic nerve. However, the point of light here is how people will overcome evil. It might not be easy, it might not happen right away, but there is hope and goodness in the light that shines within us. Claire is a character of heroic proportion. You owe it to yourself, to those that died, to read this story based on that of a real life hero. You might cry but ultimately you’ll smile as light triumphs over darkness .

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mary L Smith

    Heart rending This book is a riveting piece that shows both the horror of war, and the quiet courage of good people to try to survive. Not always easy to read, as it pulls you into the story and you can feel the fatigue and sadness that strives to extinguish hope. It provokes you to "see" and feel things that can't and shouldn't be forgotten about the atrocities that were committed. Even though the ending is in justice, it leaves one's heart heavy, and mind full of the big question.... "Why".

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gail Wright

    Not as exciting as Ellsworth's prior books I have read all of John Ellsworth's books and a third of the way through The Point of Light I was hooked except for.......many word and spelling errors which didn't allow the book to flow smoothly. Not sure what happened there. The story is a great one but having read many historical fiction books about WWII, I found this one only mildly exciting. I loved the characters and the very real problems they faced but not as much as the legal thrillers.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Although this book is historical fiction, it is based upon the life of French photojournalist, Marie-Claude Valliant, who was a member of the French Resistance during WWII. The book details the main character's exploits as a Nazi Resistance fighter, her marriage to a French man that was conscripted into the German SS, her eventual capture, her life as a prisoner in Auschwitz, her survival and final revenge. The story is riveting and brings to life the horrors of the Nazis. My on!y complaint is t Although this book is historical fiction, it is based upon the life of French photojournalist, Marie-Claude Valliant, who was a member of the French Resistance during WWII. The book details the main character's exploits as a Nazi Resistance fighter, her marriage to a French man that was conscripted into the German SS, her eventual capture, her life as a prisoner in Auschwitz, her survival and final revenge. The story is riveting and brings to life the horrors of the Nazis. My on!y complaint is the author needs to edit his books better. Typos are distracting. D

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janie Lloyd

    As difficult as this type of book is for me to read (who doesn't experience these feelings when reading about the atrocities of the Holocaust?), I could NOT put this book down. The author took a true life heroine from the early days of the French Resistance to the Nuremberg Trials. Man's inhumanity to man is difficult for reasonable people to understand, but in this book I found moments of joy and hope and incredible bravery. Heroes come in all sizes, shapes, and are formed by all sorts of situa As difficult as this type of book is for me to read (who doesn't experience these feelings when reading about the atrocities of the Holocaust?), I could NOT put this book down. The author took a true life heroine from the early days of the French Resistance to the Nuremberg Trials. Man's inhumanity to man is difficult for reasonable people to understand, but in this book I found moments of joy and hope and incredible bravery. Heroes come in all sizes, shapes, and are formed by all sorts of situations. Even in the bleakest of times, love comes through. This was really an excellent book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Pam Rule

    I wasn;t sure what to expect when I took this on because it is not what I have read by this author previously. But I loved it. John Ellsworth once again puts you right in the middle and makes you feel like you are a part of the action and the feelings. There is romance. There is intrigue and mystery. And there is the feeling of not wanting to put it down for fear of missing something. I hope there will be a sequel of some sort! Awesome book! I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and I wasn;t sure what to expect when I took this on because it is not what I have read by this author previously. But I loved it. John Ellsworth once again puts you right in the middle and makes you feel like you are a part of the action and the feelings. There is romance. There is intrigue and mystery. And there is the feeling of not wanting to put it down for fear of missing something. I hope there will be a sequel of some sort! Awesome book! I received a free copy of this book via Booksprout and am voluntarily leaving a review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Donna Shaw

    This story was inspired by Claire Vallant a photojournalist in Paris, France, during the WWII invasion of the German Nazis. Claire is captured for being part of the French resistance and was sent to Auschwitz. She had some limited privileges because she was not a Jew. Claire managed to secretly photograph some of the atrocities, evil and horror of the Nazi soldiers. It is obvious the author did a tremendous amount of research and shared it with the reader.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Wessman

    DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY! Well, thank God for Claire! Our super hero who single handedly won WWII! I'm surprised by how stupid the Germans were, and how great Claire was, the war took longer than an afternoon! I especially loved the part where her doctor boss, raped her in the car,and poor put upon Claire, doesn't resist. And, Claire, being so much more important, stands mute while her sister is murdered. Her,vans her milk toast husband, live to fight another day!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Rachel N

    Sadly, this story fell far short of its potential. The characters were not believable. The story line was disjointed and confusing. The historical aspects of the narrative did not align with the many many other biographies and historical fiction stories I have read from this time period. Perhaps with additional research and an experienced editor, The Point of Light could have been a moving story. Disappointing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Debby

    Excellent Read This book kept me reading for hours. Having an interest in the horrors the Nazis perpetrated since reading about Anne Frank as a child this book didn't disappoint. I still can't imagine the hell all those innocent people went through, but this book made it clear. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in this genre

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Meyerhofer

    Chilling & Inspiring This is the first book I read by John Ellsworth. Point of Light is both a chilling recollection of the atrocities committed at the concentration camps and an inspiring look at the people who persevered in these darkest of times. I can't wait to read the next book by John Ellsworth.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I'm not an expert on WWII, the Resistance, or the Holocaust but I have read many books on the subject, and this book is simply poorly written and large parts of it make no sense and aren't historically correct. Read The Just-About-Cocky Ms M's review, it says it better than I could. A disappointing book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Trammell

    Wonderful story This touches on every emotion and courage a person can consider. The heroine is truly brave at all times seeing the bigger picture even when the picture is heart wrenching. I hope to see more of this character in other books. Look forward to reading the other books in this series and others by this Author. I will recommend this book!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nile James

    Amazing Have some time available, it is hard to lay down. It was, at once, engaging and depressing. I beautiful tribute to the French resistance and the souls of the thousands who died at Auschwitz and other such hideous camps. This story needs to be told over and over to be certain it never happens again.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Eileen L. Sullivan

    Riveting As we get farther from the tragedy that was WWII, it is important that there are approachable books that draw people to learn about this agonizing period in human history. Ellsworth is a master at organizing a complex topic into a form readers can access. I look forward to reading his other works in this series.

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