Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea: Guida all'universo sconosciuto

Availability: Ready to download

Sappiamo davvero poco del mondo in cui viviamo, di come ha avuto inizio, di cosa è fatto e di come finirà. Ci chiediamo da dove vengano lo spazio e il tempo, se siamo soli nell’universo e come funzionano le leggi della fisica quando vengono applicate all’infinitamente piccolo e all’infinitamente grande, ma la verità è che… non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea! Con rigore, ir Sappiamo davvero poco del mondo in cui viviamo, di come ha avuto inizio, di cosa è fatto e di come finirà. Ci chiediamo da dove vengano lo spazio e il tempo, se siamo soli nell’universo e come funzionano le leggi della fisica quando vengono applicate all’infinitamente piccolo e all’infinitamente grande, ma la verità è che… non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea! Con rigore, ironia e grande facilità divulgativa gli autori di questo libro – un PhD in robotica a Stanford, creatore di una nota striscia di divulgazione scientifica a fumetti, e un docente di fisica delle particelle che collabora con il Cern – hanno unito le forze per esplorare i più grandi misteri insoluti del cosmo e spiegare come mai siano ancora tanto misteriosi e cosa hanno fatto, finora, gli scienziati per trovare delle risposte (o almeno porsi le domande giuste). Hanno provato insomma a spiegare alcuni argomenti davvero complicati in parole semplici. Dalla materia oscura all’antimateria, dalle onde gravitazionali ai buchi neri, con l’ausilio di infografiche e illustrazioni che accompagnano e semplificano i concetti più complessi, Cham e Whiteson ci accompagnano in un viaggio di scoperta appassionato e divertente, che ci mostrerà l’universo sotto una nuova luce: un’immensa distesa di territori ancora enigmatici e selvaggi, tutti da decifrare.


Compare
Ads Banner

Sappiamo davvero poco del mondo in cui viviamo, di come ha avuto inizio, di cosa è fatto e di come finirà. Ci chiediamo da dove vengano lo spazio e il tempo, se siamo soli nell’universo e come funzionano le leggi della fisica quando vengono applicate all’infinitamente piccolo e all’infinitamente grande, ma la verità è che… non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea! Con rigore, ir Sappiamo davvero poco del mondo in cui viviamo, di come ha avuto inizio, di cosa è fatto e di come finirà. Ci chiediamo da dove vengano lo spazio e il tempo, se siamo soli nell’universo e come funzionano le leggi della fisica quando vengono applicate all’infinitamente piccolo e all’infinitamente grande, ma la verità è che… non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea! Con rigore, ironia e grande facilità divulgativa gli autori di questo libro – un PhD in robotica a Stanford, creatore di una nota striscia di divulgazione scientifica a fumetti, e un docente di fisica delle particelle che collabora con il Cern – hanno unito le forze per esplorare i più grandi misteri insoluti del cosmo e spiegare come mai siano ancora tanto misteriosi e cosa hanno fatto, finora, gli scienziati per trovare delle risposte (o almeno porsi le domande giuste). Hanno provato insomma a spiegare alcuni argomenti davvero complicati in parole semplici. Dalla materia oscura all’antimateria, dalle onde gravitazionali ai buchi neri, con l’ausilio di infografiche e illustrazioni che accompagnano e semplificano i concetti più complessi, Cham e Whiteson ci accompagnano in un viaggio di scoperta appassionato e divertente, che ci mostrerà l’universo sotto una nuova luce: un’immensa distesa di territori ancora enigmatici e selvaggi, tutti da decifrare.

30 review for Non ne abbiamo la più pallida idea: Guida all'universo sconosciuto

  1. 5 out of 5

    Caidyn (SEMI-HIATUS; BW Reviews; he/him/his)

    This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. 2.5/5 The reason I picked this book up was because it reminded me of A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. That book was about the known universe and the scientists behind it. Literally, chock full of hilarious anecdotes about the scientists who created/discovered things that was presented in an easy and humorous way. However, this book is about what we don't know. About how the more answers we have, the more questions crop up This review and others can be found on BW Book Reviews. 2.5/5 The reason I picked this book up was because it reminded me of A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson. That book was about the known universe and the scientists behind it. Literally, chock full of hilarious anecdotes about the scientists who created/discovered things that was presented in an easy and humorous way. However, this book is about what we don't know. About how the more answers we have, the more questions crop up and the more that we realize we have no clue. The authors of this repeatedly emphasized that we know, about, 5% of the universe. That's it. So, as I said, this book is meant to be humorous. Well, it is. Definitely is. There were times that I smiled or snorted about something that they said. It was brilliantly adapted, too. Since I listened to this book, I can review only that. But, I know that this book was highly visual and probably completely full of comics. It brought some of those aspects into it with sound effects. However (shouldn't you expect that from me?) I found it grating after a while. The jokes were all the same, one of the things that I dislike most about books categorized as humor. I get tired of the same jokes over and over again. Usually, I try putting those books down for a bit then trying again only to find the humor still annoys me. That was the problem with this book for me. It expected itself to be funny when I simply didn't find it to be after a while. As for the content, it was super interesting. Black holes, dark matter, energy, gravity. Typically, I always sign myself up for books like that. But, the humor distracted me. When the authors really buckled down and didn't explain things with humor, I paid so much attention to it. If there was humor, I just spaced out. This book definitely has a good premise, but a bad carry out.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tsedai

    If you like your physics with a side of dad-joke level puns, then this is totally the book for you. It's a fun romp through some of the wilder aspects of physics, though if you've got a fairly high level of understanding to start with then this book might feel like something of a review. For those who don't know physics at all, I'd worry that they might not be able to distinguish some of the punnier jokes, but I think most people should be able to parse it out. Overall a fun read to get you thin If you like your physics with a side of dad-joke level puns, then this is totally the book for you. It's a fun romp through some of the wilder aspects of physics, though if you've got a fairly high level of understanding to start with then this book might feel like something of a review. For those who don't know physics at all, I'd worry that they might not be able to distinguish some of the punnier jokes, but I think most people should be able to parse it out. Overall a fun read to get you thinking, with lots of interesting concepts. I highly recommend reading it in conjunction with The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu because a lot of the crazier topics have a fair bit of overlap.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    On the inside flyleaf of We Have No Idea, it states: Armed with their popular infographics, cartoons, and unusually entertaining and lucid explanations of science, (Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson) give us the best answers currently available for a lot of questions that are still perplexing scientists, including: • Why does the universe have a speed limit? • Why aren't we all made of antimatter? • What (or who) is attacking the Earth with tiny, superfast particles? • What is dark matter, and why does On the inside flyleaf of We Have No Idea, it states: Armed with their popular infographics, cartoons, and unusually entertaining and lucid explanations of science, (Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson) give us the best answers currently available for a lot of questions that are still perplexing scientists, including: • Why does the universe have a speed limit? • Why aren't we all made of antimatter? • What (or who) is attacking the Earth with tiny, superfast particles? • What is dark matter, and why does it keep ignoring us? And after finishing the book, I can't help but observe that these four particular questions are among the many that the authors are unable to answer: We simply don't know. They don't give us many answers at all, but they do ask a fascinating string of questions that are revelatory in their unanswerability. The science here is easy to understand (all anecdotal, no math) but I could have done without the unending puns and quips (especially annoying when 95% of 129 footnotes are distractingly lame jokes; I would have skipped them all if it weren't for the 5% that were relevant). As I was reading I kept wondering, "Are the jokes ruining this for me?", but I guess they did serve to keep everything easy and accessible: this is pop-science-light; appropriate for a lay-reader like me but unlikely to be of use for the scientifically trained out there. I do read some science books, but there's a lot in We Have No Idea that I haven't heard before. As that bar chart attempts to illustrate, the matter that we are able to describe and interact with only comprises 5% of the “stuff” of the universe. We know that dark matter makes up another 27%, but while we can observe its effects on a cosmological scale, we can't see it or understand what it is. That leaves a whopping 68% made up of dark energy – something we can neither observe or understand but which we know must exist because it explains the present-day expansion of the universe (which is why it's called “energy”, even if it's not energy as we would know it) and every mathematical proof confirms that there's 68% of something missing from our observation-based models. When I went to high school, there was a whole gang of subatomic particles that seem to have become irrelevant: We now know that everything we observe is made up of only electrons, up quarks, and down quarks; and while there are nine other subatomic particles, they're weird and we don't know what they do. I thought I understood the concept of mass, but it's weird, too: • It's weird because the mass of something is not just the mass of the stuff inside it. Mass also includes the energy that binds the stuff together. And we don't know why that is. • It's weird because mass is actually like a label or a charge (it's not really “stuff”), and we don't know why some particles have it (or feel the Higgs field) and others don't. • And it's weird because mass is exactly the same whether you measure it via inertia or gravity. And we don't know why that is either! I like the idea that superfast cosmic rays are constantly bombarding us that must be coming from “a new kind of object in the universe that we don't know about” (and that the authors would like you to use your personal devices as cosmic ray detectors while you sleep, info here). And I like all the quirky coincidences of our universe: that subatomic particles could carry a charge of literally any value, but happen to have those that perfectly balance each other out (we wouldn't be here otherwise); that there is the ideal amount of mass and energy in the universe to give it its flat shape (one more or less hydrogen atom per cm² of space would curve or bend it in unusual ways); humans have evolved to our scientifically literate present at the perfect time in the history of the universe – when the forces of gravity and dark energy are balanced in their push and pull of the galaxies – in which to observe not only superclusters (“the largest structures the universe will ever know”) but also the routine night sky that first started us on the path to understanding the cosmos (a billion years from now, our sky will be dark as old stars die and everything else moves further away from us). As much as I liked these coincidences, the authors are careful to caution us away from finding anthropocentric significance in them (I seem to remember Stephen Hawking once saying that it's not that the universe was created specifically for human life, but that the universe, made randomly as it was, could only have created life that could survive in its uniquely random conditions. Something like that.) In the end, the unanswerable questions are all fascinating to think about, and along the way, Cham and Whiteson caught me up on what we do know today. I could have done with fewer llamas, ferrets, and puns, but without straining my brain, I learned plenty. Hard to complain about that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    A very intriguing title, certainly and I found this to be humorous at times, but I don't know enough about quantam physics, etc., to tell the real from the jokes. For example, most of the footnote explanations are jokes themselves, but I'm not sure about the footnote 67 on page 156: "Muons and taus are not extra-dimensional versions of electrons, because they don't have a regular mass spacing , and don't have the same weak-force interactions as electrons." Some readers might think, "Oh, exactly. A very intriguing title, certainly and I found this to be humorous at times, but I don't know enough about quantam physics, etc., to tell the real from the jokes. For example, most of the footnote explanations are jokes themselves, but I'm not sure about the footnote 67 on page 156: "Muons and taus are not extra-dimensional versions of electrons, because they don't have a regular mass spacing , and don't have the same weak-force interactions as electrons." Some readers might think, "Oh, exactly." Some might laugh, IF this is a joke. And I think it must be a joke, as are most of the footnotes, but I have no idea. When the author talks about things I already know (the universe is expanding) and the author points out we really don't know why, I get that because I know that already.. But most of the time I wasn't sure what was fact or fiction. It took me three readings of Hawking's "Brief History of Time" before I felt I could follow it through. Then it was republished with an additional chapter or two and it felt to me the author of "Brief History" may have been just making things up all along. So, all in all, I really don't know, within this book, what we really do know and what we really don't know. Maybe that's the point. But I don't know, hence my two star rating. I recommend this to quantum physics experts only. And Sheldon.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jani-Petri

    Pretty good popular science Worth reading. Maybe too much focus on cosmology for my taste, but we can not have everything. 3 more words needed because of this stupid app.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jose Moa

    This book is a good complement to de book What We Cannot Know by Marcus du Sautoy,because is not centered so much in the phylosofical side as in physics and cosmology. We are living a golden age of science popularization with a lot of good books abot disparate subjects. This one is a example,is a book that joins science,frontiers of science ,fine humor and amusing drawings. The book beguins saying that we only know the 5% of matter ,the rest 95% composed of dark matter and energy we almost have no This book is a good complement to de book What We Cannot Know by Marcus du Sautoy,because is not centered so much in the phylosofical side as in physics and cosmology. We are living a golden age of science popularization with a lot of good books abot disparate subjects. This one is a example,is a book that joins science,frontiers of science ,fine humor and amusing drawings. The book beguins saying that we only know the 5% of matter ,the rest 95% composed of dark matter and energy we almost have no idea.In the following chapters the book explains what we actually know and the questions about we have no idea. For put a few examples : Why are 3 generations of quarks and leptons? We have no idea. Are the quarks and leptons actually elemental? We have no idea. Why gravity is so weak with regard the other forces? We have no idea. Why there is a speed limit in the universe and why have its value? We have no idea. What is the origen of cosmic rays? We have no idea. Is the universe finite or infinite?We have no idea. Are we alone in the cosmos? We have no idea. why there are matter and no antimatter? We have no idea and so on..... A recomendable,easy reading,fun ,deep book about the to day limits of the knowledge of the our universe.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna J. Shelby ☕

    A very lighthearted approach to some heavy questions and it's certainly solves none of them. I enjoyed the weird jokes and the fool proof examples make it a bit easier to understand the complicated science underneath. A good book to start your science quest with!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    It's hard to overstate how good this book is at conveying, in a simple fashion and with an unending series of graphics and "dad jokes", some very complex materials. Each chapter is a topic in physics that "we" (we being scientists - I have almost no idea about most things) have surprisingly little idea about (hence the name), with topics that include time travel, the nature of empty space, why particles have mass, how big the universe is, etc. It's basic and strips out all of the math and hard b It's hard to overstate how good this book is at conveying, in a simple fashion and with an unending series of graphics and "dad jokes", some very complex materials. Each chapter is a topic in physics that "we" (we being scientists - I have almost no idea about most things) have surprisingly little idea about (hence the name), with topics that include time travel, the nature of empty space, why particles have mass, how big the universe is, etc. It's basic and strips out all of the math and hard bits, but what remains should prove fascinating for anyone with even a passing interest in science. The true success of this book is that it somehow strikes a perfect balance between something that a junior high student could easily follow, while avoiding a tone of "talking down to" the reader. One thing though: the jokes. They are uniformly terrible. Just so, so terrible. And yet...they become endearing almost immediately; probably because each page is bursting with a sense of enthusiasm and fun.

  9. 4 out of 5

    César

    If you gave up reading Stephen Hawking because you couldn’t grasp it but you really like science and want to understand weird and opaque concepts like particle theory, black matter, space ripples and the meaning of live, this is the book for you. It is great and fun reading, by real scientists with a no-bullshit approach on some of the most complex matters of cutting edge physics. Highly recommended.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Charlene

    Entertaining mix of text and toons. This is a great book for younger readers and those intrigued by physics but nervous or intimidated by the possibility of complicated explanations. There's no math here, but there are lots of interesting ideas--with good, vivid examples--and plenty of pop culture references and funny bits to stir up just about anyone's Sense of Wonder.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Peter Mcloughlin

    covers topics in physics and cosmology where we have a profound ignorance of what is going on. Right now we can't answer questions like what is the stuff that makes up 95% of the universe, Why do we have charmed, Strange, top and bottom quarks which don't seem to have any purpose as far as we (ordinary matter beings) are concerned. Why three plus one dimensions, What about time. What happened before the big bang. Why inflation and what drives it. If you are interested in questions where the phys covers topics in physics and cosmology where we have a profound ignorance of what is going on. Right now we can't answer questions like what is the stuff that makes up 95% of the universe, Why do we have charmed, Strange, top and bottom quarks which don't seem to have any purpose as far as we (ordinary matter beings) are concerned. Why three plus one dimensions, What about time. What happened before the big bang. Why inflation and what drives it. If you are interested in questions where the physicists are just as in the dark as you here is your book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Travis S

    Daniel and Jorge signed a pre release copy for me, and I'm a very excited to have read it! Very funny, as expected from the creators of PhD comics. Gives a great impression of the scope of our universe and just how much we don't understand. I recommend it for anyone to read!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rosey Waters

    Physics has always been my weakest subject in the sciences. It seems to be where my brain stops being able to pick things up with ease and instead goes “but whyyyyyyyy?!” So when I picked this up I thought it would help. Easy physics! Excellent! I still don’t understand physics. I found this boom to be dad joke filled and amusing all the same (the audiobook is filled with audio effects too). Ultimately, this was interesting but not illuminating. I enjoyed it, and even had some parts where I FINALLY Physics has always been my weakest subject in the sciences. It seems to be where my brain stops being able to pick things up with ease and instead goes “but whyyyyyyyy?!” So when I picked this up I thought it would help. Easy physics! Excellent! I still don’t understand physics. I found this boom to be dad joke filled and amusing all the same (the audiobook is filled with audio effects too). Ultimately, this was interesting but not illuminating. I enjoyed it, and even had some parts where I FINALLY understood some concepts I’ve struggled with make sense finally, but ultimately it was a book about things we don’t know. So I still don’t know much about physics!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    I liked the *idea* behind this book: two hip young physicists, one a cartoonist, explaining how little we actually know about our universe. The execution -- well, the (alleged) humor, while OK in small doses, wore me down. I did learn some things, and the cartoon-diagrams were (sometimes) helpful. But, basically, the book's aim-point is people who know little about modern physics. Which does (kind-of) include me, except that I am (was) a professional geologist/geochemist, and I keep up with gene I liked the *idea* behind this book: two hip young physicists, one a cartoonist, explaining how little we actually know about our universe. The execution -- well, the (alleged) humor, while OK in small doses, wore me down. I did learn some things, and the cartoon-diagrams were (sometimes) helpful. But, basically, the book's aim-point is people who know little about modern physics. Which does (kind-of) include me, except that I am (was) a professional geologist/geochemist, and I keep up with general physics (as best I can) at the Scientific American level. So, DNF at about 25% in, and not really the book for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    I was surprised to find this book to be funny..I often laughed out loud at the same time I was struggling with complicated concepts. There are so many unknowns; here is a tiny sample: why is the universe expanding and how will it end;wha is dark matter and dark energy; how big is the universe; what is time and what is space? I recommend this book and applaud the authors for their fun and humor.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vladimir Slaykovsky

    Without loads of silly jokes I would rate it 5 stars. It is on par with best Hawking's books. Latest discoveries such as gravitational waves and extrasolar planets are discussed

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Jorge Cham is a smart guy and the creator of the PHD webcomic, which pokes gentle fun at scientists and grad students. Daniel Whiteson is another smart guy --a partical phycisist at UC Irvine. Together they wrote this book about all the stuff in the universe that smart guys like them have no idea bout. Well, not ALL the stuff. Mostly it's about particle physics, astronomy, and related topics. How big is the universe? Are there more than three dimensions? What is time? Is there other life out ther Jorge Cham is a smart guy and the creator of the PHD webcomic, which pokes gentle fun at scientists and grad students. Daniel Whiteson is another smart guy --a partical phycisist at UC Irvine. Together they wrote this book about all the stuff in the universe that smart guys like them have no idea bout. Well, not ALL the stuff. Mostly it's about particle physics, astronomy, and related topics. How big is the universe? Are there more than three dimensions? What is time? Is there other life out there in the universe? The answer to every one of these questions is the same as its title: "We have no idea." But the interesting part is figuring out WHY we have no idea, and going through the things we DO know enough about to ask the question that we have NO idea about. For each question, Cham and Whiteson do a good job of walking you through a (very) simplified version of the current state of physics. Cham also provides little drawings and single panel cartoons that vary from informative to amusing to some combination of the two. It's a pretty good physics book for non-physicists, which is to say that it holds your hand while leading you out of your depth. At times, though, it may go a little too far in its attempts to be approachable and funny. It seems like every third sentence is a joke, and far too many of them are predictable or repetitious. And any time there is a list of concepts or examples, you can be 100% sure that the fourth one presented will be some joke about the funny animal or concept that they have chosen for that chapter. This is the chapter with the baboon jokes. This one has llamas. For this one we're mixing it up with jokes about marshmallows. It's too much and too tame to the point where it frequently detracts from the genuinely interesting stuff being discussed. It is too much Garfield and not enough XKCD (which, now that I mention it, did a similar and, I think, funnier book called "What If..."). But as far as books that make you feel smarter because physics and science and stuff, We Have No Idea is still pretty enjoyable if you can learn to skim past every other joke. I learned a lot about what people haven't been able to learn, to the point where I'm pretty sure that scientists 200 years from now will have figured at least some of this stuff out and look back on us like we look back on cave men. It's nice to see it coming, in a way.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    This book has a compelling premise of "these are the open questions in physics and some guesses as to what the answers could be". For instance, we've identified and characterized some 18 sub-atomic particles yes seemingly all of the matter we see is made up of only three (up quark, down quark, and the electron) plus the force-carrying particles. What are the other 12 for? The book then walked through some 10 to 15 more questions and in some cases outlined what potential answers could look like. A This book has a compelling premise of "these are the open questions in physics and some guesses as to what the answers could be". For instance, we've identified and characterized some 18 sub-atomic particles yes seemingly all of the matter we see is made up of only three (up quark, down quark, and the electron) plus the force-carrying particles. What are the other 12 for? The book then walked through some 10 to 15 more questions and in some cases outlined what potential answers could look like. As much as I enjoyed myself, the book was constantly tripping over itself to make jokes. These jokes weren't generally funny, didn't help clarify the material, and simply added length. It was maddening. This book also seemed to very much be a "whet your appetite" book with the answers just being sketches and there being no in-depth discussion of who's working on the problem and the technology required to tackle it. Overall this book was frustrating but acceptable with occasional sections that were good. You can get most of the way here by reading the Wikipedia articles on "open problems in physics".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Noah Goats

    The illustrations in We Have No Idea seem like an attempt to copy Randall Munroe’s work in “What If” and XKCD, but these illustrations completely lack the visual wit of Munroe’s. Some help explain things a bit but most are a waste of space. And the attempts at being funny in this book are disastrous. The authors have many fine qualities, but being funny isn’t one of them. The jokes produce cringing rather than laughter. The huge number of failed jokes, both in the illustrations and in the text i The illustrations in We Have No Idea seem like an attempt to copy Randall Munroe’s work in “What If” and XKCD, but these illustrations completely lack the visual wit of Munroe’s. Some help explain things a bit but most are a waste of space. And the attempts at being funny in this book are disastrous. The authors have many fine qualities, but being funny isn’t one of them. The jokes produce cringing rather than laughter. The huge number of failed jokes, both in the illustrations and in the text itself, drag this book down like an anchor tied to a man who is swimming for his life. It would have felt cathartic to read this whole thing with a red pencil and just line them all out. Ok. So much for the negative. I liked We Have No Idea because despite the cringe inducing jokes, the author are very good at explaining difficult scientific concepts. Also, the whole approach of looking at things we don’t understand in the universe was innovative and fun. You can learn a lot by focusing a bit on what you don’t know yet.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    A properly pulled-off heist- physics doesn't even know what hit it. Reading notes: - The humor is egregiously bad/dumb, but in a comfortable, ugly couch kind of way that matches tone. - Any philosophical/intellectual deficiencies (and they are there), are easily forgivable because they simply mirror deficiencies in the larger scientific community. This does mean a few chapters are real duds, but seeing as the chapters on gravity, dark matter, the size of the universe, etc. were phenomenal, who ca A properly pulled-off heist- physics doesn't even know what hit it. Reading notes: - The humor is egregiously bad/dumb, but in a comfortable, ugly couch kind of way that matches tone. - Any philosophical/intellectual deficiencies (and they are there), are easily forgivable because they simply mirror deficiencies in the larger scientific community. This does mean a few chapters are real duds, but seeing as the chapters on gravity, dark matter, the size of the universe, etc. were phenomenal, who cares? - That being said, the authors should be given due credit for delivering on the book's title. I really had no idea how deep our having no idea goes.* - Basically, this book really delivers on its premise, which is high praise. Highly recommended if you found yourself tempted by the premise. * Okay, maybe I had an inkling. See here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    "We Have No Idea" is perhaps the funnest and funniest physics book I've yet to read! It's intriguing and profound, whilst also easy to understand, with great comic illustrations, graphs, and many jokes.... though some of the puns were a tad groan-worthy! It's an extremely gratifying read, discussing what we do know -- and pointing out many of the things that remain a mystery in our wild and wonderful and wacky universe. "We Have No Idea" is a must-read for anyone interested in this topic. It wou "We Have No Idea" is perhaps the funnest and funniest physics book I've yet to read! It's intriguing and profound, whilst also easy to understand, with great comic illustrations, graphs, and many jokes.... though some of the puns were a tad groan-worthy! It's an extremely gratifying read, discussing what we do know -- and pointing out many of the things that remain a mystery in our wild and wonderful and wacky universe. "We Have No Idea" is a must-read for anyone interested in this topic. It would probably be a great introductory book on particle physics and astrophysics, though I can't say for sure as I've read many books on this subject. It's definitely fun to read and very accessible to the scientific ideas discussed within.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Akhil Munjal

    This book explains the deepest darkest secrets of our universe. Emphasis throughout the book are on questions science has no anwser for. And hence this book is different from many other books because instead of filling pages with half baked theories that may or may not stick, this book is upfront about what science just doesnt know, followed-up with some of the most promising explanations. I would recommend this book to readers with an existing basic knowledge of physics and science with a motiv This book explains the deepest darkest secrets of our universe. Emphasis throughout the book are on questions science has no anwser for. And hence this book is different from many other books because instead of filling pages with half baked theories that may or may not stick, this book is upfront about what science just doesnt know, followed-up with some of the most promising explanations. I would recommend this book to readers with an existing basic knowledge of physics and science with a motivation to learn more without running into complicated equations and mathematics. I loved the fact that the audio book version uses well placed intonations and jingles that make this quite an interesting listening experience. I wish more audio books would take a cue from this approach.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hrothgar

    This was a truly excellent read. The authors break down very difficult concepts into easy-to-understand explanations, with loads of relevant examples. Plenty of playful illustrations, gobs of humor, and a humble attitude toward what is (and is not!) known by science make this a delightful read. This book is highly accessible whether you have prior familiarity with modern quantum and relativistic physics or not, and yet even if you are well-read in this area, the authors' fresh and honest present This was a truly excellent read. The authors break down very difficult concepts into easy-to-understand explanations, with loads of relevant examples. Plenty of playful illustrations, gobs of humor, and a humble attitude toward what is (and is not!) known by science make this a delightful read. This book is highly accessible whether you have prior familiarity with modern quantum and relativistic physics or not, and yet even if you are well-read in this area, the authors' fresh and honest presentation of the state of knowledge can still teach you something. I highly recommend this book to anyone wanting either a gentle, lighthearted orientation to modern physics, or a seasoned science reader seeking a fresh perspective on where the mysteries really lie. Five stars!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aleksi

    Pros: explains the anti-intuitive and complex fundamentals of modern physics and cosmology succinctly and with admirable clarity. Cons: the constant barrage of groanworthy puns, dad jokes and tongue-in-cheek footnotes starts grating by the third chapter at the latest and it never, ever ceases. So is it a 3- or a 4-star effort? I have no idea.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joshi

    What a wholesome book. The humor is really pleasant and integrated very well into the actual scientific content of the book. While it is called "We have no idea", after reading this you'll probably have learnt quite a few things. And if, like me, you have no idea about physics, the topics this book deals with are explained in a very casual and easy to understand manner.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Simon Yoong

    A good introductory to the big questions of astrophysics and the cosmos. The humour is a little forced, though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Łukasz Woliński

    It left me with severe brain damage. I need more of this stuff. :)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Fred Rexroad

    I want to give 6 stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Florian

    Intriguing to read, but the graphics in the ebook version were way too small (at least in my experience) and 99% of the jokes were not funny.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sascha Z

    "We Have No Idea" is a fun and infotaining read about some of the big open questions in fundamental physics. These range from the ubiquitous problems of dark matter, dark energy, or the elusive quantum theory of gravity, to less mundane questions, such as "Who's shooting superfast particles at the Earth?", culminating in some intriguing speculations on whether or not we are alone in the universe. The unique selling point of the book is its PHD-comics-style illustrations. Those are mostly funny bu "We Have No Idea" is a fun and infotaining read about some of the big open questions in fundamental physics. These range from the ubiquitous problems of dark matter, dark energy, or the elusive quantum theory of gravity, to less mundane questions, such as "Who's shooting superfast particles at the Earth?", culminating in some intriguing speculations on whether or not we are alone in the universe. The unique selling point of the book is its PHD-comics-style illustrations. Those are mostly funny but — well, sometimes just a tad too much. It's a lovely idea to lighten up an esoteric topic by some amiable and lighthearted cartoons – but they should add some value by making the text easier to understand. Most of the time, though, they’re just rather pointless jokes, which can be distracting and repetitive if they’re found on nearly every page. The text itself tries to imitate this pattern: While the core ideas are well written (in plain language), Daniel Whiteson’s attempts at humor are just way too much and often childishly silly. Where Bill Bryson in “A Short History of Nearly Everything” only subtly sprinkled his main story with a few witty statements, in this work the jokes tend to be contrived and off the point. Annoyingly, there are quite a few footnotes which also turn out to be just nonsensical jokes. If you can handle these downsides, the book is a pleasant and amazingly light journey through the cornerstone problems of contemporary fundamental physics.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.