Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The New Voices of Science Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

What would you do if your collective of tiny bots suddenly decide to mutiny? Would you find bioprinted steak delicious, even after it was signed by the artist? Is an 11 second attention-span long enough to bond with a cryogenically-revived tourist? Would you sell your native language to send your daughter to college? The avant garde of science fiction has appeared, arriving What would you do if your collective of tiny bots suddenly decide to mutiny? Would you find bioprinted steak delicious, even after it was signed by the artist? Is an 11 second attention-span long enough to bond with a cryogenically-revived tourist? Would you sell your native language to send your daughter to college? The avant garde of science fiction has appeared, arriving via time machines and portals that may (or may not) work properly. In this space-age sequel to award-winning anthology, The New Voices of Fantasy, The New Voices of Science Fiction has launched the rising stars of the last five years of science fiction, including Rebecca Roanhorse, Amal El-Mohtar, Alice Sola Kim, Sam J. Miller, E. Lily Yu, Rich Larson, Vina Jie-Min Prasad, Sarah Pinsker, Darcie Little Badger, S. Qiouyi Lu, Kelly Robson, Suzanne Palmer, Nino Cipri, and more. Their wide-ranging tales were hand-selected by cutting-edge author Hannu Rajaniemi (The Quantum Thief) and genre expert Jacob Weisman (Invaders). So go ahead, join the starship revolution. The new kids hotwired the AI.


Compare
Ads Banner

What would you do if your collective of tiny bots suddenly decide to mutiny? Would you find bioprinted steak delicious, even after it was signed by the artist? Is an 11 second attention-span long enough to bond with a cryogenically-revived tourist? Would you sell your native language to send your daughter to college? The avant garde of science fiction has appeared, arriving What would you do if your collective of tiny bots suddenly decide to mutiny? Would you find bioprinted steak delicious, even after it was signed by the artist? Is an 11 second attention-span long enough to bond with a cryogenically-revived tourist? Would you sell your native language to send your daughter to college? The avant garde of science fiction has appeared, arriving via time machines and portals that may (or may not) work properly. In this space-age sequel to award-winning anthology, The New Voices of Fantasy, The New Voices of Science Fiction has launched the rising stars of the last five years of science fiction, including Rebecca Roanhorse, Amal El-Mohtar, Alice Sola Kim, Sam J. Miller, E. Lily Yu, Rich Larson, Vina Jie-Min Prasad, Sarah Pinsker, Darcie Little Badger, S. Qiouyi Lu, Kelly Robson, Suzanne Palmer, Nino Cipri, and more. Their wide-ranging tales were hand-selected by cutting-edge author Hannu Rajaniemi (The Quantum Thief) and genre expert Jacob Weisman (Invaders). So go ahead, join the starship revolution. The new kids hotwired the AI.

30 review for The New Voices of Science Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    This short story collection caught my eye primarily because Hannu Rajaniemi's name was on the cover, but I wasn't fooled. Not really. This just happens to be a collection of the best SF stories to come out in the last five-ish years, as selected by him and Jacob Weisman. Was I still interested? Yeah! After all, those guys have good taste. :) And when it comes to good tales as a whole, I enjoyed this entire book. I've read a number of these stories already, and if I have, I'm lightly skimming over This short story collection caught my eye primarily because Hannu Rajaniemi's name was on the cover, but I wasn't fooled. Not really. This just happens to be a collection of the best SF stories to come out in the last five-ish years, as selected by him and Jacob Weisman. Was I still interested? Yeah! After all, those guys have good taste. :) And when it comes to good tales as a whole, I enjoyed this entire book. I've read a number of these stories already, and if I have, I'm lightly skimming over them. Otherwise... Openness by Alexander Weinstein - A cool, scary look at intimacy worthy of a Black Mirror episode, where giving another person access to all your secret kinks, buttons, and memories can be either a great boon or a relationship killer. Me likey. The Shape of My Name by Nino Capri - Time travel done in a very interesting way, focusing more on a strained familial relationship than anything else. The focus is clear but all the side discoveries are quite visceral. UTOPIA, LOL by Jamie Wahls - Clever take on virtual reality and memes, with the added benefit of AIs and badass choices. Cool twist. Mother Tongues by S. Qiouyi Lu - Linguistics-focused tale of parenthood and only wanting the best for the child with a very dark twist. It made me very sad. In The Sharing Place by David Erik Nelson - What seems to be a tale set in the brackets of the Stages of Grief eventually becomes something much more interesting, more creative. Very chilling. A Series of Steaks by Vina Jie-Min Prasad - I've read this twice and have seen it reprinted all over the place. If you haven't read it, enjoy a printed tale as tasty as steak. Don't ask if it's a forgery. :) Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palmer - Also a commonly reprinted tale, but quite fun. A Hugo winner. Ice by Rich Larson - Probably my least favorite of the collection, this was a tale of sibling rivalry on an ice planet. Genetic jealousy. One Hour, Every Seven Years by Alice Sola Kim - Very oppressive in isolation and loneliness, this time travel tale seems to have lots of hidden gems in it. The descriptions of Venus and Mars and their places in the tale struck me as rather important. Time to see the sun! Toppers by Jason Sanford - This one really caught my imagination. Apocalyptic New York meets a creepy Whispering Mist that is a lot more than it seems. Two thumbs up. Tender Loving Plastics by Amman Sabet - AIs and foster care. What could go wrong? Welcome To Your Authentic Indian Experience by Rebecca Roanhorse - Another Hugo winner. And it's easily one of the best stories I've read in the last few years. :) Quite sharp. Strange Waters by Samantha Mills - Another re-read for me, Water is not always water, and fishing is not always fishing. Great worldbuilding, interesting mash. Calved by Sam J. Miller - Another re-read. Excellent setting with a frustrated dad just trying to do right but unable to get a grip on the future world or his own slightly estranged son. The Need for Air by Lettie Prell - A virtual reality warning. Pretty heartbreaking but my sympathies are all for the son. Robo-Liopleurodon! by Darcie Little Badger - Nanotech in the ocean. Need I say more? Aren't you excited? I was! And am! The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi by E. Lily Yu - The transformation from gamer to ... dreamer. Pretty mild, but interesting. Madeleine by Amal El-Mohtar - Probably one of my favorites in the bunch, it combines a voluntary medical trial with horrible time-travel-ish side effects, reality modifications, and the very uneasy feeling that memory inside time is all that we have. Parts of me would call this a horror. Our Lady of the Open Road by Sarah Pinsker - Very enjoyable tale of aging traveling rockers butting heads against a VR tech world. A Study in Oils by Kelly Robson - I can't decide whether I think this is the best one in this collection or not, but it's really close. I'm a sucker for redemption stories... especially when it comes tied to horrible sanctioned free-range revenge and art. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    New Voices of Science Fiction is a brand new anthology showing us where the future of science fiction is going. Compare this collection to an anthology from thirty or forty years ago and you'll find that time travel has been reimagined. No more time machines. Just a creepy fog that takes over everything and makes it impossible to get from one skyscraper to another. Telepathy has gone places where barely would have expected and forget surfing with a computer. What's a relationship without knowing New Voices of Science Fiction is a brand new anthology showing us where the future of science fiction is going. Compare this collection to an anthology from thirty or forty years ago and you'll find that time travel has been reimagined. No more time machines. Just a creepy fog that takes over everything and makes it impossible to get from one skyscraper to another. Telepathy has gone places where barely would have expected and forget surfing with a computer. What's a relationship without knowing everything, and I mean everything. Openness takes us places we never knew we wanted to go. And, of course, what a long strange trip it's been with a story that makes touring with the Grateful Dead seem passé. Not to be forgotten is the award-winning tale about the bots in space. If you never really took to robots 🤖, this story might change your mind. Although there are a few stories here I never got into, there are quite a few gems. The future will be here sooner than you expect and apparently it will be filled with time travel, with self-aware bots, with fake live music, and with privacy all but vanished.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joe Karpierz

    Depending on who you talk to, short form science fiction is either dead or thriving. Those who espouse the theory that it is dead must be basing their opinion on the fact that the print magazine appears to be dying, or at least hanging by a thread. Circulation figures for the big three - Asimov's, Analog, and Fantasy and Science Fiction - are either dropping annually or staying level. However, there is a huge online presence for short fiction. I won't list all the online magazines here, mostly b Depending on who you talk to, short form science fiction is either dead or thriving. Those who espouse the theory that it is dead must be basing their opinion on the fact that the print magazine appears to be dying, or at least hanging by a thread. Circulation figures for the big three - Asimov's, Analog, and Fantasy and Science Fiction - are either dropping annually or staying level. However, there is a huge online presence for short fiction. I won't list all the online magazines here, mostly because there are way to many to do so. And a lot of the fiction is free. There are more sources for short science fiction than there have ever been, more stories than there have ever been, and more writers than there have ever been. And I'd guess many readers who follow short fiction might not even know who some of those writers are. The New Voices of Science Fiction, edited by Hannu Rajaniemi and Jacob Weisman - both highly respected people in the field, contains a treasure trove of short fiction published in roughly the last five years. Among the stories in this book you will find award finalists and winners. These writers are just making their impact felt in the field, and every one of these stories is a gem. Three of the stories in the collection were the stars of the 2018 Hugo ballot. “The Secret Life of Bots” by Suzanne Palmer won the Hugo for Best Novelette, while “A Series of Steaks” by Vina Jie-Min Prasad was a runner up in the same category that year. Meanwhile, Rebecca Roanhorse, whose 2018 novel TRAIL OF LIGHTNING was a finalist for the Best Novel Hugo this year, won the Hugo for Best Short Story in 2018 for “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience™”. "The Secret Life of Bots" was good the first time when I was reading for the Hugos, but it was much better the second time around. "A Series of Steaks" was just as sly the second time around as it was the first. “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience™” did not disappoint upon a second reading as well. The rest of the stories are outstanding in their own right. "Openness", by Alexander Weinstein is a tale of trying to make a relationship work in a time when you know everything about your partner - and they know everything about you. Jameie Wahls' "Utopia, LOL?" is a tale of AIs, virtual reality, and the future of mankind. It's an amusing and lighthearted story that has a nice ending. A story that I had read in another collection, "Mother Tongues", by S. Qiouyi Lu, is a sad tale of what a mother will do for her child when she wants the best for her. A really tough ending. Rich Larson, who is as prolific a short story writer as any and who won the Dell Award for Undergraduate Excellence in Science Fiction and Fantasy Writing (that's mouthful) in 2014, gives us "Ice", a story of sibling rivalry on, what else, an ice planet. It's been hard to avoid Larson, so I've read quite a few of his stories and I have never been disappointed. One of my absolute favorites in the book is “Our Lady of the Open Road” by Sarah Pinsker. I love music, and I love going to concerts, and I'm old school. This story hit all my buttons. It tells the tale of a band of aging rockers who continue to tour and play live shows in the face of modern virtual reality entertainment. The band does what it does for the love of music, the love of the road, and their version of integrity. This story is barely science fictional, but it doesn't need the genre trappings to make it an emotionally touching story. Much like Larson, I never met a Sarah Pinsker story I didn't like. Another terrific story is E. Lily Yu's “The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi”, about a gamer who believes that he can be the best of the best in his world until he finds out that he can do so much more by leaving his life behind and joining the makers and doers. It's a wonderful tale. Another engaging story is “Toppers” by Jason Sanford. It tells the tale of people trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic New York City, and the strange things that live in the strange mist that engulfs the metropolis. It's good stuff. The book has many stories that deal with parenting and parent/child relationships. A good one is “The Need for Air” by Lettie Prell. It's the story of a mother and son trying to adapt to living in a virtual reality environment, but the son just isn't ready for that. A different take on child rearing is Amman Sabet's "Tender Loving Plastics", in which children are raised by AIs. “The Shape of My Name” by Nino Cipri is a story about a strained family relationship using time travel as a way to try to make things work. Quite touching. Another particular favorite is Amal El-Mohtar's "Madeleine", a disturbing tale about a woman voluntarily taking part in a medical trial. She encounters all sorts of side-effects, including what appears to be time travel and hallucinations. The tale takes a creepy turn at the end. I love it. The list goes on. “One Hour, Every Seven Years” by Alice Sola Kim, “Robo-Liopleurodon!” by Darcie Little Badger, “Calved” by Sam J. Miller, “In the Sharing Place” by David Erik Nelson, “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills and “A Study in Oils” by Kelly Robson would all be worthy of inclusion in a Year's Best Anthology for whatever year they were originally published. Then again, this is a sort of "Best of" anthology, so in a sense they are already included in one of those types of volumes. Rajaniemi and Weisman have done an outstanding job compiling some of the best short science fiction by up and coming (although I would argue that if you've won the Hugo you're past that point) new writers. In a collection like this, I usually find one or two that aren't to my taste. Not this time. To me, every one is a winner. The future of short form science fiction is in good hands.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    The best of science fiction uses the tools of the future to examine the complexities of the now. This anthology is most certainly the best. The New Voices of Science Fiction contains an exceptional collection of stories set in diverse and fascinating worlds, where the eternal dramas of the human experience are acted out in new and interesting ways as each author explores the mysteries of identity, relationships, and the human condition in their own unique style. While there is an overall tone of The best of science fiction uses the tools of the future to examine the complexities of the now. This anthology is most certainly the best. The New Voices of Science Fiction contains an exceptional collection of stories set in diverse and fascinating worlds, where the eternal dramas of the human experience are acted out in new and interesting ways as each author explores the mysteries of identity, relationships, and the human condition in their own unique style. While there is an overall tone of hope, substance was never sacrificed for joy, and readers will find depth throughout the collection. Furthermore, I don't think I've ever seen anything like parity before in an anthology. In fact, I know that I haven't. Authors of various cultures, genders, races, sexualities, and ethnicities lend their voices to this collection, which is in no small way part of why the collection is so fresh. STORY NOTES Openness Alexander Weinstein 4 stars How does the rhythm of relationships change when social media becomes an imbedded part of life and an integrated part of romance? The Shape of My Name Nino Cipri 5 stars A powerful story about anger and forgiveness in an imperfect family Utopian, LOL? Jamie Wahls 5 stars When a human is placed in stasis until they can be cured, will they be able to recognize or cope with the humanity and world of the future? An amusing story with a beautiful ending. Mother Tongues Qiouyi Lu 5 stars A heartwrenchingly beautiful tale of an immigrant mother's love for her child and her gift of the ultimate sacrifice. In the Sharing Place David Erik Nelson 4 stars How does the human race survive in a future where mental flexibility and true acceptance are the only key to viability in the new world? A Series of Steaks Vina Jie-Min Prasad 5 stars A woman struggling to keep her head above water faces an uncertain future when an anonymous and powerful enemy exploits her vulnerable position. The Secret Life of Bots Suzanne Palmer 3 stars A derelict ship and her crew hurtle through space on a desperate mission to save humanity before the crumbling vessel falls apart. Ice Rich Larson 4 stars What conflicts arise between siblings when parents choose genetic modification for their second child but not their first? One Hour, Every Seven Years Alice Sola Kim 4 stars A woman with access to a time machine repeatedly tries to save herself only to find that she needs saving again. Toppers Jason Sanford 4 stars A girl lost in time tries to find safety from a decaying future. Tender Loving Plastics Amman Sabet 5 stars What is the shape of life for a child raised by an AI foster system, and how do they satisfy the longing to return home? Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience Rebecca Roanhorse 5 stars An Indian man struggles to come to terms with his identity while making his living selling a stereotype of his culture. Absolutely incredible on so many levels. A perfect story. Not only does the writing flow in a completely natural fashion, but the subtext is a much needed statement on modern American relations between indigenous and settler peoples. Strange Waters Samantha Mills 4 stars A mother throws herself repeatedly back into danger and strife all for the slimmest hope that she will see her children once more. Calved Sam J. Miller 5 stars An immigrant father struggles to remain close to a teenage son separated by divorce and culture. The Need for Air Lettie Prell 5 stars A mother tries to provide only the best for her child but fails to recognize the subjectivity of her choices and the validity of her child's desires. Robo-Liopleurodon! Darcie Little Badger 4 stars A humorous slice-of-life piece of microfiction about the dangers of pursuing your passion in a dying field The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi E. Lily Yu 3 stars An examination of life with a guaranteed income. This is one of two stories that fell flat for me. The writing was excellent and the universe creative, but the story arc felt too pat. Madeleine Amal El-Mohtar 3 stars A woman throws herself into a medical experiment in the wake of her mother's death only to find herself lost in unanticipated side effects. This story probably deserves a better rating than I gave it. Due to my personal history, I find stories about grieving the death of a loved one highly unrelatable. Our Lady of the Open Road Sarah Pinsker 2 stars A woman and her band struggle to maintain the tradition of live music while resisting the temptation of new opportunities. This was my least favorite. I felt zero connection with the motivations of the characters, and the whole experience was like hearing someone reminisce longingly about something altogether unpleasant. A Study in Oils Kelly Robson A man flees to ancient Earth to hide from predators in the wake of a crime. There among those who live in traditional ways, he works through his guilt with an art that ha long been forbidden to him. I received a complimentary copy of this book via Netgalley. Many thanks to all involved in providing me with this opportunity.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Natalie aka Tannat

    3.5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Corin

    I'm sure the other stories are good, too, but honestly I only got the book so I could read Suzanne Palmer's The Secret Life of Bots. It was worth it. 😊

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jenni

    Sometimes, you read a short story and you come away feeling that you've just been part of something important. It's a powerful feeling. Like an author has shared a secret with you, whispered into your ear something profound. A truth you didn't know that you were holding in your heart, an idea you hadn't yet polished into belief. Well, this collection managed to give me that sensation multiple times. Rajaniemi and Weisman have curated something beautiful here. The title is a bold claim, "The New Sometimes, you read a short story and you come away feeling that you've just been part of something important. It's a powerful feeling. Like an author has shared a secret with you, whispered into your ear something profound. A truth you didn't know that you were holding in your heart, an idea you hadn't yet polished into belief. Well, this collection managed to give me that sensation multiple times. Rajaniemi and Weisman have curated something beautiful here. The title is a bold claim, "The New Voices of Science Fiction." You could not be blamed for being skeptical. But as an avid fan of the genre, I feel it has lived up to its promises, and more. After almost every story in this collection I scrambled to GoodReads to follow an author or mark a first novel as 'to read'. I feel like this anthology has turned me on to authors that I'll be following for many years to come, a series of stars on the rise. The collection opens with a story that could best be described as a Black Mirror cautionary, if Black Mirror were even half as clever as it thinks it is. It ends with a meditation on remorse and the power of art, in a world where bots and nanotech can handle everything. The two stories couldn't be more different, but they felt perfectly connected by the thread uniting the collection. Personal standouts: The Shape of My Name by Nino Cipri Mother Tongue by S. Qiuoyi Lu Madeleine by Amal El-Mohtar Ice by Rich Larson The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi by E. Lily Yu

  8. 4 out of 5

    Doug Cornelius

    With any collection, you’re going to like some stories, not like some, and hate a few. With a collection of sci-fi, stories are going to be all over the place within the genre. That is all true of this collection. There is time travel, cyberpunk, alien worlds, future earths and more. I had two favorites: Strange Waters by Samantha Mills The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palmer I’m going to look for more by these authors.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anneke

    Book Review: The New Voices of Science Fiction Edited by: Hannu Rajaniem and Jacob Weismann Publishler: Tachyon Publications Publication Date: November 23, 2019 Review Date: December 22, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a extraordinary collection of new science fiction stories. Creative beyond imagination. Some of the best writing of the year. If you like science fiction, this is a must-read. You will not want to miss these stories. Wide Book Review: The New Voices of Science Fiction Edited by: Hannu Rajaniem and Jacob Weismann Publishler: Tachyon Publications Publication Date: November 23, 2019 Review Date: December 22, 2019 I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This is a extraordinary collection of new science fiction stories. Creative beyond imagination. Some of the best writing of the year. If you like science fiction, this is a must-read. You will not want to miss these stories. Wide-ranging in subject matter and style. 5+ stars! Highly, highly recommended!!! Thank you to Tachyon Publications for allowing me early access to this breathtaking anthology. Best of luck to all the authors and editors. This review will be posted on NetGalley, Goodreads and Amazon. #netgalley #thenewvoicesofsciencefiction #tachyonpublications

  10. 5 out of 5

    CD

    Twenty first century SF. Classic forms with modern topics ranging from gender fluid characters and time travel that is family oriented. Bullying and urban loneliness play roles in story lines as well. Good collection from newer and very talented voices in the field! Recommended for S-F readers and short story fans!

  11. 5 out of 5

    ~Geektastic~

    If these are the voices of the future of science fiction, then the future is bright! It's rare that I find a collection where I enjoy every single story but this one brought it, and then some. Diverse, challenging, creative, heartfelt, wondrous. Most of the stories are small-scale, character-driven pieces that get to the heart of why science fiction is so immensely flexible and has so much potential to be truly inclusive and wide-ranging. When we let these voices tell their stories, everyone wins If these are the voices of the future of science fiction, then the future is bright! It's rare that I find a collection where I enjoy every single story but this one brought it, and then some. Diverse, challenging, creative, heartfelt, wondrous. Most of the stories are small-scale, character-driven pieces that get to the heart of why science fiction is so immensely flexible and has so much potential to be truly inclusive and wide-ranging. When we let these voices tell their stories, everyone wins. I plan on reading the books written by every single author in this anthology.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally published on my blog Nonstop Reader. The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of new SF short fiction expertly curated and introduced by Hannu Rajaniemi & Jacob Weisman. Released 13th Nov 2019 by Tachyon, it's 432 pages and available in paperback and ebook formats. These stories (20 by my count), were originally published between 2015 and 2019 and are gathered here for the first time. This is top shelf fiction. One of the reasons I like anthologies and collections is that t Originally published on my blog Nonstop Reader. The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of new SF short fiction expertly curated and introduced by Hannu Rajaniemi & Jacob Weisman. Released 13th Nov 2019 by Tachyon, it's 432 pages and available in paperback and ebook formats. These stories (20 by my count), were originally published between 2015 and 2019 and are gathered here for the first time. This is top shelf fiction. One of the reasons I like anthologies and collections is that they're often full of new-to-me authors for further reading. I've always had a particular fondness for collections/anthologies because short fiction is spare and technically challenging, so you get a better feel for an author's expertise with the form. Short fiction is less of a time commitment as well, so if one story is not working for you, there's another piece readily available in a few pages.This is a showcase of up and coming authors; it's a sister volume to The New Voices of Fantasy from 2017. The short introductions for each story are interesting and well written and add a lot of interest. The quality of the stories is very high. They are well written, varied, well curated stories. Of the 20 included stories, only a few were from authors familiar to me. It's unclear from the publishing info available online, but the eARC I received has a handy interactive table of contents. I hope the ebook release version does also. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. Presumably that feature will carry through to the final release version. I think this might be the first time I've given an anthology 5 stars. These stories are varied in tone, execution, length, subject matter, but they're all really good. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I thoroughly recommend this collection of recent sci-fi stories. This collection represents a diverse set of new and upcoming authors who I hope to read more of in the near future. Even the stories that I only marked as "2/5" were still decent efforts, they just didn't provide me with much personal pleasure. While most stories in this colleciton stick to a "hard" science perspective some stories offer room for a dash of magic along with the "science-y" elements. Nothing felt "out of place" among I thoroughly recommend this collection of recent sci-fi stories. This collection represents a diverse set of new and upcoming authors who I hope to read more of in the near future. Even the stories that I only marked as "2/5" were still decent efforts, they just didn't provide me with much personal pleasure. While most stories in this colleciton stick to a "hard" science perspective some stories offer room for a dash of magic along with the "science-y" elements. Nothing felt "out of place" among this collection and I think that is impressive given the wide range in tone (contemplative, comical, action-packed), the varied settings (far-distant space, future Earth, alternate timelines), and the differences in the goals and attitudes of the lead characters. For those who are eager for more specific feedback I have included my reactions to each short story below. I recorded each of these snippets shortly after each story. I gave each short story a rating out of 5 stars. I based my rating here purely on my own personal enjoyment as a lover of the sci-fi genre and especially short science fiction stories. My experience with short stories is mainly with the classics of the mid-twentieth century; this collection has certainly whetted my appetite for more contemporary short stories! (note - I don't consider any of the short synopses and reactions below to be "spoilers" but reasonable folks may disagree so read at your own risk if you are sensitive to "spoiler talk") Openness: 3/5 stars - what does falling in love and breaking up look like in a hyper-social world? The Shape of My Name: 5/5 stars - lovely descriptions and a simple satisfying symmetry help to elevate this time travel memoir. Utopia, LOL: 4/5 stars - this one will probably be dated in about 5 years, but I really enjoyed the humor in it. I would love to read more about Kit's adventures in the distant future. Mother Tongues: 3/5 stars - the title is all the synopsis you need. It's a short, bittersweet story about losing something important. In the Sharing Place: 4/5 stars - nearly perfect. No spoilers or hints for this one. A Series of Steaks: 3/5 stars - What's the harm of one more illegal job printing "fake meat"? The Secret Life of Bots: 4/5 stars - A charming story of an extraordinary day in the life of a precocious micro-bot. Ice: 5/5 - Sibling rivalry meets genetic modification. This works perfectly as a neat, self-contained short story. It would also make a great beginning for a larger fictional universe. One Hour, Every Seven Years: 3/5 - A disturbing companion piece to the already disturbing classic sci-fi short "All Summer in a Day". Tender Loving Plastics: 5/5 - This one is going to mess with my head for awhile. Strange Waters: 5/5 - It's hard to say much without spoiling this one. It's great world-building for such a short story and it has a solid ending Calved : 2/5 - A dark father-son story involving a serious failure to communicate The Need for Air: 4/5 - What happens when a parent and a child fundamentally disagree about how they want you experience reality? Robo-Liopleurodon!: 2/5 - A very short story containing the titular sea monster The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi: 2/5 - Another very short story with a simple premise. No surprises but some nice universe building of a very optimistic near-future Earth. Our Lady of the Open Road: 2/5 - This one felt longer than the others. The technological changes affecting how we consume music are already well underway. A Study in Oils: 3/5 - A young man runs away seeking to escape revenge and guilt for his actions.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Full disclosure: I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. This collection of previously published short stories highlights authors that Rajaniemi and Weisman believe are rising stars in the genre. As with any anthology, the stories can be hit-or-miss, although the editors picked many award-winning stories for this collection. You may recognize some of them. As a whole, I thought this was a fun and thoughtful collection with some really love Full disclosure: I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. This collection of previously published short stories highlights authors that Rajaniemi and Weisman believe are rising stars in the genre. As with any anthology, the stories can be hit-or-miss, although the editors picked many award-winning stories for this collection. You may recognize some of them. As a whole, I thought this was a fun and thoughtful collection with some really lovely gems. My favorite was “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills, a story about a time-traveling fisherwoman who desperately wants to get home to her children. “Mother Tongues” by S. Qiouyi Lu is similarly heartbreaking, about a mother who is willing to give up her knowledge of her first language in order to give her daughter a better life. “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience™” by Rebecca Roanhorse, about a Native American man working for a virtual reality tourism company that offers guests an “authentic” vision quest experience (read: chock-full of stereotypes and cultural appropriation), is another obvious standout in this collection. “Our Lady of the Open Road” by Sarah Pinsker appears to be connected to (perhaps the inspiration for?) her novel A Song for a New Day, which just came out a few months ago. I also can’t help but applaud an anthology like this that celebrates the talent of so many diverse writers whose work pushes the bounds of the genre in so many ways. I think this collection of stories offers a good view of where the genre is heading, grappling with topics such as gender and sexuality, colonialism, climate change, AI, and more. I’ve provided the table of contents below, since I know I like to have that information when I consider buying/reading an anthology full of reprinted stories and I assume that many of you do too. Table of Contents: “Openness” by Alexander Weinstein “The Shape of My Name” by Nino Cipri “Utopia, LOL?” by Jamie Wahls “Mother Tongues” by S. Qiouyi Lu “In the Sharing Place” by David Erik Nelson “A Series of Steaks” by Vina Jie-Min Prasad “The Secret Life of Bots” by Suzanne Palmer “Ice” by Rich Larson “One Hour, Every Seven Years” by Alice Sola Kim “Toppers” by Jason Sanford “Tender Loving Plastics” by Amman Sabet “Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience™” by Rebecca Roanhorse “Strange Waters” by Samantha Mills “Calved” by Sam J. Miller “The Need for Air” by Lettie Prell “Robo-Liopleurodon!” by Darcie Little Badger “The Doing and Undoing of Jacob E. Mwangi” by E. Lily Yu “Madeleine” by Amal El-Mohtar “Our Lady of the Open Road” by Sarah Pinsker “A Study in Oils” by Kelly Robson

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    4.5 stars!! It started off meh with "openness": 3/5 stars ~ what's the point of this story?? I don't understand what it's trying to tell us "The shape of my name": 4/5 stars "Utopia, LOL?": 4/5 "Mother tongues": 5/5! Important story, it almost made me cry. "In the sharing place": 4.5/5 ~ this was so weird and creepy, but I loved it?! "A series of steaks": 4/5 ~ sometimes hard to understand, but a sweet read "The secret life of bots": 3/5 "Ice": 2.5/5 ~ whales terrify me "One hour, every seven years" 2.5/ 4.5 stars!! It started off meh with "openness": 3/5 stars ~ what's the point of this story?? I don't understand what it's trying to tell us "The shape of my name": 4/5 stars "Utopia, LOL?": 4/5 "Mother tongues": 5/5! Important story, it almost made me cry. "In the sharing place": 4.5/5 ~ this was so weird and creepy, but I loved it?! "A series of steaks": 4/5 ~ sometimes hard to understand, but a sweet read "The secret life of bots": 3/5 "Ice": 2.5/5 ~ whales terrify me "One hour, every seven years" 2.5/5 ~ interesting, but confusing "Toppers": 4/5 "Tender loving plastics": 4/5 ~ Interesting concept "Welcome to your authentic Indian experience": 4/5 ~ I'm not sure I understood this one properly (maybe it just isn't meant for me), it was still a good story "Strange waters": 5/5 ~ Made me cry, I love it!!! "Calved": 3/5 ~ Saw the twist coming immediately, unfortunately another sci-fi story where being a POC and being gay still gets you bullied... I know it was necessary for the plot, but still... Eh "The need for air": 3.5/5 ~ Loved the concept, I'd read a whole book about this. Was a bit flat as a short story tho "Robo-liopleurodon!": 3.5/5 ~ This was very short and cute. I couldn't enjoy it quite as much, because I'm scared of underwater animals and open water, so the entire setting was really unsettling for me. But that's just a really personal thing, I feel like the story was very interesting. "The doing and undoing of Jacob e. Mwangi": 4.5/5 ~ Nice to have a story with a different setting: Kenya, if I remember right. It's a nice little story about a gamer chasing a dream. The character, Jacob, reminds me a little of myself. it's a sweet little story, I would read a whole book about this character and his friendships! "Madeleine": 5/5!!! ~ Perfect, lovely, amazing, I'm in love!!! AHHHHHHHH I teared up, its so beautiful "Our Lady of the open road": 4.5/5 ~ This is a very realistic, near-future story. I liked it, the characters are pretty cool, I love the road tripping punk band setting. "A study in oils": 4/5 ~ a little confusing at first, but satisfying wrap up for this anthology

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Aldred

    An anthology from well-established science fiction writers, never mind new authors, can be a very mixed bag. Not so The New Voices of Science Fiction. They are superb examples of very engrossing and affecting storytelling. These writers demonstrate the breadth of concepts and worlds with which science fiction writers can create a delicious buffet of stories for readers to gorge themselves on and that, for emerging writers in the genre, there will always be plenty of room for stunning originality. An anthology from well-established science fiction writers, never mind new authors, can be a very mixed bag. Not so The New Voices of Science Fiction. They are superb examples of very engrossing and affecting storytelling. These writers demonstrate the breadth of concepts and worlds with which science fiction writers can create a delicious buffet of stories for readers to gorge themselves on and that, for emerging writers in the genre, there will always be plenty of room for stunning originality. It was also interesting to see how light a touch could be used in worldbuilding, and yet keep the tales firmly located in the science fiction realm, even though the character’s surroundings were not lavish with detail. Many of the stories were woven around interesting concepts where the technology was left to the reader’s imagination and quietly placed off the page. Instead, the characters and their responses were placed centre stage, leading to some very interesting and particularly heart-rending reading. One of the stories concerned the decision someone had to make when giving over, and therefore giving up, the capacity to communicate in their native in order to pay for their child’s education. This not only took me through an emotional rollercoaster, but also made me think hard about the value of being able to communicate effectively, birth right and identity. After reading the book I am still left mulling over the type of important contemporary issues that well written science fiction stories are so good at highlighting. I will certainly be looking out for these authors over the next few years. The New Voices of Science Fiction was courtesy to Tachyon Publications.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of twenty short stories, which was collected and edited by Hannu Rajaniemi and Jacob Weisman. It is a collection of twenty short stories from twenty recent award-winning or award-nominated science fiction stories. For the most part, I rather like most if not all of these contributions. The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of superlative twenty short stories from the science fiction genre. There are various perspectives within the anth The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of twenty short stories, which was collected and edited by Hannu Rajaniemi and Jacob Weisman. It is a collection of twenty short stories from twenty recent award-winning or award-nominated science fiction stories. For the most part, I rather like most if not all of these contributions. The New Voices of Science Fiction is an anthology of superlative twenty short stories from the science fiction genre. There are various perspectives within the anthology, which create a tonal freshness in the genre. Most of the included works extrapolate contemporary technological and social changes into near-future nightmares. While others stories explore dangerous extensions of popular science. However, all these stories provoke the reader to ponder not only what the future might be but what it should be. Like most anthologies there are weaker contributions, but The New Voices of Science Fiction may be an exception. It is far from perfect, but each story is crafted extremely well, that any imperfections could be glossed over rather easily and the anthology is an enjoyable read. All in all, The New Voices of Science Fiction is a wonderful solid collection of essays about twenty science fiction short stories from currently the best science fiction writers around.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    This intelligently-edited anthology showcases a number of new voices in science fiction, many of whom are already becoming Big Names in the field: Kelly Robson, Rebecca Roanhorse, Sam Miller, Rich Larson, Sarah Pinsker. They all have signature stories here. What's interesting are the newcomers that the editors profile, some of whom I've never read: Nino Cipri, Jamie Wahls, Lettie Prell, and others. But do you know what I miss? Funny science fiction, like what Connie Willis does. There is lots of This intelligently-edited anthology showcases a number of new voices in science fiction, many of whom are already becoming Big Names in the field: Kelly Robson, Rebecca Roanhorse, Sam Miller, Rich Larson, Sarah Pinsker. They all have signature stories here. What's interesting are the newcomers that the editors profile, some of whom I've never read: Nino Cipri, Jamie Wahls, Lettie Prell, and others. But do you know what I miss? Funny science fiction, like what Connie Willis does. There is lots of funny fantasy (RIP, Sir Terry Pratchett), but not much SF that's humorous. In this collection, the closest are Wahls's story “Utopia, LOL” and Suzanne Palmer's “The Secret Life of Bots”. There are genderfluid stories here, and a number of takes on time travel. Authors don't seem to be afraid of time paradoxes anymore, but use time travel to examine the choices we make and the identities we build. The current issue of gender identity is a very SF-nal concept, and authors are working with it to expand the boundaries of SF once again, far beyond the classic time-travel-and-gender-swapping Heinlein story “All You Zombies”.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... ARC from @TachyonPub and voluntarily reviewed So I don’t read a lot of science fiction. I know. It’s a flaw I have and I’m working on it. I decided to give this a shot because I tend to be impressed by the quality of books from Tachyon Publications so I knew I was in good hands. I also don’t like very hardcore science fiction or too much AI. So, I was a bit nervous about reading this. I needn’t have worried. I was surprised by the excellent quality of the s https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... ARC from @TachyonPub and voluntarily reviewed So I don’t read a lot of science fiction. I know. It’s a flaw I have and I’m working on it. I decided to give this a shot because I tend to be impressed by the quality of books from Tachyon Publications so I knew I was in good hands. I also don’t like very hardcore science fiction or too much AI. So, I was a bit nervous about reading this. I needn’t have worried. I was surprised by the excellent quality of the stories. I enjoyed every one. I read a lot of anthologies and the trend seems to be that at least one or two fall short of the mark. That wasn’t the case here. Every story worked and some a bit more than others. My favourites were Openness by Alexander Weinstein, The Shape of My Name by Nino Capri, UTOPIA, LOL by Jamie Wahls, Mother Tongues by S. Qiouyi Lu, In the Sharing Place by David Erik Nelson and Ice by Rich Larson. I enjoyed ever story here but these shone a little brighter.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Translator Monkey

    There's frankly nothing NOT to like in this excellent collection of perfectly-written short stories. They all brought me back to my childhood days of reading the brilliant works of some of the best science fiction authors of the late 1950s and 1960s - in particular, Dick, Ellison, Asimov, Norton, and Ray Bradbury, whose excellent "All Summer in a Day" is heavily lifted but expanded broadly with a time-travel twist. I felt compelled to read this in a few weeks' time, as I was reading against the There's frankly nothing NOT to like in this excellent collection of perfectly-written short stories. They all brought me back to my childhood days of reading the brilliant works of some of the best science fiction authors of the late 1950s and 1960s - in particular, Dick, Ellison, Asimov, Norton, and Ray Bradbury, whose excellent "All Summer in a Day" is heavily lifted but expanded broadly with a time-travel twist. I felt compelled to read this in a few weeks' time, as I was reading against the clock - sincere thanks to NetGalley for their pre-publication copy in exchange for this review - but this is a book I'll purchase in order to read and enjoy spread throughout the year. A collection of stunning short stories that really brought me back. Thanks, also, to the editors for expanding my reading list as I chase down other works by these exceptional authors.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I really was not sure what to expect from this anthology, but I was totally surprised and happy. This collection of stories is VERY good. These are really wonderful writers, that even if a story didn't hit me like a sledgehammer, or like a soft caress, they were all innovative, well-written, intriguing and thought-provoking. It is rare that anthologies manage to keep my interest throughout all the stories. This one did. I didn't necessarily think EVERY story was amazing, but I must say, this is a I really was not sure what to expect from this anthology, but I was totally surprised and happy. This collection of stories is VERY good. These are really wonderful writers, that even if a story didn't hit me like a sledgehammer, or like a soft caress, they were all innovative, well-written, intriguing and thought-provoking. It is rare that anthologies manage to keep my interest throughout all the stories. This one did. I didn't necessarily think EVERY story was amazing, but I must say, this is a fine set of stories. The authors will have long and successful careers. Many of them are already putting out collections and debut novels and the like and now, unfortunately, my TBR will increase by 22+ more books because I really want to read what else these authors come up with. Read this for the future. Read this for the upcoming. Read this for the joy.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    The New Voices of Science Fiction is a brilliant anthology of cutting-edge short stories hand-selected by award-winning author Hannu Rajaniemi. ⁠ ⁠ The stories come from the new wave of science fiction authors from a diverse range of countries, ethnicities, sexualities, and gender identities - all of which is reflected in their works. ⁠ ⁠ This is a genre spanning collection covering space, aliens, time travel, post-apocalypse, technology, medicine, parallel worlds, and more, and as with all such com The New Voices of Science Fiction is a brilliant anthology of cutting-edge short stories hand-selected by award-winning author Hannu Rajaniemi. ⁠ ⁠ The stories come from the new wave of science fiction authors from a diverse range of countries, ethnicities, sexualities, and gender identities - all of which is reflected in their works. ⁠ ⁠ This is a genre spanning collection covering space, aliens, time travel, post-apocalypse, technology, medicine, parallel worlds, and more, and as with all such compendiums some tales are better than others, but here the balance favours the excellent over anything else. ⁠ ⁠ I don't read enough science fiction these days, but this has certainly inspired me to look out more material by the authors included, as well as other upcoming writers in the field. ⁠

  23. 5 out of 5

    MJ VanGompel

    I really liked this anthology of SF short stories! Edited by Hannu Rajaniemi & Jacob Weisman, & published in 2019, the stories were written between 2015 and 2018. The book contains 20 short stories ranging from 4 to 44 pages in length and a wide variety of topics from parenting, death, robots, time travel and 3D printing. Many of the stories received award(s). My favorite stories were: * Openess by Alexander Weinstein * Tender Loving Plastics by Amman Sabet *The Need for Air by Letie Prell *The Sec I really liked this anthology of SF short stories! Edited by Hannu Rajaniemi & Jacob Weisman, & published in 2019, the stories were written between 2015 and 2018. The book contains 20 short stories ranging from 4 to 44 pages in length and a wide variety of topics from parenting, death, robots, time travel and 3D printing. Many of the stories received award(s). My favorite stories were: * Openess by Alexander Weinstein * Tender Loving Plastics by Amman Sabet *The Need for Air by Letie Prell *The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palmer *One Hour Every Seven Years by Alice Solar Kim I'm sure you'll have your own favorites. This is a definite must read for SF fans! I hope to read more from these authors in the future. Thanks to the Winneconne Library for purchasing this book at my request.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dree

    An excellent collection of 20 short stories by new authors. Every one was good, and now I have many new authors to explore the works of! My favorites: The Shape of My Name by Nino Cipri: A trans man from a family of female time-travelers Mother Tongues by S Qiouyi Lu: A woman sells her fluent Mandarin to send her daughter to college A Series of Steaks by Vina Jie-Min Prasad: Helena and Lily, steak forgers The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palma: an old retired bot is brought back into use due to de An excellent collection of 20 short stories by new authors. Every one was good, and now I have many new authors to explore the works of! My favorites: The Shape of My Name by Nino Cipri: A trans man from a family of female time-travelers Mother Tongues by S Qiouyi Lu: A woman sells her fluent Mandarin to send her daughter to college A Series of Steaks by Vina Jie-Min Prasad: Helena and Lily, steak forgers The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palma: an old retired bot is brought back into use due to desperate times Strange Waters by Samantha Mills: Mika, a fisherwoman in time, is trying to get home But really, every story was good, and every author in this anthology writes interesting stuff. ——— Thanks to NetGalley and Tachyon for the egalley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shaz

    This anthology contains 20 stories, eight of which I had previously read. As with any such anthology, there were ups and downs and overall this is just an ok selection. My favourite stories were Utopia, LOL? by Jamie Wahls, A Series of Steaks by Vina Jie-Min Prasad, The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palmer, and Strange Waters by Samatha Mills. The greatest appeal of anthologies and the primary reason I may opt to read one is to be exposed to and discover new-to-me writers who are doing interesti This anthology contains 20 stories, eight of which I had previously read. As with any such anthology, there were ups and downs and overall this is just an ok selection. My favourite stories were Utopia, LOL? by Jamie Wahls, A Series of Steaks by Vina Jie-Min Prasad, The Secret Life of Bots by Suzanne Palmer, and Strange Waters by Samatha Mills. The greatest appeal of anthologies and the primary reason I may opt to read one is to be exposed to and discover new-to-me writers who are doing interesting and exciting thing. Then I can go and explore what else they have done and possibly find new favourites or explore the various boundaries they are trying to push. In that respect, I have to say this anthology was entirely unsuccessful for me and that is disappointing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rt

    Excellent collection with a number of award-winning stories, including Suzanne Palmer’s The Secret Life of Bots (service and heroism even when you’re considered outdated), S. Qiouyi Lu’s Mother Tongues (when you can sell your knowledge of your basic language to buy your child’s future, what should you do?), Rebecca Roanhorse’s Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience TM (also about selling your culture to survive, though very differently), Kelly Robson’s A Study in Oils (surviving the doing o Excellent collection with a number of award-winning stories, including Suzanne Palmer’s The Secret Life of Bots (service and heroism even when you’re considered outdated), S. Qiouyi Lu’s Mother Tongues (when you can sell your knowledge of your basic language to buy your child’s future, what should you do?), Rebecca Roanhorse’s Welcome to Your Authentic Indian Experience TM (also about selling your culture to survive, though very differently), Kelly Robson’s A Study in Oils (surviving the doing of a horrible act in a destructive culture), and a number of others, including Sarah Pinsker and Amar El-Mohtar. Overall, delivers on its promise.

  27. 4 out of 5

    J2Diewald

    The stories were enjoyable and fun to read, but nothing really stood up and grabbed me. I wouldn't mind reading more from these authors, but I probably won't go looking for them. Sometimes you have to read a lot of good (and, unfortunately, some bad) before you find that great story or book that's going to grab you and make you think about things. There are better things to follow up on, such as the remainder of the Lady Astronaut stories, more Murderbot, and more Chinese SF beyond the Three Bod The stories were enjoyable and fun to read, but nothing really stood up and grabbed me. I wouldn't mind reading more from these authors, but I probably won't go looking for them. Sometimes you have to read a lot of good (and, unfortunately, some bad) before you find that great story or book that's going to grab you and make you think about things. There are better things to follow up on, such as the remainder of the Lady Astronaut stories, more Murderbot, and more Chinese SF beyond the Three Body Problem trilogy, just to name three on my Amazon wish list. And, now that I've seen Season 4 of The Expanse, I may have to go read the book again. Or read Watchmen again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    This is a great collection of SFF by relatively new writers. While many of them have become well-established by now, getting major awards and big publishing deals, this is still a good introduction to the work of Rebecca Roanhorse, Amal El-Mohtar, Alice Sola Kim, Sam J. Miller, E. Lily Yu, Rich Larson, Vina Jie-Min Prasad, Sarah Pinsker, Darcie Little Badger, S. Qiouyi Lu, Kelly Robson, and others. I love the diverse viewpoints and characters created by this group of writers and recommend this h This is a great collection of SFF by relatively new writers. While many of them have become well-established by now, getting major awards and big publishing deals, this is still a good introduction to the work of Rebecca Roanhorse, Amal El-Mohtar, Alice Sola Kim, Sam J. Miller, E. Lily Yu, Rich Larson, Vina Jie-Min Prasad, Sarah Pinsker, Darcie Little Badger, S. Qiouyi Lu, Kelly Robson, and others. I love the diverse viewpoints and characters created by this group of writers and recommend this highly for anyone interested in the current state and trends of SFF and its future.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    I started this ARC while I was waiting at the doctor's (always a good place to read) and I was so engrossed reading the I nearly missed my turn. It's a great anthology that features tons of great authors new to me. I loved theirs stories, the different approaches and genres and all of them are well crafted and fascinating. Back home I started to search books by the authors I read and I hope I will be able to read some of their works. It was a great reading experience, highly recommended. Many thanks I started this ARC while I was waiting at the doctor's (always a good place to read) and I was so engrossed reading the I nearly missed my turn. It's a great anthology that features tons of great authors new to me. I loved theirs stories, the different approaches and genres and all of them are well crafted and fascinating. Back home I started to search books by the authors I read and I hope I will be able to read some of their works. It was a great reading experience, highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Craig Pearson

    Thank you to Netgalley for the oppportunity to read and review this book. One aspect of short story anthologies that attracts me to them is that if a story does not interest me I can easily move on to another. I found mysylf moving on regularly with this book and only a few did I read through to the end. You will not find many aliens and spaceships here. Most stories were vignettes in the lives of future apocolyptic survivors which will have an appeal to certain readers but not me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.