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La Dame aux Camélias: Ebook Premium illustré

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♦ Cet ebook bénéficie d’une mise en page esthétique optimisée pour la lecture numérique. ♦ Version illustrée par Paul Gavarni Comment une courtisane, fille du bas peuple, fascina ces contemporains au point de devenir un des mythes féminins les plus connus de l’ère bourgeoise ? Ce roman d'Alexandre Dumas fils connu un succès immédiat et durable sans doute lié à s ♦ Cet ebook bénéficie d’une mise en page esthétique optimisée pour la lecture numérique. ♦ Version illustrée par Paul Gavarni Comment une courtisane, fille du bas peuple, fascina ces contemporains au point de devenir un des mythes féminins les plus connus de l’ère bourgeoise ? Ce roman d'Alexandre Dumas fils connu un succès immédiat et durable sans doute lié à son sujet empli de scandales et portant offense aux bonnes moeurs de l’époque. Son personnage principal, Marguerite Gautier est inspirée de Marie du Plessis, célèbre courtisane morte à l’âge de 23 ans en 1847 à Paris. Prostituée de luxe, l'héroïne découvre, après de nombreuses turpitudes, l’amour grâce à un jeune homme de bonne famille, Armand Duval. Cet amour inespéré changera sa destinée... Verdi s'inspira de ce drame pour composer son fameux opéra La Traviata.


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♦ Cet ebook bénéficie d’une mise en page esthétique optimisée pour la lecture numérique. ♦ Version illustrée par Paul Gavarni Comment une courtisane, fille du bas peuple, fascina ces contemporains au point de devenir un des mythes féminins les plus connus de l’ère bourgeoise ? Ce roman d'Alexandre Dumas fils connu un succès immédiat et durable sans doute lié à s ♦ Cet ebook bénéficie d’une mise en page esthétique optimisée pour la lecture numérique. ♦ Version illustrée par Paul Gavarni Comment une courtisane, fille du bas peuple, fascina ces contemporains au point de devenir un des mythes féminins les plus connus de l’ère bourgeoise ? Ce roman d'Alexandre Dumas fils connu un succès immédiat et durable sans doute lié à son sujet empli de scandales et portant offense aux bonnes moeurs de l’époque. Son personnage principal, Marguerite Gautier est inspirée de Marie du Plessis, célèbre courtisane morte à l’âge de 23 ans en 1847 à Paris. Prostituée de luxe, l'héroïne découvre, après de nombreuses turpitudes, l’amour grâce à un jeune homme de bonne famille, Armand Duval. Cet amour inespéré changera sa destinée... Verdi s'inspira de ce drame pour composer son fameux opéra La Traviata.

30 review for La Dame aux Camélias: Ebook Premium illustré

  1. 4 out of 5

    Best Eggs

    Quite good and similar to Zola's Nana in many ways, although, good storytellers as they were, neither Dumas Papa or Dumas Fils were in Zola's league. What happens to the pretty girl who trades off her looks for money when she is past her sell-by date? Then she has to hope the man who always loved her will stump up the cash she needs so badly despite her constant rejection when she was at the top of the game and judged him too poor to supply her with the luxuries she felt entitled to. And hope he Quite good and similar to Zola's Nana in many ways, although, good storytellers as they were, neither Dumas Papa or Dumas Fils were in Zola's league. What happens to the pretty girl who trades off her looks for money when she is past her sell-by date? Then she has to hope the man who always loved her will stump up the cash she needs so badly despite her constant rejection when she was at the top of the game and judged him too poor to supply her with the luxuries she felt entitled to. And hope he doesn't mind that she says she loves him only now she's desperate. Nor mind the sickness that has ravaged her body and destroyed her beauty, putting her out of work and losing her the gilded place in society and the envy, if not respect, of the women she never failed to lord it over? Does being feckless go with the job of being a whore? Did none of them ever think of putting something by? Or is this just a literary device by the male authors who were looking to entertain rather than enlighten?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    "Once I had a little dog who used to look at me with sad eyes when I coughed: he was the only living creature I have ever loved."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    I never thought I would love a book with a theme like that so much.But I did.Such a beautiful,heart-breaking love story.Truly sad and realistic.I found the writing style truly mesmerizing, not at all austere on the contrary very easy to read.The way the story is built,in rewind, made me incredibly curious to find out more about this story.The scene in the cemetery where Armando sees the corpse of Margarita is one of the most powerful ones in literature.Pretty amazing and horrifying.The character I never thought I would love a book with a theme like that so much.But I did.Such a beautiful,heart-breaking love story.Truly sad and realistic.I found the writing style truly mesmerizing, not at all austere on the contrary very easy to read.The way the story is built,in rewind, made me incredibly curious to find out more about this story.The scene in the cemetery where Armando sees the corpse of Margarita is one of the most powerful ones in literature.Pretty amazing and horrifying.The characters?Wow!The way the author analyzes their misdemeanors,thoughts and feelings makes you think that they are real people and although this story concerns predicaments hard to find nowadays the philosophical deductions can be applied today.Some of the best quotes ever.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I wish people could still express themselves the way they do in the classics. After I got a few chapters in, I really couldn't put this book down, which is unusual for me, for the genre. The story is such a train wreck of emotion and life that that must be why it pulls the heartstrings of so many people. It is all so raw. I liked the author's choice to make it a story told by Armond after the fact, so he was remembering it exactly, but could see it all in a big picture view, the beginning, and w I wish people could still express themselves the way they do in the classics. After I got a few chapters in, I really couldn't put this book down, which is unusual for me, for the genre. The story is such a train wreck of emotion and life that that must be why it pulls the heartstrings of so many people. It is all so raw. I liked the author's choice to make it a story told by Armond after the fact, so he was remembering it exactly, but could see it all in a big picture view, the beginning, and what and how things were leading to the end. He wasn't stuck in the middle of the emotion somewhere. I loved that it wasn't simple and sweet, but love and jealousy and anger and fear and anguish are all balled up and spurted out. I read something that talked about how people were worried, at the time, that this would promote the "kept woman" way of life, or of men seeking after them. The narrator (and hence, the author) are very careful to explain that they don't believe this to be typical behavior but that was a very exceptional woman. I found that amusing and wish that if there must be 'bad', that the 'bad' of our day was as pretty and clean as the 'bad' of theirs.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Simona Bartolotta

    “When she had gone, I was frightened at the solitude in which she left me.”

  6. 5 out of 5

    Merna

    The oxford world's classics edition of this novel said in the opening introduction that 'this has never been a novel for which persons of taste and discernment have been able to confess outright enthusiasm.' As much I dislike oxford for that very pretentious and frank statement; I can't fully disagree. Now, I'm definitely not a person of good 'taste' and 'discernment' or whatever that may mean. All I know is that when I read stuff like this: "Am I not your slave, your dog? Do with me what you wil The oxford world's classics edition of this novel said in the opening introduction that 'this has never been a novel for which persons of taste and discernment have been able to confess outright enthusiasm.' As much I dislike oxford for that very pretentious and frank statement; I can't fully disagree. Now, I'm definitely not a person of good 'taste' and 'discernment' or whatever that may mean. All I know is that when I read stuff like this: "Am I not your slave, your dog? Do with me what you will. Take me, I am yours." Then I want to barf. It's certainly not my type of romance. It's a rather plain story with an overbearing excess of sentiment and sweetness. It also has insta-love which I cannot stand. The story follows a young man named Armand and the courtesan, Marguerite Gautier, whom he falls madly in love with. Of course complications abound in their relationship which makes it difficult for them to be together. For Armand, it's to do with the fact that he wants her to be his lover, not merely his mistress, which would have been considerably bad for his image since she's essentially a high-class prostitute, but Armand doesn't care about that because his madly obsessed and infatuated with her. For Marguerite, it's the fact she's can't simply give up her extravagant life for Armand, who is not all that rich. She spends money so outlandishly that's she in debt even though she gets huge amounts of money from her other lovers. I would think that if someone said that they can't love you because you don't have enough money to spend on them then you would know it's time to simply move on. But it doesn't convince the love-sick hero for he's just too enamoured by her. And for what reason? I seriously have no clue. There's nothing interesting about her. She comes off as quite selfish. And it's not like Armand doesn't realise that she spends money recklessly. He says so himself, "She was one of those women who never consider the countless amusements of which their life is made can be a serious financial drain." Armand also notes that she had 'men spend more on flowers than would be needed to enable a whole family to live without care.' Maybe, I am misinterpreting the story. I know this story was intended to make you sympathetic to courtesans, but I only came out thinking how these courtesans need to better handle their finances and maybe lay out a budget plan along the way.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Luís C.

    The Lady of the Camellias was one of the biggest hits of this great century. This novel revealed Alexandre Dumas son, who was inspired to write the story of Marie Duplessis. Verdi then make a sublime opera, La Traviata.Armand Duval, therefore, falls madly in love with Marguerite Gautier, one of the most famous courtesans of Paris, from the first glance. It is presented to her, she mocks him. Two years later, they meet and tears poured seeing Armand taking a terrible coughing (Marguerite is consu The Lady of the Camellias was one of the biggest hits of this great century. This novel revealed Alexandre Dumas son, who was inspired to write the story of Marie Duplessis. Verdi then make a sublime opera, La Traviata.Armand Duval, therefore, falls madly in love with Marguerite Gautier, one of the most famous courtesans of Paris, from the first glance. It is presented to her, she mocks him. Two years later, they meet and tears poured seeing Armand taking a terrible coughing (Marguerite is consumptive) upset the young woman who then agrees to be his mistress. Armand has no money, he will have to overcome the jealousy inspired her lovers as the courtesan guard to maintain its luxury. Only Marguerite ends up falling in love with him really. She no longer dreams of only one thing: to live in the country, removed from the world, this man who loves her for herself and not to proclaim everywhere that he has a pretty mistress. This kept woman begins to sell everything she owns, cashmeres, cars, horses, jewelry ... because her lover is penniless. Thereupon comes in Armand's father. This gentleman is firmly opposed to the link. What reputation does give Armand and the family? He met Margaret in secret and begs her to sacrifice her love for the future of her lover. Transformed by the month of romance, Margaret agrees with nobility and die alone and any proceedings, dying under the vengeance of Armand who believes she left him to get his luxury.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicole~

    4.5 stars This is the tragic story of the life of a courtesan, Marguerite Gautier (dubbed Camille or Lady of the Camellias for her always carrying a bouquet of the flowers), who, by willing sacrifice that could never have rewarded her in kind, proved her purity of love. It is also a lamentable apologetic story told by Armand Duval, the man who sworn love for her but judged her too harshly, too unwisely, and painfully abandoned her. In the opening of the story, the narrator chances upon the auction 4.5 stars This is the tragic story of the life of a courtesan, Marguerite Gautier (dubbed Camille or Lady of the Camellias for her always carrying a bouquet of the flowers), who, by willing sacrifice that could never have rewarded her in kind, proved her purity of love. It is also a lamentable apologetic story told by Armand Duval, the man who sworn love for her but judged her too harshly, too unwisely, and painfully abandoned her. In the opening of the story, the narrator chances upon the auctioning of Camille's possessions, a process which literally began over her freshly dead body. There were no mourners at her death, and now among the remainders of a kept-woman, there are only spectators and bargain hunters. Camille truly died alone. The narrator remarks that "Marguerite was a pretty woman; but though the life of such women makes sensation enough, their death makes very little. Their death, when they die young, is heard of by all their lovers at the same moment, for in Paris almost all the lovers of a well-known woman are friends." He meets Armand Duval who, stricken by the death of Camille, recounts his possessive love affair with the famous courtesan and the circumstances that led to her early demise. Dumas paints a vivid portrait of Paris life in 1847, of male patrons young and old whose keeping of mistresses was the norm, of the double standards and snobbery of "decent" society. Camille or Lady of the Camillias is a love story that may be compared to Shakespeare's tragic story of the star-crossed lovers, Romeo and Juliet. It is an autobiographical glimpse of Dumas' affair with the beautiful courtesan Marie Duplessis, written four months after her death in 1847.Throughout the story, one may easily assess the heavy guilt weighing the conscience of the famous author. This might not be his usual adventure packed work but still it is a splendid taste of the romantic side of Alexandre Dumas, fils. It may be found free, printed in its entirety at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1608/1...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sophia.

    It's not a love story. It's the romanticized story of a very dysfunctional and disturbing relationship between unstable Marguerite and deeply idiotic and vicious Armand. Armand is by far one of the most infuriating narrators I've ever had the misfortune to read about. He never loves Marguerite : throughout the book, he's obsessed with the idea of owning her, which is completely different. He "falls in love" with her seconds after seeing her for the first time, although she does not display any l It's not a love story. It's the romanticized story of a very dysfunctional and disturbing relationship between unstable Marguerite and deeply idiotic and vicious Armand. Armand is by far one of the most infuriating narrators I've ever had the misfortune to read about. He never loves Marguerite : throughout the book, he's obsessed with the idea of owning her, which is completely different. He "falls in love" with her seconds after seeing her for the first time, although she does not display any likable quality beside being beautiful. On the contrary, she's even quite vain, cruel, and, at dinner, vulgar and childish (throws the piano partition across the room because she can't get it right). I pitied Marguerite at the end, but only because she was dying young, alone and in pain : for the entirety of the book, she does nothing but show an unstable, unlikable and shallow personality. Armand is just as bad, though: that first night, he proclaims his eternal love to her, although he has JUST met her and doesn't actually know anything about her or her personality. Therefore, his easy tears and words of love have strictly no value - love builds over time, not overnight, and it is his immaturity that actually drove them to their doom. Later on, the fact that he was unable to guess that Marguerite had sacrificed herself by meeting with his father in secret while it was so, so, blatantly obvious was maddening. He's an idiot... and a mean one at that. The way he treated her after she left him is where it went downhill for me. Instead of seeking an explanation, instead of communicating or being forgiving (again: he should have known why she did what she did, it was OBVIOUS), he turned so completely psycho on her I could not believe it. How can you claim to love someone so much yet take so much pleasure in trying to destroy them? He picked the one woman he knew would hurt her the most; slept with her out of sheer viciousness and arranged it all so Marguerite would know. The pleasure he took in causing her pain in public, in humiliating her, in savoring each instant he saw her weaken or leave a party because she could not bear to see them together, disgusted me and I was so angry that he kept saying that deep down, he still loved her. No, asshole. You don't and you never have : that is not how you treat someone you love. Prudence was the only character who ever made sense in the entire book, the only one who understood the characters, their motivations, and the depth (or lack thereof) of their bond. Her monologues were incredibly accurate and always fascinating to read - too bad nobody ever bothered to actually listen to her. The entire "love" story was nothing short of abusive. The only redeeming quality of the book lies in the exceptionally beautiful way it is written. Dumas' writing is godly and it reads like poetry. It's engaging, gripping, beautiful. I thoroughly enjoyed every sentence, the French language is, in this book, at its finest.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I love Camille and I can't recommend it enough. It's become one of my favorite books. I had seen the Greta Garbo movie version of Camille and I can honestly say that the novel is more heartbreaking. Alexandre Dumas fils's writing was excellent and his tale of thwarted love is timeless. Camille is set in 1840s Paris. A young courtesan, Marguerite Gautier, has died and although she was once the most sought-after courtesan in Paris she died of consumption without any of her rich friends or benefact I love Camille and I can't recommend it enough. It's become one of my favorite books. I had seen the Greta Garbo movie version of Camille and I can honestly say that the novel is more heartbreaking. Alexandre Dumas fils's writing was excellent and his tale of thwarted love is timeless. Camille is set in 1840s Paris. A young courtesan, Marguerite Gautier, has died and although she was once the most sought-after courtesan in Paris she died of consumption without any of her rich friends or benefactors by her side. It seems everyone has forgotten Marguerite except for Armand Duval, a young man who has countless camellias sent to her grave. The novel goes back to when Armand and Marguerite were in love and willing to risk everything to be together. Fate got in the way and led to the beautiful courtesan's dying alone. The writing style was interesting and very well done. Much like in Wuthering Heights and The Great Gatsby, the narrator was a minor character who played little part in the action. In fact, the narrator of Camille didn't even have a name. Also like Wuthering Heights, the narration changes hand when Armand tells the story of him and Marguerite. Still another part of the novel is told from Margeurite's perspective. Dumas wove these stories within stories together so skillfully that the different voices never felt forced. Camille is a classic you should definitely read. Just be prepared with a box of tissues.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    How do you suppose the kept women in Paris could live in the style they do, if they had not three or four lovers at once? It's very easy to see how this book translates so perfectly into opera (La Traviata) as every emotion is heightened: lovers weep, obsess, throw dramatic hissy fits, swoon and, ultimately, die beautifully. Along the way, though, Dumas fils anchors all the emotion through the dispassionate accounts of the economics of a courtesan: we learn precisely how much Marguerite needs How do you suppose the kept women in Paris could live in the style they do, if they had not three or four lovers at once? It's very easy to see how this book translates so perfectly into opera (La Traviata) as every emotion is heightened: lovers weep, obsess, throw dramatic hissy fits, swoon and, ultimately, die beautifully. Along the way, though, Dumas fils anchors all the emotion through the dispassionate accounts of the economics of a courtesan: we learn precisely how much Marguerite needs to live her lavish lifestyle, exactly what Armand's income is, and how much other men are prepared to pay. Each element balances the other so that the rash passions are offset by financial realities - in both the markets for female flesh and love, poor Marguerite just can't win.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    La Dame aux Camélias is a beautiful novel about the tragic character of Marguerite, inspired by women that Alexandre Dumas fils knew in real life and his own tragedy of losing his mother very young. He was an illegitimate child of Marie-Laure-Catherine Labay and novelist Alexandre Dumas. His father took him very young from his mother because the law allowed that, which inspired him to write about tragic female characters. Marguerite is a tragic, vulnerable and heroic character we follow through h La Dame aux Camélias is a beautiful novel about the tragic character of Marguerite, inspired by women that Alexandre Dumas fils knew in real life and his own tragedy of losing his mother very young. He was an illegitimate child of Marie-Laure-Catherine Labay and novelist Alexandre Dumas. His father took him very young from his mother because the law allowed that, which inspired him to write about tragic female characters. Marguerite is a tragic, vulnerable and heroic character we follow through her life in Paris where she works as a courtesan, her love with the main man character, (view spoiler)[ and eventually her agony and death by tuberculosis. (hide spoiler)] Marguerite was the character that I really loved and found very deep and realistic and I could understand her in her suffering very well. In the beginning, she was closed- hearted to the love of men, because of awareness about the most hidden motives and complexity of men's selfishness. She was very smart and could read others intentions very well, she knew the man's heart and refused to lie to herself in any way. I find her clear-sightedness quite refreshing, especially in the hypocritical, self-deceiving and self-righteous world. “Then,” continued Marguerite, “you were the only person before whom it seemed to me, from the first, that I could think and speak freely. All those who come about women like me have an interest in calculating their slightest words, in thinking of the consequences of their most insignificant actions. Naturally we have no friends. We have selfish lovers who spend their fortunes, riot on us, as they say, but on their own vanity. For these people we have to be merry when they are merry, well when they want to sup, sceptics like themselves. We are not allowed to have hearts, under penalty of being hooted down and of ruining our credit.” On the surface, she looks vain and craves materialistic things, but a romance with Armand reveals her idealistic and unselfish hidden nature and thirst for empathy and intimacy. “Because when you saw me spitting blood you took my hand; because you wept; because you are the only human being who has ever pitied me. I am going to say a mad thing to you: I once had a little dog who looked at me with a sad look when I coughed; that is the only creature I ever loved. When he died I cried more than when my mother died. It is true that for twelve years of her life she used to beat me. Well, I loved you all at once, as much as my dog. If men knew what they can have for a tear, they would be better loved and we should be less ruinous to them.” In the first real conversation with Armand, Marguerite shows her opinion about the love of men based on her past experiences and what does she seeks in her lover that is very hard to find. “But I forewarn you I must be free to do as I please, without giving you the slightest details what I do. I have long wished for a young lover, who should be young and not self-willed, loving without distrust, loved without claiming the right to it. I have never found one. Men, instead of being satisfied in obtaining for a long time what they scarcely hoped to obtain once, exact from their mistresses a full account of the present, the past, and even the future. As they get accustomed to her, they want to rule her, and the more one gives them the more exacting they become. If I decide now on taking a new lover, he must have three very rare qualities: he must be confiding, submissive, and discreet.” The contrast of Marguerite love for Amando was his love for her, that we can even debate in calling love, rather infatuation and selfish obsession. I usually not on board for stereotypical opinions about the major differences between men and women on topics of love and sexuality, but this story can start a great conversation about the problems of the immaturity of some men when it comes to romance. Indeed Marguerite showed immeasurably greater maturity than Armando. “You are right,” I said, letting my head sink on her knees; “but I love you madly.” “Well, my friend, you must either love me a little less or understand me a little better. ” Some people could think that this is a story about impossible love because of outside circumstances, but the story shows us that great loves are not killed by outside situation and other people, but buy inside matters of selfishness, lack of understanding and communication. Armand great love turned to hate when he thought it was no longer reciprocated and showed that his ego was more important to him that Marguerite. He became obsessed with revenge and hurt Maurgerite in every way possible. In his later guilt and redemption he admits: “Oh, how petty and vile is man when he is wounded in one of his narrow passions!” Some could say that suffering she endured was her path of redemption for her as society viewed immoral life, but for me, this story uncovers greater ideas. From someone outside life, we can see the thing that is truly important and that is the person's heart. As we can see in the story someone flaws, wrong ways and sins don't determine or decrease their goodness or their ability to love whole-heartedly as Marguerite did. In the state when she is continuously hurt, mocked and humiliated by Armand, her love stays strong as a rock. “You are good, your soul has generosity unknown to many women who perhaps despise you, and are less worthy than you.” I really like the idea of the opening our eyes and hearts for all people, despite their moral choices on which we don't need to agree to respect and love them because in the end true virtues are hidden deeply and often people are much more than they seem. I would like to finish off with this quote that sums up the main spirit behind this book that made me love it so much. “Here is Christianity with its marvellous parable of the Prodigal Son to teach us indulgence and pardon. Jesus was full of love for souls wounded by the passions of men; he loved to bind up their wounds and to find in those very wounds the balm which should heal them. Thus he said to the Magdalen: "Much shall be forgiven thee because thou hast loved much," a sublimity of pardon which can only have called forth a sublime faith. Why do we make ourselves more strict than Christ? Why, holding obstinately to the opinions of the world, which hardens itself in order that it may be thought strong, do we reject, as it rejects, souls bleeding at wounds by which, like a sick man's bad blood, the evil of their past may be healed, if only a friendly hand is stretched out to lave them and set them in the convalescence of the heart?”

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00h4w7j Description: The story of Marguerite Gauthier, a Parisian courtesan who goes on a journey through worldliness, love, renunciation and atonement, thanks to the love of young Armand Duval. 1: Armand is distraught to return to Paris too late to see Marguerite, the love of his life, before she dies. 2: Armand remembers his first meeting with Marguerite and the beginning of their passionate love affair. 3: Armand is unable to stand his mistress Marguerite being wi http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00h4w7j Description: The story of Marguerite Gauthier, a Parisian courtesan who goes on a journey through worldliness, love, renunciation and atonement, thanks to the love of young Armand Duval. 1: Armand is distraught to return to Paris too late to see Marguerite, the love of his life, before she dies. 2: Armand remembers his first meeting with Marguerite and the beginning of their passionate love affair. 3: Armand is unable to stand his mistress Marguerite being with other men, and takes rash action in a fit of jealousy. 4: Armand and Marguerite have at last escaped to a rural idyll, but their happiness is shattered when Armand's father begs his son to leave his mistress. 5: Armand finally reveals the hidden sacrifice that Marguerite made for him, and how nobly she acted for love. I'll stick to Verdi, this book is mere sentimental hogwash. Marguerite ...... Ruth Wilson Duval ...... Dan Stevens Dumas ...... Joseph Kloska Marguerite's sister ...... Manon Edwards Gravedigger ...... Dick Bradnum<

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    What a book!. Truly I enjoyed every single part. It's a timeless classic you should read. I knew the story I saw Moulin Rouge! countless times but yet it was so different. It's funny at the beginning I thought I will love Armand more and I judged her since she was...well you know what she was but more book progress I more disliked Armand and started not only to love her but to admire her. Marguerite is strong and independent twice stronger character than Armand. Overall beautiful writing style s What a book!. Truly I enjoyed every single part. It's a timeless classic you should read. I knew the story I saw Moulin Rouge! countless times but yet it was so different. It's funny at the beginning I thought I will love Armand more and I judged her since she was...well you know what she was but more book progress I more disliked Armand and started not only to love her but to admire her. Marguerite is strong and independent twice stronger character than Armand. Overall beautiful writing style steady and not pathetic. I like it. ------------------------------------------------ Kakva knjiga! Baš sam uživala. Vanvremenki klasik koji bi trebalo da pročitate. Priča mi jeste bila poznata zbog "Mulan ruća" međutim u isto vreme bila je potpuno drugačije. ironično je, na početku sam bila sigurna da ći Armanda više voleti. Nju sam odmah osudila jer je..pa bila je to što jeste. Međutim kako je knjiga odmicala njega sam počela da ne volim a njoj da se divim. Ona je zaista jak lik koji ne zavisi od bilo kog muškarca dva puta jača od njega. Generalno prelepo napisana knjiga, stil veoma dobar nema patetike. Dopala mi se.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Romie

    I really liked the way this story was written, through memories and letters, it really gave it a specific atmosphere. I thought it was a very sad but poetic story. (3.5)

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Alexandre Dumas' son Dumas "fils" (fils means "son" in French) certainly had a lot of live up to. His father of course threw a long shadow over him and his life. He did manage to write this short romantic tragedy that has survived to become a French classic and inspiration for both films and operas alike - The Lady of the Camelias. It is a fast-moving and wonderful story and definitely differentiates his more agitated, youthful style from the more mature and controlled one of his father. Definit Alexandre Dumas' son Dumas "fils" (fils means "son" in French) certainly had a lot of live up to. His father of course threw a long shadow over him and his life. He did manage to write this short romantic tragedy that has survived to become a French classic and inspiration for both films and operas alike - The Lady of the Camelias. It is a fast-moving and wonderful story and definitely differentiates his more agitated, youthful style from the more mature and controlled one of his father. Definitely worth a read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nhi Nguyễn

    A really really great book about a beautiful but fleeting love story. It has the sentiment (but not to soppy-sappy like other romance novels I've read) that I always love to see in a romance novel, but still, the rational thinking of some characters in it served as a great balance for that sentiment. The chemistry between the two main characters was there, but what I loved the most, and thought to be the most important point this novel has brought to romance genre, is that it didn't portray love A really really great book about a beautiful but fleeting love story. It has the sentiment (but not to soppy-sappy like other romance novels I've read) that I always love to see in a romance novel, but still, the rational thinking of some characters in it served as a great balance for that sentiment. The chemistry between the two main characters was there, but what I loved the most, and thought to be the most important point this novel has brought to romance genre, is that it didn't portray love simply in a perfect situation, where there was happy ending, that the couple lived happily ever after. No, it portrayed love in the time when money ruled (well and it still rules today...), when the couples were not freely allowed to live together in peace and happiness, because there were still many responsibilities and social roles for them to fulfill, when a relationship between two people could affect other people's futures... That was sad, when the love between the two main characters could not break out of that sorrowful reality, but still, it was a beautiful love story, and Marguerite showed immense maturity beyond her age and profession, especially when it came to love. The way Alexandre Dumas-fils created this story, this character, and the way he put it into real life's barriers, I thought, were the things that make this book an iconic one in romance novels in particular, and in classic novels in general. There were some parts when the sentences were too long, and some points were hard to comprehend (I think since this book was written a long time ago, and the way people thought at that time isn't exactly like what we think nowadays) which lowered my enjoyment a little bit, so 4 stars is the maximum rating I can give this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    "'My dear Prudence, your protege is not very well-mannered. One thinks such letters but one doesn't write them." "'Well, my dear, you ought to have loved me a little less or understood me a little better.'" "'Then I met you, young, ardent, happy, and I tried to turn you into the man I had been crying out for in the midst of my noisy solitude. I loved in you not the man I found, but the man I wanted to find.'" "'The vanity of man! It presents itself in every possible guise.'" "'Just remember that lif "'My dear Prudence, your protege is not very well-mannered. One thinks such letters but one doesn't write them." "'Well, my dear, you ought to have loved me a little less or understood me a little better.'" "'Then I met you, young, ardent, happy, and I tried to turn you into the man I had been crying out for in the midst of my noisy solitude. I loved in you not the man I found, but the man I wanted to find.'" "'The vanity of man! It presents itself in every possible guise.'" "'Just remember that life sometimes imposes necessities which are very cruel to the heart, but to which one has to submit.'"

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anastasiaadamov

    Very melancholy and dramatic. I loved the angsty feel to it and the writing style.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joanie

    Excuse me, my heart's gotten heavy now. Marguerite Gautier and Armand Duval: two lovers in nineteenth-century Paris. A beautifully spun tale of woe. One of the countless tragedies where the ones involved succumb to the circumstances of the times in which they live. However loosely based/inspired by Dumas' real-life lover, the courtesan Marie Duplessis. I can certainly believe that Dumas wrote this in less than a month [! according to the introduction in this particular edition], because it really Excuse me, my heart's gotten heavy now. Marguerite Gautier and Armand Duval: two lovers in nineteenth-century Paris. A beautifully spun tale of woe. One of the countless tragedies where the ones involved succumb to the circumstances of the times in which they live. However loosely based/inspired by Dumas' real-life lover, the courtesan Marie Duplessis. I can certainly believe that Dumas wrote this in less than a month [! according to the introduction in this particular edition], because it really reads like it was scribbled down with fervour. A sincere compliment from me. That's how I read it too, completely swept up in this feverish whirlwind of a doomed romance between the lovers. It's infused with so much grace, like how Marguerite herself would appear in public, but at the same time, delightfully unrestrained in its emotions, mirroring the passion barely contained within these pages. I particularly enjoyed the balance of having the patronizing dialogue from the men, and hearing from the women, the utmost clarity in the ways they've had to live with the cards they were dealt with in life. I never would've known about this if it wasn't for a missed screening of the current Bolshoi season's performance of it. I was intrigued with the idea of this romance having been adapted to a ballet, done to Chopin (one of my favourite composers, as I'm a hopeless romantic and a Romantic at heart), so the story been on my mind ever since! I had no idea that this was the inspiration for so many works, and it's a real shame that I wasn't aware of it 'til recently. I'll go look for an older performance of it by any company soon, I'm determined to see it in any way possible.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela

    As far as I'm concerned, the book was a bit cheesy at times but overall enjoyable and even quite touching.

  22. 4 out of 5

    BAM The Bibliomaniac

    So beautiful A love story full of mature angst Armand falls in love with Margaurite, a courtesan with expensive taste and high debts. Can they make a go of it? Oh and she has THE CONSUMPTION Doesn't every lady have that? I'm waiting for my diagnosis

  23. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    The narrator buys a courtesan's old book at a whim. Some time later, the man who gave her the book comes looking for it, and shares with the narrator their tale of love and sorrow. They had but a few short months together before her debts and his family's need to maintain their reputation came between them. I hadn't realized how closely the movie Moulin Rouge was based on this--the broad outline and many of the visual details (like the courtesan visiting her true love one last time, pale and wax The narrator buys a courtesan's old book at a whim. Some time later, the man who gave her the book comes looking for it, and shares with the narrator their tale of love and sorrow. They had but a few short months together before her debts and his family's need to maintain their reputation came between them. I hadn't realized how closely the movie Moulin Rouge was based on this--the broad outline and many of the visual details (like the courtesan visiting her true love one last time, pale and waxy under her black veil) are the same. That said, Ewan McGregor's character was far less frustrating (nay, hateful!) than Armand Duval, the "hero" of this tale. But the courtesan of this tale is even more affecting than in the bombastic movie. I was helplessly crying near the end, distraught at Marguerite's courage and how little she hoped for (in vain, as it turns out). "...I am tired out with seeing people who always want the same thing; who pay me for it, and then think they are quit of me. If those who are going to go in for our hateful business only knew what it really was they would sooner be chambermaids. But no, vanity, the desire of having dresses and carriages and diamonds carries us away; one believes what one hears, for here, as elsewhere, there is such a thing as belief, and one uses up one's heart, one's body, one's beauty, little by little; one is feared like a beast of prey, scorned like a pariah, surrounded by people who always take more than they give; and one fine day one dies like a dog in a ditch, after having ruined others and ruined one's self."

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I was surprised how engaging this novel was. Having seen the 1930’s movie based on this book with Marlene Dietrich (Maguerite) and a very youthful Robert Taylor (Armand) not to mention familiarity with Verdi’s La Traviata which was also based on this book I thought I knew what was between these covers. Not so. Some of it was a bit over the top (It is French after all) but most of it was believable and emotionally honest. The hardest thing was to leave my preconceptions from the movie and opera b I was surprised how engaging this novel was. Having seen the 1930’s movie based on this book with Marlene Dietrich (Maguerite) and a very youthful Robert Taylor (Armand) not to mention familiarity with Verdi’s La Traviata which was also based on this book I thought I knew what was between these covers. Not so. Some of it was a bit over the top (It is French after all) but most of it was believable and emotionally honest. The hardest thing was to leave my preconceptions from the movie and opera behind and concentrate on the story. It is set in the mid 1800’s in Paris and a young man who’s finished his studies but who’d rather kick his heels up a little rather than settle into lawyering meets a beautiful young kept woman. He’s entranced. After a little toing and froing she decides she likes him too. In fact she goes to quite a bit of personal trouble to make sure she’s not a burden on him financially and then they leave Paris for the country to be together. Armand talks her into leaving her glamorous and many peopled Paris life behind and they have a short time to be a young couple in love. Then Armand’s pop gets wind of the shenanigans.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    I can do no better than quote from the book, which made me cry--and which also compelled me to visit Bougival. "Everything was believed except the truth." "Why do we hold obstinately to the opinions of the world, which hardens itself in order that it might be thought strong." "Sorrow sharpens the sensations." "It is very fortunate that the imagination lends so much poetry to the senses, and that the desires of the body make so much concession to the dreams of the soul." "To be really loved by a court I can do no better than quote from the book, which made me cry--and which also compelled me to visit Bougival. "Everything was believed except the truth." "Why do we hold obstinately to the opinions of the world, which hardens itself in order that it might be thought strong." "Sorrow sharpens the sensations." "It is very fortunate that the imagination lends so much poetry to the senses, and that the desires of the body make so much concession to the dreams of the soul." "To be really loved by a courtesan: that is a victory of infinitely great difficulty." "One has always had a childhood, whatever one becomes." "Women sometimes allow you to be unfaithful to their love; they never allow you to wound their self-esteem." "We are not allowed to have hearts, under penalty of being hooted down." "We must have done something very wicked before we were born, or else we must be going to be very happy indeed when we are dead for God to let this life have all the tortures of expiation and all the sorrows of an ordeal." Review: Camille

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Were this book not written from the perspective of Armand, I think I would have liked it a great deal more, but as it stands, I find him a dull narrator. There are countless instances where he drills into the reader how childlike and spoiled Marguerite is and I just to kick him because he's the idiot who can barely make heads or tales of his surroundings or the actions others take to protect him. (view spoiler)[It's also dumb how neither one of these lovers trusts the other (hide spoiler)] All in Were this book not written from the perspective of Armand, I think I would have liked it a great deal more, but as it stands, I find him a dull narrator. There are countless instances where he drills into the reader how childlike and spoiled Marguerite is and I just to kick him because he's the idiot who can barely make heads or tales of his surroundings or the actions others take to protect him. (view spoiler)[It's also dumb how neither one of these lovers trusts the other (hide spoiler)] All in all, I wish the whole book were from Marguerite's point of view (given that her purity of feeling is the subject of the book) or maybe third-person, but still it was an enjoyable read with a strong ending.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lynne King

    This is a wonderful book and I'm so pleased to see that it continues to be so popular! This just reaffirms my thoughts of what a super country France is and such culture.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric Kinney

    This being the second novel I've read from Alexandre Dumas, his work has truly won me over as an admirer. "Lady of the Camellias" harks back to the forlorn essence of romantic tragedy so often lamented in Shakespearean works such as "Romeo and Juliet". Inspired by the author's notorious affair with a french courtesan, this novel published in 1848 tells the story of two lovers from different stations of 19th century Paris society. Armand Duval, a young and aimless aristocrat, and the desirable so This being the second novel I've read from Alexandre Dumas, his work has truly won me over as an admirer. "Lady of the Camellias" harks back to the forlorn essence of romantic tragedy so often lamented in Shakespearean works such as "Romeo and Juliet". Inspired by the author's notorious affair with a french courtesan, this novel published in 1848 tells the story of two lovers from different stations of 19th century Paris society. Armand Duval, a young and aimless aristocrat, and the desirable socialite by the name of Marguerite Gautier, whose very existence is defined by her extremely lavish lifestyle and endless list of wealthy pursuers eager to fill more than her purse. Coined as the "Lady of the Camellias" Marguerite wears a white camellia when she is available to her lover and a red one when her condition proves too fragile for making love. Due to her excessive consumption, Marguerite suffers symptoms of tuberculosis and as reckless as she is, sees no prospects in dying old. Despite this, her beauty bewilders the most esteemed of frenchmen whose devotion and admiration she finds no more wholesome than that of the innocent Armand. Though only 24 and more or less naive, the impetuous Armand begins a relationship with Marguerite that blossoms into an affair despite her warnings that she could never expose Armand, in fear of losing her most precious clients and income to satisfy her debts. Warned by many that his dedication will only leave him brokenhearted, he continues to pursue Marguerite in hopes of a future together. However, Marguerite's own desires for love and happiness will prove to be her redemption, but at a price neither could anticipate. Though Dumas paints a refreshingly human portrait of the common mistress too often stereotyped for their loose morals, "Lady of the Camellias" is a haunting and beautiful contemplation of how society's strict moral principles and social codes play a role in calling passion to order, even those of the purest intentions. What brought me closer to this novel was how much it's characters and themes reminded me of some of my most beloved films growing up, from Marguerite's feistiness and vulnerability derivative of Holly Golightly in "Breakfast at Tiffany's", and the blind hate and jealousy of "Wuthering Heights" that unveils the story's darker side. Of the many books I've read this summer, this novel will always have a place in my heart as a prized literary treasure, and is without doubt the most enlightening and spellbinding of tragic romances.

  29. 5 out of 5

    cindy

    I know it was Paris. I know it was 1847. I know it was a romance novel (with faint act, man crying, brain fever and all). But seriously! Can a man be so...I don't know...so 'Armand'? He really did not know what he wants. One moment he's would sacrificed all for love, the next he was too jealous to do that. He could not made up his mind nor to have the right thought what the consequences were. He didn't know whether he should broke all the society rules or just lived by it. All these doubt had to I know it was Paris. I know it was 1847. I know it was a romance novel (with faint act, man crying, brain fever and all). But seriously! Can a man be so...I don't know...so 'Armand'? He really did not know what he wants. One moment he's would sacrificed all for love, the next he was too jealous to do that. He could not made up his mind nor to have the right thought what the consequences were. He didn't know whether he should broke all the society rules or just lived by it. All these doubt had to be paid, not by him, but by Marguerite (and Olympe part was the worst from them). He was so phony. The one thing that is true from him was when he said he was not too rich nor to poor to love her. And that's why I despise him a lot. Even more than what I should have enjoyed from the Marguerite's love story. If I can put my two cents here, I would rather watch Molin Rouge movie again and again than to read this. At least he (the leading man - Ewan McGreggor) had some brain and bravery in him.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adelina Traicu

    Perfecta..

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