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The Call of Agon: An Epic Fantasy Adventure

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The last line. The last words. The last chance. Ifferon is one of the last in the bloodline of the dead god, Telm, who imprisoned the Beast, Agon, in the Underworld. Armed with a connection to the estranged gods in the Overworld, and a scroll bearing Telm's powerful dying words, he is tasked with ensuring the god's vital legacy: that Agon remain vanquished. Yet there is somethi The last line. The last words. The last chance. Ifferon is one of the last in the bloodline of the dead god, Telm, who imprisoned the Beast, Agon, in the Underworld. Armed with a connection to the estranged gods in the Overworld, and a scroll bearing Telm's powerful dying words, he is tasked with ensuring the god's vital legacy: that Agon remain vanquished. Yet there is something just as powerful: Fear. Ifferon abandons his duty and tries to hide away from the world. But when Agon's armies find his monastery refuge, he is forced to find his courage and embark on a life-changing quest. Join Ifferon on a journey across the world of Iraldas that will lead him to brave new companions, through the struggles of many peoples, the siege of many lands, and to discoveries that could bring hope to some—or doom to all. Experience the unforgettable start of an Epic Fantasy adventure perfect for fans of Will Wight, AC Cobble and Michael J Sullivan. Also Available on Audible, narrated by the award-winning Simon Vance.


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The last line. The last words. The last chance. Ifferon is one of the last in the bloodline of the dead god, Telm, who imprisoned the Beast, Agon, in the Underworld. Armed with a connection to the estranged gods in the Overworld, and a scroll bearing Telm's powerful dying words, he is tasked with ensuring the god's vital legacy: that Agon remain vanquished. Yet there is somethi The last line. The last words. The last chance. Ifferon is one of the last in the bloodline of the dead god, Telm, who imprisoned the Beast, Agon, in the Underworld. Armed with a connection to the estranged gods in the Overworld, and a scroll bearing Telm's powerful dying words, he is tasked with ensuring the god's vital legacy: that Agon remain vanquished. Yet there is something just as powerful: Fear. Ifferon abandons his duty and tries to hide away from the world. But when Agon's armies find his monastery refuge, he is forced to find his courage and embark on a life-changing quest. Join Ifferon on a journey across the world of Iraldas that will lead him to brave new companions, through the struggles of many peoples, the siege of many lands, and to discoveries that could bring hope to some—or doom to all. Experience the unforgettable start of an Epic Fantasy adventure perfect for fans of Will Wight, AC Cobble and Michael J Sullivan. Also Available on Audible, narrated by the award-winning Simon Vance.

30 review for The Call of Agon: An Epic Fantasy Adventure

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This review and others can be seen on my blog: Book Nerd Paradise The Call of Agon is a perfect read for those fantasy lovers who enjoy reading about fictional/mythical locations with a medieval feel to it. The book starts off with our main character, Ifferon, as he is conversing with the head cleric, Teron. Ifferon is the last child of the dead god Telm and has been in hiding, with what I like to consider monks, for the last 10 years. Right off, The Call of Agon starts with action. The monaste This review and others can be seen on my blog: Book Nerd Paradise The Call of Agon is a perfect read for those fantasy lovers who enjoy reading about fictional/mythical locations with a medieval feel to it. The book starts off with our main character, Ifferon, as he is conversing with the head cleric, Teron. Ifferon is the last child of the dead god Telm and has been in hiding, with what I like to consider monks, for the last 10 years. Right off, The Call of Agon starts with action. The monastery and the nearest town are about to be attacked by The King who wishes to rid the world to those with Telm's blood. In the beginning our main character is a bit of a coward. He contemplates running and leaving everyone behind instead of standing and fighting. But soon he is off on his quest, guided by the scroll left by Telm asking him to make sure the beast Agon stays banished in the dark underworld. Agon is, for all intents and purposes, the evil god. After he can hide no longer, Iffereon must journey through the land of Iraldas to stop the Call of Agon. Overall this book earned four stars from me. At first it was a little hard to get into and it was hard to keep track of the different names, god and places. But once I got in to it, I really like it. It was nicely written and easy to follow even with all the complex names. It also read very well for me. I'm one of those people who can't stand certain books because they don't read easy - the language is too complex, chapters are 80 pages long and it just doesn't flow as well as it should. This wasn't the case for The Call of Agon the language was easy to read, the chapters were a bit longer but broken up in certain points and everything flowed nicely. Looking forward to book two. **I was provide a copy of this book in return for an honest review

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonel

    Wilson embraces fantasy with a flair all of his own. The intricate world building brings forward the land and many religions within it. I loved the visual and textual differences between the different regions of this world. Wilson’s descriptions and world building didn’t stop at the visual. His world building was all encompassing. It was a fantastic experience, really enhancing the plot for me. The twists that Wilson worked into the intricate story kept me on my toes and had me hooked to the pag Wilson embraces fantasy with a flair all of his own. The intricate world building brings forward the land and many religions within it. I loved the visual and textual differences between the different regions of this world. Wilson’s descriptions and world building didn’t stop at the visual. His world building was all encompassing. It was a fantastic experience, really enhancing the plot for me. The twists that Wilson worked into the intricate story kept me on my toes and had me hooked to the pages of this novel. The different cultures really shone throughout. I enjoyed the multicultural feel to the story, and the way that they all banded together towards a common goal. There’s a sense of urgency throughout the novel. The characters were pushing forward on their quest and I found myself drawn into the story with it. I also got to know the motley crew of characters who banded together in the quest that Wilson sets them on. The myriad of danger that they faced not only helped me get to know them on many levels while also pulling me deeper and deeper into their world. Surrounding these individuals Wilson creates vivid, if at times dark, creatures through his writing. The presence of the many different types of creatures made the world even more vivid. I loved meeting the peoples and travelling to distant lands through Wilson’s writing. His polished writing shone throughout this epic fantasy that I couldn’t put down. I loved each moment of it, from world building to character development to unforgettable plot. This is definitely a must read for all those who enjoy fantasy. Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this work in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aditi

    this book is an epic fantasy novel..the author created a brand new world, with its history, a new race..the way the story was told is amazing..i was somehow transported to that beautiful world..i was a part of it..ifferon is a great hero..love his character so much..have recommended to all my friends..

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Ifferon and Teron part ways hurriedly while battle approaches their village. Ifferon is assailed by black chasing shadows almost immediately as he and another (wannabe cleric Yavun) run willy nilly like startled bunnies. Soon, they bump into Herr’Don The Great, savior of damsels in distress, bringer of the sword, major task accomplisher, and blow hard. They all leave, running into the magus Melgales who reveals hidden things. Next enters Thalla, the lover of Herr’Don and apprentice to Melgales. Ifferon and Teron part ways hurriedly while battle approaches their village. Ifferon is assailed by black chasing shadows almost immediately as he and another (wannabe cleric Yavun) run willy nilly like startled bunnies. Soon, they bump into Herr’Don The Great, savior of damsels in distress, bringer of the sword, major task accomplisher, and blow hard. They all leave, running into the magus Melgales who reveals hidden things. Next enters Thalla, the lover of Herr’Don and apprentice to Melgales. She also has a bow but rarely uses it. In fact, she starts off strong and interesting but then quickly slides into Silly Lass With Breasts role. For nearly half the book, she is the only female character. Other heroes, magi, women, bad guys, and youngins make an appearance as we move forward. So far I have made this book sound a bit light hearted. It isn’t. This is a thick book, not so much in page numbers, but in the fact that so much is going on on every single page. Additionally, the book is told in limited third person, like Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings. This means that we see everyone’s actions and hear everyone’s words, but we never know what is going on in anyone’s head. In some instances, this can be challenging, and in some it makes the plot that much more interesting because you truly have to weigh everything about a character to figure out if they are the spy and betrayer. I enjoyed the intensity of this book. The serious, desperate need to defeat Agon and his minions weighed on all the characters and drove the plot. There was a variety of ages; not just the young and beautiful were key to this novel. Eventually, we do get some warrior women, one with sense and the other without. I do have to mention that nearly all the women are called sluts or prostitutes or whores by some man at some point in the book (and those male characters are soundly booed by other male characters). But it stood out in my mind as I was reading it. Perhaps because the main female character, Thalla, was driven by the need to be attached to a man and had to be protected, or fought over, for most of the book. By and large, the book was very interesting with beautiful prose, good guys with personality flaws, and large, well-developed world to play in. From a technical aspect, I only have two points that stand out for me as minor detractions: 1) Occasionally the reader would be following a group of heroes and several pages into the scene, a character, who I thought had gone with the other hero team, speaks up. Ooops, where did you come from? Been here all along, have you? 2) The ending left several of the smaller story arcs unanswered and I felt I could have used at least a few more pages to wrap things up for this book. I know it’s a series, but there were just some nagging questions. Nothing major for those who plan to continue with the series.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

    I actually didn't finish the book, so take this review with that in mind. This self-published fantasy series showed a lot of promise. The covers are great, the description intrigued me, and he'd clearly done a lot of promotion. I haven't read a good epic fantasy series in a while, and I was keen to dive into the world this author had created. The reason I didn't finish it, however, is that I found it terribly boring. Though the writing itself was okay, and in some spots ver I actually didn't finish the book, so take this review with that in mind. This self-published fantasy series showed a lot of promise. The covers are great, the description intrigued me, and he'd clearly done a lot of promotion. I haven't read a good epic fantasy series in a while, and I was keen to dive into the world this author had created. The reason I didn't finish it, however, is that I found it terribly boring. Though the writing itself was okay, and in some spots very lovely, the storytelling left much to be desired. The dialogue was Tolkein-esque to the point of feeling like a rip off (I swear whole phrases could have come straight from the Lord of the Rings). We were dropped into this crisis that had promise, but ultimately I didn't feel the experience of the characters was created wholly enough for me to step into, and as a result, I didn't really care about what was happening to any of them. The series of events that follows as we journey with our main characters was painfully episodic, and despite scenarios meant to raise the stakes and create tension, I never felt a true sense of danger. Probably because, as previously noted, I never truly felt invested in the characters. I think major portions of the opening chapters could have been cut without detracting from the story, and would probably have improved it. I read several chapters to give it a chance. But alas, if this story picks up halfway through, I will never find out. Too many other books to read to keep forcing myself through this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dianne

    His task seems insurmountable, but Ifferon must assure that an ancient, yet powerful monster, Agnon remains entrapped in his eternal prison. His weapons? Powerful blood flows through his veins, he has a sacred scroll from the god Telm and he knows his mission can NOT fail. But is that knowledge a help or will it be his downfall as the weight of his quest bears down on him. They say there is power in knowledge and in friendships, when the time comes, will Ifferon’s journey end in victory with his His task seems insurmountable, but Ifferon must assure that an ancient, yet powerful monster, Agnon remains entrapped in his eternal prison. His weapons? Powerful blood flows through his veins, he has a sacred scroll from the god Telm and he knows his mission can NOT fail. But is that knowledge a help or will it be his downfall as the weight of his quest bears down on him. They say there is power in knowledge and in friendships, when the time comes, will Ifferon’s journey end in victory with his allies by his side or will his journey first teach him about life, people and more importantly, himself? Dean F. Wilson’s The Call of Agon is a fantasy lover’s dream as he paints a world filled with myth and mystery in the classic battle of good vs evil. Ifferon struggles with the pressures placed on him. Through Mr. Dean’s words, the emotional turmoil sparks the air with tension as we follow Ifferon’s journey, his struggles and the often bitter discoveries he makes of the world around him as he follows the path the gods, the world and destiny need him to. I started this tale, standing alone on a blank canvas, but quickly Dean F. Wilson filled his canvas with color, places, people and his own brand of magic. I was traveling with Ifferon every step of the way from his flight for safety to his march to destiny and battle against the vile forces of Agon’s minions. Will Ifferon have what it takes to from deep within to stand as defender and victor? I was so deep into this world I found completely returning to reality difficult as I revisited and pondered those special passages that seem to be saying something more, something deeper. Mr.Wilson knows how to connect with his audience and keep them enthralled, without a doubt! Not for the reader who wants a fast read, but for one who wants to live each moment in a world far away from our reality. Series: The Children of Telm - Book 1 Publication Date: February 19, 2013 Publisher: Dioscuri Press Genre: Historical Epic Fantasy Print Length: 384 pages Available from: Amazon |  Barnes & Noble Reviewed for: http://tometender.blogspot.com

  7. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    http://jerseyguyscanread.blogspot.com... Yet another book sent to me by the author for a review :) If you couldn't tell, it always makes me feel a little more special when people want to know my opinion on something. Anyway, this time around it's the first book in the Children of Telm series, The Call of Agon. Part fantasy, part mythology, and bearing a slight resemblance to many different classic novels, TCOA is very well written and I give it 4 out of 5 stars, and I'm looking forward to the rest of the series when Wilson fin http://jerseyguyscanread.blogspot.com... Yet another book sent to me by the author for a review :) If you couldn't tell, it always makes me feel a little more special when people want to know my opinion on something. Anyway, this time around it's the first book in the Children of Telm series, The Call of Agon. Part fantasy, part mythology, and bearing a slight resemblance to many different classic novels, TCOA is very well written and I give it 4 out of 5 stars, and I'm looking forward to the rest of the series when Wilson finishes them up. At first, I was very confused with the story. I couldn't figure out who was who, what was happening, and the main plot line was lost in the early chapters. That being said, the action and the mystery behind who Ifferon is, and why he is being hunted, add a strong element of intrigue and don't give the reader an opportunity to put this book down and forget about it. Ifferon meets an assorted crew, nay, a FELLOWHIP, on his quest to use the god Telm's final words to vanquish Agon back to the Underworld. Wilson does a great job making these characters fun to read about, and likable (even if you dislike a character, you still love to hate him as you read). Not only, by the way, is Ifferon's quest very comparable to Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, but other details also bring the epic fantasy to mind. For example, Oelinor cannot die by natural means, but he is still fallible in battle (elves, anyone?) It was pretty fun to read this story, and think of where the inspiration for Wilson's characters and world came from. As I said above, the beginning chapters can be confusing and hard to get into, partly owing to the fast pace and lack of explanation (which is mostly remedied throughout the story), but is also due to the difficult and somewhat similar names. I know enough mythology to know that this is to be expected, and also makes this story seem so much more similar to ancient stories. Many aspects of life and nature were humanized and deified by ancient civilizations, and it's interesting that the personification used in TCOA speaks to Wilson's ability to make the story and words themselves reference the world of mythology. Overall, the combination of mythology, fantasy, and adventure makes The Call of Agon a great story to read, and I definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys ancient mythology, epic novels such as LOTR, or who's looking for a good new book to read :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    JeanBookNerd

    Dean F. Wilson’s The Call of Agon is the magical fantasy about the last remaining bloodline of the dead god Telm. Expelled and restrained by Telm, the Beast Agon has been kept in the dark underworld. Upon Telm’s death bed, Ifferon, a bloodline of Telm, is given the task to ensure that Agon stays banished. When the forces of Agon locate his hideaway, Ifferon must take on the journey through the strange world of Iralda to restore peace. He will run into danger and will meet a group of interesting Dean F. Wilson’s The Call of Agon is the magical fantasy about the last remaining bloodline of the dead god Telm. Expelled and restrained by Telm, the Beast Agon has been kept in the dark underworld. Upon Telm’s death bed, Ifferon, a bloodline of Telm, is given the task to ensure that Agon stays banished. When the forces of Agon locate his hideaway, Ifferon must take on the journey through the strange world of Iralda to restore peace. He will run into danger and will meet a group of interesting people that will follow him to carry out Teml’s request and vanquish Agon back to the Underworld. This is a very adventurous story that pits people from different walks of life into one common goal: suppress evil. The story building and the details that Mr. Wilson has brought into this book are incredible. It has its own unique religion and mythology that are impeccably created. The key to a great fantasy book is the world the characters live in. The world that Mr. Wilson has crafted is totally unique and original. It entails a very complex story that is firmly wrapped. The included poetry within the book gave a sense of density and sophistication. It provided a channel to brilliantly enrich this adventurous tale. Readers will appreciate how highly compelling the characters are and how gripping the story is right from the very beginning. As the story progresses, there is a sense of something grand, epic, and magical that will happen on Ifferon’s journey. I really enjoyed how Mr. Wilson used a fantasy adventure to showcase deep comprehensions into human intentions and needs. The conclusion of The Call of Agon is systematically built with excitement and suspense. This is the perfect start to what is certainly going to be an incredible series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sky

    I have not read a great epic fantasy in such a long time, this was honestly very refreshing. Thank you for a copy of this story for a review, Dean! The tone of this novel was exceptionally well written. It’s a poetic, dark, and adventurous tale told in the eyes of a man named Ifferon who is the last of his bloodline of the God, Telm. Telm had banished a beast name Agon to the underworld and on Telm’s death-bed, he requested that Ifferon carries the duty to ensure the imprisonment of A I have not read a great epic fantasy in such a long time, this was honestly very refreshing. Thank you for a copy of this story for a review, Dean! The tone of this novel was exceptionally well written. It’s a poetic, dark, and adventurous tale told in the eyes of a man named Ifferon who is the last of his bloodline of the God, Telm. Telm had banished a beast name Agon to the underworld and on Telm’s death-bed, he requested that Ifferon carries the duty to ensure the imprisonment of Agon. But this task and its journey which leads to the outer world will be far from simple. Here we see a tremendous transformation of Ifferon, brilliant character development. In the beginning, he was weak, but through his endeavors, he meets great friends, enemies, and becomes the stuff made of heroes. Like all epic adventures, there are many places, many characters of different races and abilities. We are by far not left short on a true mythical expedition. Wilson obtains an outstanding talent to keep the reader captivated by painting with the power of words a world entirely unique, dark, dangerous and all so exciting. There were moments I felt as if I were there in on his journey, had to blink a few times and think to myself, “Wow, where did time go?” I hear this is just the first book in a series? I cannot wait to see what happens next on this exhilarating adventure! (Did I mention this was his debut novel? Seriously, it’s written as if by a man of decades of experience. Pure genius, and that my friends, is not exaggerated. This guy knows what he loves!)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nika

    The book starts off with the beautifully written dark poem which along with the nice cover illustration and handy map of imaginary land leaves great first impression. (There will be quite a number of nice poems throughout the book.) No matter complex names and locations (which actually in my opinion added more fanciness; and medieval - fantasy touch) storyline itself is exiting and non-intrusive. There is always some actions going on which keeps you engaged. The characters are di The book starts off with the beautifully written dark poem which along with the nice cover illustration and handy map of imaginary land leaves great first impression. (There will be quite a number of nice poems throughout the book.) No matter complex names and locations (which actually in my opinion added more fanciness; and medieval - fantasy touch) storyline itself is exiting and non-intrusive. There is always some actions going on which keeps you engaged. The characters are different and fun. It is very adventurous book where main hero along with the Prince of Boror on their way meet numerous people from different lands who has the same purpose of suppressing the evil, and who decide to join them on their mission. However, only the main hero - the child (bloodline) of dead god Telm is in power to "fight off'' - suppress the evil who is under threath of emerging and gaining power. It was very interesting to watch main hero being so different and unheroic at some sense. I very much enjoyed the novel and definitely recommend it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I sincerely recommend this amazing book to you...although it is fantasy it really defies categorization. Seldom can you say a new novel is unique, but Dean Wilson has his very own style and manner of story telling. Everything about the book is sound, a book complex but solidly encased. The tale flows well. The author possesses an amazing talent for the lyrical and I applaud the exquisite poetry he seamlessly blends into the complex storyline. He is an abundantly talented poet and has I sincerely recommend this amazing book to you...although it is fantasy it really defies categorization. Seldom can you say a new novel is unique, but Dean Wilson has his very own style and manner of story telling. Everything about the book is sound, a book complex but solidly encased. The tale flows well. The author possesses an amazing talent for the lyrical and I applaud the exquisite poetry he seamlessly blends into the complex storyline. He is an abundantly talented poet and has used it to enhance this passionate tale. His use of minstrels and bards is very effective. I found many of the characters highly compelling, such as the robustly rendered Herr'Don and the entirely admirable Belnavar. The geography of the place enhances The Call of Agon immensely, along with the very fitting character and place names. Plot development keeps the reader highly engaged. Warmly recommended!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Susan Lulgjuraj

    This review originally appeared on Books and Pals. Agon, a powerful and evil god, is being called back to the world from his prison. Ifferon, one of the last of the bloodline of the god Telm, is one of the few who can stop Agon’s resurrection. He embarks on the journey with several companions who aid in his quest. Appraisal: The term epic fantasy was made to apply to The Call of Agon. It has all the typical elements you would expect with a dangerous mission to save th This review originally appeared on Books and Pals. Agon, a powerful and evil god, is being called back to the world from his prison. Ifferon, one of the last of the bloodline of the god Telm, is one of the few who can stop Agon’s resurrection. He embarks on the journey with several companions who aid in his quest. Appraisal: The term epic fantasy was made to apply to The Call of Agon. It has all the typical elements you would expect with a dangerous mission to save the world, a band of companions whose attributes complement each other, an evil monster, and an epic world. The book starts with the “hero” realizing that he can no longer run. Ifferon spent the last decade hiding. However, his secret has caught up to him as the monastery he has been living in is under attack from dark forces. He manages to escape the attack, and that is when the journey begins. I used “hero” in quotes because Ifferon is reluctant. He spent most of his life hiding and now that he is pushed to the forefront, he would rather run than face the challenges, which makes for interesting conversations between him and the people who want to fight. The characters are mostly well-written and have their own voices, especially Herr'Don, a brute prince charged to help Ifferon. Ifferon is actually one of the most underdeveloped characters for most of the first half of the book, but I think that’s by design. Also, it’s not entirely clear as to why Ifferon needs to be protected, simply that he is important. But this is all revealed in time. The band does their fair share of walking through this world, which is one of the drawbacks of the book. When it looks as though an action scene is finally about to happen, it’s not given enough play with a section ending just as the intense fighting is about to begin. The next section then starts when everything is over and some of the characters recount what happened to them. More action and less talking in this case would have been better. Author Dean F. Wilson makes up for that with the big fight scene followed by several important reveals at the end of the book. The action in this section was gripping and kept me pushing through to the finale. I was actually disappointed when the book was over because I became so invested by this point, I wanted to know more. But anytime you read something with “Book One” in the title, you know that there is a chance the story continues even when the book is over. Wilson wrote the book with beautiful prose and mixed in lyrical verses as part of the story. It’s not an easy book to read, but that’s not a negative. The Call of Agon is a book that readers can’t skim through, but have to pay attention and absorb the words.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Victorius Promos

    The Call of Agon is well-written and narrated with such colorful artistry; it captured my attention immediately and the fantasy that follows quickly pulled me in and transform my thoughts to a playful state. It took me on a beautiful journey of fantasy as the characters displayed are creativity set apart for each role. The compassion displayed, the intimacy in friendship and the tension all created a picture of complete uniqueness in the writers gift to tell a GREAT STORY. The writer portrays tremen The Call of Agon is well-written and narrated with such colorful artistry; it captured my attention immediately and the fantasy that follows quickly pulled me in and transform my thoughts to a playful state. It took me on a beautiful journey of fantasy as the characters displayed are creativity set apart for each role. The compassion displayed, the intimacy in friendship and the tension all created a picture of complete uniqueness in the writers gift to tell a GREAT STORY. The writer portrays tremendous transformation with Ifferon and transition him from weakness to a tower of strength with heroic attributes and it captivates your every moment. I was totally immersed into this book and I highly recommend it…I generally do not read much fantasy work but this was a wonderful read. @VictoryReviews

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    I had to force myself to finish this. I found it to be a very tough read with almost no character development. I wanted to quit many times but kept going, hoping it would improve. All the characters speak the same and none of them trust any of the others. There isn't a single one that I was interested in. They all have so many negative character traits and no redeeming qualities. The whole story is long travels and incessant bickering and bragging with battles popping up and then ending with no I had to force myself to finish this. I found it to be a very tough read with almost no character development. I wanted to quit many times but kept going, hoping it would improve. All the characters speak the same and none of them trust any of the others. There isn't a single one that I was interested in. They all have so many negative character traits and no redeeming qualities. The whole story is long travels and incessant bickering and bragging with battles popping up and then ending with no insight into their significance.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ✿Claire✿

    Disclaimer: This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review Right up until the end, this was going to be 4 stars. It was a really good book although it lacked a little bit of oomph at the beginning and seemed to take a while to get going. However, I was really disappointed by the ending as it cut off suddenly, it just felt really incomplete. This would definitely get 3.5 stars if I could but I felt let down by the suddeness of the ending.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Wright

    I was not expecting to give this 5 stars.. When I first began this book, I was not really impressed. I found the characters lacklustre and nothing really grabbed my attention. I always give something a chance... After roughly 60 pages, I started adjusting to the quirks of the characters and, instead of hating them, I recognized them for typical character flaws as in any normal person. As I got further through this story, referring to the map on numerous occasions, I began to visu I was not expecting to give this 5 stars.. When I first began this book, I was not really impressed. I found the characters lacklustre and nothing really grabbed my attention. I always give something a chance... After roughly 60 pages, I started adjusting to the quirks of the characters and, instead of hating them, I recognized them for typical character flaws as in any normal person. As I got further through this story, referring to the map on numerous occasions, I began to visualize the scope of what was quickly unravelling as an epic fantasy. Yes, the shadow realm may well have several nods to Mordor, but the whole land, language and enemies are unique to this author. The excerpts of verse among the dialogue add a nice touch of bardic quality and the ending leads well into the sequel, shaping things up nicely for the next instalment.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Simon Brenncke

    Agon, the outcast of the gods, is filled with hatred for the world. Imprisoned by the god Telm's dying words, he nourishes desires of vengeance. But he cannot set his plan of world-destruction into motion as long as he remains bound by the spells of the gods. He must be called by a formulae of dark magic. And truly it happens that the world is threatened by his calling. The beginning of the novel finds Ifferon hiding in his monastery from the gathering forces of Agon. These want to ma Agon, the outcast of the gods, is filled with hatred for the world. Imprisoned by the god Telm's dying words, he nourishes desires of vengeance. But he cannot set his plan of world-destruction into motion as long as he remains bound by the spells of the gods. He must be called by a formulae of dark magic. And truly it happens that the world is threatened by his calling. The beginning of the novel finds Ifferon hiding in his monastery from the gathering forces of Agon. These want to make sure the bloodline of Telm is eradicated, lest hidden powers should surge to pose an obstacle to Agon's liberation. Ifferon's last haven, the monastery, is attacked by the evil army. Ifferon flees and first embarks on a journey for safety, then for destiny. He will be accompanied by a growing number of companions. The question of the true identity and destiny of the principal personages recurs frequently in the novel. It is a perilous question, because often the boundaries between friend and foe escape definition. As diversified as is the author's picture of Ifferon's companions, as accentuated is the element of indeterminacy in the story. The possibility of sudden reversals in the assessment of characters and the direction of events remains open. The author manages to separate indeterminacy from confusion. With every action happening against a horizon of heightened indeterminacy, Wilson triggers a constant flux of tension. Though, for a long stretch, I struggled with this novel. There is quite an extensive middle part when indeterminacy is played out so abundantly that the reader comes to believe the author might not determine anything to come to pass at all. Characters talk profusely about what they can do, what they might do, but their words are not met by adequate space allotted to the descriptions of their actions. But, finally, the reader will come to experience the elaborate speech as part of the authenticity of Middle Age atmosphere. A feeling for historicity is conveyed by language with an archaic sound. This was the point that ultimately convinced me of the exceptional value of the novel. The prose is remarkable for its choice expressions and excels by a densely metaphorical style. In contrast to the language, my appraisal of the coherency of the story must carry a cautious tone. What I am concerned about is that a lot of information is taken for granted, though the reader won't be able to gauge it in full from this first novel, and what part of the picture he will get will be determined by his willingness to follow up small clues: to spot them, retain them in memory and to assemble them with others that will be given in later chapters. While this means of storytelling is acceptable for a mythical story background, Wilson would sap the coherency of his own world conception if he weren't to adduce further information and complete the mythological picture in the forthcoming two instalments (indeed he has written to me in that sense). In this respect this review is a prospective review, granting credit in advance. In consequence, I also won't count as a negative point what I deem an instance of serious infringement on internal coherency, because I'm convinced this instance will only be of limited duration. I mean the role of Aralus, which is left a mystery. He first meets the company on the borders of the river Hamis and he went there with the precise intention of meeting Ifferon. But it's not explained why he hadn't sought out Ifferon in his cloister while the latter was still stationary there; nor is the much more difficult question treated of how he could keep track on Ifferon's whereabouts on his haphazard journey, in order to be able to join the fellowship; finally, no convincing reason is given why Aralus' company has been accepted at all. Until Aralus' role is not clarified, story logic is suspended, and though the reader might endure the suspension in this first part of the trilogy, the source of Alarus' information about Ifferon's location, as well as the reason for his acceptance into the fellowship, needs to be revealed in the coming instalments. In sum, Wilson has wrought a vigorous tale that draws for its progression in tension on world-scale events, small skirmishes and individual perils, as well as ambiguous psychological moments. The descriptions the densely textured, graphic language paints are both beautiful and meaningful. “The Call of Agon” is fantasy that has been designed on the lasting qualities of the great classics of its genre. It incites to the top rating and gives much to hope for its successors. [This is a shortened version of the review. In full it can be found on the reviewer's blog.]

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marie-Josee Larouche

    Won in the giveaways, to be a part of the first reads program. Dean F. Wilson has a very unique way of telling this story. It’s in the way that he describes things; whether it’s the scenery or what’s happening in a situation, it’s all very descriptive in a way that makes you keep turning the page and not wanting to put the book down for even a minute. This tale is about a man – a demi god – who is a coward and has been running from his destiny for too long and it has finally foun Won in the giveaways, to be a part of the first reads program. Dean F. Wilson has a very unique way of telling this story. It’s in the way that he describes things; whether it’s the scenery or what’s happening in a situation, it’s all very descriptive in a way that makes you keep turning the page and not wanting to put the book down for even a minute. This tale is about a man – a demi god – who is a coward and has been running from his destiny for too long and it has finally found him in his reclose. He has very little choice, and has to rise to the occasion and stop the evil from devouring their world, the beast Agon. I really enjoyed reading this book. I liked how the characters, mainly Ifferon, despite all the fear and trepidation, and doubt surrounding his quest to save his world and banish evil, he clung to the hope and strength in his bloodline, and found courage in his friends to complete his quests and not back out, like the coward he used to be. He tries his very hardest to put his past behind him, and not let cowardice run his choices. There is little mannerism within the story that threw me for a loop now and then. There were a couple of instances within the story where the characters would repeat what they are saying; a certain manner of speaking where the character would repeat a certain phrase to answer another character. I didn’t really like that, as the characters could have replied in a different manner instead of having to reply in the sentence and manner over and over. Like for example, “It was not good, no. It doesn’t go down well for people, no.” It’s that little ‘no’ thing and it was the same thing for when they were saying ‘yes.’ I really liked the names he used for the states and cities in his story, very creative and different! Although there were times in the story where they were misspelled or called something else entirely. It through me for a loop at times, and I had to constantly look at the map at the beginning of the story to check. It was the same every time a new name for a city was introduced that was not names already. The story didn’t explain what the name meant or was attached to. I had to look at the map to make sure they were actually talking about a city or a town or something else.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Rodrigues

    I received this book from the author, through the giveaways, for first read it and share with the Goodreads community my sincere impressions. Thanks Dean for the entertaining reading. Review published in http://leiturasdajurodrigues.blogspot... The world worships a different god now, but it is threatened by a ancient evil. The god Telm is dead, and despite his great amount of bastards, children generated with mortal women, only a few had survived these times of uncertainty. Ifferon is a Telm`s child and was supposed to ehttp://leiturasdajurodrigues.blogspot... I received this book from the author, through the giveaways, for first read it and share with the Goodreads community my sincere impressions. Thanks Dean for the entertaining reading. Review published in http://leiturasdajurodrigues.blogspot... The world worships a different god now, but it is threatened by a ancient evil. The god Telm is dead, and despite his great amount of bastards, children generated with mortal women, only a few had survived these times of uncertainty. Ifferon is a Telm`s child and was supposed to ensure that his father legacy would remain. However Ifferon`s fear made him hide himself in an isolated monastery, where he though nobody would know who he really is. The Beast Agon`s force plague the world and it wants to vanquish any possible threat to Agon`s reappearance. Leading it to hunt every last children of Telm. After many years, Ifferon`s fragile peace collapse, the coast where he lives is attacked and the monastery is ruined. In the middle of the caos, he escapes with two different companions. This new group travels along dangers to find guidance and shelter, but along the way they find delays, enemies, urge, new fellowships and the knowledge that they must help others. The time is running out and the window to fight the evil before he regained full power is small. It is time to Ifferon put fear aside and fight for his and his friends live, time to save the humanity`s freedom. The book has an interesting story, with some original elements, although I found the write a little hard to follow at the beginning, but after a while I got used to it. Ifferon, Yavün and Elithéa were my favorites characters, well constructed, with fears, faults, strength and pride, and space to personal growth. Délin is a typical knight, in my opinion, so it is easy to like him and understand his actions. But I disliked very much Herr`Don, I wanted to shut him up a number of times. The final part of the book was the best one for me, with actions, mystery, surprises and a good amount of `I want to know what will happen next`. I recommend it for the ones who likes god`s mythology , fantasy and stories when the world and humanity are in danger.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Strong

    The Call of Agon – Book One of the Children of Telm Dean F. Wilson The hurdle that every writer of fantasy fiction must face is that of being compared with the master of the genre - J.R.R. Tolkien. As soon as wizardry, dark forces or a pedigree of ancestors is detected, a disparaging cry will go up from some quarter. Dean F. Wilson need have no anxieties on this score. At no point in his first novel, ‘The Call of Agon’, must we endure hearing about some mediocre Middle Earth. This is a The Call of Agon – Book One of the Children of Telm Dean F. Wilson The hurdle that every writer of fantasy fiction must face is that of being compared with the master of the genre - J.R.R. Tolkien. As soon as wizardry, dark forces or a pedigree of ancestors is detected, a disparaging cry will go up from some quarter. Dean F. Wilson need have no anxieties on this score. At no point in his first novel, ‘The Call of Agon’, must we endure hearing about some mediocre Middle Earth. This is an original, gripping saga with, above all, deep insights into human motives and desires. Warriors - like the battle-scarred Herr’Don - contrast tellingly with characters who are not born to combat, like the poet Yavun. Iffeln is by far the most enigmatic figure, and it would not be fair to reveal too much of his pivotal role in the tale. An air of fear often dominates the story, and Wilson depicts this debilitating emotion masterfully. The Shadowspirits drive men to madness, and they are never far away. But this is not a depressing tale, love that once shone in the Past is rekindled, faith is transformed into hope through courage. Lyrical songs are dispersed throughout the text and serve to lighten the mood. When magic appears, it is introduced subtly and unexpectedly, thus it is all the more marvellous ‘The Call of Agon’ tells us that dreams and reality are interchangeable, if not inseparable. The major riddle of the tale, ‘In whose veins does the sacred blood run?’ is answered, partly with scholarly reasoning, but mostly through the logic of its own myths. Even in the midst of battle - scenes described with a skilful and dispassionate touch - profound moral questions always remain. The most powerful symbol appears at the conclusion of the tale, most fitting as the excitement does not let up until the final page...and this is only Book One! Gordon Strong

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    This was an exciting book to read. The writing is beautiful. I mean there are some descriptions I had to read over and over, just because they were put so beautifully. Ifferon had decided to take refuge in a monastery. When he is intruded upon by a young boy pretending to be a cleric, his world is turned upside down. Ifferon is called into a meeting, and while in the meeting they are attacked. The monestary falls to ruin and only Ifferon and Yavun, are spared at the hands of Herr'Don. This was an exciting book to read. The writing is beautiful. I mean there are some descriptions I had to read over and over, just because they were put so beautifully. Ifferon had decided to take refuge in a monastery. When he is intruded upon by a young boy pretending to be a cleric, his world is turned upside down. Ifferon is called into a meeting, and while in the meeting they are attacked. The monestary falls to ruin and only Ifferon and Yavun, are spared at the hands of Herr'Don. Herr'Don is determined to take Ifferon to safety. Along their travels Ifferon is forced to face who he is and what role he plays in this world. Along their way they pick up others on their travels. There are battles on their journey, not only with others but between themselves. Everyone seems to know how to get where they are going and what needs to be done to get there. The closer you get to the end of this book the more exciting it gets. There is no time to breathe :). It's battle after battle, and its so exciting to read. Then end....ugh the end.....I will definitely be picking up book two! This book doesn't really end. It draws you in, gets you invested, and then it ends.....Ugh. I am sure that is the authors plan though :). Draw you in so you have to read more. I am anxious to read how this story continues!!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rabid Readers Reviews

    I must applaud Wilson on the tone he accomplishes in The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm. There is a hopelessness and fear that frequently shines through the story-line which causes the reader to wonder if any of the characters will get out alive. That sense of suspense is invaluable and often lost in modern fiction. Action scenes are described with a deft hand. There is a separation between the action and the narrative that is chilling and further adds to the sense of urgency wit I must applaud Wilson on the tone he accomplishes in The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm. There is a hopelessness and fear that frequently shines through the story-line which causes the reader to wonder if any of the characters will get out alive. That sense of suspense is invaluable and often lost in modern fiction. Action scenes are described with a deft hand. There is a separation between the action and the narrative that is chilling and further adds to the sense of urgency within the story. The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm is not for everyone. The novel is especially well-crafted and detailed. If you’re looking for things you might recognize you would be disappointed. This is an incredibly detailed world like none I’ve seen before with that medieval bent that these sort of novels often have. If you like novels like “The Lord of the Rings” this novel is probably for you. Wilson builds a unique mythology, religion, eco-structure and world and his construct is flawless. He embeds poetry into his culture and story-line that are complex and show an author who didn’t just sit down one day and decide to write a book. The Call of Agon: Book One of The Children of Telm took a great deal of planning and likely checking as the story progressed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    A fantasy novel set in a well-wrought world with geography, politics, warring factions, gods, rituals and more, Dean Wilson’s Call of Agon takes readers deep into the hearts of complex characters who follow their own rules but can’t quite fathom their causes. Who is good? Who is evil? Or even, what is good? Should a call be followed, stopped or ignored? Should the lives of friends be risked for an unknown goal? And who can be trusted? The novel is complex, as befitting its complex wor A fantasy novel set in a well-wrought world with geography, politics, warring factions, gods, rituals and more, Dean Wilson’s Call of Agon takes readers deep into the hearts of complex characters who follow their own rules but can’t quite fathom their causes. Who is good? Who is evil? Or even, what is good? Should a call be followed, stopped or ignored? Should the lives of friends be risked for an unknown goal? And who can be trusted? The novel is complex, as befitting its complex world. Careful plotting reveals itself in curious twists and turns. A fascinating mythology of gods and powers underlies it all, and there’s a classic sense of epic adventure, strangers called to be allied in the quest, serious and light-hearted characters following the same trail, and dangerous trials on the route. The novel is a slow read but a rewarding one for readers attuned to complexity instead of straight-forward adventure. There’s lots of serious world-building filled with history and depth, and there’s a pleasing blend of characters, each with invaluable strengths and personal weaknesses all their own. Disclosure: I purchased it on a deal and I offer my honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    This book has the huge epic fantasy feel to it. There is something that really attracts me to these types of books. I love following a character through some type of challenge that they overcome with the help of people they meet along the way. Though it can get a little confusing at times with the different gods, it is not hard to grasp what is going on. I'm used to reading books like this so I was able to get everything pretty easily but I can see where some people may have a hard ti This book has the huge epic fantasy feel to it. There is something that really attracts me to these types of books. I love following a character through some type of challenge that they overcome with the help of people they meet along the way. Though it can get a little confusing at times with the different gods, it is not hard to grasp what is going on. I'm used to reading books like this so I was able to get everything pretty easily but I can see where some people may have a hard time with it. But it is worth sticking it out and things do start to make sense. The only thing that got me was that it was maybe a little to descriptive at times. When books get like this I start to kinda glaze over and at times miss certain things. Causing me to have to go back and reread things. All in all it was a well written fantasy book. Would I recommend this? Yes, it was an interesting read. **Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for a honest review.** http://zephyrbookreviews.blogspot.com/

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    The Call of Agon (The Children of Telm, #1) Dean F. Wilson Ifferon is one of the few remaining in the bloodline of the dead god Telm. Telm banished and imprisoned the Beast Agon to the dark underworld. Telm leaves Ifferon a scroll upon his death bed asking him to carry out his final wish, that is to make sure Agon stays banished. Ifferon , loyal to Telm honors his request in the outerworld but finds this may not be an easy task. Agon find his hideaway in an isolated m The Call of Agon (The Children of Telm, #1) Dean F. Wilson Ifferon is one of the few remaining in the bloodline of the dead god Telm. Telm banished and imprisoned the Beast Agon to the dark underworld. Telm leaves Ifferon a scroll upon his death bed asking him to carry out his final wish, that is to make sure Agon stays banished. Ifferon , loyal to Telm honors his request in the outerworld but finds this may not be an easy task. Agon find his hideaway in an isolated monastery. Ifferon has no choice to hastily set out on a dangerous journey. Along the way he meets many people who he befriends, and enemies as well. They encounter dangerous creatures and many obstacles, lands are overtaken and his discoveries could be the last hope for all, or a terrible end. A very detailed mythical tale. I feel this is for the serious reader, with many characters with unique names, several lands and creatures. It is not a book to just skim through. I loved the story line and look forward to more work by Dean F. Wilson.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    A great fantasy debut. The names and places were somewhat difficult at first, but while reading this book they become second nature to the reader. Ifferon is a wonderful character. He starts as somewhat of a coward but rises to the occasion when his hand is forced. He is a descendant of the God Telm. He is given the task of maintaining the safety of his people from the beast Agon. This book is full of action, suspense and adventure. It has a wonderful mythological feel to it, not in the Greek- A great fantasy debut. The names and places were somewhat difficult at first, but while reading this book they become second nature to the reader. Ifferon is a wonderful character. He starts as somewhat of a coward but rises to the occasion when his hand is forced. He is a descendant of the God Telm. He is given the task of maintaining the safety of his people from the beast Agon. This book is full of action, suspense and adventure. It has a wonderful mythological feel to it, not in the Greek-like manner. Reminded me more of the wild Vikings and Norse mythology. It has a Tolkien feel to it. As a reader, knowing this is the first in a series, I had an idea how it would end. The ride to the finish was fun and adventurous. I recommend this book to anyone who loves action and adventure with a flair.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kasey Cocoa

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Call of Agon. For me this is what the fantasy genre should read like. The writing is solid and well edited. The characters feel well fleshed out and authentic with flaws and goals. I like how each character sounds as though they speak with their own voices, not the voice of the author. The plot feels fresh and well conceived with a good flow throughout the book. I expect to be seeing this author's name again. I received an e-ARC through Masquerade Tours in exchan I thoroughly enjoyed reading The Call of Agon. For me this is what the fantasy genre should read like. The writing is solid and well edited. The characters feel well fleshed out and authentic with flaws and goals. I like how each character sounds as though they speak with their own voices, not the voice of the author. The plot feels fresh and well conceived with a good flow throughout the book. I expect to be seeing this author's name again. I received an e-ARC through Masquerade Tours in exchange for an honest review. This in no way influenced my opinion which may or may not mirror your own.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I really enjoyed this book. Had a little trouble at first with all the strange names and words but you quickly get into the flow of it. The author has a way of describing places and things so you can just picture it in your mind and you feel transported there. The characters are well written and Ifferon's adventure is exciting. If there is a book 2 then I will certainly be reading it. I received this book from the author for an honest review. I highly recommend this book.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Dean F Wilson has woven a wonderfully orginal world with intriguing characters with deception around every corner it would seem. He has a unique writing style, and amazing attention to detail, fully emersing you into Ifferon's world. I'm looking forward to the next book to find out what happens next! I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    I received this book from the author through the giveaways for which I'm extremely grateful! Some of the things I liked about the book were beautiful language, intriguing story line, surprises and comic elements. On the other hand some of the dialogues sounded a bit artificial to me and the booked ended really quick (not something I like).

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