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Divergence

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The twenty-first book in the beloved Foreigner saga continues the adventures of diplomat Bren Cameron, advisor to the atevi head of state. The overthrow of the atevi head of state, Tabini-aiji, and the several moves of enemies even since his restoration, have prompted major changes in the Assassins' Guild, which has since worked to root out its seditious elements—a clandest The twenty-first book in the beloved Foreigner saga continues the adventures of diplomat Bren Cameron, advisor to the atevi head of state. The overthrow of the atevi head of state, Tabini-aiji, and the several moves of enemies even since his restoration, have prompted major changes in the Assassins' Guild, which has since worked to root out its seditious elements—a clandestine group they call the Shadow Guild. With the Assassins now rid of internal corruption, with the birth of Tabini's second child, and with the appointment of an heir, stability seems to have returned to the atevi world. Humans and atevi share the space station in peaceful cooperation, humans and atevi share the planet as they have for centuries, and the humans' island enclave is preparing to welcome 5000 human refugees from a remote station now dismantled, and to do that in unprecedented cooperation with the atevi mainland. In general Bren Cameron, Tabini-aiji's personal representative, returning home to the atevi capital after securing that critical agreement, was ready to take a well-earned rest—until Tabini's grandmother claimed his services on a train trip to the smallest, most remote and least significant of the provinces, snowy Hasjuran—a move concerning which Tabini-aiji gave Bren a private instruction: protect her. Advise her. Advise her—perhaps. As for protection, she has a trainload of high-level Guild. But since the aiji-dowager has also invited a dangerously independent young warlord, Machigi, and a young man who may be the heir to Ajuri, a key northern province—the natural question is why the dowager is taking this ill-assorted pair to Hasjuran and what on this earth she may be up to. With a Shadow Guild attack on the train station, it has become clear that others have questions, too. Hasjuran, on its mountain height, overlooks the Marid, a district that is part of the atevi nation only in name—a district in which Machigi is one major player, and where the Shadow Guild retains a major stronghold. Protect her? Ilisidi is hellbent on settling scores with the Shadow Guild, and her reasons for this trip and this company now become clear.  One human diplomat and his own bodyguard suddenly seem a very small force to defend her from what she is setting in motion.


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The twenty-first book in the beloved Foreigner saga continues the adventures of diplomat Bren Cameron, advisor to the atevi head of state. The overthrow of the atevi head of state, Tabini-aiji, and the several moves of enemies even since his restoration, have prompted major changes in the Assassins' Guild, which has since worked to root out its seditious elements—a clandest The twenty-first book in the beloved Foreigner saga continues the adventures of diplomat Bren Cameron, advisor to the atevi head of state. The overthrow of the atevi head of state, Tabini-aiji, and the several moves of enemies even since his restoration, have prompted major changes in the Assassins' Guild, which has since worked to root out its seditious elements—a clandestine group they call the Shadow Guild. With the Assassins now rid of internal corruption, with the birth of Tabini's second child, and with the appointment of an heir, stability seems to have returned to the atevi world. Humans and atevi share the space station in peaceful cooperation, humans and atevi share the planet as they have for centuries, and the humans' island enclave is preparing to welcome 5000 human refugees from a remote station now dismantled, and to do that in unprecedented cooperation with the atevi mainland. In general Bren Cameron, Tabini-aiji's personal representative, returning home to the atevi capital after securing that critical agreement, was ready to take a well-earned rest—until Tabini's grandmother claimed his services on a train trip to the smallest, most remote and least significant of the provinces, snowy Hasjuran—a move concerning which Tabini-aiji gave Bren a private instruction: protect her. Advise her. Advise her—perhaps. As for protection, she has a trainload of high-level Guild. But since the aiji-dowager has also invited a dangerously independent young warlord, Machigi, and a young man who may be the heir to Ajuri, a key northern province—the natural question is why the dowager is taking this ill-assorted pair to Hasjuran and what on this earth she may be up to. With a Shadow Guild attack on the train station, it has become clear that others have questions, too. Hasjuran, on its mountain height, overlooks the Marid, a district that is part of the atevi nation only in name—a district in which Machigi is one major player, and where the Shadow Guild retains a major stronghold. Protect her? Ilisidi is hellbent on settling scores with the Shadow Guild, and her reasons for this trip and this company now become clear.  One human diplomat and his own bodyguard suddenly seem a very small force to defend her from what she is setting in motion.

30 review for Divergence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Twenty-one books! Of course, I think that's a real feat, considering that we're following the SAME sets of characters over many years and situations on an alien world and this has NONE of the feel of a Urban Fantasy OR a long crime series. Indeed, it's ALL about alien politics. And it REMAINS GOOD after twenty-one books! Are you amazed? I'm amazed. :) Just ask anyone. Do you think a book about translation errors and alien assassinations as a basis for good government could carry your interest for Twenty-one books! Of course, I think that's a real feat, considering that we're following the SAME sets of characters over many years and situations on an alien world and this has NONE of the feel of a Urban Fantasy OR a long crime series. Indeed, it's ALL about alien politics. And it REMAINS GOOD after twenty-one books! Are you amazed? I'm amazed. :) Just ask anyone. Do you think a book about translation errors and alien assassinations as a basis for good government could carry your interest for twenty-one books? Well, it does! :) And if you're reading this review, you're probably already a fan or you're wondering if you should pick up the series again and I'm here to say: It's STILL GOOD. :) I just can't say anything because of spoilers. And damn, there's a big spoiler coming up. The great-grandson of our wonderful Dowager is growing up. Bren is almost like an elder statesman now. It's fascinating to see the dynamics and politics. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Divergence is the 21st Book in C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner Series, so I recommend not reading this book first. This is a "series" arranged in trilogies with short plot arcs and one long, over-reaching plot arc for the entire story of Bren Cameron, a human translator sent among non-humans. Divergence is all about power-politics, and how the Atevi (the Aliens) avoid the sort of all-out War humans tend to use to settle matters. All of these novels are tightly focused on Bren Cameron's point of view, b Divergence is the 21st Book in C. J. Cherryh's Foreigner Series, so I recommend not reading this book first. This is a "series" arranged in trilogies with short plot arcs and one long, over-reaching plot arc for the entire story of Bren Cameron, a human translator sent among non-humans. Divergence is all about power-politics, and how the Atevi (the Aliens) avoid the sort of all-out War humans tend to use to settle matters. All of these novels are tightly focused on Bren Cameron's point of view, but with occasional accompaniments of a young (ruler to be) Atevi child who has learned to understand humans (somewhat). Divergence emphasizes how Bren Cameron has come to understand, on a deep level, just how much he will never, ever, understand about Atevi. He now lives among Atevi, is honored by (some) of them, and his human friends and family find him truly odd because he's become so very Atevi in behavior. In fact, Bren finds himself a little odd. So in Divergence, Bren takes action only once, and perfectly properly, then sits out action-situations that he formerly would have plunged into and derailed by his human reactions. He uses mature good sense instead of human impulse, and tweaks the Atevi politics just a bit, here and there, helping to bring peace to a troubled region of the Atevi civilization. The novel ends off with a springboard into the next novel, as Bren and a train load of Atevi head for the estate Bren now calls home, anticipating a little time to breathe before the next emergency. I don't think they'll have much time. Much of Divergence is simply Bren thinking over the salient moves by Atevi in previous novels, understanding now (as never before) how these moves have led to the current opportunity to make peace. It is a long reprise of previous events, reminding the reader of which events are the most significant for understanding what must come in the next novel. This makes the book almost one, lone, expository lump. But Cherryh's writing is so deft, so cogent, so tightly pointed, that it is an absorbing good read. The previous novels are so well written, the characters so vividly portrayed, that the reader remembers each of these movers sand shakers of the Atevi world as they are mentioned -- full context. That is why I recommend this series so highly, but start with the first novel, Foreigner. If you're a writer, and have been reading the Foreigner Series, study Divergence closely for exposition techniques. Long-long passages summarizing and reminding of previous novels in the series, but re-interpreting events you thought you understood but now know ever so much more about. The real hero of Divergence is The Dowager. In fact, she's the real hero of the whole series, according to this new interpretation of events. And now she's feeling her mortality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Bren Cameron and the Aiji-dowager, Ilisidi --in the thick of Atevi politics! In this, the 21st in the Foreigner series, I find myself still as fascinated with the Atevi and theirtheir culture and politics as ever! Including the space station inhabitants. (Given the new space race to be in, the space station seems all too real.) There are three distinct groups the Atevi, the humans from the Mospheiran enclave, and the Space Station humans--all the humans being foreigners (indeed the humans are dis Bren Cameron and the Aiji-dowager, Ilisidi --in the thick of Atevi politics! In this, the 21st in the Foreigner series, I find myself still as fascinated with the Atevi and theirtheir culture and politics as ever! Including the space station inhabitants. (Given the new space race to be in, the space station seems all too real.) There are three distinct groups the Atevi, the humans from the Mospheiran enclave, and the Space Station humans--all the humans being foreigners (indeed the humans are distinct foreign groups to each other) to this Atevi world. The aiji-dowager, Ilisidi , in her own inimitable way, has decided the time is ripe to settle once and for all the fermentation in the South supported by Lord Tiajo in the Dojisigin Marid—and the outlawed Assassins Guild splinter group, the Ghost Guild. She has taken the Red Train south along with some key players she sees as important to that outcome. Bren Cameron, paidhi-aiji, the ambassador interpreter and the chief negotiator for Tabini-aiji accompanies her with the Aiji's words ringing in his ears, "Keep her safe. Tabini’s final order to him, hours before he boarded the train." As always the feisty Atevi Dowager is five moves ahead and six sideways of everyone else. She is one of my favorite characters. Bren does reminiscence about his first meeting and testing with the dowager. I do think that was one of my favorite tales. The entourage move towards the troubled areas with important relevant lords, Lord Bregani, his wife and daughter; Lord Machigi of the Taisigin. A new treaty has been proposed. Felicitous Three for the agreement including nand’ Bren. (Numbers have a religious imprimatur for the Atavi) Lord Geigi on the space station, friend and ally to the Duchess manages to surprise even her. On board the Red Train is "Nomari, a railway worker, favored candidate to take on the lordship of Ajuri. This brings the important personnel to felicitous seven. The aiji-dowager has decided to test Nomari's mettle. Meanwhile Cajeiri, Tabini-Aiji's son has turned fortunate nine and finds himself a keeper of knowledge and given greater understandings about his parents relationship and reasons for their actions. He gives us a brief outline of much that has occurred up to now. A lot of political jockeying is at the forefront. Man’chi (commitment and loyalty) is tested. Nomari reveals more of himself. Bren manages to bring some plans to fruition but not without his Atevi priectors becoming somewhat disturbed. As the aiji-dowager and the Assasins Guild look to root out the renegade and entrenched Shadow Guild, Bren finds himself facing a direction that will take nerve and strength. I am constantly amazed by Cherryh. It continually dazzles me as to how she's able to maintain this world so cleverly and how the series continues to engage my interest right from the very first novel to the latest. I'm never disappointed! A DAW ARC via NetGalley Please note: Quotes taken from an advanced reading copy maybe subject to change

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laz the Sailor

    Arrggh! It kills me to rate this so low, as this series is fantastic. But this book falls flat. After a brief flurry of excitement, all of the action occurs off-screen. Our heroes are being shot at, but since they are on a windowless train, all we get is "ping" off the armor. The rest of the book is talking and negotiating and getting reports of things that happened elsewhere. Yes, these things are interesting, but the entire book is so passive... Plus we get only a few pages with Cajeiri and his Arrggh! It kills me to rate this so low, as this series is fantastic. But this book falls flat. After a brief flurry of excitement, all of the action occurs off-screen. Our heroes are being shot at, but since they are on a windowless train, all we get is "ping" off the armor. The rest of the book is talking and negotiating and getting reports of things that happened elsewhere. Yes, these things are interesting, but the entire book is so passive... Plus we get only a few pages with Cajeiri and his human ashid. They bring a delightful perspective to the stories, and their absence is noted. Last, the normal rhythm over 20 books has been mini-trilogies, so this book should have completed the current story arc, but it didn't. But the words continue to be elegant, descriptive, and flowing. Wonderful prose. I will read the next one, because I love her writing and I have enjoyed the series for 20 years.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Quartzen

    I've felt since Visitor that this series has been heading toward an ending, and Divergence has solidified that impression. Visitor closed off the plotline of contact with the kyo, Convergence and Emergence settled most of the human politics including providing for successors for Bren, and Resurgence and Divergence turn their attention back to the politics of the Marid and the matter of the Shadow Guild, with Ilisidi facing her mortality and the life's work of continent-wide peace, long-standing I've felt since Visitor that this series has been heading toward an ending, and Divergence has solidified that impression. Visitor closed off the plotline of contact with the kyo, Convergence and Emergence settled most of the human politics including providing for successors for Bren, and Resurgence and Divergence turn their attention back to the politics of the Marid and the matter of the Shadow Guild, with Ilisidi facing her mortality and the life's work of continent-wide peace, long-standing matters of politics she has been working to see stabilized and settled. Divergence calls back to questions asked in the series' earliest installments: can a human really understand the alien instincts that bind atevi together? What is man'chi if it's not love? Is it possible to reconcile a society without love with the seemingly default nuclear family arrangements we see among important characters in the series, such as Tabini and Damiri's marriage, and the presence of sexual but not and never romantic attraction in atevi society? We spend the book almost entirely in Bren's head as he acts as Ilisidi's proxy in a tense situation where she can't risk her life, he realizes the power he actually wields within atevi society by virtue of being the person in the midst of negotiations even if his authority comes from someone else, and as his aishid informs him that he is the primary enemy of the Shadow Guild, the architect of everything they see as evil human influence. Divergence ends with the foreshadowing of this conflict coming to a head, with the Shadow Guild forced to retreat to territory close to home--(view spoiler)[territories neighboring Bren's own Najida that are neither fully part of the aishidi'tat nor fully independent (hide spoiler)] . Cajeiri gets a few key scenes, but not a full B-plot this time around, having himself been settled into the position as his father's heir. It was nice to see more of Tabini and Damiri through his eyes, and I was grateful we just spent more time with Bren instead of having it divided. Continuity is still rough with Nomari, whose age seems to slide around a bit and who displays unexpected skills as the plot requires. I could see this wrapping up in two more books like the last plotlines or three like the earlier sequences, but either way I'm looking forward to seeing what happens next.

  6. 4 out of 5

    keikii Eats Books

    I finished my first book in mooooonths. I liked it but I was really slow to read it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jim Sanderson

    A good, solid read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Maria Landry

    Good I love the Foreigner series. I'm also ready for a spin off. Maybe next time Cajeiri can be the star.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jo (Mixed Book Bag)

    The twenty-first book in the Foreigner saga continues the adventures of diplomat Bren Cameron. Once again Bren is In the middle of the action. The problem - there is little action and a lot of in the head thinking and remembering. This was just a slow read - I think I said the same thing about book twenty. I waded through the story and will continue to read the series but I do hope it get more interesting.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    What a richly rewarding read! The Foreigner series never disappoints! Book 21 Divergence is a milestone because the second POV character, the Atevi ruler's son & heir Cajeiri, is now nine. Atevi children mature much faster than human children. At the age of nine, Cajeiri has already outgrown his childhood. He is beginning to become a responsible young adult. Cajeiri has been the second POV character since he turned six and went with our main POV character Bren on the human starship to attempt a r What a richly rewarding read! The Foreigner series never disappoints! Book 21 Divergence is a milestone because the second POV character, the Atevi ruler's son & heir Cajeiri, is now nine. Atevi children mature much faster than human children. At the age of nine, Cajeiri has already outgrown his childhood. He is beginning to become a responsible young adult. Cajeiri has been the second POV character since he turned six and went with our main POV character Bren on the human starship to attempt a rescue mission. (Humans had set up a second space station that was now under attack from a hostile alien species so they needed to withdraw and come back to the atevi planet, where the rest of the humans were.) Starting with this book, it is clear that Cajeiri will have even a larger role in future books as he is now a player in his own right in the delicate dance of ruling (and watching your back because enemies are always out to get you). But the main character remains Bren in his role as the paidhi-aiji. Spokesman for the ruler Tabini at times and for Tabini's grandmother the dowager-aiji at other times. Always the neutral party representing the interests of the atevi ruler. Bren has a fine line to tread, indeed, especially as he is only human (and thus cannot fully understand the still alien atevi). Can't wait for the next installment in this fine series! Highly recommended for series readers who have the patience to appreciate a slow pace, even if at times the action seems precipitate! Totally my favorite series for a study in human-alien relations!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    Glorious as ever I’m especially grateful for another book in the life of Bren Cameron this year (2020). To dive into the atevi world has been incredibly well timed to distract me from the pandemic, from the election, from all that is this year. Hods bless you and hold you dear, C.J. Cherryh for your release of this book! As for this 21st book in my very favorite series, Foreigner, it is wonderful! It ended far too quickly despite deliberately pacing myself! Bren is off with Illisdi to forward her Glorious as ever I’m especially grateful for another book in the life of Bren Cameron this year (2020). To dive into the atevi world has been incredibly well timed to distract me from the pandemic, from the election, from all that is this year. Hods bless you and hold you dear, C.J. Cherryh for your release of this book! As for this 21st book in my very favorite series, Foreigner, it is wonderful! It ended far too quickly despite deliberately pacing myself! Bren is off with Illisdi to forward her plans at the behest of the aiji to ‘keep her safe’. He does his very best throughout each encounter as Illisidi furthers her intentions to unify the atevi world in peace. We also get to see Cajeiri stepping into his new role as heir. Cajeiri must take all that he has learned from his mani, Illisidi, from Bren-paidhi, his mother and his father, and, not least, from his aishid. His experiences with all of them and his trip through space has made him a unique atevi and he uses all he has learned to continue his journey toward a future his grandmother, his uncle, and his parents are building for him. I truly adore this series and have read all of the books every year since they first started. I have a few series I do this with (starting with Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring) and they are the kind of books that let me fall into their worlds and relish every page.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Cherryh, C. J. Divergence. Foreigner No. 21. DAW, 2020. If you are foolish enough to read No. 21 in a C. J. Cherryh series without knowing a few of the basics about it beforehand, you deserve your bafflement. It will be difficult to help you out without creating unwanted spoilers. The Foreigner series is written as a sequence of trilogies, but all the books are close sequels. If you are thinking George R. R. Martin, you are not far wrong. Dial down the dragons and swords, dial up the politics, ec Cherryh, C. J. Divergence. Foreigner No. 21. DAW, 2020. If you are foolish enough to read No. 21 in a C. J. Cherryh series without knowing a few of the basics about it beforehand, you deserve your bafflement. It will be difficult to help you out without creating unwanted spoilers. The Foreigner series is written as a sequence of trilogies, but all the books are close sequels. If you are thinking George R. R. Martin, you are not far wrong. Dial down the dragons and swords, dial up the politics, economics and technology, then complicate and round out all the characters but one (the Dowager is, after all, an inscrutable constant)—and you may have some idea. Bren Cameron is a linguist and translator who gradually becomes the most important diplomat on the distant planet on which a small group of castaway humans have taken refuge. Humans have been gradually introducing technology into the conservative, yet volatile and dangerous, Atevi culture. Even in this latest novel, Bren is still learning how unlike humans the Atevi think and feel. Cherryh is an SFWA grandmaster, and as much as I love her company war books, there is no doubt that Foreigner is her masterpiece.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    This is a middle book in an arc. (Sort of. The previous book, 'Resurgence', leaves one story line and launches this one.) The Dowager has launched a complicated plan, and at the end of this book it is still playing out. The writing displays a high level of craft. History is being made - new alliances, enemies isolated and attacked, unexpected counter-moves - but we don't see the action directly. The main viewpoint is Bren's, and he spends most of the book sitting in a chair, watching, sometimes a This is a middle book in an arc. (Sort of. The previous book, 'Resurgence', leaves one story line and launches this one.) The Dowager has launched a complicated plan, and at the end of this book it is still playing out. The writing displays a high level of craft. History is being made - new alliances, enemies isolated and attacked, unexpected counter-moves - but we don't see the action directly. The main viewpoint is Bren's, and he spends most of the book sitting in a chair, watching, sometimes advising. The situation is complex, as situations are when the participants come with grudges, historical baggage, and their own ideas. Cherryh lets the complexity peek out from behind the story without making the story too crowded, and lets enough of the action peek out from behind reports to maintain tension and reader interest. Cherryh has written superb books, and this one isn't superb, but it's very good.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rene Garvin

    As usual for Cherryh, this book starts in right after the last one with no summary of previous events so if you haven’t been following this series you may have a hard time with it. Past events are worked into the narrative but I think that wouldn’t be enough for a new reader. I adore this series and have read and re-read all of them. It is a fascinating premise to have a human interacting with another species where the human is not the “good” guy and must learn to fit another culture’s ways. Her As usual for Cherryh, this book starts in right after the last one with no summary of previous events so if you haven’t been following this series you may have a hard time with it. Past events are worked into the narrative but I think that wouldn’t be enough for a new reader. I adore this series and have read and re-read all of them. It is a fascinating premise to have a human interacting with another species where the human is not the “good” guy and must learn to fit another culture’s ways. Her characters are so real and complex that the interactions are totally believable and understandable despite the cultural differences. Bren Cameron has come a long way from his original role as a translator representing the humans and is now a force of his own as a mediator, peacemaker and politician as he represents the Atevi in dealings with their own complex system. Fascinating look at cultural and political issues from a "safe remove" and provides insights into our own inadequacies .

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Trachta

    Ms. Cherryh's works are books I have to get when they come out, I'm always looking forward to what her next book has in-store for me. I'll open by saying Divergence is a good continuation of the Foreigner saga. As is usual with any of Ms. Cherryh's Foreigner works Bren Cameron is the focus of the story with minor side bars from Cajeiri. As the sequel to Resurgence Ms. Cherryh continues the excitement and adds a little more to it. While I'm calling this one 4 stars I have to say she's stepping he Ms. Cherryh's works are books I have to get when they come out, I'm always looking forward to what her next book has in-store for me. I'll open by saying Divergence is a good continuation of the Foreigner saga. As is usual with any of Ms. Cherryh's Foreigner works Bren Cameron is the focus of the story with minor side bars from Cajeiri. As the sequel to Resurgence Ms. Cherryh continues the excitement and adds a little more to it. While I'm calling this one 4 stars I have to say she's stepping her game up more than some of the earlier Foreigner books. Here we see inputs that are unexpected with clarification about actions from earlier books. This is an exciting book where the excitement continues to the end.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Most of the book consists of Bren's mind-numbingly trivial and dull reminiscences while he's sitting on a train, waiting on external events. In his mind, he rehashes politics, history, and personal relationships. There's a lot of repetition. The tiny bit of action again comes mostly at the end, and both times it involves a young woman disappearing. Cajeiri is back in the capital, waiting at a remote distance to hear news from the train. He does have a moving moment with his mother, and his parent Most of the book consists of Bren's mind-numbingly trivial and dull reminiscences while he's sitting on a train, waiting on external events. In his mind, he rehashes politics, history, and personal relationships. There's a lot of repetition. The tiny bit of action again comes mostly at the end, and both times it involves a young woman disappearing. Cajeiri is back in the capital, waiting at a remote distance to hear news from the train. He does have a moving moment with his mother, and his parents begin to treat him as more of an adult. Cajeiri gains insight into why his mother thinks and behaves as she does. This used to be my favorite series, but this time I skimmed much of it. It's become more of a character study than an adventure saga.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Baron

    For the most part this is a very quiet book. I enjoyed it, but I would not recommend for anyone but the true fan. Plot wise? One character decides not to keep a confidence. One group gets better communications. One kidnapping is foiled. Some agreements are formalized. Some information is learned. One set of bad actors is presumed to be moving their base of operations and is pursued. That's about 10% off the book. The rest is conversations, plots, reflections, worries. Always good to check in wit For the most part this is a very quiet book. I enjoyed it, but I would not recommend for anyone but the true fan. Plot wise? One character decides not to keep a confidence. One group gets better communications. One kidnapping is foiled. Some agreements are formalized. Some information is learned. One set of bad actors is presumed to be moving their base of operations and is pursued. That's about 10% off the book. The rest is conversations, plots, reflections, worries. Always good to check in with these characters.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    As usual, a very well written book from C. J. Cherryh. If you’re a fan of the Foreigner series, you will love this book. If you are not familiar with these books, I cannot stress this enough; START FROM THE BEGINNING!!! If you try jumping in to see if you like the style or the characters, you will hate it. C. J. Cherryh has deep characters, with a lot of what they are thinking written in. She has a lot of conversations to give you details. I like this, you may not. I highly recommend the whole s As usual, a very well written book from C. J. Cherryh. If you’re a fan of the Foreigner series, you will love this book. If you are not familiar with these books, I cannot stress this enough; START FROM THE BEGINNING!!! If you try jumping in to see if you like the style or the characters, you will hate it. C. J. Cherryh has deep characters, with a lot of what they are thinking written in. She has a lot of conversations to give you details. I like this, you may not. I highly recommend the whole series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    It was good to see some insight into Tabini and Damiri's relationship, as it affects their son and heir as well as the overall political landscape I would really like to see more Atevi POV's other than Cajeiri's, perhaps one of the senior Guild like Banachi or Cenedi. Actually thought C.J. upped the pacing a few notches for this novel and as always, can't wait for the next one

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary Helene

    Just beneath the surface, something else is going on. I catch something wafting in, but I cannot quite say what. "It was just so much more complicated than that. The Marid was a maze of connections and foreignness." (p.130) "War complicated a diplomatic effort."p.173 Perhaps this series is about diplomacy. "There was nowhere left to run."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    Human diplomat Bren Cameron, advisor to the Atevi head of state, accompanies Tabini-aiji's grandmother, the aiji-dowager Ilisidi, on a wintry railroad journey to the rebellious South, where she plans to stage a coup against the Shadow Guild (rebel assassins) and their Dojisigi allies.

  22. 5 out of 5

    rg gorham

    As usual ms cherryh didn't disappoint she is one of the few authors I always buy and will do again I highly recommend her foreigner series but for a new reader please start the series with the fitst book

  23. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Murphy

    More can't put it down storytelling I always finish these books wanting to rush right on to the next one. Love the world, the culture, the characters. Amazes me that such a lengthy series continues to have nuances that keeps it fresh and new.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ted Bade

    Another thrilling segment in this massive tale. I thought the ending epilog was a bit off. It was more like, let's wrap this up so we can work on the next book. But it did leave one believing there would be a volume 22!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    It’s been a long time since I have enjoyed one of the Foreigner novels so intensely. Full of complicated intrigue and sudden, shifting, surprising plot twists, the 21st (!) novel in this series stands among the best.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Luiken

    We stuck mostly with Bren this time, with only a few scenes from Cajeiri. Some interesting developments in this, the latest in the long-running series. I was especially intrigued by the offhand mentions of the Southern Islands and smuggled artifacts...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sascha

    As always with Cherryh's books it is an absolute delight to read about all kinds of political shenanigans in the Atevi series. This is one of the slower books, not much happens until the end but oh boy do I not mind. Perfect from beginning to end.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    Lots of action, and new territory! I always enjoy Ms. Cherrhy's work, but this one was extra enjoyable, I think partly because we travel to new territory, and also learn some new things about many of the long known characters. Highly recommended!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    Train ride.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Price

    Still enjoy the story. She keeps the adding to great world. Over twenty books and I am ready for the next book. What will be next after the shadow Guild?

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