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Omni Vol. 1: The Doctor Is In

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What would you do if you could think faster than the speed of light? Gifted doctor Cecelia Cobbina was once held in the highest regard by peers and patients alike. But that was before an incident in Africa changed her life forever. Now with the ability to process thoughts at the speed of light, she faces the unimaginable burden of literally having an answer for everything. What would you do if you could think faster than the speed of light? Gifted doctor Cecelia Cobbina was once held in the highest regard by peers and patients alike. But that was before an incident in Africa changed her life forever. Now with the ability to process thoughts at the speed of light, she faces the unimaginable burden of literally having an answer for everything. As the truth of her origin slowly comes into focus, Cecelia must overcome her fears and tackle the one mystery she can’t seem to crack: the truth behind the Ignited. Written by fan favorite author Devin Grayson (Nightwing, Black Widow), Doctor Cecelia Cobbina bursts on to the scene as the world’s newest favorite female hero. Just don’t call her that.


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What would you do if you could think faster than the speed of light? Gifted doctor Cecelia Cobbina was once held in the highest regard by peers and patients alike. But that was before an incident in Africa changed her life forever. Now with the ability to process thoughts at the speed of light, she faces the unimaginable burden of literally having an answer for everything. What would you do if you could think faster than the speed of light? Gifted doctor Cecelia Cobbina was once held in the highest regard by peers and patients alike. But that was before an incident in Africa changed her life forever. Now with the ability to process thoughts at the speed of light, she faces the unimaginable burden of literally having an answer for everything. As the truth of her origin slowly comes into focus, Cecelia must overcome her fears and tackle the one mystery she can’t seem to crack: the truth behind the Ignited. Written by fan favorite author Devin Grayson (Nightwing, Black Widow), Doctor Cecelia Cobbina bursts on to the scene as the world’s newest favorite female hero. Just don’t call her that.

30 review for Omni Vol. 1: The Doctor Is In

  1. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    Holy hell, this was AMAZING! I'm so grateful that I grabbed this from NetGalley and I'm already dying to get my hands on the next volume because I NEED to know what happens next. I'm not usually into superhero stories, but the twist on this plotline makes it such a breath of fresh air that I couldn't help loving it. Omni not only has a beautiful art style and some very lovable characters (seriously, is anyone else shipping Cece and Mae as hard as I am?!), but the storywriting here is brilliant. Holy hell, this was AMAZING! I'm so grateful that I grabbed this from NetGalley and I'm already dying to get my hands on the next volume because I NEED to know what happens next. I'm not usually into superhero stories, but the twist on this plotline makes it such a breath of fresh air that I couldn't help loving it. Omni not only has a beautiful art style and some very lovable characters (seriously, is anyone else shipping Cece and Mae as hard as I am?!), but the storywriting here is brilliant. Cece and Mae are a self-recognized play on Sherlock and Watson, which I love enough all on its own, but when you add in the "is Earth trying to eradicate humanity" theme and the commentary on people from disenfranchised communities taking back the power? Brilliant. Brilliant. Seriously, I rooted for every single Ignited character we've met so far, and I feel like this is one of those rare graphic novel series I'm going to be shoving at people for a long time to come. Please, do yourself a favor and check this one out — you won't regret it! ✨ Representation: Dr. Cecelia "Cece" Cobbina, Dr. Livi Cobbina, and Antony are all Black; Mae is plus-sized; all 'Ignited' side characters are Black, Latinx. or Asian. ✨ Content warnings for: violence, police brutality, racism, depiction of internment centers & separation of migrant families Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this review copy in exchange for an honest review!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Shaw

    Thank you to NetGalley and Humanoids for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. At last year's Comic-Con, Omni's artist Alitha E. Martinez told a story about a woman who asked a panel of comic book writers why Black women are always portrayed in comics as mothers of gang members, in sexy roles, and the woman started crying when the response she got was these representations "reflect the world." Needless to say, this anecdote shows the necessity of challenging these tropes and of supporting Blac Thank you to NetGalley and Humanoids for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. At last year's Comic-Con, Omni's artist Alitha E. Martinez told a story about a woman who asked a panel of comic book writers why Black women are always portrayed in comics as mothers of gang members, in sexy roles, and the woman started crying when the response she got was these representations "reflect the world." Needless to say, this anecdote shows the necessity of challenging these tropes and of supporting Black voices and Black creators as they develop multifaceted and diverse representations of Black characters and communities. Martinez continues on to say that she is "proud to be say that [Omni] is about a very smart woman, people who use their brains to problem solve." It is about a character who is saying "I don't yet know yet, because she's figuring it out" and people who work through problems with brain power rather than brawn. Martinez's comments point to the importance of a comic like Omni, which gives us an engrossing plot, vibrant art, and a group of unique, diverse women characters including a Black woman protagonist. This volume introduces us to Dr. Cecelia Cobbina, a medical doctor, whose "superpowers" are ignited during a particularly stressful event working for Doctors Without Borders. However, these are not typical superpowers. Cecelia, to quote her colleague Mae, becomes a "multi-modality hyper-genius" capable of perceiving situations from nine distinct "intelligence modalities" (logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, visual-spatial, intrapersonal, interpersonal, verbal-linguistic, musical-rhythmic, naturalistic, and existential). Cecelia learns that she is not the only one who has had new powers activated during moments of intense stress, though the powers differ depending on the individual. These individuals are called the Ignited and each issue explores a distinct Ignited character and their situation, along with Cecelia and Mae's efforts to reach out to them and figure out what is going on. Cecelia hypothesizes that the ignition of these powers is symptomatic of a global crisis related to climate change, but the specifics remain mysterious. I'm excited to read on and learn more. The story here, skillfully written by Devin Grayson, is entertaining and fast-paced, but it also compels readers to question some of their assumptions about superheroes, superpowers, and numerous topical political issues. The comic addresses themes such as police violence and racial profiling, immigration detention, and disenfranchisement as a result of race, gender, and class. Although these are heavy topics, Omni incorporates quite a bit of humour and playfulness as well. I loved witnessing the relationship between Cecelia, who is more serious, and Mae, who is charming and excitable, as they navigate new and challenging situations. Martinez's approach to the art is perfect for representing Cecelia's unique powers, as her varying - and sometimes competing - perspectives of any one situation are represented as different coloured thought bubbles. I really enjoyed the visual style of the comic, which is colourful and vibrant. Each issue begins with a little interlude by Mae giving a recap of what happened in the prior issue, which I thought was very effective. "Mae's" art style is also a little different than the main comic; it is a little more simplistic and very cute. I found the inclusion of these little interludes quite effective and creative. I recommend Omni to those looking for: -diverse representations of BIPOC characters -narratives centered on smart and unique women with strong friendships -stories trying to shake up and add something new to the superhero genre -stories that explore contemporary political and social issues -vibrant and eye-catching art -an enjoyable, action-packed time Content Warnings for: -police violence -racial profiling -immigrant detention and family separation

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    Shoutout to NetGalley and Humanoids for the digital review copy of this wonderful comic! Cecelia Cobbina used to work with doctors without borders, until a traumatic event “ignited” her super human intelligence power. She’s not the only one, either. All over the country, random people are igniting and unleashing various super powers. Cobbina thinks it may be related to catastrophic environmental events we’ve been experience these last few years, and she doesn’t know if it’s another stage of evolu Shoutout to NetGalley and Humanoids for the digital review copy of this wonderful comic! Cecelia Cobbina used to work with doctors without borders, until a traumatic event “ignited” her super human intelligence power. She’s not the only one, either. All over the country, random people are igniting and unleashing various super powers. Cobbina thinks it may be related to catastrophic environmental events we’ve been experience these last few years, and she doesn’t know if it’s another stage of evolution, or a sign to prepare us for much worse things to come. So she’s traveling around the country to try and find other ingnited people and to help however she can. I loved this comic, and I can’t wait to keep going. It blends sci-fi with psychology and social justice issues in an intriguing way. It weaves immigration issues with the Black Lives Matter movement and I think the author does a good job of bringing these important issues into a compelling, entertaining sci-fi super powers story. This volume collects issues 1-6, and it’s not just the story that’s on point. The art is stunning. I’d love to have a couple of prints of some of these covers on my walls. No idea when the next volume is out, but it seems like half of the next trade (issues 7-9) are out as singles now, so hopefully it won’t be too long of a wait. Check out Humanoids’ website or your fav. local shop to grab your copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    RG

    Started this on a whim and continued. Not something I usually read but still enjoyed it

  5. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I would read volume 2 just for the color palette. The story is good, a lot like what I might expect out of an X-Men origin.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Doctor Cecilia is a gifted surgeon working for "Doctors Without Borders" when she discovers she may be the future of human evolution. It's a phenomenon she calls "Ignited." Humans placed under extreme stress or afraid for their lives manifest super-human abilities. For Dr. Cece, it so happens that she thinks and can project herself into the nine different learning modalities to solve any problem she's put in. But, she's not the only one. Read more graphic novel reviews at www.graphiclibrary.org. Doctor Cecilia is a gifted surgeon working for "Doctors Without Borders" when she discovers she may be the future of human evolution. It's a phenomenon she calls "Ignited." Humans placed under extreme stress or afraid for their lives manifest super-human abilities. For Dr. Cece, it so happens that she thinks and can project herself into the nine different learning modalities to solve any problem she's put in. But, she's not the only one. With Ignited sprouting up all across a volatile U.S and world landscape, how can they come together to put their powers to good use, and what does this mean for the evolution of the un-ignited humans? This may be another in a long-line of superhero comics, but Grayson's approach to super-human powers is unique and intriguing. There are only a few ignited so far who have powers similar to other comic book characters, but definitely Cece's 9 modalities is new and different. Cece often talks amongst herselves, and the dialogue provides a fascinating look at the different way people can approach a solution. Grayson also makes use of real and stressful situations, like the detention facilities on the U.S./Mexico Border, instead of drumming up his own fictitious situations that may ring hollow in comparison to the real world today. There's a nice cliffhanger ending here to keep readers going as well. Martinez' illustrations make use of a bright color palette to denote each of Cece's modalities, but the world itself is shaded with natural colors and makes use of a typical, solid comicbook style. Humanoids does not have age ratings for their material. There is some mild violence with a very small amount of blood, and that's about it. A knowledge of current events would help readers understand events of the book and connect with characters. Sara's Rating: 8/10 Suitability Level: Grades 7-12 This review was made possible with an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Net Galley. This graphic novel will be on sale September 1, 2020.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Justina

    I should've expected this comic to be obviously about real world issues such as climate change and police brutality. Yet I somehow did not anticipate that and was perhaps not in the best mindset to read it just now. However, objectively, I think, it's a good comic, especially after Melody Cooper takes over as the writer in Issue #5. A lot of this volume is really set-up, but each issue is a story onto itself and I love the 'superpowers emerging in the world' type of narrative. I also especially I should've expected this comic to be obviously about real world issues such as climate change and police brutality. Yet I somehow did not anticipate that and was perhaps not in the best mindset to read it just now. However, objectively, I think, it's a good comic, especially after Melody Cooper takes over as the writer in Issue #5. A lot of this volume is really set-up, but each issue is a story onto itself and I love the 'superpowers emerging in the world' type of narrative. I also especially like that so far the majority (if not all) people who gain superpowers are minorities or somehow disenfranchised (e.g. serving prison sentences). It's very satisfying to see them receive these powers, even if it's made clear that even with that, they won't be able to effect significant social/global change. But it's the small acts that matter too. I'm enjoying the portrayal of the 'super smartness' of Dr Cobbina, especially once we get an explanation inside the narrative to the artistic choices. Speaking of which, the art is OK, nothing too extravagant, but it gets the point across and there are some cool panels, especially where Dr Cobbina's powers are shown, as well as some scenes with cool light effects, such as a scene at night during rain while surrounded by car lights, and a scene around a fire at night. There was also a bit of a weird meta thing where for a few issues one of the characters was writing a comic about the events that happen in the book, but luckily it seems to have been dropped after a couple issues. My hope for the future of this comic is that it'll develop a more consistent secondary cast, because so far we've met a lot of characters and some of them are quite fascinating but only one or two of them made an appearance in more than one issue (aside from the protagonist of course).

  8. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    Okay, first, go read the publisher synopsis, it'll make more sense than I will trying to explain the story. I'll start with what I liked: a diverse cast of characters, including an African American woman MC, who is smart, is a doctor, is solving problems using her brain rather than kicking posteriors, and isn't scantily clad or treated as eye candy. Supporting character friend is a plus-sized woman, and there's no mention of her weight. Other Ignited characters are POC. Tough issues are discusse Okay, first, go read the publisher synopsis, it'll make more sense than I will trying to explain the story. I'll start with what I liked: a diverse cast of characters, including an African American woman MC, who is smart, is a doctor, is solving problems using her brain rather than kicking posteriors, and isn't scantily clad or treated as eye candy. Supporting character friend is a plus-sized woman, and there's no mention of her weight. Other Ignited characters are POC. Tough issues are discussed, such as racial profiling, police brutality, detention centers and separation of immigrant families, misogyny, and human involvement in climate change. The art is gorgeous, with bold graphics and color that pops, and the color-coded personality types graphics and text for Cecelia is especially helpful in seeing how her mind is working. The story is good, and has a lot of promise, but my only complaint lies in the story: I expect a lot of set-up at first, but events, like Antony's arrest and the events at the detention center, get wrapped up too quickly and neatly, and I'm not feeling a sense of struggle or urgency. I feel like the stories need more fleshing out. Hopefully, we'll get more meat in future volumes, because I do like where the story is going! #OmniVol1 #NetGalley

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ebony

    I had such high hopes for this but unfortunately they were thoroughly dashed... I picked this up in a local bookstore on a whim, enchanted by the vibrant cover featuring a Black female superhero. Finally, I thought, I had seen myself or rather someone that looked like me, as the main character in a comic book / graphic novel. Mon erreur. I appreciated what the writer tried to do here, creating a world in which human actions have severe consequences, through the lens of climate crises and a hero nar I had such high hopes for this but unfortunately they were thoroughly dashed... I picked this up in a local bookstore on a whim, enchanted by the vibrant cover featuring a Black female superhero. Finally, I thought, I had seen myself or rather someone that looked like me, as the main character in a comic book / graphic novel. Mon erreur. I appreciated what the writer tried to do here, creating a world in which human actions have severe consequences, through the lens of climate crises and a hero narrative. However it fell short. The events felt gimmicky and highly staged, repeating well-trodden tropes but in a somewhat obtuse way. Yes, police brutality and immigration are important themes to tackle, as is medical aid work. But this didn’t seem to bring a fresh perspective in response to these themes beyond making superheroes out of the disenfranchised or hurt. Instead, this read like a series of events that felt thrown together in a quasi box-ticking exercise for references to diversity, representation and current affairs. I claim victimhood. This could have been something great, but alas... I committed the cardinal sin of judging a book by its cover. It really is a shame as this had the potential be so much more than it was. I really wanted to like this. The art was beautiful though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Books And Chocaholic

    Upon initial glance it seemed to have a very "safe" art style. One that is reminiscent of successful comics that we've seen before. The way it uses that art however was excellent. All the visuals for the parts of the brain she is using when using her powers is incredibly well executed. It is rare for me to say this but in this case it being a graphic novel was the perfect choice to realise this plot at its fullest potential. The story benefits greatly from the aid of the illustrations especially Upon initial glance it seemed to have a very "safe" art style. One that is reminiscent of successful comics that we've seen before. The way it uses that art however was excellent. All the visuals for the parts of the brain she is using when using her powers is incredibly well executed. It is rare for me to say this but in this case it being a graphic novel was the perfect choice to realise this plot at its fullest potential. The story benefits greatly from the aid of the illustrations especially with the use of colour and explanations when she is using her abilities that would probably have proven very difficult to comprehend in a novelised form. The characters will probably need another volume before I can fully love them but they were certainly an entertaining read. They carry the story well and give it life and personality. Mae is probably my personal favourite and I loved her "comic-within-a-comic". Overall it was good and I suspect it will only get better from here on out.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    Of the Ignited titles I've read, this was definitely my favorite. Devin Grayson uses a very different approach toward intelligence to highlight Cobbina's Ignited genius, and uses that approach to provide surprising and effective solutions to the conflicts without turning everything into action sequences. The art supports the plot very well, especially in the use of color to highlight the different styles of intelligence it uses. Cobbina deals with contemporary issues like minority-police relatio Of the Ignited titles I've read, this was definitely my favorite. Devin Grayson uses a very different approach toward intelligence to highlight Cobbina's Ignited genius, and uses that approach to provide surprising and effective solutions to the conflicts without turning everything into action sequences. The art supports the plot very well, especially in the use of color to highlight the different styles of intelligence it uses. Cobbina deals with contemporary issues like minority-police relations and an immigration facility full of children, and Mae serves as a useful viewpoint character into Cecilia's adventures. The fourth issue's full-page panels investigating her situation through all the different intelligence categories is a great use of the medium and almost poster-worthy. I'm curious to see where the series goes from here; this title shows a lot of promise.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Devon

    I would like to thank NetGalley for giving me the opportunity for me to receive an e-arc and write a review. First, I would like to address the AMAZING cover art. The story itself is vibrant, tackling tough issues that involves racial profiling, family separation, gun-violence. But, it is woven into the futuristic science ficiton graphic novel series that brings diversity. I appreciated the main character, Ceceilia Cobbina, not immediately accepting her new powers into grace and seeing it as a burd I would like to thank NetGalley for giving me the opportunity for me to receive an e-arc and write a review. First, I would like to address the AMAZING cover art. The story itself is vibrant, tackling tough issues that involves racial profiling, family separation, gun-violence. But, it is woven into the futuristic science ficiton graphic novel series that brings diversity. I appreciated the main character, Ceceilia Cobbina, not immediately accepting her new powers into grace and seeing it as a burden she literally would have the answers to everything. I would include this in my classroom library, as I hope my future students can appreciate it as much as I did. I like it so far, look forward to seeing how the series develop.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Drew Austen

    This graphic novel/comic is intelligent, multi-layered, and fascinating! It incorporates present day issues with sci-fi in such an engaging manner. The artwork is stunning. I initially was in love with the cover. When I first started reading, I was a bit confused about what was going on, but as the narrative continued, a lot of aspects cleared up. Now that I know certain things that were brought up later, I want to go back an reread it multiple times to catch what I might have missed the first t This graphic novel/comic is intelligent, multi-layered, and fascinating! It incorporates present day issues with sci-fi in such an engaging manner. The artwork is stunning. I initially was in love with the cover. When I first started reading, I was a bit confused about what was going on, but as the narrative continued, a lot of aspects cleared up. Now that I know certain things that were brought up later, I want to go back an reread it multiple times to catch what I might have missed the first time! The main character, Cecelia, is intricate and analytical, which is shown through her various thoughts that she can utilize in at amazingly quick speed. I plan on purchasing a physical copy of Omni, as well as hopefully continue with the series!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    Omni v. 1 follows Dr. Cecelia Cobbina as she comes to terms with being an Ignited, someone who has gained super powers, in her case super-intelligence. She's accompanied by a regular sidekick who thinks that the super-powers are fun and interesting but the Dr. believes that they're a response to the changes humanity has on their environment, that these powers are an adaptive response to the environmental changes or possibly something worse. At the end of the volume we find the Dr. and Mae give t Omni v. 1 follows Dr. Cecelia Cobbina as she comes to terms with being an Ignited, someone who has gained super powers, in her case super-intelligence. She's accompanied by a regular sidekick who thinks that the super-powers are fun and interesting but the Dr. believes that they're a response to the changes humanity has on their environment, that these powers are an adaptive response to the environmental changes or possibly something worse. At the end of the volume we find the Dr. and Mae give the charge of a company called Omni, to find and study more Ignited, potentially with a more nefarious purpose. This is an interesting concept for a graphic novel and I'm looking forward to seeing more of Omni. I received a free e-copy of this volume from NetGalley.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Reviewed in advance thanks to Netgalley. Cecelia, a doctor, becomes super-powered with nine different types of intelligence. Other Ignited (aka people with powers) start appearing and a mysterious organization is tracking them. It definitely has an early X-Men feel to the plot (how will society react to people with super-powers? is it the next step in human evolution or caused by something else?), but with a heavy social justice framework to the plot. The plot can feel a little bogged down by the Reviewed in advance thanks to Netgalley. Cecelia, a doctor, becomes super-powered with nine different types of intelligence. Other Ignited (aka people with powers) start appearing and a mysterious organization is tracking them. It definitely has an early X-Men feel to the plot (how will society react to people with super-powers? is it the next step in human evolution or caused by something else?), but with a heavy social justice framework to the plot. The plot can feel a little bogged down by the social justice lessons, but the artwork does a good job of portraying Cecelia's nine intelligence types. I'll stick around for one more volume to see where it goes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey

    Doctor Cecelia Cobbina, already at the top of her field, finds her world a bit more complicated when she discovers she can now analyze thoughts faster than the speed of light. She's one of the "ignited" a group of humans who suddenly have powers they were not expecting. This first volume follows the good doctor on her initial trips to locate and help the other ignited, so they can figure out how this happens before it's too late. An amazing graphic novel with smart art and design choices, the co Doctor Cecelia Cobbina, already at the top of her field, finds her world a bit more complicated when she discovers she can now analyze thoughts faster than the speed of light. She's one of the "ignited" a group of humans who suddenly have powers they were not expecting. This first volume follows the good doctor on her initial trips to locate and help the other ignited, so they can figure out how this happens before it's too late. An amazing graphic novel with smart art and design choices, the color pallet is perfect. The author works topical issues into the plot without seeming forced or blunt. I look forward to the next volume!

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    This was cool. Marginalized people across the world gaining super powers. How can you hate on that? Where the x-men used metaphor to expose their readers to issues of social injustice in the world, "Omni" is not as subtle. I would have loved to have opened a comic book as a kid and seen a group of migrant children taking on armor clad ICE agents. The art is nothing incredible and the pacing of the plot seemed sporadic throughout, but I really like this idea. I probably won't read any further vol This was cool. Marginalized people across the world gaining super powers. How can you hate on that? Where the x-men used metaphor to expose their readers to issues of social injustice in the world, "Omni" is not as subtle. I would have loved to have opened a comic book as a kid and seen a group of migrant children taking on armor clad ICE agents. The art is nothing incredible and the pacing of the plot seemed sporadic throughout, but I really like this idea. I probably won't read any further volumes, but im glad this book exists.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elna

    *Received via NetGalley for review* Unabashedly political, Omni takes a little but to find its footing, but delivers when it does. Dr. Cecilia has become the first "Ignited", manifesting all 9 intelligences. She and her (honestly, incredibly annoying) sidekick Mae travel around finding other Ignited, until the Omni corporation finds them. Lots more is left to be explored in future installments, and the hint of a reveal at the end definitely leaves me wanting more.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Brown

    Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC. An interesting story that is supported by great illustrations. The storytelling was a bit disjointed and several of the characters lacked backstory, making it a bit hard to understand their roles and relationships. Omni does do a great job at tying in social issues like racial profiling and immigration into the plot, making it feel incredibly relevant. I am interested to see how to story progress in the next volume.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I love that this features a Black woman discovering her superpowers, but that's really the only part of this that I liked. I don't understand why her experience is constantly filtered through her white woman friend, and the story is way more interested in bouncing Sherlock-esque mini-thoughts off of each other instead of developing a backstory. It has the potential to be a better comic, but instead it's caught up in gimmicks.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John

    THis book is amazing! This is truly a modern and even post-modern superhero story. How a person with enhanced abilities would truly live in our world with real world problems. It also has relatable and diverse characters. I would say early teens, maybe even middle grades can read the books, though there are some mature/YA topics.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ron Turner

    I really wanted to like this. I liked the idea behind it. A brilliant African-American female superhero. But I'm just burned out on superhero stories altogether. The lettering was also terrible. I could barely read a lot of it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Carr

    review coming soon!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    The story is great fun, and the art is fantastic.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Larakaa

    intriguing

  26. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    Black woman superhero doctors!

  27. 4 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    Gorgeous illustrations, strong female lead with a good heart and superpowers for processing info at the speed of light. Great graphic novel!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kay Tilden Frost

    I originally read this book in single issues and enjoyed the story all the way through. Everything that's being done with the Humanoids world is intriguing; the stories are fully fleshed out, the different characters are interesting and fun to read, and the world and its powers are fresh and original. Unfortunately, the artwork and lettering in the digital review file I received meant that I couldn't clearly reread the story in its final form, which was a disappointment; this would obviously not I originally read this book in single issues and enjoyed the story all the way through. Everything that's being done with the Humanoids world is intriguing; the stories are fully fleshed out, the different characters are interesting and fun to read, and the world and its powers are fresh and original. Unfortunately, the artwork and lettering in the digital review file I received meant that I couldn't clearly reread the story in its final form, which was a disappointment; this would obviously not be an issue with a physical or even finalized digital copy. I was able to see, however, that issues were clearly separated from each other, although the covers were gathered in the back rather than looped in with the issues themselves. A good science fiction comic with high quality writing and good art that you should check out.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Goodfellow

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐ 2 Stars A young doctor suddenly and mysteriously acquires superpowers as do several other individuals on the planet. But only her power can answer "why". Given how stale the superhero genre has been getting these past few years Omni is a fresh and original take on what human beings would do if they were given tremendous unexplained powers. This book has one of the most interesting premises for a superhero story I’ve heard in a long time. It’s culturally relevant, not afraid to tackle 'taboo ⭐⭐⭐⭐ 2 Stars A young doctor suddenly and mysteriously acquires superpowers as do several other individuals on the planet. But only her power can answer "why". Given how stale the superhero genre has been getting these past few years Omni is a fresh and original take on what human beings would do if they were given tremendous unexplained powers. This book has one of the most interesting premises for a superhero story I’ve heard in a long time. It’s culturally relevant, not afraid to tackle 'taboo' subjects and still fun and interesting enough to keep your attention. The colour work and illustrations are fantastic. They work so well to clearly show how the ignited's powers work and any limitations they have. I especially like the neon colours used when Celina uses her powers. The only reason that this book didn't get a 5 Star rating from me was that the tension seemed to decrease as the story went on. However, with all the questions the ending of this volume left me with and everything is set up so far, I will be sure to pick up the next issue when it's released. You Should Read This Book if you Like: +Inventive Science Fiction 🧪 + Cool superpowers a la the Xmen 👩🔬 + Diversity in Sci-fi 🙌 +Plot driven graphic novels 📑 Trigger Warnings: Discussions on Racial Profiling, Gun violence, internment camps, refugee children, family separation. This is one to watch. PREORDER this book now for only £11.99 🦸🏿♀️. I received an advance review copy for free via NetGalley in alliance with H1 Publishers. I am leaving this review voluntarily 📚.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elia

    Something is happening to people around the world - they are becoming "ignited..." developing strange powers that Dr. Cecilia Cobbina thinks are physical reactions to environmental stressors. Dr. Cobbina is one of these ignited. Her superpower: she is INSANELY intelligent. In fact, she is able to maximize all 9 of the accepted kinds of intelligence, and can think and respond faster than any human being on the planet. But when looking for others like her, a mysterious organization called Omni com Something is happening to people around the world - they are becoming "ignited..." developing strange powers that Dr. Cecilia Cobbina thinks are physical reactions to environmental stressors. Dr. Cobbina is one of these ignited. Her superpower: she is INSANELY intelligent. In fact, she is able to maximize all 9 of the accepted kinds of intelligence, and can think and respond faster than any human being on the planet. But when looking for others like her, a mysterious organization called Omni comes calling, and explains she is their new CEO. No one will tell her how Omni was founded, or how it is funded, or how they knew about her powers... which leads her friend Mae to believe it's all just a little too supervillainy for comfort.

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